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The Fremont weekly journal. (Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio) 1867-1877, March 13, 1874, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038229/1874-03-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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fBriQNT WEEKLY JOURNAL,
rrBLlSUE6 EYEItY FF.EDAY,
BY A. H. I3ALSLEY.
TEEliS OF THE JOEItNAL;
O i") year, in advance, -SLv.
months, .----.
Three montns, ----
SS.08
1.00
SO
EVERY VARIETY OF
aon r hinting
VT' NEATLY AND QUICKLY DONE.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY.
LEGAL.
J. X. UHCI. .4. B. FRENCH.
. . LEKSION & FRENCH,
ATTOKNEYS AT LAW AND GEKKEAL
AGIiN'TS, CLYDE. OHIO.
Mr. Lenunon will be in hi office at Fremont, on
Thursday of each week. Prompt attention i gnen
to all legal business. M
n. W. WINSLOW.
J. T. OABVKB.
WIXSLOW& GARYEiJ,
a TTO
A nee in Tyler's Block.
ITTORKKTS AT LAW, Fremont, Ohio.
Of
16 ). L. (iKEEXE, Saif.
TTOBVT5Y AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
'Awi'l stVnd to IccmI business in Sandusky and
arivm.in" counties, Onice, corner room, up stairs,
Tyler's Block. Fremont, O.
' H. EVEBETT.
J AS. H. FOWLKH,
EVERETT & FOWLER,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
and Solicitor in Chancery, will attend to pro
fessional business in Saudosky and adjoining cmio
tics. Office, second story, Buckland's New Block.
Fremont, O.
MEDICAL.
D. H. BE1XKERHOFF, M. D.
TnYStCl.X. AND SCKGF.GN, Ottce fnBock-
R;rrh,r.l Avenue, comer of Wood street.
hours meuO to 12 A. M, 1 to 4 r.
r.a?t- '' '
Office
and 7 to
DENTISTRY,
. 7BE- A. F.PRICE,
x , . . . ....tT i vTf ir TirvTT4T QJKfe
fc. t- U h'.l..'a K Iru'K. Will UC
VovtT buns (n rremijiii, " "---
f ouud in hi office at all times.
HOTELS,
BALL HOUSE,
CIORNER OF FRONT STJIEET AND BIRCII
MK1) AVKNI B, FremoB O. Guests carried
to and from each train free ol charge.
STOUGU SUN, Proprietors.
KESSLER HOUSE.
JK WILLIS, Proprietor. Tassrogers carried
.toandfrnTOtheHooMfreeotchw!. bitnat
ed corner of Front and State streets. Fremont, O.
NICHOLS HOUSE,
OCOMMODATIONS FIRST-CLASS.
A Kaafman. Proorietor.Clyde, Ohio.
ol Clyde, ,5(10. Livery Stable ii
W. F.
Population
connection with
the House.
LLNDSEY EOUE,
LINDSET, SaodotkT Connty, Ohio, E- S. Bower
wox. Proprietor, 'i'ne proprietor takes pleasure
in announcing that be is prepared to accommodate
tue traeliiijr public Kvery attention paid to tue
comtortof quests f the Ilonse.; , Hyl-
B
EXCHAKOE HOTEL.- -
ELLETTE, O. John Ford, Proprietor,
cently refitted and lurniahed.
Re-
BIRCH HOUSE,
CLEVEIAND, Om 1M Water street, near the
Kuiiroad Depot, and in the emter ol business,
L.D. HI NT, pWrietors.
1 a HUNTf 1Topnelonu
COMMISSION MERCMANT8.
! j. BAWSOX, . JiS. MOOEE, JOSEPH U BAWBOM.
J. L. RAWSOX, & CO.,
STORAGE, FORWARDINd & COMMISSION
Merchants, Dealers in Coarse Salt, Pine Salt,
Dairy Silt, Land Plaster, Calcined Plaster, Water
Lime, etc. Having purchased the entire property
known as the Fremont Warehouse and Steam Lle
Tators, at the head ot navigation on the Bandm-ky
Hirer, we are prepared to receive, store and sliij)
Grain, Lumber, Merchandise and other produce. .
Oilice, at elevators. Fremont, O. 1-1
ARCHITECT,
J. C. JOHNSON,
ARCHITECT AND DESIGNER, Office In Moore
and Jiawson's Block, corner of Front and Gar
rison streets, Fremont, Ohio. All ardors promptly
attended to. "'J'1-
MISCELLANEOUS.
JOHN S. BRUST,
HOUSE PAINTER, GRALNER, PAPERER
and Kalsominer. Residence on South Street,
in Dillon A Miller's addition. All orders promptly
executed and satisfaction srnaranteed. Orders.may
left t Thomas. Grand Lane's Drug Store. II
LIGHT GUARD
JOHN J. SPICHER, Leader.
The Light Guard Band is composed of twenty
three members, and are at nil times prepared to
fnrnish Mucic for PARADES. FUNERALS, EX
CURSIONS, &c on reasonable terms where prevl
miBixmimrtB tin nnt inljrfpn. bv iuauirine of F.
J'abiug, Manager.or by addressing IL W. Bctta,Scc
OSCHESTRAI
They are also prepared to furnish String Music
for PARTIES, BALl-S, Pit it-, ic., on reawiu
able terms, by applying to Joh J. 8piCHEB,Leader,
Fekmoki, 0.,1SIS.
up j. 1" th rtfp o .
m SOLICITORS AND ATTORKim TO
U. S. and FOREIGN PATENTS.
BUKRIDGE&OO
Ameri-1
ISTSnperler St.,
can House, C
onnesite
lev tland, O.
With Associatd Offices In Washington and For
eign uouines. xi-ti
HO! FOR THE WEST!!
Tb undersigned would notify all persona who de-1
sign traveling wesiwara uiuoi'iii
THROUGH TICKETS
to au. Tire HAnrNO points in Indiana, Illinois,
Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, iveorasiia, aim v-aiuuruia.
W. II. ANDREWS.
Office In Itirchard'a Block, Fremont, O. 3yl
LEEK, DOEKES'Gr & CO.,
MPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF
YANKEE NOTIONS,
6T V ANCT LrOODS,
Toys
No. 133 and 135
Water St.
CLEVELAND, OHIO.
T. W. MtEK, I. C. & W. H. DOMISa, S. H. STTLSOX.
E. F. HAFFORD.
CARRIAGE
Corner Front St, and Birchard Ave.
CARRIAGES, OPEN AND TOP BUGGIES con
stantly on hand, or made to order in any style.
rr- Psrticnlar attention naid to repairing.
work done at my lactury warranted.
Jyl E. F. HAFFOBD.
J. P. ITIOORE,
M ANTJF A7TURER OF
C1RRIIGES,EUSGIES &WAG0NS
T DESIRE to call the attention of all to the
AditiGUS 1 have recemiy uiauc lu uj
, CABRUCEFACIOKI.
t vp cnlarpca and remodeled my shop, as
'ti'ti.eunurpas.ed fact Ii tie. for
: Srntina inn superior manner, every description
. umrm-' ..." ,vrt. Mv workmen are
' S,4rpeteuU.AHniatexiAl k-lected
.wcm1 and thoroughly neasouod belore it
ahaU have a merit. reputation for superior qnal.ty
and stvlc. I hive lilted M a large store room
shall keep always on hand,
IS Terr variety -f CrrIlB;"!,Png"
ales, Lnmber, feprinff
market ("
With those newly acquired facilities my prices
' J. r. MOORE,
t?nrriae Factory, corner Garrison and
Street, Fremont, Ohio.
AMBROSE
QCHS,
MANUFACTURER OF
mm
mm
CORNER OF STATE AND OAK STS.,
HAVING creatlv enlarged his shop and
his facilities for doing first-class
askstheaucntion of the public to his large
SPLENDID ASSORTMENT
' Of Carrlaje, Bng-ies and W'asnns,kept constr.t
1. on han3, made of the best material, of the
workmanxhip. and the latest styles.
IT Call and eramine my sleek before purchas
ing elsewhere. A. ( H;
Framont, Olrio.
I lie; IN rei
mon
- -
-
Weekly ; Journal; '
11.
Established 1839. Vol.XLVI.
New Series Vol. XXII. No.
w" . " : '
FREMONT, SANDUSKY COUNTY, OHIO ; FRIDAY, MARCH 13. 1874.
S1- XU JO. IB' XK Xi;-JO. Kff
MUTUAL ilFE INSURANCE C0,NEV YORK. L,
23
o
02
O
3
a
" M c3 Si
1 P-t O
CQ
O
a
o
I
2
11
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CP
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CO
EVERETT CLAPP, Vice President.
H. C. Clekch, Asst. Sec'y.
ANDREW W. GILL, President.
Lucius JIcIdam, Secy and Act'y.
. T-tMHAMMialawaatf- ' .
HOOD Sc HAND, Gen'l Agts for Oliio, except Toledo District. '
Headquarters, 197 Superior Street, Cleveland, Ohio.
DRS.MCJS, Medical KxaminerB.
51-51
REAL ESTATE
E. LOUDENSLEGER & CO.,
ornoE no. l.DEiroos'fLOCK.
HOUSES, LOTS, FARMS, LAJYDS.
Thefollowinc desirable property to offered for
sale at reasonable prices and easy terms. Persons
wishing to purchase property should call and learn
particulara:
I-OR SALn-Vacant Lota in different parts of
the eily. Prices ranging from $1K0 to $1,000,
owing to location. E. LOL'DENSLEUJiR & CO. ,
FOR SALE A two story Frame Dwelling House
containing eight moms, pantry and closets,
rood cellar under the house, all new and in good
order. The lot contains about one-third ol an acre,
aituatod in the first ward, on the northwest corner
o Kwing and Wood Streets. Price $3,000, pay
ments made asv. This property wonld be ex
changed for good timbered land in either Sandusky,
Wood or Ottawa counties.
WANTED A tract of S00 or 800 acres of choice
timbered land in Sandusky or Ottawa coun
ties. E. LOUDENSLEGER & CO.
CARRIAGE
MANUFACTORY ! .
01YZTE, OHIO.
The undersigned bavine been engaged ta the
Carriage Manufacturing business for the last
twenty-ave years, wouid respectfully inform the
cififens of '
Sandusky and Adjoining Counties
That he has permanently located himself in
CLYDE, SANDUSKY OOUNTY.OHIO,
For the purpose of prosecuting the Carriage Manu
facturing Business in all its various branches, and
will keep constantly on hand a large variety of
Open and Top Buggies, Three
Springand Platform
Wagons,
Made of the best material and latest styles known
to the trade. Prompt attention given to
Repairing and Repainting Old Buggies!
He will keepconstantly on, hand and for sale
Smith's Coal, Turned Spokes, Bent Felloes, Hubbs.
Polet and Thills: all Well Seasoned.
He invites special attention to his work, together
with the low prices, lor wuicu ne is euauieu iuwu
to same. f. OSBOR3I.
tyde, Ohio, August S3, 1878.
THE
FINEST ASSORTMENT
OF
.
I
AU
ad-
to
cx-
of
re-
with
is
and
will
ISoots & Shoes
IN THE CITY,
CAN BE FOUND AT
I3oi'i- fc Son's
Call and Examine for Yourselves.
A,
-
iiifT DREAMS
h'itt.
y -wool
FOR SALE BY
TSCHUMY & D0NCYS0N.
COMPLETE BOOK STORE.
INGHAM, CLARKE & CO
in
creased work
and
hlgh-i!.-.of
Wholesale and Retail
Libraries.
Several hundred choic volnmes in every
branch of Litemture.
snnday School Books.
Twenty thousand volumeB of good tone
fot the purpose.
Holiday Books.
An immense variety.
Ban and Girls Books.
Optic's Kellogg's Sophie May's. Sevoral
dred volnmes from all the popular authors.
Printers and Tor Books.
Fifteen hundred dozen, at from IS cents
dozen to $3.00 per dozen.
Initial Stationery.
All the new styles and sizes J
JUusi" Books.
For Sunday Schools, Church Choirs and
ing H:nool8.
Medical and Law Books.
A full variety 1400 volumes.
Photoerapli Albums.
Over 50 varieties vt from 75 cents to $25.00.
"Cheap Usoks.
A small quantity ef shelf-worn books,
for School, Private, or S. 8. Libraries.
Any book in market supplied to order.
IHGHAM. CLAKKii & 00
S1I Superior St., Cleveland, Ohio.
I
TO MANUFACTURERS
THE "Cooper Busc" Eulding will beforrent
atVr December 1st, 73. To n party w ho
use it for the manufacture of Boot or Shoes,
ilieral K'liiis will he given. OSCAR BALlu
1
Fremont, ov. a, its i ...
I. M. KEELER'S
J3L Gr 33NO Y ,
FREMONT, OHIO-
Notary Publie, Real Estate and General
Intelligence Office,
the strongest Fire Insurance Companies
In the land com pnnies that paid every dollnrof
thoirkwws at CHICAGO and BOS'lXJN will be
found the Ael
HOME, New York, $4,852,697
PH(ENIX, Hartford, 1,678,613
PHENLX, N. Y., 2,008,947
HOME, CoItlthdhs, 517,176
ROYAL. Livernool 1U,UUU,UUU
IMPERIAL London, 8,000,000
ARMENIA, PittsDnrg, 327,64
HOWARD, N. Y., 695,500
Fire Associate, Phil 2,513,000
GENERAL INTELLIGENCE. Persons at a
distance desiring informatiou fn-T! this point can
address me. It the subject does n.it tvquire much
investigation a few postage sumps will be suffi
cient remuneration.
Resident of Fremont Since 1840.
Bkteresces: F. S. White, Bank of Fremont,
A. II. Miller, First Natioml Bank,
Gen. R. P. Buckland.
i
i
The panic is over. Money is be
coming more plenty. Business all
over the country is reviving. Our
business men are paying cash and
the highest prices for grain and all
kinds of farmer's" products. New
men are coming into our city. City
lotsTare being sold. Preparations
for new buildings are being made.
New manufactories are opening. ' lt
is acknowledged all over the couatry..
that Fremont is one of the liveliest
and best towns in Northern Ohio.
At i". M. Keeler's Agency you can
get Insured, Rent Property, or Buy
any of the following:
Office in Bucklnnd (old) Block, to Rent.
Two Offices in Buckland (new) Block, to Rent. -
Store Room in Clapp Corner, to Rent.
179 feet front on Birchard Avenue, by 105.feet
deep on Whittlesey Street, a very handsome and
desirable corner. "Will sell one-half, one-third, or
the whole. Price for the whole $3,000.
Tot Tfo. 9.-5. on the south side of Court Street,
ncur the Depot, for sale at 11 ,500.
Thrinnn f:omer. Front and Garrison Streets,
82X feet iront by 132 feet deep, with Store, Dwell
ing ami warn, uue ui uiu uuw wmwid
city. Forsale at giz,uuu. ine ui iiscu ie buiui
the money. i
ont-lot No. 1W. on south side of Tiffin street,
between 8 and 4 acres, for sale at $2,S00.
mnrin, Vill. 8 Rnn Stones. Saw Mill. Frame
Dwelling,good Water Power, 8 to 10 acres Laud, 1
mile to Railroad, all in good order. For sale at
1U,000.
16 rods front on Birchard avenue, S Lots with a
Dwellings, choice Fruit and Shrubbery, good
Fences aud Sidewalks; two minutes walk from
the Post-office, none more pleasantly located in
the city, for sale.
103 feet fronton Croghan Street, adjoiningFront
Street, suitable for Store Buildings, with in story
Brick Dwelling on southwest corner, east of and
adjoining Fort Stephenson Park, for sale.
A choice Farm of 125 acres, t miles north o
the f itv, fine Orchard, 60 rods deep river front;
Buildings, Barns, Sheds, Brick Yard. Is worth
$10 per acre but will be sold for $W) per acre.
Ont-lot No. S, acres in Thad Bali's sub-dms-
ion, 1 H miles north of town, for sale.
80 Lots, f.-ora half an acre to 10 acres in Glenn
Springs' sub-division; half mile from the Depot.
Just the place for mechanics aud suburban resi
dences. West part lot SI, with 2-story Brick Store and
Dwelling, on south side State Street, for sale.
Lot No. 11 Ml, on the east side of Arch Street,
south end, Frame Dwelling, for sale at $1(00.
7 acres in hich state of cultivation, all kinds
Fruit, Berries, Frame Dwelling, Ham, Shed and
Heuery, on south side East J'.aiu Street, one mile
from the Court House, Korwulk, Ohio, for sale at
$5,000, cash $i,ono, balance on time.
mi.. rw,nr TTouse." Hotel and Bam property.
In the center of the city. Good fur lurniturc
Warehouse, Dry Goods or Grocery Stored, or any
kind of Mannfactnringpurposes. Here is a chance
for n speculation.
8,000 LoW in Oak Wood Cemetery, for sale.
M. KEELER'S AUfcNUT
ad Storr Buckland' (old) Hlock,
Is the place to transact yonr bnsincsa. Strangere
visiting Fremont are invited to call.
UNION BUSINESS
iriSTITUT
0BERLIN. 0 HI0.
J
se
lected per
sing
j
good
Oneof the oldest 0ml most snccessfulcolleges in
the conutrv. Youuc Men ami i.tii: ...-.,
will liinlsupcriorad-
vantagesatthisinstitutiou. 'lhe
COURSE OF STUDY
nclndcsSinirleaudDoubleEntry.Stoekand Part
nership Sets, Wholesaleand Retail .Mercliaumzing,
Forwarding, Simple aud Compound Commission,
i-f.., f;i.tr.ur'i Sets. Bankinc, Railroad
ing. SteSiiboaUuK, Mauutacturiug, etc. SwjenW
are taught to execute all kiuds of Business Paper
i..l Documents belonging to me
would
very
COMMERCIAL X.A.W
is-oneofthepromincntfeaturcsortbeconrse,ler
i j:anu.l.-,,t. ar iriven dailv. Wcteacu
cr.n;i Rn n.u Arithmetic, in ovmv.
makegreat proficiency.
OUR WRITING DEPARTMENT.
r.i.,1nrtment will be in charge of Practical
tcachlLJ?. 1 ne aemauw "
inrrMS ll'. nud those who
Srtto perfect themselves in this beautiful art
aebarringthcmsclvesot cnancesoi
THE BUSINESS WORLD.
Nooutlay will so soon meet withantpleretntusas
.u.... i... h urhirh i mild inlcarninc to write.
fulloirtiulars.send stamp forcirculaisaudspoci-
meusofpenmauBhip.
II
, T. TANNER, Principal.
BOOTS "
; v and
SHOES!
HATS CAPS !
S A C l! I F 1 G E
I nowoffer at
WHOLESALE-and RETAIL
the entire stock of goods
assigned to me by -
A. HOOT k SON,
for the benefit of creditors.
The Goods must be sold, and in order to close
them out rapidly a great sacrifice will be made.
All in want of a bargain in Boots, Shoes, Hats,
Caps, Gents' Furnishing Goods, Ac, are invited to
call and get their share of bargains while the as
sortment is full.
Persons indebted to A. Hoot & Son will pleaso
call and make immediate settlement with the un
cersigned. .
S. P. MENG, Assignee-
JUSiTA BLISIIED 1852.
Union Business College
CLEVELAND, OHIO
Largest, most thoroughly practi
cal and most uoDUiar .Institution m
the State.
of
Over three hundred Students
daily attendance now.
Faculty composed entirely
practical and experienced teachers.
The celebrated teacher and author,
Piatt C. Spencer is Principal of the
Writing Department
For catalogue containing full par
ticulars, address
FELT0N & BIGELOW,
B-18 CLEVELAND, OHIO.
ATCKISOiV. TOPEKA Sc SANTA
F UAILIIOAD.
THREE MILLION ACRES
LIBERAL TERMS TO IMPROVERS.
11 Years Credit, 1 Per Cent. Int.
No part of the Principal Payable for Four Years.
FINE GRAIN-GROWING REGION.
Tracts of one to two thousand acres available for
Neighborhood Colonies, or for Stock Farms. -
EXCELLENT CLIMATE WITH
FIRE FLOWING WATER.
"I would say, that In the course of many years,
and through extensive travel, I have not seen a
more invitingcouutry, nor oue which offers greater
inducements, with fewer objections to settlement,
h.n l,ra la,, Ho of th A. 1- & S. F. R. K. A'X-
trocr ttciiort of Uenry Stewart, Agricultural Editor
American A grieulturalM.
A. TOUZALIN,
Land Commissioner, Topeka, Kansas.
For full particulars, and through ticketeat reduced
rates, inquire 01
KAIILO & CROWE,
Land and Ticket Agents, A. T. A S. F. B. R.,
258 Snmniit "t. , Toledo, o.
ram mm LANDS
MILLIONS OF ACRES
or THE
BEST LAN I) IN THE WEST
FOR SALE BT TI1E
plisgtsn & Missouri Hi?er Mmi Co.
On Ten Y ears' Credit, at 6 Per vent, interest.
No Payments required on principal till :
ar. and then only ONE-SEVENTH each J
incipal till FIFTI1
vear un
I year, and then only
cC"i5d; TXuea-
I.arur Hetiuclinn on -Fare anil Freight
I Buyers ann ineir iamiues.
BTJ"X" THIS Y-fcJ
1 1 .i f.ir ..lvnntjifTc of the Premium of 20 per cent.
I for cultivation, oftered only to purchasers during
11874.
For Circulars containing full particulars, aud
ap of country, send to , o
IMap
UGI). S. HARRIS
Land Commissioner, Hurl injton, Joiea
-thorouHib'usiiiesseducation
for-
.
For
THE FAVORITE HOME REMEDY.
niiannrimllcrt Southern Remedy is warranted
not to contain a single partideof MEncuitT.orauy
injurious mineral suhfuince, uui is
PURELY VEGETABLE,
nn,n;n;nr Sontliern Roots and Herbs, which
an all-wise Providence has placed in countries
where Liver Diseanes most prevail, ii win. .uibm
Diseases caused by Derangement oi tne Livet
Bowels. ,
Simmons' Liver Regulator, or Medicine,
Is eminently a Family Medicine; and by
kept ready tor lmuieoiaie in :- -
an hour of suffering and many a dollar in time
Doctors' bills.
After over Forv Years' trial it is still receiving
the most unqualified testimonials to iW virtues
Lrom persons oi lue nigneai uii-- ' 'T-.
Eminent physicians commend it a
mot 1
EPFECTTJAIi SPECIilO
for Dyspepsia aud Indigestion.
Armed with this ANTIDOTE, all climates
changes of water and food may ne . accu
BOWEL COM PLAINTS, KESTLESSN
JAUNDICE, NAUSEA,
IT HAS NO EQIIAIj.
It is the Cheapest, Purest and Best ramuy -neui-
cine in me yonu:
MANVFACTPREIJ ON1.Y BT
J. H. ZEILIK & CO.,
MACON, GA., and PHILADELPHIA.
Price $1.00. Sold by all Druggists.
P. of H.
this Bifni-i.iit COMMI'NICATION
i:SV' of Fort Scepheuson Grange, No. 954,
A4 u iu. Ii.il.l ..I SItiiniM IImIi. on the Kii-st.
X&rlr uriav beloie the full muon of enc and
erviunulh, at in A. M. Jatraary 8 and
ami Ulsn-h S. B. W . LEWIS, W.
E. . Aiihtit.-s, t-y.
Poetry.
the New York Times.
The Ghost that Jim Saw.
Kansas Pacific Railway, 1873.
Kansas Pacific Railway, 1873. BY BRET HARTE.
"Why, as to that," said the engineer,
"Ghosts ain't things we are apt to fear,
Spirits don't fool with levers much,
And throttle-valves don't take to such;
And as for Jim
What happened to him- '
Was one-half fact and tother half iim!
Riumiog one night on the line, he aw
A house es plain as the moral law"
Jast by the moonlit bank, and thence
.Came a drunken man with no moiosense
Than to drop on the rail,
Flat as a flail.
As Jim drove by with the midnight mail.
Down went the patents. Steam revel sed. Too
Late! for thcrsoone a 'thud.' Jim cursed,
As his fireman, there in the cab with him,
Kinder stared in the face of Jim,
And says, 'what now?'
Says Jim, 'What now!
Fire jnrt run over a man that's how!
The fireman stared at Jim'.' They ran
Back, hut they never found house nor man
Nary a shadow within a wile.
Jim turned pa!c, but he tried to smik
Then on he tore
Ten mile or more,
In quicker time than he'd made afore.
Would you believe it! the very next night
Up rose the hoiise In the moonlight white;
Out comes the Chap and drops as before,
Down goes the brakes, and the rest encore
And so in fact.
Each night that act
Occurred, till folk swore Jfm was cracked.
Humph! Let me see; it's a year now, most, -I
met Jim, East, and says, 'How's yourghost?'
"Gone,' says Jim; 'and more, it's plain
That ghost don't trouble me again;
I thought I shook
That ghost when I took
A place on an Eastern line but look:
What should I meet the first trip out,
But that very house we talked about.
And that self-same man! 'Well,' says, I, 'I guess
It's time to stop this yer foolishness,"
So I crammed on steam,
When there came a scream
From my fireman and it broke my dream
You've killed somebody' Says I, 'Not much;
1'vo been thar often and tliar aint no such,
. And now I'll prove it.' Back we ran,
Aud darn my skin! but tbar vat a man .
On the rail, dead,
Smashed in the head
Now I call that meanness!" That's all Jim said.
Kansas Pacific Railway, 1873. BY BRET HARTE. Selected Story.
JOHN'R TRIAL.
BY P. DEMING.
just where the wilderness road of
the Adirondack Ilighlands strikes
the edge of the great Champlain Val
ley, in a little clearing.is a lonely log
house. On the 10th day of July 1852
a muscular, gaunt woman stood at
the door of the house, overlooking
the vast extent of the valley. From
her stand point ten miles of green
forest swept down to the lake's wind
ing shore; She saw the indentations
made in the shore line by "the bay"
and beyond the wide waters, gleam
ins in the fervid brightness of sum
mer. Specks were , here and there
discernible in tne lignt nasnea Dacn
from the blue, mirror-like surface,
and by long watching it could be
seen that these specks were moving
to and fro. '
The woman knew that these dis
tant moving atoms.were boats freight
in"- lumber througti LiaKe cuampiam
She knew there was but one boat
that would be likely to turn aside
and come into the little bay, and
that boat would be her son John's
slooo.
That was why 6no watcnea so anx-
iouslv a speck that neared the bay
and at leneth entered it. To make
doubly sure she brought to bear an
old" 8DV class whose principal lens
was cracked entirely tnrougn. it
ravc her a smoky view of the famous
sloop, the Dolly Ann, John's proper
ty, and then she was entirely certain
that her son. wno nau Deen tnree
weeks absent on his voyage, was com
inrr home.
Juniper, the house dog, who had
been watching her, seemed to know
it too, perfectly well; for as she turn
ed from he survey through the glass
his canine nature developed a degree
of wrizsling friakiness of which the
o-rave old dosr seemed half ashamed
Ho whined and walked about the
door-yard for a few moments,then he
o-ave hi3 mistress a long,sieaciy 100s
and seeming satisfied with what he
read in her face, jumped over the
fence and started aown the roatl into
the vallev on a fall run.
The woman knew that three or
four hours must vet elapse before
John and Juniper would come along
to
the path together, tired by their long
tramp up the mountain sine, one
thought and waited as lonely mothers
think and wait lor absent sons.
At about four o'clock a yonng,
(Jarfe-eved man and dog Came Up the
J . .
u
being
-
ana
.i.
Bibiiity. the
and
EbS,
-
P. of
St-
ev-
lebru
ary M.
road and to the house.
,4Heigho,-Kther, all well?
Was the man's greeting.
The woman's greeting was only
"How do you do, John?"
There was no show of sentiment,
not even a hand shake; but a bright
look in the man's face, and a tremor
in the voice of the woman, conveyed
the impression that these plain peo
ple felt a great deal mere man tney
expressed. - ; ; .
Two hours passed away, ana tue
supper over the neighbors who had
seen John and the dog come up
road, dropped in for a talk with
"Captain" as John wss called by
friends.
- Soon the inquiry was made
"Where did you leave your cousin
William?"
John had taken his cousin William
who lived upon the lake shore, with
him npon his last trip, and hence
Question.
But John did not answer tne ques
tion directly. He seemed troubled
and unhappy about it. He nnaiiy
acknowledged that he and William
had not agreed, and that high words
and blows had passed between tnem
and added that his cousin had final
ly left the boat and had gone-away
A. . , 4 1 1,
in a nun, ne Knew cut ucie,
somewheres into the pineries of
nada. He declared, getting warm
his recollection of the quarrel,
"he didn't care a darn" where
went, any way.
A month passed away: it
August, Cousin Will did not return
But certain strange stories came
the lake from Canada, and reached
lhe dwellers along the Adirondack
Wilderness road. No cousin
liam had been seen in the pineries;
but just across the Canada line,
the mouth of Fish ltivcr, where
sloops were moored to receive
ladine of lumber, a bruised, swollen
festering corpse had risen and floa
ted in the glare of a hot August day.
The boatmen rescued it and buried
it upon the shore. They described
it as a body of a hakyvigorous young
man, agreeing in hight, size and op
pearance with cousin William.
And there was another story told
by the Captain of a sloop which had
been moored at the mouth of Fish
River, near by John's sloop, on the
fatal voyage from which cousin
William had not returned.
The Captain said that upon the
4th of July he had heard quarreling
upon John's sloop all the afternoon,
and had noticed that only two men
were there. He thouglft the men
had been drinking. At nightfall
there was a little lull; but soon af
ter dark the noise broke out again.
He could see nothing through the
gloom, but hfteard high and angry
words, and aMength blows, and then
a dull, crushing thud, followed bT a
pludge into the watcr,and then there
was entire silence. lie listened for
an hoar, in the stillness of the sum
mer night, but heard no further
sound from the boat. In the early
gray of the nest morning the Cap
tain, looking across the intervening
space to John's sloop, which he de
scribed as hardly a stone's throw
from his own, saw a hat lying upon
the deck, and using hi3 glass was
confident that he saw "spatters of
blood." He thought it "none of his
business," and taking advantage of
a light breeze sailed away and. said
nothing. But when the floating
corpse was found he felt sure there
had been a murder, and, as he ex
pressed it, felt bound to tell his story
like an honest man, and so told lL
Putting these things together, it
soon grew to be the current opinion
upon the lake tha Captain John
had murdered bis cousin William.
Tle dwellers upon the Wilderness
road also came, by slow degrees and
unwillingly, to the same conclusion.
It was felt and said that John ought
to be arrested.
Accordingly, on a dreary day in
November, two officers, from the
county town twenty miles away
down the lake shore, came and
climbed the steep road to the lonely
log-house, and arrested John. It
was undoubtedly a dreadful blow to
those two lonely people living isola-
tedin the wilderness. Perhaps therf'ay
1. i i l 1. . : 1
the
the
his
the
..
uuv
Ca
in
that
Will
was
up
Wil
at
the
their
ought to have been some crj'ingand
a scene.but there was no such thing.
The officers testified that neither
John nor his mother made any fuss
about it There was a slight twitch
ing of the strong muscles of her
face, as she talked with the officers,
but no other outward sign.
John gave more evidence of the
wound he felt. He was white and
quivering, yet he. silently, and with
out objection, made ready to go with
the officers. He was soon prepared,
and they started. John, as he went
out of the door, turned and said,
Good-by; it will all be made right,
mother." She simply answered,
"Yes, good-by ; I know it, my son."
1 he trio went on foot down the
road to the next house, where the
officers had left their Uim. Jupiter,
standing up with his fore paws upon
the top of the fence, gazed, wistfully
after them. When they passed
around the bend of the road out of
sight Jupiter went into the house.
The strong woman was there about
her work, as usual; but the heavy
tears would now and then fall upon
the hard pine floor. Sue knear that
her own boy would spend the com
ing night3 in the county jail
At twelve o clock of that INovem-
ber night the woman and the dog
went out of the house; she fastened
the door, and then they went togeth
er down the dark mountain road,
while the autumn winds swept dis
mally through the great wilderness,
and the midnight voice of the pines
mourned the dying year. The next
day at noon a very weary woman
on foot, with a small bundle and a
large dog, put up at the little village
hotel hard by the county jail
Another day had passed and then
the preliminary examination came
on before a Justice to determine
whether there was sufficient evidence
to hold John in custody until a grand
jury of the county should be assem
bled foi the next Court of Oyer and
Terminer.
Three days were spent in this ex
aminatlon before the Justice; the
Captain of the sloop who had over"
heard the quarrel in the night told
his story, and the boatmen who had
found the body told theirs. Two
men who had been the crew of John's
little vessel were also called. But
they could tell little more than that
they were absent on shore upon the
4th of July.and when they retuied to
the vessel William had gone, they
knew not where nor why.
Tie evidence against John seem
ed to the magistrate clear and con
clusive. But the counsel for the ac
cused, employed by John's mother,
took the ground that, a3 the offense
was committed in Canada, a Justice
in the Unite States had no jurisdic
tion in the matter.
This view prevailed, and after five
days the accused was set at liberty.
But that voice of the people, which
the ancient proverb says is like the
voice of God, had decided that John
was guilty. It was under this crush
ing condemnaiion that John and his
mother left the country town on
cold December day, turning their
steps homewards; and at "evening
time they climbed the acclivity so
miliar to them, and reached the lone
ly log-hou3e upon the mountains.
Their neighboi'3 were glad to
them back again, but were plain
say that "it appears like as if John
was guilty." Thepe dwellers in
solitudes were accustomed to speak
truly what they thought John
his mother too spoke openly of
matter. It was only of showing
fection and love that these people
were asbamed and thy. They both
admitted to their neighbors that
evidence was very strong, but John
aided quietly that be was not guilty
as if that settled the whole matter.
But the voice of the people and
sense of justice would not let
crime rest. It came to be very gen
orally known that a man guilty
murder was living near the shore
Lake Champlain. Arrangements,
were erlected by which it came
pass that the Canadian authorities
made a formal application to
United States for the delivery of
John Wilson, belived to be guilty
the murder of Lis cousin W llliain
Wilson.
And so again two officers, this
time United States officials, climbed
np to the little log-house upon the
edge of the great valley. Through
a drifting, blinding storm of snow,
they were piloted by a neighbor to
the lonely house. They made known
their errand. and in the course of
half an hour the officers and their
prisoner were out in the storm on
their way to the distant cityol Mon
treal. It was many days before the wo
man saw her son again. For four
months John was imprisoned, await
ing his trial be'fore the Canadian
courts. Doubtless those four months
seemed long to the solitary woman.
She had not much opportunity to in
dulge in melancholy fancies; she
spent mach of her time in pulling
brush and bieaking it up with an ax,
so as to adaDt it to the size of her
stove.
The neighbors tried to be kind,
and often took commissions from
her to the store and the grint-mill in
the valley; "But after all," said Pete
Searlcss, ODe of John's . friends, -Sa
speaking of the matter afterward,
"what could neighbors amount to,
when the nearest of them lived a
mile awa, and all of them were
plain to say that they believed she
was the mother of a murderer?"
But the neighbors said the woman
did not seem to mind the solitude
and the rough work. Morning, noon
and night she was out in the snow
and the storm at the little hovel of a
barn at the back of the house, tak
ing care of two cows and a few sheep
which were hers and Johns. At
other times travelers upon the wil
derness road wonld see her gaunt
figure clambering down a rocky ridge
dragging poles to the house to be
cut up for fuel.
She received two letters from John
in the course of tbc winter. The
first told her he was imprisoned, and
awaiting his trial in Montreal, and
the next one said that his trial had
been set down for an early day in
March.
This correspondence was all the
information the mother had of her
son ; for the lake was frozen over
the winter so that the boats did not
run, and no news could come from
Canada by the boatmen.
When March came and passed a-
without intelligence from John,
. , i . i , n I.
a
see
to
the
al-
the
a
this
of
of
to
the
one
of
it was taken by the dwellers on the
lake shore and along the wilderness
road as a sure indication he had
been convicted of the crime. A let
ter or newspaper announcing the
fact was confidently looked- for by
the ji,Mbor3 whenever they went
to 't ostoffice for their weekly
mrtiU
Au. .-rch went out and spring
days and sunshine came, it, was
Noticed that the face of Jonn'a mo
ther looked sharp and white, but she
went about the same daily duties as
before, without seeming to feel ill or
weak.
On a splashy April day full of sun-
shinee, stood on the rocky ridge,
DacK Ok-lne nouse, looaing uown up
on trie laise. Aitnongn tne snow
still lingered in patches upon the
highlands, the valley looked warm
below, and the first boats of the sea
son were dotting the wide, distant
mirror of "old Champlain." A man
came slowly up the muddy line of
road, through the gate, and around
the house ; then, for the first, the
woman 6aw him. A slight spasm
passed over her face. There was a
little pitiful quiver of the muscles
about the month, and tnen sue
walked slowly down the ridge to
where the man stood. She strug
gled a little with herself before she
said. "Well. John, I am glad to see
you back."
John tried to oe cool, aiso, oat na
ture wa3 too much for him. He could
not raise his eyes to hers, and his
simple response. "Yes, mother," was
chokingly uttered.
The two walked into the house to
gether in the old familiar way. The
woman, without a word, began to
spread the table, and the son went
out and prepared fuel, and bringing
it in replenished the lire, inen ne
sat down in his accustomed place by
the stove, with a pleasant remark
about how well the fie burned, and
how good it seemed to be home again
And the woman spoke a few kind
motherly words.
It was the way they had always
done when John came back, but now
there was great sadness ic it, for
had come from prison. Jupiter
seemed fully to realize the situation
He exhibited none of that friskincss
which characterized the welcome
had usually given; but when John
was seated the old dog came slowly
up to him, laid his fore paws and
head in his master's lap, and looked
sadly in his face
As thev sat down to supper jonn
began to tell of his fare in the jail
Montreal, and to speak freely of
life there.
"Will yon have to go back?" said
the mother, with that quiver about
the mouth again.
"No, mother," said John, "it is fin
ished, and I am discharged."
After supper the story was told
over, now wen jonn s counsel
worked for him, and how tlie J udge
had said there was not sufficient evi
dence to convict of so great a crime.
John continued from this time
through the spring to live at home.
He allowed his sloop to noat idly
the bay, while as he said, of himself
rested. The trutn was ne saw, wuai
others did not, that his mother
carried a fearful weight, and
that it was lifted by his return,
the resources of her life were
hausted. The change, not yet appa
rent to other eyes, was clear to
vision. So it is that these silent
rits read each other.
As the warm weather advanced
strong woman became weak, and
the June flowers began to bloom,
ceased to move about much, and
the most of each day in a chair
the open door. John managed
house and talked sitb hi3 mother.
Her mind changed with the relax;
tion of her physical frame. She
longer strove to hide her tears,
like a tired infant would weep with
out restraint or concealment as
told Ler son of the early loves
romance of her girlhood life in
warm valley of the We9t He learn
ed more of his mother's heart
those June days than he had surmis
ed from all he had known of her
fore. And he understood what
predicted. He felt that the
he
he
his
at
his
uau
on
in
had
now
that
ex
his
spi
the
as
she
sat
by
the
no
but
she
and
a
in
be
this
heart
nearest his own was counting over
the treasures of life ere it surrender
ed them forever.
There .was no great scene when
the woman died. It wa3 at evening,
just as the July fervors waa coming
on. She had wept much in the mor
ning. As the day grew warm she
became very weak and faint, and
was moved by her son from her chair
to her bed, and so died as the snn
went down.
John was alone in the house when
she died. , Since his return from
Montreal ho had been made to feel
that he had but one friend beeides
his mother, lie had tver proved
true. But John did not like to
trouble his one friend, who lived
two mi'e3 away, to come and stay
with him during the nieht. So ho
lighted a candle, took down from a
shelf a little Bible and hymn book
that he and his mother bad carried
on an average about four times a
year to a school house used as a
church, some six miles away, and
so alone with the dead ho spent the
hours in reading and tears and med
itation. . . ...
In the morning he locked the door
of his home and walked "over to
Pete's. As he met his fried, be said
in a clear voice, but with eye3 aver
ted, "She has gone, Pete; if you
will just take the key and go over
there I'll go down to the lake and
get the things, and tell Downer, and
we'll have the funeral, say on Thurs
day."
Pete hesitated a moment, then
took the key John offered him, and
said, "Yes, John, I will tell my wo
man, and we will go over and fix it,
and be there when you come back."
And sd John - went on his way.
"Downer" was the minister, and
"the things" were a coffin and a
shroud.
On Thursday was the funeral
Pete took care to have all the people
of the neighborhood there, although
it hardly seemed as if John desired
it. The popular voice, having once
decided it, still held John as a mar
aerer, ana claimed mat ne was
cleared from the charge only by the
tricks of his lawyer. John knew of
this decision. At the funeral he
was stern, cold, white and statue
like. While others wept, but few
tears fell from his eyes, and even
these seemed wrung from him by an
anguish for the most part suppressed
or concealed.
ile chose that his mother should
be buried, not in the "burying-
ground" at tho settlement, but upon
their own little farm where she had
lived. And so in a spot below the
rocky ridge, where wild violets grew,
she was iaid at rest.
John spent the night following
the funeral at Pete's house, then re
turned to his own home, and from
that time his solitary life began. He
took his cattle and his sheep over to
Tat-a'oi mala all foot ariAiif hia firtma
a. 0y uiu ail iaov cowwuu ui xsu4W
and resumed his boating upon Lake
Champlain. He fully realized that
he was a marked man. He was ad
vised, it was said, even by his own
legal counsel, to leave the country,
and to leave his name behind him;
but no works influenced him. Firm
and steady in his course, strictly
temperate and just, he won respect
where he could not gain confidence,
The year3 rolled by. Captain
John was still a boatman, and still
kept his home at the lonely log-
house on the edge of the great val
ley. From ach voyage he returned
and spent a day and night alone at
the old place; and it was noticed
that a strong, high paling was built
around his mother's grave, and a
marble head-stone was placed there,
and other flowers grew with the wild
violets. Even in winter, when there
was no boating and he boarded
down by the lake, he made many
visits to the old homestead. His
figure; which, though youthful, was
now growing gaunt and thin as his
mothers had been, was often seen Dy
Pete at nightfall upon the top or
certain rociy ndge standing out
clear and sharp against the cold blue
steel of the winter sky.
John had no companions and
30ught none. The young men and
women of his set had married and
settled in life; he was still the same
But there came a change. Jueven
years had passed since his mother
died, and it was June again. Jonn
was spending a day at the old place
once more. He sat in the door, loos
ing out on the magnificent landscape,
the broad lake and the dim line
mountains away across the valley.
The lovely day seemed to cheer this
atern. lonely man
Three persons came up the road
they advanced straight to where
John" was sitting. One of them
stepped forward, looked John stead
ily in the face, held out his hand
him, and said, "John, do -ou know
me?"
The voice seemed to strike him
with a sharp, stunning shock, lie
ouivered. held hU breath, stared in-
to the eyes or tue questioner, ana
then, suddenly becoming unnaturally
cool and collected, said, " yu
William ?
The two who stood back had once
been John's warmest friends. 'They
now came lorwara ana wim sucu
words as they could command told
the story of Wiliiam's sudden retnrn,
and sought tor themselves forgivness
for the cruel and false suspicion
which had so ionjr estranged them
from their friend9.
John seemed to hear this as one
in a dream. He talked with W llliam
and the men in a manner
seemed strangely' "cold and indiffer
ent about where William Had Deen
voyaging so long in distant seas,
of his strange abscencc. A quarter
of an hour passed away. The
proposed that John should go with
them to their homes, and said their
would be a gathering of friends there.
They pressed tho invitation
warmth and such true feeling as
voices express when a- dear friend
has been greatly wronged and
humbly acknowledge it,
John said absently that he' did
know. He looked uneasily around
as if in search of something, perhaps
his hat, He assayed to nse
his chair, but could not: and in
moment he fell hnc ashv rale.
ing and breathless. The men:
not looked for this, but, accustomed
as they were to the rough life of
wilderness, they were not alarmed.
They fanned the fainting man
their straw ha', and as soon
water could be found applied it
his f ice and . hands. lie soon
WW-"""!
tially recovered, and. looking ujv
said in a broken yoke : "Give me a
little time, boys." At thU tint the
two old friends, who were now
crying, stepped out (of the door and
cousin William sat 'down out upon
the door-step.
Johh founnd that a little time was
not enough. He had traveled too
far and long in thattearful desert of
loneliness, easily or quickly to re- (
turn. A nervous fever followed the
shock he received, and for some two
months he did not leave the home
stead, being confined to his bed.
But the old house was not lonely.
The men and women came, both his
old friends and new comers, and
tried to make up to him in some de
gree the love and sympathy he had
so long missed. But for many days
it was evident that their kindness
pained and oppressed him.
"It appears like," said Pete,-"t.hat'
a rough word don't hurt him, but a
kind one he can't stand." And this
was true, his soul was fortified
against hatred and contempt, but a
k?nd voice, or a gentle caress, seem
ed to wound him that he would sob
like an infant
As he recovered from his illness
he continued genue, Kind, ana
shrinking to a fault By the opera
tion of some spiritual law that I do
not comprehend, he was, after his
recovery, one of those who "in a
a strange affection from others. His
inflnence seemed like a mild fascin
ation. It was said of him in after
years that he was more truly loved
and by more people, than any other
man or woman in tne setuemenis
around. Children loved h'm with a
passionate attachment, -and the wo- ,
man of child-like nature whom le
made his wife is said to have died of
grief at his death. He departed thi
life at the age of thirty-eight, and he
sleeps on the edge of a great valley,
with his mother and his . wue Desiae
him. Atlantic Monthly.
the New York Tribune.
A Granger's Serenade.
Oh, come my low, and live with ue
And keep my cotuge in the glen -
As patient as an humble bee,
And busy as a seiUng hen.
Oh rest beneath my fragrant bower,
Where sweet stramonium doth entwine.
Come smell the gentle caaiflower
And cull the mangel-wurzel vine.
Ah! listen to the rural songs!
The pea shall wind his magic shell
As Echo plaintively prolongs
The warble of the pimpernel.
Beyond the vermicUli row
I hear the bull frogs aigh again.
The cackle of the Durham ewe
The bellow of the Berkshire hen.
Ob, come, love, come! the morn is fair,
I'D celebrate the day with thee;
I"U merKly di g the Bartlett pear.
And shake the rnU-baga tree.
My sweetest! I am fond of mnah.
And thou wilt set some out for uie;
We'll early sow the currant bush.
And tap the cranberry-jelly tree.
Well pnll the wool from off the calf.
The Cottonwood its fleece shall shed.
So at the winter will we laugh,
And gaily weed the oyer-bed.
Well blithely hoe the winter wheat,
Well chase the eggs the squirrels lay.
And when the bantum hog shall bleat,
Well feed him with some clover hay.
Then come my lore and Hve with me,
And beautify my lonely den,
As patient as humble bee.
And busy as a setting hen.
FOR FARMERS' LEISURE MOMENTS.
MENT3.
of
to
ana
with
our.
we
not
from
a
faint
had
the
with
as
to
par.
A white quail was recently shot in
California.
Farming operations are being re
tarded by the damp nature of the
soiL -
It is proposed to import bees to
New Zealand. The bees are removed
while dormant, the nests being sur
rounded by ice during transporta
tion.
It is stated that tho crop of an apri
cot tree, in Somerset county, Ata.,
netted last season $102 over and
above the cost of marketing.
Chicago packers have handled
1,433,028 hogs the present season.
It is reported that a farmer, near
Emporia, while pulling his turnip
crop wiuh a Btump puller, a few days
since, came near losing hi3 life
breaking of a chain, wnicn let a
large turnip settfe back into the bed
suddenly. ,
Farmers are again reminded to
avoid the purchase of patent rights
until they really compreuena wuai
they are doing.
Scions for grafting may be cut at
any time previous to the starting of
the buds in the spring, and whan out
should be kept in a cool cellar,
where they will not dry up.
Two thousand dollars is a pretty
high price to pay for a ro ter.
That is what Mr. Davis, of Port.aaa.
has jast given to Ira Batch, for a
black Spanish cock considered tue
best game bird in the country.
Relieving Choked Cattle. A cor
respondent of the London (Ont)
Farmeri AdoocaU sajs he makes
the suffering animal jump over a
pair of bars, placed up as high as it
is possible for the animal to jump
when compelled by tne application
of a whip. He never fails to relieve
a case or choKing by tuis means
Occasionally he makes them leap
over the bars twice ; birt once, as a
rule, will be found to have the de
sired effect.
To clean a rusty plow use coal oil
and a rusty brick ; the oil should
be poured on the iron and rabiied
with the brick until bright. We
have sometimes used strong vinegar
with good effect In this, in
other matters, "an ounce of preven
tion is worth a pound of cure," and
a little grease rubbed on while tne
plow is still bright, will save both
time and trouble.
It is estimated that a pair of
halthy sparrows having a family to
bring up will consume over three
thousand caterpillars inside of onu
week.
Measuring Hay. To measure a
stack of hay, proceed as fellows:
If it is a ground stack, tapering from
the ground to a point, measure the
width half way from the ground to
the peak of the stack multiply this
width by itself, and divide it by 7354
this will give the average area of the
surface covered by the ataefc. i neu
multiply that by the hoight from the
ground to the point where the width
was measured. If these measure
ments are feet the sum found is the
cubic feet in the suck. If tlie hay
is orchard grass, timothy, millet or
hungarian, 500 feet will make a ton
or a cube eight feet each way. If
the stack is very solid, end was cut
when dead ripe, 350 feet will make a
ton. If it is clover or meadow grass
or redtop, 800 feet will be required
to make a ton, unless it is pressed
very hard.when some allowance must
be made. If the hay is mixed with
clover, about 700 feet, or a cube of
nine fect each way will make a ton.
The estimates are made from notes
of great many stacks and mows of
various kinds, and wilt give a fair
average,.

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