OCR Interpretation


The Fremont weekly journal. (Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio) 1867-1877, November 21, 1873, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038229/1873-11-21/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE JOURNAL.
A . H .B ALSLET, Editor.
iPBEMONT, OHIO.
FRIDAY, Prober 21, IS73.
Great BurriN bus notified Spain
that she will be held responsible for
any executions of British subjects.
Ths jury in the case of "Boss
Tweed," at New York, have found
him guilty on each count of the in
dictment (201 in number). '
Lakgi and enthusiastic public
meetings hare been held in the prin
cipal cities in regard to "the atro
cious murders by the Cubans, and
the public pulse beats for war.
All Mckdebed. The Cuban au
thorities hare signalized their wan
ton cruelty and blood-thirsty barbar
ity by "leading to slaughter all the
offcers, and most of the crew and
passengers of the Virginius, and in
that hare perhaps fulfilled the say
ing "Whom the god's seek to destroy
they first make mad." If the author-
ities had purposely adopted the
course they have pursued, with a
Tiew of embroiling the home govern
ment in trouble, thfey could not hare
more completely succeeded. There
is no doubt the home government
rebrobates the course -pursued by
the Cuban authorities, and that those
authorities have despised and set at
naught the commands of the home
government, and so brought it into
collision with frendly powers.
The action of our government in
calling additional vessles into service
to be sent to the West Indies, indi
cates an intention to maintain not on
ly the national honor but the rights
of humanity,and to hold the govern
ment de facto to account for the ac
tion of its subordinates. ' But there
in seems a hardship. There is little
doubt that the Cuban authorities are
opposed at heart to the Castelar or
Republican government of Spain, or
they would have respected its author
ity and submitted to its commands.
But being opposed to it and favor
ing the Carlists, their action can on
ly be regarded as designed to ad
Tance theCarlist interest, and embar
rasse the Republican government.
Nevertheless, it is the home govern
ment that must be held responsible,
though it is to be hoped it will only
be assailed, if war should come,
through Cuba, that the perpetrators
of this atrocity should be made to
feel the vengeance of outraged jus
tice. Thjc latest intelligence in re
gard to the Virginius is that her
capture was effected upon the high
seas,' that she was an American ves
sel and did not have on board goods
contraband of war. This bejng es
tablished, it Eeems plain that our
government is bound to demand rep
aration, and insist upon it even at
the cannon's mouth, and that irre
spective of the question of the citi
zenship of those on board, and the
subsequent treatment of them. If
the principle insisted upon by Web
ster, in his correspondence with
Lord Ashburton in 1842 is correct,
the honor of our Cag must be main
tained as fully as though a Spanish
war vessel had run into New York
harbor and captured those men from
the streets of that city. Webster
held
A vessel on the high seas, beyond,
the distance of a marine league from
the shore, is regarded as part of the
territory of the nation to which she
belongs.and is subject exclusively to
the jurisdiction of that nation.
Every merchant vessel on the seas
is rightfully considered as part of
the territory of the country to which
she belongs.
This being recognized as eorrect
and the vessel being overhauled up
on the high seas, the act becomes
one of flagrant outrage and the insult
and must be atoned for. The fact
that the Virginius had, several times
before ran into Cuban waters, and
landed stores and men for the insur
gents, had nothing to do with her
status outside of Spanish waters.
She was then in her own territory,
under her own flag, and as exempt
from capture as though she had nev
er been in Cuban waters. It is not
even established that she was
blockade runner, no attempt having
been made by Spain to maintain
blockade, as required. She may
have very properly incurred the en-
. mity of the authorities of Cubs, but
that did not justify capture when
the proper effort was . not made to
prevent her from entering Cuban
ports at least did not justify cap
ture cpon the high seas. Such are
the latest conclusions in reference to
this atrocity.
The active preparations at the
navy yards show a determination
upon the part of the government
be prepared for whatever exigency
may occur when, after the meeting
of Congress, the facts Bhall have
been laid before it Meanwhile the
demand for reparation has been
made and will be insisted upon.
THE JOURNAL. Cash vs Credit.
Why not adopt the cash sys
temr it is good lor every
body. The purchaser will save
money by it whether he pur
chases at wholesale or retail
whether he be a business man, or
consumer, and the seller would
benefitted for he would have the
cash and not the unsecured, indefi
nite promise to pay of the purchser,
Instead of an unavailable asset, he
would have the cash wherewith to
replenish his stock. It would rami
fy and benefit all commercial inter
course and be the universal panacea
against bankruptcy, panic, specula
tion, unreal gains, fictitious values,
and embarrassments. It would meas
lire the active wealth and prosperity
of every community, give solid and
enduring comfort wherever enforced,
disarm the prejudices of class, and
by enabling all to purchase and po-
a
a
a
Bess whatever was needed, at prices
more nearly approaching real values,
disabuse them of the idea so preva
lent with many, that all the rest of
society was acquiring wealth at their
expense.
It would be no hardship to any,
and to many would prove a real ben
efit, by obliging them to do what
they otherwise would never do-keep
out of debt-and husband their re
sources against the time of need.
The man who pays his debts would
regard it as no hardship, for first or
last to him it is all the same, and
when he knows that cash will be de
manded, he will arrange his affairs
so as to have it, or allow the pur
chase to await a few days, ine
maawho does everything on credit
will find himself forced to "manage"
his affairs so as to have the means
on hand to pay for what he must
have, when he gets it. His nose will
not always be at the grindstone, for
necessity will compel him to drop a
useless expense, or a worthless hab
it, which costs, when necessities can
not be had without the cash which
his habit of improvidence have per
versely squandered. There may be
those who will never learn to man
age even as there are those who nev-
work; but even with those it is un-
wise mat otbers tnan tnemseives
should bear the burthen of their in
competency or dishonesty, ine
lule "if any would not work neither
should he eat," i equally applicable
to such cases.
There is n valid reason why a
man should sell his goods on credit.
The purchaser may call it an accom
modation to himself, or the seller
may call it so. But it is not bo. It
is a riBk and a responsibility which
is not taken or assumed without a
consideration of future profit The
money lender does not part with his
money until he has examined the
security, and if tha question is haz
ardous he charges a hazardous price,
or he keeps his price at a certain
standard, making the safe pay for
the unsafe risks. The merchant
does likewise. He doesn't want to
do a credit business, but his neigh
bor, does it, and he conforms to the
practice. But in taking the general
risk he adds the additional cost, and
the cash purchaser and the purchaser
on credit pay an advance, in order
that the seller may be secured
against loss from the purchaser on
credit It is seemingly a fair trans
action, if both are chaged alike, but
is a CTeat wrong nevertheless. The
seller has the use of the cash pur
0 w
chaser's money, which is worth, say
ten per cent He waits on the credit
customer and loses the ten per cent
which he has made from the cash
purchaser. The cash purchaser has
then paid the expense the seller has
had in doing business with the pur
chaser on credit, and the purchaser
on credit is the only one benefited,
for he saves the ten per cent on the
money, while he uses the unpaid for
goods of the merchant 3
It is all wrong. Either all busi
mess should be done for cash, at the
lowest rate of profit, and this the
cash purchaser should insist on, or
is should be done on a uniform cred
it basis; or, if cash and credit are
combined, the cash purchaser should
insist on a deduction equal to the
rate per cent which money is worth
a rule recognized and a right ac
corded to cash purchaser, at whole'
sale, by all iobbinz houses in the
country.
But putting aside this views of the
case, it is no advantage to the seller
to sell on credit If a time of a pan
ic like the present comes, his goods
are worth as much on the shelf, of
ten times much more, than they are
in accounts at least ten per cent of
which proves worthless. On the
shelf they are on hand when needed,
in accounts, even good ones are se
cured as it happens, many times,only
by process of law, after vexatious
delays. In a time of hardships such
sales add nothing to the seller's rev
enues, but are a drain on his resour
ces, and are at all times a more pro
lific source of bankruptcy than that
of profit
There is not a business man but
will recognize the truth of what we
have said, and wish he could "adopt
the cash system." Acting separate
ly they cannot unless well fortified
but by concert of action they can
and duty to themselves as well as to
those who pay for what they get,
should impel them to adopt a sys
tern beneficial alike to themselves
and all who deal with them.
Wi wouldn't advise any of our rea
ders to risk going to investigate the
matter, but give the story only to
show what a rich country lies south
of us. These mines must be the
same ones, a former sesident of this
country once went hunting. He
knew just where they were. But
there was only one point in the
neighborhood from which the en
trance to the mines could be seen.
and he couldn't find that point It
had been carried away by some one
who didn't understand its nature:
Correspondence Xewscomertown Argus
Gold and Silver Mines In Coshocton
County A Description of Them by
an Old Californlan Wno Haa Visit
ed Them.
Last week, Mr. John Vance, a Cal
ifornian of '49, in company with Mr.
Swaim and other gentleman, visited
the Coshocton mines and made ex
tensive observations while thereand
they have no hesitancy in declaring
that gold and silver bearing quartz
are found in large paying quantities.
The grounds bear witness of having
m 1 1
Deen minea many years ago, anu sue
cessfully too, as shown from the fact
that large furnaces, shafts, Ac, are
found still to exist Fire distinct
furnaces as yet have been discover
ed, with flues five feet in width and
eighty feet in length. In these are
now being found quartz containing
gold and silver as can be plainly seen
by the aid of the magnifying glass.
Black sand is also found, which, it is
said, is never known to exist except
where there is gold and silver. The
shafts have now all caved in. These
shafts have been worked in recent
yesrs to some extent, but without de
veloping much of value, owing to
the fact that after reaching a certain
depth they have come upon a pecu
liar tough earth that is very difficult
to penetrate, and the operators have
given up in despair, being told that
quartz rocK is never lounu oeneatu
this clay, liut iney misiane uie na
ture of this, evidently, as this earth
is by closest observation, found to
be decomposed quartz rock.
The work that it took to develop
these mines and build the furnaces
must have been enormous at the
time it was done, when there was no
machinery to aid them, but all done
by hand. Even now, by the aid of
machinery, it would take many years
to accomplish what work has been
done there.
There can be ho doubt as to the
existence of the rich mineral in this
valley, and there are some of the
early settlers still living here who
are aware that the Indians found
gold and silver in this neighborhood.
One old gentleman wno resides near
this city, relates an incident that
happened to him when quite a small
lad. His father sent him to hunt
the horses, one morning, and not
findins them anywhere near home
he followed on for several miles and
at last came upon a band of Indians
who were engaged in some very ab
sorbing work, and he concluded to
see what it was, and ventured so
close to them that they discovered
him and took him prisoner, when he
discovered they were mining silver
and melting it into bars. They be
ing friendly Indians, did not wish to
keep him captive, so they blindfolded
him and led him by a circuitous
route to near his father's house and
let him go. Afterwards he and his
father made several attempts to find
the locality where he had saen the
Indians at work, but failed,
We simply make the statement to
satisfy the incredulous that such min
erals do exist among us, and ere long
Mr. Swaim and company propose to
furnish us the proof of the existence
of gold m these mines; viz: by pro
ducing the auriferous metal itself.
If any ol our readers wish to ex
amine specimens of these rocks they
can do so by calling at the JLrgut of
fice and we will be pleased to snow
them the ones we have in our possss
session. President Crant and the Wine List
"Howard" the lively lady corre
spondent of the Philadelphia Press,
tells tne following of rresident
Grant:
You will remember that during
his last trip to the White Mountains
the patriots of the profile House
moved to give him a big dinner.
They feared the wine demonstration
would not be long and strong enough
and therefore sent for several new
brands. They made an imposing ap
pearance upon the bill of fare, which
the waiter offered to Grant, witn an
engaging flourish, and then awaited
the result with the solemn aspect of
his class. The President read it at
tentively and then laid it down
"What will you take?" inquired the
attendant. "You may bring me,"
returned Grant "a plate of roast
beef, with potatoes and tomato sauce,
and a cup of Btrong coffee." After
this was disposed of, the guardian
angel of the table approached, and
calling the President's attention to
the wines, said: "What can I bring
your7 "I have a touch of dyspep
sia, and I will take a glasB of lemon
ade, a little tart, was the second as
tounding reply of his Excellency.
Whether the lemonade was "tart
enough for the President or not,
was so "tart ' that the very sight of
it puckered both waiter and diners to
such a degree that the word wine
was not heard at that table again.
If you don't believe me, ask Henry
W ard Beecher, who was at the table.
NEWS ITEMS.
-
When tii term of oflics expire Got. Koyei
will resume the practice of law, in Cincinnati.
Mrs. E. M. Stanton, widow of Ex-Secretary
of War Stanton, died on Tuesday lait
Chestnut Hill, near Philadelphia.
Only eighteen of all the paasengeri and
crew of the Virginias have been spared, and
but four or fire will be set at liberty.
Bossnsweig, the New York abortionist, has
been discharged, on a law quibble. He bad
better hare been discharged on the end of
rope.
The New York Financial Chronicle thinks
the financial situation is fall ot encourgement.
Greeley's advice is now in order in svsry
branch of business : "The way to resume is
resume."
Memphis sent Chicago $30,000 in the time
of its extremity. Chicago responded recent
ly with 15,000, after an effort, although
it is said she has $300,000 of the relief unex
pended. Chicago should report
The King of Italy dosen't "scare worth
cent." Is spite of excommunications minor
and major, his speech at the opening of
Italian Farlimant Saturday, bristled with de
fiance of the Pope's temporal claims.
Of the members of the crew of the Virgini
us not shet at Santiago de Cuba, four were
condemned to the cbain-gang for life, three
to eight yean' imprisonment, eight to four
years' imprisonment, and three were set
liberty.
The people of the great cities are begining
to agitato the question as to what is the cheap
est and most nutritious food, and the most
economical method of cooking. As pinching
times are expected this winter, these are im
portant questions to be solved
Monday last was the first anniversary of
Boston fire. During the year 115 buildingi
have been completed and occupied and
mere are in various stagea of completion
building. Boston has manifested the same en
ergy which distinguisbsd Chicago.
S. S. Bick ley, hanker. Columbus, made
assignment on Monday for the benefit of
creditor!. Assets, 1176,500. Liabilities, f 125,
000. Bickley made an earnest offort to keep
tap, but was viable to realize on his securities.
General Walcutt was chosen assigaee.
Jim Hester and John Finn bet on election
in New York, and the loser was to cary
tons of coal down into a cellar. Hester
to carry the coal down. A crowd assembled;
a band was engaged to furnish the music,
by the contract played "Down in a coal Mine'
during the entire performance.
The Cubans in Kew York City are reported
to have circulated a document, signed by
of their number, asking Secretary Fish to
sign, and declaring their purpose, should
not do so, to make arrngementa for his
sassination. This is the Spanish way of
ing things, but it won't win in this country.
The Si. Mary's Cowant says duckling is
very good. Charley Marshall shot 113 in
day, a short time since. Every day there
shipped by Eeiker from 3 to 6 hundred pounds
ot ducks killed at the reservoir. And every
day brings mo.e hunters. The Forrester shoot
ing Club of Dayton come np last week in
boat especially built and equippted, with small
boats, dogs, provisions, etc
The small pox is again spreading in Clave-
land, and the disouuion of the best means
1 ' . . .
P-T' gl?g n Piy"C1"
sumed that no ordinary hygenic measures mit
igate the severity of the dissase, or prevsnt
spread. That nothing but general and com
pulsory vaccination will check ths disease,
with general vaccination the disease would
unknown. The disease is said to be spreading
more rapidly than ever before known.
Beautiful Women. The hair is the crown
ing glory of woman. There are few mode
rate defects which oaunot be remedied by
proper disposition of ths tresses. But when
tjis hair begins to fall out, or turn gray,
young people, or with those in the prime
life, there is cause of real regret When this
is the case, HalCt Vegitable Sicilian Hair Re
neuter will be found to be a first-olass remedy,
far superior, as a sound miieefjniedium, to
any thing else before the public. It actually
restores gray hair to its original color, and in
the great majority of esses, causes it to grow
again when it becomes thin. It is not like
many popular preparations, a mere wash, but
scientiflo discovery indorsed and used Dy
physicians of character. Address B. r. Hall
Co., Nashua, N. H.-Forwy" Weekly Free
Feb. 1, 1863.
The telegraph announces the death of the
celebrated Arab ohieftain Abd-el-Eader, who
for seventeen years defied the French power
in Algeria and commanded the respect of the
world not only by his bravsry and military
skill, bat through hie high mental and moral
qualities and the extraordinary power he dis
played in ruling the wild tribes who acknowl
edged his leadership. Few characters in his
tory are more remarkable than Abd-el-Kader.
He was born near Masoara, Algeria, about
1807. his father being a man of great influenoe.
When the French invaded Algeria in 1830, the
the Arab tribes united in choosing Abd-el-Ka
der emir, his oiety and wisdom having gained
him prominence among his people. He fought
the French with varying fortunee.aud with oc
casional In termissiosn, until December 1847
hn ha surrendered on condition that he
should be sents to Alexandria or St Jean d
Acre. In shameful disregard of this agree
ment he was sent to 1'aris, where he was kept
until 1802, when Kapoleon ordered his releaee
From that time until his death he resided ei
ther at Brussa or Damascus. In 1860, when
all the Christian population in Syria was
danger of massacre, Abd-el-Kader protected
many thousands of both sexes, at the immi
nent danger of hia own life. In adversity
prosperity, as ruler of Algeria or prisoner
Paris, Abd-el-Kader compelled admiration
his virtues and abilities.
LOCAL MATTERS.
at
to
at
the
340
or
an
his
had
and
100
rs
as
do
still
one
to
its
and
be
the
in
of
The Fire Fiena The Engine House,
Two Engine and Three Hose Caits
Destroyed. About 3 o'clock on Wednes
day morning last, fire was discovered issuing
from the belfry and roof of the engine House
onCroghaa street, where the steamer Mo
Pherson and the hand engine City of Fre
mont, with their hose carts, were kept
Hodes, who discovered the fire endeavored
tn -raina the alarm. But could
get into the engine house, as
front doors were barred, and the side door
which, it waa understood, should always
left unlocked, was locked. He was soon after
joined by George Zeigler, and together they
managed to burst open the side door, Dut
smoke rushed out so thickly tbey could
anter to unbar the front door. That sealed
the fate of the engines, as before enough per
sons assembled to force open the front doors
the fire had reached them and cut off all op
portunity. Meanwhile they entered the frame
building adjoining, to draw out the book
ladder trucks, when they found the back end
of that building on fire, and the trucks bias
ing. The trucks, however, were pulled
and saved in a damaged condition.
By this time the fire had spread rapidly.
and the Court House bell, and the Catholic
Church bells rang out the alarm. Crowds
citizens gathered, but it seemed at first
though nothing could be done, so used were
they to depend upon the engines in case
fire. An effort was made to form a line
pass water from the river in buckets, which
were plentifully furnished, but it waa a dis
couraging undertaking, as many seemed dis
posed to do nothing but look on. Others
deavored to pull down the framtf buildings
that intervened between the fire and Tyler's
brick block, but the fire continued to spread
until it had enveloped the truck house,
Keofe's saloon and Bhinecker's barbershop
Fortunately, at this time, the hand engine
from the east Bide was brought over, and
had a stream of water playing upon the
doing very effective service. This, together
with the fact that the side walls of Ehinesk-
er's barber shop were of brick, and the roofs
of the adjoining buildings were covered with
snow, prevented the further spread of the
although tho building adjoining, belonging
Mr. Horn, was several times on fire.
The property destroyed was almost a com.
plete loss to the owners, there being no
surance on any but Keefe's saloon and
The loss as near as we could gather was
follows:
Engine House, 2,000; steamer, 4,100; band
engine, f 3,800; three hose carts, $1,000;
feet of hose, 14,000: truck house and contents,
1.500; Keefe's saloon and stock, f 3,000 (insar
ed for $1,700); Bhinecker't barber shop,
Besides these losses the buildings of J. Horn
and H. Hodes were damaged considerably
the effort to pull them down,and considerable
of Hodes grocery stock was scattered
destroyed, Horn's building was occupied as
saloon by Mr. Rentier, who also lost consider
able of his stock, which we understand
covered by insurance. It will probably
(1,000 to repair the buildings and replace
loss of stock. The loes all told will reach
118,000 to 120,000, on which there is insurance
of about S 2,000.
The fire is supposed to have been the
of an incendiary, as no fire had been used
the building for several weeks, though
is a bare possibility that it may have resulted
from spontaneous combustion, as when
discovered the fire appeared to have started
from the cupboard where the oils, &c,
kept, which had been built in a window
municating with the hook and ladder room,
and through which the fire evidently
munieated to that building. The fact of
side door, (which it was understood should
ways be unlocked,) being locked, and a
dow beyond being open, would suggest
conclusion that the incendiory had locked
door on the inside and made his escape through
the window. The fire has been a serious
virtually leaves the city unprotected from
but the prompt action of the Council in order-
ing two new steamers and 3000 feet of Cose
be purchased, will in a short time, place us
a better condition then ever to subdue
flag ration.
The Old Tire Department. On Wed
nesday morning last, after the fire, hand-bills
were put in circulation calling a meeting
the Old Fire Department at Birchard Hall
same evening, for the purpose or re-organization,
and signed by order of the old fir
partment. The avowed purpose of the
ers in the matter was to regard the present
organization as disbanded, the city without
organization of any kind, and proceed to
organize what was called the "Old Depart
ment,'' or that which hauled its apparatus
in front of ths mayor's omce, several
ago, and leaving it there, proceeded -to
band.
In the evening quite a large cumber
present, and organized by electing M. E. Tyl
chairman. On taking the chair he proceeded
to remark upon the importane of the
said ths city was without a fire organi
zation, and that they were called to gethar
effect such a result. Sheriff Young made
remarks to the same effect, and was followed
by E. H. Vnderhill, whe while favoring
efficient organization, was not in favor
taking any action which would ignore
rights of the present organization.
Upon the conclusion of Mr. Underbill's
marks, Mr. Van Valkenburg arose and
pressed himself as sorry there were not
property owners present, more of those
should encourage such a movement but
not think they ought to neglect a solemn
on that account There was no department
no head to it no one ?ho would be obeyed
no discipline. The apparatus had been
and the organization had perished
it He did not stop to reason that if the
constituted the department,
could not be a department until there
new apparatus, and hence the movement
which he was engaged was premature,
any action it might take would be futile,
to his own conclusions. En.
he said that iu order to bring
matter before the meeting, he would
the appointment of a committee of three
draft resolutions expressive of the sense of
meeting, and named A. Young, E. H, Under
bill and M. Smith as the Committee.
motion waa seconded, but before being
was amended by the addition of the names
ot G. M. T;ler ana J. S. Van Valkenburg
to the Committee. 1
The committee retired to the corner of
room for oousultation.and while thus engaged
the chairman concluded to "go off" himself,
or
in
H.
be
tne
not
out
of
as
of
and
en
fire,
fire,
to
in.
and went, not "to see a man" but to make a
speech, elucidating in the clearest possible
manner that the Council was in a quandary
and did not know what to do, and it was the
duty of the meeting to demand that the Coun
cil should at once purchase two "Silsbury"
steamers, with at least 1600 feet of hose for
tha TUnY4mM'a nm iTTa hid AvidentlV
been so busy "working up" tho meeting dur
ing the day that he did not regard it necessary
to ascertain that the Council had already or-
dad the purchase of two steamers and 3000 fee1
of hose, thereby spoiling his otherwise timely
soggetion, Ed And the meeting should
protest against keeping them in the same
aouM.They should protest against building an
engine house in the same place, and demand
that one be built at the foot of Croghan Street
and another on the hill. The question of
separate engine houses had been favorably re
garded by counoil at its session in the after
noon. Ed . The council would hear the voice
of the meeting, and if not it was their duty to
exert their power to make the council hear.
At this point, the committee on resolutions,
through 3. S. Van Valkenburg, chairman, re
ported that the sense of the meeting was in fa
vor of the organization of four companies, one
Hook and Ladder, one Engine and Hose com
pany for the East Side, and two for the West
Side. That this was not to be understood as
superceding the present department, but that
as it was willing to re-organize, the organisa
tion should embrace the new and old. And
further that when the companies so organized
had chosen their officers,they request of Coun
cil the right to choose their depratment officers
The report was at once adopted on motion,
and silence for a few momenta held sway.
Then the chairman ot the committee arose
and moved that until such organization was
effected the meetior elect A. Young as Chief
Engineer, to assume control in ease of fire.
The motion was seconded. Some one moved
that Tan Valkenburg be appointed and the
motion was seconded, but the chairman pnt
the motion in favor of Mr. Young. When the
nays were called for, quite a number respond-
ed, but the chairman decided the ajes bad it
Mr. Young then arose, thanked the meet
ing for its mark of confidence, but respectful
ly declined. There was, he said, a chief engin
eer appointed by Council, and it would be an
act of injustice to refuse to recognise him as
such until he was suspended in a regular way.
The meeting was evidently in sympathy with
this sentiment and applauded heartly, while
a voice cried out "Ochs is good enougi."
Perceiving the drift matters were taking
the chairman arose and stated that he thought
after ail, Mr. Young was about right Silence
followed and booome oppressive. So oppress
ive in fact that the audianoe began to dis
perse rapidly, when a thoughtful individual
relieved the perplexity by moving an adjourn
ment, which was carried and followed im
mediately by exeunt omnei.
We inoline to the opinion that Van and Al
do not regard the matter as a marked suc
cess,
Fire Two Horses Burned. On Sun
day afternoon last, about half-past three
o'olock a firs broke out in the barn of Mr;
Helt, west of the depot of the L. E. & M.
R'y. The alarm was speedily given and the
engines hurried to the scene, but when they
arrived on the ground the building was en
veloped in flames, and all thsy could do was
to assist in preventing tho fire from spread
ing. There were in the barn when it took
fire, two horses, one set of new and one of old
harness, four tons and a half of hay, wich
had i ust been drawn in,.forty bushels of corn,
one pair bobs, a now wagon box and sundry
other articles, all of which were uestroyea
with the barn. Mr. Helt's loss is about 1700,
on which there was an insurance of $300. The
origin of the fire can only be surmised. Mr.
Helt was in the barn about half-past eleven
o'clock and fed his horses, and about two
clock drove out into the country, leaving
bam locked up, and at the time of the fire
was absent It is probable that it was set
fire by children while playing near it, and
equally probable that it was area by an in
cendiary, but nothing definite is known.
The Ladiea of the Presbyterian Aid Soci
ety will omit their regular sociaois,
Thanksgiving evening, in favor of the pro
posed Oyster Supper at the M. E. Church.
SYMPTOMS OF LIVER COMPLAINT.
500.
in
and
wsa
cost
the
from
A sallow or vellow color or skin, or yellow
ish brown spots on face and other parts
body; dullness ana arownness wiia uvqueut
hHiluht: dizziness, bitter or bad taste
mouth, dryness of throat and internal heat;
palpitation; in many cases a dry, teasing
cough, with sore throat; unsteady appetite,
raising of food, choking sensation in throat;
distress, heaviness, Dioaiea or iui-. mwuij
about stomach and sides, pain in sides, back
or breast and about shoulders; oolio,pain and
soreness through bowels, with heat; constipa
tion alternating with diarrhoea: piles, flatu
lence, nervousness, coldness of extremities;
rush of blood to head, with symptoms of apo
plexy, numbness of limb, espeeiauy at nigni;
raid chill. Klternatinr with hot flashes, kidney
itnd nrinsrv difficulties: dullness, low spirits,
unsociability ana gloomy iorsoouiug. wj
a few of above symptoms-likely to be present
at one time. . All who use Dr. Pierce's
Ext., or Ooldeu Medical Discovery for Liver
Complaint and its complication. are loud
its '
A CURE OF LIVER DISEASE.
RUSK, Texas, May 10th, 1873.
first
were
com.
Tr. H. V. Piseck:
Dear Sir Mr wife last year at this time
was confined to her bed with Chronic Liver
Disease. I had one of the best doctors to
hr and ha save her un to die. whsn I came
upon some ol your medicines, x uougu
hattle and commenced giving it She then
.iKui Ihm now aha weighs 140 lbs.
is robust and hearty. She haa taken eight
bottles in all, so you see I am an advocate
MEAZEL.
New Advertisements.
the
one,
fire,
to
in
con.
the
de
mov
an
re
up
years
dis
PUBLIC SALE.
The undersigned will sell at Public Sale at
residence in KUev Township, T miles northeast
Fremont, near Clark's ssw mill, on
Wednesday, November f6th, 1ST3
commencing at 10 o'clock A. M., the following
sonal nroperty, to wit
Tn Tlm-aM. 1 Vparliu? ColL 5 COWS, t TOOJl
r-..,i. an shn l Home a lot of Tnrkies
Thickens. Hav. Corn Fodder. Corn in the shock,
int. ntmtnm w.ctiih. Farm ImDlements.
Household Furniture snd Kitchen Utensils,
other article too numerous to mention.
TcaMS. All sums of 15 and undsr cash, over
a credit of six months will be given ty giving
note with spprored secnritv.
H. F. St. JOHN.
TO MANUFACTURERS
THE Cooper lloiwc" Bidding will be lor
after December 1st, 73. To a party who would
UAe it for the manufacture of Boots or Shoes,
UDerai teims wm oe giveu. uat Ait caxsU,
Fremont, Nov. C, 1T3.
were
occa
sion, THE SUN.
W KELLY, tSESU-WKEKLY, AND DAILY.
an
of
the
re
ex
more
who
did
duty
des
troyed with
ap
paratus there
was
in
and
ac
cording Re
suming the
move
to
the
The
put
the
THS WEEkLY SUN is too widelv known to
nuire anv extended recommendation: bnt the
sons which have already given it fifty thousand
subscribers, and which will, we hope, give it
thousands more, are nneny as iomowb:
It is a first-rate newenaper. All the news of
av will be found in it. condensed when unimport-
sut, at full length when of moment, and always
presented in a clear, intelligible, and interesting
manner. . .
It in a first-rate family paper, full of entertaining
and instructive reading ef every kind, But
nothing that can offend the most delicate
and scrupulous taste.
It is a flrst-rate story paper. The beet tales
romances of current li teratnre are carefully selected
and legibly printed in its pagee.
It Is a first-rate agricultural paper. The
fresh and instructive articles on agricultural topics
regularly sppear in this depsetment
It is sn independent political paper, belonging
no party and wearing; no cellar. It fights for prin
ciple, and for the election of the best men to office.
It especially devotes its energies to the expo
oeure of the great corruptions thst
weaken and disgrace our country, and threaten
undermine republican institutions altogether.
has no fear of knaves, and asks no (avors
their supporters.
It report the fashions for the ladies and
markets for the men, especially the cattle-markete,
to which It pays particular attention.
Finally, it is the cheapest paper published.
dollar a year will secure it for any subscriber.
Is not necessary to get up a club in order to
THE WEEKLY SUN at this rate. Any one
sends us a single dollar will get the paper for
year.
We have no traveling agents.
THE WEEKLY SBJr-Eightpsges,
six columns. Only 1.00 a year. No discounts
from this rate.
THE SEMI-WEEK 1Y1T Sl'W.-Ssms
size as the dally snn. Sij.OO a year. A discount
of 20 per cent, to clubs of I O or over.
THE MAILV SUN. A large four-paga
newspaper of twentv-eight columns. Daily circu
lation over 120,Oftt. All the news for U cents.
Subscription price 6 cents a month, or ISOO
year. To clubs of lO or over, a discount of
percent. .
Address, "IHESCM," Iw ITark City
S.
his
on
on
of
in
Alt.
in
see
mi
and
for
his
ot
per
am
and
S
rent
very
re-
rea
many
the
-
con
taining snd
most
to
now
to
It
from
the
One
It
have
who
s
fifty
a
SsO
FOR 20 DAYS ONLY!
GREAT POSITIVE
O
CARPETS,
AT TOLEDO, OHIO.
Before Removing to our Large and Elegant Building, 165
167, 169 and 171 Siunmit Street, we -offer at a
All the DRY GOODS at 143
Street, and all the DRY GOODS, CARPETS, &c, at
106 and 103, at your OWN PRICES.
SALE POSITIVE!
This Sale "means business,"
or Carpets will find this
TOIiEliDO, OHIO.
w
mm
Summit Street, and 38 Madison
and any one wanting Dry Goods
opportunity not often afforded.
mm
JI
not
sn
T
an
the
It
f
COMPLETE BOOK STORE.
INGHAM, CLARKE & CO,
Wholesale and Retail.
Libraries.
Several hundred choice
branch of Literature.
volumes
every
Sunday School Books.
Twenty thousand volumes of good tone se
lected lot lue purpnee.
Holiday Book.
An immense variety.
BsvsaadGlrlsBsoks.
Optic's Keilogv'e Sophie May's. Several hun
dred volumes from all tbe popular sutnora.
Primers and Toy Hooks.
Fifteen hundred dozen, at from 15 cents per
dozen to 3.00 per dozen.
Initial Stationery..
All the new styles ana sixes j
u s I Books. .
For Sunday Schools, Churcn vnoir anu slic
ing Schools.
medical and .Law Books.
A full variety wow voHinies.
Photograph Albums.
Over OU Varieties m iruiu iu ccuis w 6o.w.
"Cheap Beoks. ' ' . . .
A small quantity m sneii-wum b"
for School, Private, or S. S. Libraries.
Any book in market supplied to order.
I5GHAJI, CLAEKE & CO.,
SU Superior St, Cleveland, Ohio.
THE FAVORITE HOME REMEDY.
This onrivalled Mouthem itemeay lswamuut-u
1 lo'contain a sincle particleof MaaccKT, or any J
injurious mineral substance, but is
PURELY VEGETABLE
containing those Southern Roots and Herbs, which
all-wise Providenr has placed in countries
vhere Liver Diseases most prevail. It will .Cure li
Diseases caused by Uerangement ot uis liw ami
Simmons' Liver Regulator, or Medicine,
eminently a Fatnilv Medicine: and by oeing I
kept ready for immediate Resort will save many I
hour ot (Uttering anu many a uuuai ui i
Doctors' bills.
After over Fory Yesrs' trial it is still receiving
most unqnslined testimonials to its virtues
from persons of the highest character and respon
itulitv. Eminent nhrsicians commend it as the
most
BFFEOrUAL 8PEOEF1C
For Dyspepsia and Indigestion.
Armi with this ANTIDOTE, all climates snd
hAnee of water and food msv be faced without
fear. As a Remedy in MALAKloi 3 rinsia,
BOWEL COMPLALST9, RESTLESStSS,
JAT5DICE, NAUSEA,
IT HAS NO EQUAL.
is the Cheapest, Purest and Best Fsmily Medi
cine m uie n una .
XAHCFACTtrBZD ONLY. BY
J. II. ZEILI-V ic CO ,
MACO", GA., and PHILADELPHIA.
Price J1.0O. Sold by all Druggists.
CRUMBS
Are a modern etove AT-iAre Deiter, oecur
poHBh.far better than f I p they pire a finer gloat
Ai : .(.,. - - than nth nnllah
tUV IJL-11CI lUCalBICUVC fcaAA "
COMFORT
Viai.i hriitUnt iiverv sheas, with less than half
the labor required when o trier poiisnes are usev.
CRUMBS
Are a neat and cleanly y-v-tCan be nse
article, making no dirt II p the parlor wi
rv-ni in nc oaenevenin
In the parlor witlsouttbe
tri-sih)s nf removing
nor dust wuen useo. - irouuie 01 i
COMFORT
fnmitnrp or PArtwta.
Ha nn fiiflftOTtfihiR HulnhuriouB or stronz cid
smell when prepared for use, bnt are pleasant and
nannlesa.
CRUMBS
Axe put up in neat style s TJtin eacn 001 are iz
and in a form more con-1 I p Bticks; 1 stick is soffi
venient for use than sny cieui. ior any nuv,
otht-r ootisri. ' - - au www m
COMFORT
Are the cheapest polish in the market, because
one bor at lu cents win poiisn as uiutin miriau: a
s cent's worth of theold polisher.
CRUMBS
Have iost taken the 1st -T-vn competii
iin competition with
premium at the lndia-ll 11 several of tl
uapolis Exposition, v the old stov
several of the best of
the old stove polishes
COMFORT
Ttrrr rtanHHB o Cnurowr of vonr storekeeper.
if he hss them, or will procure them for you; if not
send us one dollar, your name, and the name of
your nearest express station, snd we win senu you
tea boxes, and samples of Bartiett's Blacking and
Pearl Binein?, free of cost.
Cxevbs or CouroBT can be had of all Whole
sale Grocers snd Dealers in the United States, snd
Retail iteHtarawill find them the most profitable.
from the fact that they are they are the fastest sell
ing article of the Kind in the maraet.
H. A. BARTLETT & CO.,
113 North 5th St.. Philadelphia.
143 Chamber til. Wew York.
4.1 Broad St.. ?Ueton. 46m6eom
READ!
READ!!
RTHATifM
Anticipating a large FALL TRADE, we have
manufactured, and now have ready for sale an un
usually large stock of rich and plain Furniture, of
the latest and most fashionable designs. Recent
derangements in the money market indicate a doll
season, and in view of this probability, and with a
desire to reduce our stock before inventoryinj, we
now offer sa an inducement to bay a
Discount or from lO to 2G per cent.
according to the class of goods selected. This is a
rare opportunity to obtain good Furniture for much
kss than its real value. Don t buy a dollar's worth
of Furniture, Mirrors, or bedding nntU yon see na.
Furniture Warerooms,
114 and 116 Bank Street,
33mS CLEVELAND, OHIO.
Manhoods How Lost, How Restored!
JM
Just Dnbiiscea. s new eonon 01
Dr.CnlverTsrell'sCelehra
led Essay- on the radical curt
lAvi4iaaar iwithont mi
iedicine or BPiBXATir-
kbosaOJ Seminal Weakness, Luvoluntarv Semissl
. i.ypmrr. Mental and Physical Inca-
oacitv, Impediments to Marriage, etc.; aiso. Cob
Sumption, Epilepsy and ftis, induced by seif-iadd-gene'e
or sexual extravagance.
Price la a sesled envelope only six cents.
The celebrated author, in this sdmlrable essay,
clearly demonstrates from a thirty y ears' sucrees
ful oractice, thastlie alarming coniuences of seli
abnse mav be radically cured without the danger
ous use of internal medicine or the application of
the kie- pointing outs mode of cure st once sim
'", certain, and enertusl, by me-ina ot whichsvery
autferer. no matter what hiscondiUon may ba, may
cure hiinseli cheaply privately and radically.
- This lee luxe should be in the bauds of every
von th snd every man in the land.
T Sit under s7ai, in a plain envelope, to any ad
dress, poet-paid, on receipt ot six rents, or two
Tl, 1) " 'Culvorwell's "Marriage Guide
to cents.
Address the Publishers,
' price
CENTAUR
LI N I M b NT
ASTONISHING
THE
tTrpTs
WORLD
LOST!
f- ja" Four weeks sco "atttrdsv. near
.-is James Moore's MUi, a three year
old brmiile ateer, in Kunn; conoi
tiou. Anv nerson furnishing in-
furniation concernine the where-
alMui ot said steer will be suitably rewarded.
48,1 JACOB
ADMINISTRATOR'S SALE.
The nndersigned will i
Ktf fir auli, ut nuhlir: .
auction, at the late resi
dence of Jesse Emerson, deceased.
On Wcdueeday, the With day oi S member, A.D, 1873,
tbe goods and chatties of said deceased, consisting
in psrt of 1 Bull, 4 Hogs, 1 Bugy, 1 Two-hors
W'atron, 1 Onc-horse Wairou, 1 sot Double Harness,
1 set Sii'Zle Harness, 1 rauuin; Mill, and a lot
other articles too numerous to mention. Sale
eommeuce at 9 o'clock in the forenoon.
Tews Purchases smonnting to three dollars
or less to be paid in cash; above tnat sum, notes
six months, with two good sureties, will he taken.
JAMES H. FOW LER, Administrator,
rremont, "ov. , lT3. -
rsls r"1 i, i-syTntsTsll lit - asasf
t
A
I
I
I
of
to
a.
SUBSCRIBE
FOE THS
CLEVELAND
LEADER
tun
1874
THE DF.3T WEEKLY
PAPER If! OHIO.
has THE BEST Editorial Talests.
THE BEST Selection of News,
THE BEST Market Reports,
THE BEST Telegraphic Repo-t3,
THE BEST Correspondence,
THE BEST Stories,
THE BEST Miscellany,
THE BEST Reports sf sffain gssarally.
IT PUBLISHES
MORE READING MATTER
AND
MORE TELEGRAPHIC NEWS
THAN ANY WEEkLY PAPER IN OHIO,
all roc .
SI 25 per Annum
THE CLEVELAND
JRI - WEEKLY LEADER
., ,, th
'"" P"' I" Z7. .
Thursday and Saturday.
TERMS:
On Veaiv
Six 9Istitt -Three
Months
5.0O
. 1.26
The Lsadbr is a Republican paper, supports
"nK
Anum i vill not sooDort the nomination
mrn ior 0aices merely baesuee they hap-
pened to be nominated Dy a so-ouiea regur vuu
vention packed with unprincipled deicgau-s. it
will Insist on the beat men being nominated men
who are above reproach and are fitted for the office
for which they are nominated.
The Leaueb will oppose fearlessly the attempts
nev&X to be
now being made to divide the hool t una tor me
benent ot the Komsn vsitkmic
fend our glorious 8-hool svstem against the siau
derons attacks of tbe jtamaalsts; U wlU k Una
fearieely without infringing on, the religious free
dom of any sects.
The ucadsb win continue w "
frowth of a home maraet ior me aricunu
ucta of our soil by favoring a Protective TartS
with which to stimulate tae rawiaoimniuw
tares and thus increase consumers of food at home.
Tbe Lsadsb will also oppose any reraitr udi
Grants or any rurther increase ol gigantic Railroad
Corporations. . .
ItwaOOVS IS ins f ia.i..n m vi w - -
I.KiDlu. Let every man favoring this Piauona
subscribe for it, th
BEST PAPES7 in OHIO:
TBRMH:
Weekly Lender, One Ter,....t.
StT rtte-Blfcs,
THE CLEVELAND
DAILY LEADER
THE LEADING NEWSPAPER -
Of NORTHERN OHIO.
Price per Year, ,liX:I
r.r tlx MOmths,
FsrTbree,nsniks,
rr Jue aioiitl.. s.ou
THE CLEVELAND
EVENING NEWS.
It contains all the matter of the Daily Mormims)
Leadbs, and all additional leiegrapmc uu
other news received during ib day.
IT IS THE CHEAPEST OArtY PPER IN THE WESr
TEBMS;
Pa? Annum,
I'er Six Manilas, - JiJ
I sr Tliiee Meutlii,.. !!
Direct all Letters to
LEADER PRIJITsAG CO.,
. . CLEYJELAMt,
O.
$2500 A YEiR
f . villi our sptendid
COMBINATION PROSPECTUS.
It represents sample pages and style of binding of
50 iiUene!y intereiitinfj and useful books, that sell
in own fiimilv. littt ihimi ever tried si anwar
AGENTS WANTED, to make apBMANjTariK-9
of these works in every county. Properws senr
post-paid on receipt ot price, si.nv. porcirrnii
and liberal terms, sdilrees JOHN E. POTTEK
CO., Publishers, Philadelphia, Pa. . . .
RICH FARMING LANDS!
FOR SALE VERY CHEAP!
THE BEST INVESTMENT
No Fluctuations! Always Improving is Valua! "..
The Wtalth qf the Country is Made bg the Jdvanrt .
in tuai
NOW IS THE TIME I
tnHr,n of acres of the finest lsarlson the con-
tnent,in Kastbrx 'bbbbka, now for eaio mrmf
of thrm never trprre in in orw-i yr(wn m.t
DEFY COMPETITION.
Five otlen Years Credit Given, IntsrestatSixpsrCsflt
The Land Grant Bonds of the Company taken at
I pur tor lands, jiney now u j,uivuto -laree
discouut.
tw Full paiucuiars siven, new ymur wnn
Maps mailed free, by wTrtreaeiirz O. F. DAVIS,
...... Omaha, e-
A.OE3SIT3 WANTED!
SKKD FOB CATAX04UK.
DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINE CO., NEW YORK.
13SO SAVED!
To mm the rtrfrni demand t iimsiA
FLOBEMCE SEWIJIG MACHINE CO.
It a re fermiMa to
REDUCE PRICES!
and telll hereafter aril their t3 Maehtna
for JM5, ad other afyiea in proportion.
THE FLORENCE ;
iitheOVZjrQewlna Machine that feed ihr
teark batktrard and fit-ward, or to the right
and left, aa the purenaerr may pr-i-r. ji
A frei- nratlM IMi-B OWD ASD SIM
PLIFIED, and is far nasruisa any outer
aehlne In tho marten.
IT IS NOW THS CHEAPEST
Florence, Jfoss., Sot. 1, '15. Agent Wanted. ,
no rem" hisgs cosb bcbser for
r Inta UC 8C5 CH11IS2YS, mads by
pitjiu AT WOO!, produces thauugeat
light. Can be used on any coal oil lamp. For sale
by all lamp dealers.
T)3TCHOMaSCT, OB 80TJL CHAHiOSO."
I ow either sex mav fascinate and sain the
ove snd affections of sny person thsy ebooe, in
stantly. Tiia simple mental acquiremem au ea
possess, free, by mail, for f5 cental together with a
Marriage Guide, EevpUanOr ie, Driams, Hints to
Ladiea. A queer doos. ltw.OT soio. Auaress i .
n-rr rUw CO., Publishers, Philadelphia.
a At s g e ft MEN. Girls and Boys
V sf J I i EL Id wanted to sell our French
and A nerican Jewelry, Books, Games, Ac., in their
owo localities. No capital required. Cata:-g-ie,
Terme, Ac, sent Faxa. P. O. VICKERY A Co.,
Aumt, Maine. -
HOkirV Hade Rjpidly with Stenotl A
K-v
lflUIIL.1 Check outurs.
Catalogues and full
particulars PRES.
S. M. SerSLBB. ill Hanover
t., Boa ton.
REMEMBER
The 3d of December.
Tbow who propose invt Ming, (and who doe not:)
Fourth Grand Gift Concert
FOR THE BESS FIT OF THE
PUBLIC LIBRARY of KENTUCKY
Which corn's off in Louisville on the 3d of Dceuv-
ber uext, have no time to lose.
ONLY 60,000 TICKETS
IIAVE BEE ISSCED, AND
12,000 CASH GIFTS,
AMOUNTING TO
31,300,000,
WILL BE DISTRIBUTED AS FOLLOWS:
LIST OF gifts:
ONE GRAND CAsn GIFT 250VO
ONE (.RAND CASH GIFT lOO.OtIO
ONE GRAND CASH GIFT SO,W
ONE GRAND CASH GIFT 2.,0
ONK GRAND CASH GIFT A7..
10 CASH GI FTS $1U,J0 each
m cash gifst 5,o" each
SO CASH GIFTS l,iHea. h J.'.!;!:
W) CASH GIFTS WIS each lf'4iji
100 CASH GIFTS each
IM CASH GIFTS 3"0 each
SAO CASH GIFTS K each J.
3SSCASH LIFTS KM) each 3i!,.i
11,000 CASH GIFTS SO each 530,000
Whole Tickets. $50. Coupons, Tenths, $5
ELEVEX TICKET FOK jOO.
For tickets or Information, address
THOS. E. BHARLETTE,
Ajat Public Library Kentucky, Louisville, Ky,

xml | txt