OCR Interpretation


The Xenia sentinel. (Xenia [Ohio]) 1863-186?, May 17, 1864, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038244/1864-05-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

t A
i.
s - i i "TVY r A
J? P M :
7
el. I.
XEiNTA, TUESDAY, MAY 17, 1864.
No. 23
1
IKrit STSAT TCIiCiT KOBJt! IT
ei' TV . O s o rn,
XriXCa AKD rP.OIPJETOE.
T?.v : IWO t CLLAE3 per yew, is AaVanc,
C. . : Et-r E,;::irj, e; jite tl Court
iIU, ;.;.B (treoi, Stn Ohio.
Hates of Advertising:
. . . "
. . . 1 li
" - meaik
Oee-fw.i eohiM Ant yar
. . ( CO
. 44 GO
to to
Advrtin;iit f A trAmiaatehATAsUr, mottle
for is ht)lsc.
Kotietl of Krr:j And Dellll, -.
Setitti in tb Ical E-cpArimtBt t etnts per
Sine. .'
t -' CarU, Sre V:lar per year.
'HOPES SIGNAL.
G. E. Paine, D. D. L.,
Dent-it. M od ioet'i ' ie id.in street,-over
hetton'i I-rujf Siore. C e hours from S A. M. to
1J M.. nod from I P. li. lu s P. St. Xtnia, Ohio.
M. .ATC. J. A. SltXTO.
Gaicti cc Sexton,
Att-eTi and CunM!lorf ml Law. Offee in
Dean's fluiiitinjt, Sorlh-weM ecmer of Sleii and
titmit Straeia, et of th- Court House, Pallia,
Ohio. .
o5 .
Geo. Y7cU, D. D. S., IS. D.
Dont'ut C ia Tborf's Eui'idinj, Alain street'
reofix K.! n' bun. ,,
tl k.ur. i t winter, 8 M A. V. till 4 1-J P. M.
jrP In r .e of rumors to in oontmrr. Dr. W.
it t beire ;h time. tedy And willing to relitro
ail pilroci of &!1 the ilU too esonth u heir to.
R. S. FINLEY, LI. D.,
teleerin Pb.icin. Offico ALd refidenee, tt
Min itreet,i.enia, Obio.
johi;
KYLE, D.,
reiideac
Plnicien rd Ss'jeon. Office aeI
No.' A wt Sa-onii iLn ct, Xf ni, Ohio.
Prefciiionil caIIi promptly ejuwered.
R. PARTINGTON,
A'lorneT at lw, and aotlioriied Acent for the Col-
Wtion cf PeMione,And a!! other kind of Military
th. I.nitfd Etatet. OtEce orrr
Jl Anirewi clothire itore, Main ttrect,
Xenia, 0.
Slrr.cs a LIcElroy,
Attornev. and Couoeel'.oti ot Law, Pexton, Ford
H e'wiil f ;re preoipt Attention to all our profei
ional kue.ae. AUo, to the payment of taxti, aad
tbe porchaeeac . raie of Keal Estate.
W. bare fur e'.e yaiuable tracte of lands m Urn
nd Adiatxinr cmtiM. ..-Oiil-.i
IS COURT EOUSS.
'- woll-1
C. Schilling,
K,ntfetnree of P.ag Carpet. All ordert proniplly
tttended to. and ail work, warranted to give ati!e
r.tk r. i for 5 arr-et race. Beoond erreet,
eppoetie Ware iiouea, Xenia, 0.
21-ly.
A. A1CHOLS.
J50. A. ALACK.
Nichols Black, :
ITbolerale aod reUil dealere in Farni.hing Goode,
and Reedy M:!e Clothing. Oppo11 tuurt
Hooee, Xcnia, Onie.
l-ly.
Chamberlain & Son,
Pealort in booU, ehoee, hiti, tap Ac 1?. 13
Main etreet, Xeiiia, Ouio. . ' -lJ-
; Y. H. Yilson, -
Vboleaale and retail dealer in Crrnrim Main
(treat, oppoiile the Ewiag Houm, Xenia. 0. 19-ly.
John Sane,
Cot And ehoe etore. Work of all kinds pnt op to
M..Hinr done in ehort nutiee. All worn
One door eaat or Bval'i (hp. Main
Atreet, Xenia, 0. 19 ly.
Isaac Worden,
lirery Subie. Eoreee, buyjpee and carriage, a
food eobplyAtwayi on band. Uinnioae line ran.
ir.g regnlrly to all traina. Hiilin j Houe ttable,
XeniA, o. ia iy.
Sellara Cook,
n.ru nmentere and itinera. Ready At All tine.
V A nrk in their lice, with di!latch, At to
mm. and iii irood Brio. Shop, weetSeoood itreet,
Xenia, 0..
farmers arid Citizens'
. 0 A L 0 0
Ia liTT lailllng, opp. Coart Eouss,
fr.SH-E.llOE OYS TES,
ALTTllS 05 EAITD, A3D EZEVE9 VP IH
JTEI LATZST A5I) BEST ETTLK.
kinds of
rx us morra seaso.t '
r:AL3 EnVT3f TTP AT ALL
ACCORDISa TO ORDER, ASD XHB
rrsi tee mai rrr ArroRus,
CAlVaV AHD SEE
I
.
will
A
Dr.
Ohie,
for
and
and
one
Ask
HEATS, Fin , FELTS, dc.
B. HI-VSEGEB.
k. EKosiira.
rpUB CSDESSIGXED, AATinj entered into
putaertbip ia the ooteinnnj bniinea, propoM to
carry oa
Daily Heat Harket,
' At the old ftAcd of Jobn Aalinhl,
JDJZTJEMDT.T STREET
ZXMA, OHIO.
We Art pre p red to furnith, At All boon, tie bett of
FRESH MEATS
AT LIVING- PEICE3,
The beet oaiJity of
, -BEEF,
: : pork,
VEAL,
Etc., Etc.
Alwiyi on AAud, cd for Ail At the lewort market
ftfurcA.
K. 2. Firmen bAviof FAT CATTLX to die'
poeo of, will AlwAye Csd a Ie for them by calling
oa u. "
HEuaEGEB E0S::ER.
Xenift. January 25, 1964,. . solOtf
EOGTS AXD SHOES
II. K. CONNOR,
zzZxztzrzT z.zl Dealer .
IS ALL KINDS OP
BOOTS & SHOES
West Main Street,
XENIA, OHIO,
Keep, eonitantly oa band a good inpply of
Leather and Findings
In fact, trery Article for tie manufacture of
BOOTS tSr . SHOES.
ALL YWHK WAHEAXTED.
BO
PAINTING. At.
A. JL ATJBRY,
HOUSE PAIHTEO.
I take this method of informing the public that
hart eauUiihed myself in XeniA, nd am pre
pared te . .
vvAvvyc, - . .
Tliosa Building New Houses,
And desiring to hate them painted ia
Ths Most Beautiful Style,
consult their owa interest by calling oa me at
S. B. Cretors, Baxt House,
Detroit Street, Xenia, Ohio
aoIOf
A. E. A CERT.'
CUES,
Certain Remedy.
ETRTB0DT Is being enred ef this iiitrening
disease by the use of
Strickland's Pile.Itemedy.
Iteaj what a sufferer says :
Mr. J. P Hatarde, lot Second street, Cincinnati,
says he has been a dreadful suffererwilh Pilee
a Ion time, anil has tried nearly ercrything.
could obtain no relief, lle-osed aboat one
fourth of a pot of Dr. Strickland's Pile Ointment,
it made a eemplcts care. He adrises every
who is suffering to try it.
gold by all Drorgrnts. 00 cents per pot. Manu
factured At Ko. ( -eit fourth street, Cinoiniai, 0.
for
Strickland.' Pile Remedj-
aeU-ly,
PAINTS, PAINTS.
OILS, Tamifhts, Syes, Puttyrete., of she hast
,nality and M ths lowest pViees slaT,. at J
fAIIOFS.
or
A
Its
a
by
of
sole
low,
W.
T.
try
P.
will
new
.
and
ge
:
songs. era
Beautiful Leaves, 30
I Remember the Hour when Sadlj, 25
I Lored tlut Dear Old Flag, 25
Kissing Through the Bars, 25
King Cotton, 5
Linger, not Darling, 30
Sfj Liztie an 5Ie, 25
My Country so Dear, 25
.Never Despond, , 25
Our Country and Flag, 60
Shall We Meet Again,. 25
They Pray for U. at Home, 25
The Nation Shall not Die, 25
Tread Lightly where the Hero Sleeps, 25
' INSTRUMENTAL.
Battle of New Orleans, r .75
Cainille Pulka," ' '50
Emma Waits, . ;. 50
General Sieel's March, 25
Lincoln Quickstep, 40
Monitor Grand March, . - 40
Nun's Prayer, ' ' 40
Trompettes du Regiment, Polka, 40
Wyoming Walts, - 25
For Aale by
F. Harris Sc. Co.,
Eooksellers and Husic Dealers
GIFT BOOKS!
WRITING DESKS ,
ALBUMS,
A FIXE ASSORTMENT AT
imRis & ccs,
Great American Tea Company.
THE GREAT
American Tea Company
61 VESSY STEEET, KEW TOEZ.-
ikce its organisation, has Abated a new era ia the
fcntory ot
I Belling TEAS in this Co on try.
ALL oar Teas are selected by a Professional Tea
taster, expreseiy and exclusively for us, and
wo nerer charge over Two Cents .02 cents per
ponnd above cost for original pack&ges.
We nave but One Prica to every one for each
ualttv, and that price is always marked on each
sample package at our etore in piain figures.
H e issue a Monthly Price Listof our Teas, which
ill be sent free torall who order it we advise
every Tea Seller to isea it. It comprises A full as
sortment selected for every locality in the States,
Provinces, bouth America and West Indies. In
this list each kind is divided into Four Classes or
qualities, namely: Cargo, High Cargo, Fine, Fin.
eit, that every one may nndcr8tand from descrip
tion and the prices annexed thai the Company are
determined, to undersell tlio whole tea trade.
We guarantee to sell all our Teas in original nack-
ges at not over Two Cents per pound above cost.
believing this to be attractive to the many who have
heretofore been paying Enormous Profits. '
Our business is largely done on orders, which we
always exeoete as well and promptly As though the
buyer came himself, giving true weights and taros,
And always guaranteeing everything : onr responsi
bility enabling as to do all we promise. vcry
dralcr can order his tens direct from the Company,
and imrtics doing business within Five Hundred
500J miles of New York, -can Return Tea bought
us it they are not cheaper than they can buy
elrewh'.'ro, and the purchaser is dissatisfied with
his hargniu, within fourteen fl 41 days, 'and have
money refunded to him. Those who are over
Five Hundred mites can have thirty 30 days, and
the same privileges extended to them.
Besides these advantages the Company will pay
AU Lxpcnscs, both ways, if the leas are returned.
Great American Tea Company,
IJ'POKTERS AND JOBBERS,
51 Vesey St., Jiew York.
noli-JiB
" The Atlantic lloathly,
Magazine of Literature, Art and Politic.
Is universally recognized as
THE BEST AMERICANMAG AZIXE !
Th Tbirteeittr Voier of the Atlantic
commences with the ntrnrber for January, 1864.
commencement affords the pulishers An
oocAsion to say that the Atlantic hes Attained
circulation And prosperity never equaled
Any AmerieAs magalme of its class.
The prosperity of the AtTaitie enables its
conductors to employ the most eminent talent
the country in its columns. All the best
known Writers in American literature, con
trfbWi'ng constantly to its pages,- give it the
right to be known as our National Mag
azine. Its staff still comprises ths following
names Among its leading contributors.
James Rufsell Lowell, Henry W. Longfel
Louis Agassis, Ralph Waldo merson,
Nathaniel Hawthorne, C. C. Hnxewell, T. W.
Higginson, Author "Margaret Howth," M-s.
Julia W. Howe, Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney, Oliver
Holmes, John O. Whittier, . P. Whipple,
Bnvard Taylor, Charles E. Norton, Georre S.
Hillard, Henry Giles, Walter Mitchell, Henry
Tuckerman, John Weiss, Mrs. H. B. Stowe,
liarrict Alartineau, Uhas. ReaUe, "Ths Couji-
Parson," Kose Terry, Harriet E. I'rescott,
Robert T. S. Lowell, J. T. Trowbridge, Josiah
Qnincy,. Professor A. D. White..,
THE ATLANTIC FOR. 1864
be in no wise inferior to the other vol
umes, but it will be the constant Aim of the
publishers to Advance the high standard al
ready established for the magazine. In further
ance of this airo, they have secured for their
volume several features of peculiar in
terest I Among these they are now able to
announce definitely that
Robert Browning will contribute several
new poems,
Nathaniel Hawthorne will print his new ro
mance in the columns of the Atlantic,
eommencincing,'probal)ly, in the' Febru
ary number.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow will publish
in the Atlantic seme Cantos of his Trans
lation of Dante's "Divina Conimedia."
Mrs. Harriet Deecher Stowe begins, in the
January number, a series of capital
sketches, to be continued through several
months, wiih the title of "House and
Home Papers, by Christopher Crowfield."
J. T. Trowbridge has written a new Novel,
which will be commenced ia the Atlantio
during the next volume.
Prof. Louis Agassii will continue those ad
mirable articles upon different branohes
of natural scienca which have constituted
so interesting and important a feature in
the last volumes of the Atlantic.
Terms. The Atlantic is for sale by all Hook
Periodical Dealers. Price 25 cents a
number. Subscriptions for the year $J, post-
paid.
Yearly subscriptions received, or single
numbers supplied by any dealer or by the
publmlirrs.
Specimen num'ierf sen gratis oa re
etijt of four cents for ttgs.-S a"
- - TICKNOB & FiSLSS,
JJ5 Wasting" Itreat, Boston.
in
in
T
I
in
in
and
able
that
I
and
ever
fore
aod
the
the
sed
had
of
that
I
when
and
up
die,
rebel
able
doing
rebel
reach
back
while
under
would
again,
in
very
party
miles
rebel
miles
whicu-
Campaign Sentinel.
Seven Months for 75 Cents.
We will. tend the Sikiinei to any person
in this etjjiaty from the first" of May until af
ter the Presidential election for To cenu.
This period of time will be one of great injer-
eat idu i;nixiruiuce uj ine people, iurinp t
this time the greatest battles of the war will
undoubtedly be fought, and we shall go
through a most exciting and important Pres
idential Campaign.
Every effort will be made to give the Sen--Tijcil
a larger circulation than was ever had
by any paper in the county, and no efforts will
be spared to make it worthy of such a circu
lation. Seventy-five cents will barely pay
the cost of the blank paper. The offer is
made for the purpose of putting our paper,
as nearly as possible, into the hands ef every
family in the county. There is.no better way
of promoting the Union cause, than by circu
lating good local papers. Remember the
time and the price, and also the fact-that the
Scxtikil is the largest paper in the county:
Seven Months for 75 Cents.
For the Sentinel.
The Experience, Sufferings and
Privations of Joseph G. Kitchen,
of Berkly County, W. Va., During
the years 1861, 1862, 1863 and
1864.
ilr. Joseph G. Kitchen, in & commu
nication addressed to Isaac K. Ilite, dat
ed March 31st 1S64, writes as follows:
"I am the son of Bethuel M. Kitchen
Esq., of the county of Berlly and
fitate of Ta., a member elect to the Con
gress of the United States from 'the 7th
Congressional District. "
T T tO?T Jl. J 1
xu June xooi x was unven irom uome,
and all the pleasures of kind and affect-
iooate associations, having been for several
weeks previous, hiding in the woods, and
otherwise concealing myself so as to keep
out oi guusuot; uisutnce ot tue v,OLSCripl
catchers ; but seeing no way of longer
deluding '.hem, my only safety was flight,
and accordingly I bid adieu to myt "old
old home," and kind fa!her,mothpr, broth
ers and sisters, and reached Maryland
where I was received as a refugee, and
T T x 'JI - . r l- L' t
wnerexstaiaaoounourweeKs.a. wmcu
ume uea. jratterson auvauceu into v a. as
far as Martinsburg, when I heartily re
turned to my home and friends, where I
was permitted to stay about three months
continual dread, not knowing what
moment I would be gobbled up by eith
era Guerrilla, a bushwhacker, or some
reb.'l fiend in human shape, at the ex
piration of which time, my situat'on be
came so critical on account of the near
approach of the rebels, that I had to fly
again to my "Maryland," where I staid
that quiet region two months, during
which time I was in continual receipt of
information of some of the depredations
committed by the rebels, that to roused
my indignation, that I could bear it no
longer, aud resolveJ to enter the Govern
ment army, and did to the utmost of my
ability to suppress the Rebellion, which
had assumed such a desperate character
that myself and maoy others who desired to
remaia neutral at our homes were coni
pelled to be hiding and dodging like
ightened rabits, in consequence of which
volunteered in the 1st Maryland Cavalry,
. which Regiment I served uutil the
Spring ot 1862, when my hitherto gt;od
health brjan to fail, owinr to the manner
which I had been exposed in my effort
toeludctheever'watchful eye of robel sharp
shoo ers. Sly health continued to de
cline until I was unfit lor military service
on the 5th of October, 1862, I re
ceived an hon Table discharge, and re
paired to my home, where I remained
at
at
to
in
the
my
his
until Gen. Banks returned up the
Shenandoah Valley, when my situation first
doubly dangcroA, and scarcely The
to walk, or ride, but I knew full well Mj
rest at home was out of the question.
had been in the Government service, any
rebel sympathizers all round were 01
ready to report, thereby" making it just
for me to stay and live, there- ters
weak and feeblo, I got to "Mary-
again where I stayed a few weeks fied
gradually improved in health. The trca
troops agai ng advanced, crossed
Potomac, and pursued the rebels down
Shenandoah Valley, and I alsorccros- toils
into Virginia again, but Noah's dove been
could find no rest; 1 resolved to enter the
service again, which I did as a scout, and
the pleasure of fleecing many rebels
some very fine horses which we were
constantly picking up, and capturing from
thieves and bushwhackers, and Guerrillas,
were prowling abouover the country,
contiuued to scout up to June .1863,
Gen. Milroy evacuated Winche ster
like a resistless hurricane moved on
to Pcnsylvania. . I was not in condit
ion to leave but to remain at home, was ta
therefore I sought refuge in the North
Mountain, watching thc movements of
citicens and soldiers, but n t being
to do anything against such odds, I
crossed to " my Maryland" again, but in
so hazarded my life in flanking thc
pickets, which was a perilous un
dertaking, but was fortunate enough to
Hancock, aud then went a few miles
into Pa. in order to rest after my
fatigucing jourucy ; and after resting a
I visited our forco at Clear Spring
command of Gen. Kelley. I learn
ed that tho forco under his command
in a few diys, advance into Va.
and read ly did I take my pnsilim
tho ranks ogiin as scout, and being
vigilant which my situation de
manded I should be, I discovered that a
of rebels were out rn a tlieiving
expedition, and wcie encamped about 16
out from the liver. I gave immed
iate information, and was furnished witli
Gibtont BataUio and 50 of tho Ringg dd
Cavalry, and immediately started for the
horde, and after marching abnutlO
we encountered a party of Iufmtry
we succeeded ia captuiing. We
ctiisued our ouch, kirnwhing pretty
and
Fl
ty
have
hood
where
dismal
shriil
I
suit
be
of
theirs.
tan
to
times
man
was
tion,
that
question
said,
drawer,
trouble,
she
lliblo
ing
how
about
Imvo
aud
Might
joined the army, and resumed my favor-
i . . t . . ...
much all the way, and when close to the
lurking place of the rebels, we gobbled
up a wagon train consisting of four
six Mule teams, and a considerable num
ber of rebels, two of whom we returned to
camp, elated with our spoils. I then re-
day and night fur so.ne time, I discovered
that the rebels we advancing in two
columns to surpriso and attack Gen. Kel-
One division had crossed over the North
Mountain and were advancing down Back.
Creek, while three divisions were advan
cing bvjwajr. of Iledgesville. I reported the
facts to General Kelly, who adopted meas
ures to frustrate the enemy's designs,
wLich he did without the loss of a man.
1 foil coijfiJtnt that Lai I and others
been less vigiluot the entire command of
Gen. Ktlley might have been captured.
The nrxt more critical situtitiou iu which
I patticipated was in the capture of tho
notorious Captain Blackford in which I
led the charge made by the Pennsylvania
cavalry in the neighborhood of Tomakawk
Springs. ' On the next day I visited the
houe of Atchabald MejersE?q , near the
same place, aud wEiie in conversation
with.Mr. Mayers, Mr. Fiiis aod Mr. De
haven, we received information of tire ap
proach of four rebel soldiers. We im
mediately stepped to the door, and then in
to the yard, each being pretty well armed,
and with "shoot" flashing from our eyes
hid the treasure of seeing f mr HpsTiorate
r
,ook- rebelcharactflr8 ri.,.B;n, Jirettlv
t,jward U3 dctermined) fiendub looks
(and revolfers in Land) whom we ha,tcd
Dreiented our nUto,. mi nronar,d t0 Cr.
(thej Uving made th(, saffle prer aratiot))
Dercmotorl- demanded tliem L, aurrender.
What an awfui second, or two of suspense.
Each of the comlaltants with their finger
to the trigger waiting the word ' fire" each
eyeing tho other,- as if saving, ''do you
mean want you say." In the midst of this
terrib.e suspense the stalwart rebels hand-
fid ovcr weaponf and Burrendere(1
themselves as prisoners to Mr. Meyers. Mr.
Fili? and myself. Mr. Dchaven having
mounted his horse and rode off during the
parley, thus three of us captured four as
desperate determined rebels as are to be
met with in their army, vis., a captain,
adjutant, lieutenant and corporal all of
whom we handed over to the authorities
Martinsburg.
My next narrow escape was in 1S64,
a time when my father and myself were
both at home. All seemed to be perfect
quiet, when about 9 o'clock at night we
were made sensible that wa were surroun
ded by rebels. To escape by going out of
the house was out of the question, as t he
rebels hal completely surrounded it. We
therefore took a position at the bead of
stair-way, and were not long in posi
tion armed with rev- lvers and determined
defend our lives to the -death, when the
relets approached the door, and soon forced
their way into the house, and demanded to
know where my fai her aud mysel: were;
answer to which the female portion of
family gave them to uuderstund that
father and mvscif were up stairs, aud
were prepared fur them, which brought
about a sharp altercation between thtir
leader and his men. Their leader ordered
men to ascend the stair.-wav; ' Ley
peremtorily refused aud requested their
lealer to set the example; during which
my father and myself were at our
posts, at the head of the htairs, with iur
uctermming to Km tnc
ma t!iat da,e,J ,0 c,lter ,he '"ay
became moment was one of intense interest,
father's house hitherto the abode t f
Peace anJ 1uiet h tli0 blood of
tuman being, was now upon the brink
S P1-" aier nouse; out
at this particular crisis one of my sis
impossible ascended a second story porch and
commenced blowing a horn, which so teri
land," thc Guerrillas that they beat a hasty re-
ona we were relieved trom our per
Federal ous situation.
I have given you a brief narrativeof my
and Bufferings, besides which, I have
robbed of my clothing, my money,
our horses, f'r no other reason thau
because we were lovers of the good old
g. I can find no place of rest or safe
in my na'ive county, and state, and
resolved to bid the home of my child
and boyish days adieu, and try my
fortune in the truly loyal state of Ohio,
rest to a weary head can be enjoved
without fear of being disturbed by tho
clinking of rebel sabret,ot thc
clicking of eocking revolvers.
hope you may live to see the good re
of all you labor, and buff ring and
findly escorted to your home aud friends
the Shenandoah valley.
Yours most respectfully,
t'-ngue.
of
do
to
of
iu
of
a
so
pass
that
rons
with
their
Joseph G. Kitchen.
Widows wear their weeds , smokers smoko
They are properly said to be lost whom Sa
finds.
Many ladies who think themselves unable
walk a mile, would gladly danoe three
that distance.
IIuw
school
flock
then
ing,
o n
Have You a Bible?
Some gentleman called upon an old wo
and inquired if she had a Bible. 8Iie
very angry ut being nsked snoli ftucs-
and replied," Do you think, gentlemen,
f am a heathen, that you nsk me such a
?" Then calling to a little girl, sho
"Run and fetch the Biblo out of the
that I may show it to tho gentle
men. " They desired she would not take the
but she insisted that they should ''see
was not a heathen. Accordingly the
was brought, nicely covered : oa open
jt, the our tvoinuti cxtMiiiiiK'il,
not
er,
he
unkind,
to
f
Well I
glud I niu- that yuu called and asked mo C 'tl
ed
the Bible IJiero are my spucUioU-y I I
been looking tortucm these three yens,
did ut kuow w tor eta- find luetn. "
b not be'callcl s heathen ?
School Report.
Edito Si.vtjsh:
Tha following observations and sugges
tions relative to schools and school matters,
accompanied the report of onr Township
Supeiintcndant of schools; and as the
Board to whom the report was made, judg
ed it might do some good by giving it
gre-ter publicity, they directed it to be
Eent to the Sentinel far publication:
"From the foregoing brief report, you
may learn that I visited ail the schouls
Bndcr your control, and injustice to the
several teachers I will remark, that each
one seemed to cordially and kindly receive
my visits, and I thought the schools
generally in a pretty prosperous condition,
and that they bad made considerable im
provement in some respects; and a general
advancement in others. I think however,
that there an several little matters that
the Board of EJucation ought to ccntinu
ally urge upon teachers' attention. I say
lit Jc matters, for they do seem small, and
if but little importance in tho minds of
learned teachers of the present day. Yet
they cannot bo omitted or disregarded with
out marring the beauty, the harmony and
the general usefulness of tho educational
structure we wish to establish over all the
land. Common observation teaches us that
if we wish to erect an edifice a house for
instance that may be permanently useful,
(and it may be beautitul also,; we must
lay the foundation deep and strong, and of
proper' material, to secure these results,
and then we may add to it the oruamental,
the beautiful, the grand, and count pretty
surely on its durability aud usefulness.
Yes deep in the earth ont of the reach of
common observation rests that sure foun
dation; without which, however magnifi
cently we may have built thereon; our la
bors must ere long prove abortive; our
great expenditure in Tain. Amongst these
simple little things that I think consti
tutes a part, at lea3t,of the foundation, for
practical usefulness in after life, as well to
me accompiisnescuoiar as tno more or
dinary one, I will name Orthography,
Rea lingand Writing,aud with these should
be taught a clear and distinct articulation
of each, and every constituent sound of
our language. Then should follow
knowledge of the points, or punctuations
in reading, the roman nu merals, the ab
breviations; and even what used to be cal
led in olden times grammar. These it-is
true, are to be found in the spelling book,
aud may be easily learned by a child eight
years of ago; yet ia these days of fast
teachers and precocious children, they are
pretty generally neglected in early life,
and very probably never learned at a later
period. I think there is now to much of
an inclination to pass too hastily from the
the rudimental and intrinsically useful, to
the more ornamental and advanced scien
ces. The chill is now taught the science
of language, or grammar, almost before
he can wrile his name, or tell the time of
day by the clock; he must leave the arith
metic and pass to algebra, before he can
calculate thj number of rqa-irc inches iu
his dad's barn floor; thus onward and up
ward he climbs, next into the higher math
ematies, then into the dead languages, and
often too, l efore he is master of his native
He spais amongst the suns and
planuets, and revels in the majestic grand
eur aud beauty a:id harmony that pervade
the great immensity of space; and yet
perhaps may be grossly ignorant of the
geography of his own native sphere. This
eourse I think is all wrong, yet I wish to
cast no censure upon the most accomplish
ed savant; if he have the inclination, and
the time and means, at command, he may
push his researches to the utmost limits
human comprehension and possibly be
may promote good by it; and equally pos
sible it may be that all thc benefit derived
may be the selfish satisfaction of knowing
that owing to propitious circumstances he
knows a little more than his neighbor.
not wish to be understood as being op
posed to a useful and applicable knowl
edge. But in my little observation of
men, and their acquirements I have come
the conclusion that there is a great deal
precious time wasted by many persons,
acquiring a useless and superabundant
education, that is not available cither tq
themselves or others. I think the great
Judge Hale of England, towards the close
his useful, and eventful life, expresssd
regret, that he had thus missDcnt
many precious momeuts. Butj we will
from this part of the subject to one
more particularly concerns as as pat
and directors of schools. I believe it
would be greatly bencfical if we could pre
vail on our teaehors 4o take more care
regard to the morale,, manners and
common gentility and civilty of their pu
pils outside of the school house, .during
recesses and noons, and also in their
to school, and returning therefrom.
harshly it grates upon the car, where
children are permitted to rush out of a
hou.-e ug noisy and indecorous as a
of sbeep from th-J shearing pen; and
set up their shouting and hollowing;
knocking of hat", jerking bonnets, throws
ingcach of cr in tho und, pulling, haul
teat ing clothes, and alf such like mU.
luct. Such demeanor ds not bespftik
for refined and enlightened com
or fr a liUral education; it te-
Eitiiilatos nioro nitb barbarism. This docs
bespeak much for the ere lit of a teach
however learned anl however skillful
nuy be in tho schoolroom in imparting
knowledge. Again how uncivil, tow
how impolito it is for them
salute the traveller on his way, with an
application ot a' xtone or clod' to the rear
I
are
or
anu
his vehiclu. As of:en T ,!,
, ... . "
luct as tins, just SO olteil I fcef inclin
to doubt the teacher s moral scnsihili
ties, or at le.ist his capacity f r salutary
ii'pliaa. Agaia bawjoly era"! i
f:
a. is
our
On
of
cano
of
We
the
the
no
are
cate
of
until
this
when
that
own
flung
to
dwnied
that
that
W
spend
havo
by
profit
po
to-day
blossom
older
and
f'ndoaVAl-
bio
act
cause
and
criticism
but
mike
is fur a company of rude school boys, to
pelt tho poor old goose, a passing pig, or
old brindlo as the quietly moves to her
graziog place. If these could speak, they
might tell many a hard story on the ur
chins of more than one school. Now I
consider that it is the teacher's indispen
sable duty to investigate ail these outside
matters; to watch over their morals, their
manners, their health, their clothing, their
books, and sec that all these are properly
cared for, rig -tly used, Dd not abused.
And if they either connot, or will not
stoop so - low, (I call it raise so high,)' as
to attend to all these matters, they are un
fitted for their vocation. Parents a;:d di
rectors have alsi many duiies to perform,
as well as the teacher. Amongst these
may be mentioned the important one of
visiting the schools, to cheer and encour
age both the teacher and the taught, at
least by our presence. Thus we may be
enablvd tojudgo whether tt.c teacher is
fitted in mincer, in temper, in judgement,
in knowledge; and finally in his whole de
meanor, to have the care 'of our children.
We should encourage every effort he
makes for their improvement; if needful,
we should make suggestions, (not selfish
narrow ones) to him privately; and may
even find it necessary to admonish him
kindly for a dereliction of duty; but the
children should never learn from us that we
consider him defcetie in any particu
lar; for they should have entire confidence
in him, if we wish them to receive the
full benefit of his instructions. But if
wa doknow of his obsolute unfitness, there
is a remedv; apply it. We should early
apprise tho teacher, of any peculiarty of'
mind or disposition, or of an uncommon
physical weakness attendant on a child,
for if left to him to find these out, and
treat correctly, it may tako some time,
and cost the pupil unjust restriction and
censure, greatly to the kind instructors
regret and our own displeasure. I think
there is a fault of which we are all more
or less guilty; and that is the too fre
quent practice of speaking disparaging
of the teacher in the presence of the
children, instead of hiving tho magna
nimity and discretion to tell him kindly
of his faults to his face. Iu conclusion
will quote tho following lines which
pretty aptly portray the general prac
tice :
" Old men and women senadaliie his name;
The children, listening, learn to do the
. same.
Placed on point, the object of B.ich sneer,
Ilia faults enlarge, his merits disappear.'
If mild, our la jy teacher loves bis ease, '
The boys at school doanything they please.
If rigid, he's A cold unfeeling wretch;
be
of
no
be
or
the
and
He drives the children stupid with a birclsfpto
My child with gentle mesas would mind
a breath;
But frowns And flogjings frighten hid to
death."
Davis Flras. Chairman,
Samuel McCunb, Clerk,
Of Board of Education, Yt'ayne Town
ship, Warreu County, Ohio.
and
is
and
pour
the
Gen. Seymour Taken Prisoner.
WASHINGTON, May 10.
Only about ninety men and five officers
left of the 4tu Vermont rrgiment.
Gen. Seymour, just from Florida, is apris-,
oner. His-brigade was outSjnked and
broken. No men fougiit Miorc gallantly
bravely, hut it se tus that t.e was unfor
unate with his troops-
voices
with
other
Experience.
Nearly all the accomplishments off,
- . . r rr. l. . . ... . I a
, ., , 1 ever
tnirtv: mav rje surnmeu nn in one i
word, experience. At the commence
of that period, we are in the con-
refino
tions,
with
his
in
iton of a youn sailor inst shipped;,
T ;f V.i, uas
iaio it i, u w jj xjitu v A;uuua
before us ; it "seems limitless as wc
the shore; odorous breezes 11
white sailes of palms and spices.
our charts there arc- no indication
hidden rocks ; there are no burri-
regions; we see no magazines
wind and lightning and thunder,
to overwhelm us in explosion.
play with the wave, we laugh in
sunlight, and . think not of wait
ing dangers about our pathway. But
clouds bide tho 6un ; they roll
fearfully up from the horizon, and'
canopy the waters. We forgot our
pleasures in ; the terror of .the pres
ent. As we enter upon the twenties we
havoho3ti of friends who would spare
effort to benefit us. So anxious
they, that wc have only to indi
the direction in which they may be
use, and they straightway rest not
our desire ii accomplished. All
exists in our imaginations. And
we are undeceived,-and it takes
years to effrct this, wo find
we must first give evidence of our
capacity before barred doors are
open for us, and we are besought
enter upon our inheritance of labor.
Yes,vea too- privilega of labor ia
us until we have demonstrated
the world needs just the work
we, better than any one else, can
accomplish. - '
e earn moooy. For what lo w
it? For experience. Wa will
experience of our own, modidrl
our wa nature, ia epito f the
catrettics of our elders tbat w will
by their experience. No. no,
grejsdsotber, grandfather; wo can
more take the results of your expe
rience than the young shoot you have
planted can appropriate the
and fruit which belong to the
tree. We will accent rrratefullv.
A
of
for
feel
over
Be
trivial
languor
Leach,
croaking
activity.
out-
in
in ton-eats.
his
stern
saystb.3
happy
precious
come
you
course
hut
idleness
rod as
tl.
swver
with
ta f sb,
waterspout
Wa
will
path
tho
happiness
r.lties,
rodin?
tho
is
heed your admonitions ; vie will
tf hm U-Vint I Jwl intr.-li-l nn.
men, noblo women ; but we shall I 8hoot
foolishly, ignorantly,- simpl vbe- j be" ,r
wo nro foolish and ignorant, I
in this way we shall become wiser. ; f
be ridiculed and ccn5Ui ed; j "r.
will lush ua unmercifully ; i
IV i
I A
every smart of tho wounds
ue wjsw Horaa Moaf-bly.
but
Prominent Literary People.
A CoRr.ESPoysrj.-T of the Sprlaj-f
field Republican gives the fsllowicg
pen and ink sketches of protricer.s
literary people: "Emerson look
like a musical farmer, meditative an J
quiet; Lopgfellow like a good-nature;
b?&f.-eater ; Holme J like rsady tar
laugh little body, wishing only to be
"as funny as he can;" Everett leeras
only the graceful gentleman, who haj
been handsome; Beecher, a ruddy
rollicking boy; Wliirtier, the most re
tiring of Quaker?. Ho cne cf these
gentlemen can te called lantlsoac,
unless we except Jkecher who might
be a deal handsomer. Mrs. Sigourney,
the grandmother of American- "fe
male" literature, in her prime, (If wa .
may believe her portrait,) was quita
handsome ; Katharine BeccLcr is
homely ; Mrs. Beecher Stowe is a
ordinary is" looks that she has boea
taken for Mrs. Sto we'a "Biddy ;" Mrs.
E. F. Ellet looks like a Washer-woman ;
Margaret Fuller was plain ; Charlotte
CusliihatV hus a face as -marked as
Daniel' Webster's and eui?e as strocz;
so has Elizabeth BlackwelL .Harriet
Hosmer looks like a man ; Mrs. Oake
Smith is considered srandsoruej Mrl
Ward Howe has Been a Isew York
belle ; Frances S. Osgood had a lovely,
womanly face; Amelia F.-TTeloy wit
almost beautiful; Sarah J. Ule, ir
her young days', nite prtttT unless
her picture fibs."-
sir ... .
The Pleasures of Home.
Self-Control and discipline mast t
learned at home, or license in after
life will surely follow." Let bora
the nursery of truth, of reSircmei't
simplicity and of t'aste.- Study - to
make it attractive to your children- by
every means in your power, and lose
opportunity for improving their
miml ana cultivating their . home af
fections. ' Let system and order, i
dustry and study, taste and refberaen,
cultivated at home, and cocfort
harmony and peace; will reign witliid
your dwelling, however bumble.- Do
your children love music, or drawing,
flowers, encc-urage their taste to tha"
utmost of your ability. Indeed, where
love of music pervade a family, .
is judiciously cultivated, it is an
important aid in the training cf chil
dren ; for the child wheae eoul ia
touched wiih melodyyieldi easily to tit"
voice of affection, and seldom requires
severity. More than this, the haiil
tones of the father's voice as it com
mands, and the cutting tones cf tS
mother as she forbids, become milder
and'more persuasive, if accustomed
join with their children in tLei
recreations, and thus both parents
children are mutually refined and
elevated. Let me add that I can not
conceive of any purer enjoyment than"
felt by the head of a family, as wife
chifdren gather about him, and
forth sweet voices ia songs sf
praise at thc morning sacrifice and
evening oblation. If. a father
money to spare, I do not doubt
he might make a good investment
a piano, a melodeon, or some other
musical instrument, to accompany the
oi Lis wile and children, provi
ded always tha"- practice on these in
struments be not allowed to interfer
the practice at the kneading
trough, the wash-board, or wiih any
duty that a true womun, be the '
'daughter, sister, wife or mother, ought '
understand. These duties and
pleasures are in no degree . in
compatible with each other, cr out cf
ecpmg with a farmer s home. W hat-
tends to develrtn th info t-
. . ' .. .
the taste and purify .tie afTec
may ana nttmg place ia every
the gems ef art,- and' "sMrronnd
hon?e with all that beautiful
cultivated nature.
, - , , u'"uu
a ueiierngui w aaonr n-i waK
The Pleasures of Home. Indolence and Industry.
little indolence, a brief vacuity .'
thought, may enervate the mind
the labor of a whole tay.- If you "
its poppy icfluencea spreading '
you, start up and shako yourseli.
intent about something, . however,
it may. seem and the insidious. .,
will soon pass away. John '
in one of his sketches, has well
illustrated the difference between
idleness and self-contented "
Two young men have gona
to spend their annual holiday
fishing. The rain begins to pour
One of them throwg ul
rod, but the other continues witi
determination. "Do corns hcoc,"
croaker. "Well, sayt tha
fellow, "I never dii seesuch a
disagreeable old ch&p : ytrj
out for a day's pleasure, an l .
are always for going loa;e. Cf
the raia was far from p'easact,
ho.isevr that a day cf enforce J
was gt ill worse, and chzz to lis
a protection, agaicsi tzzd iz 1
Ila kneT th Tain cf
words of tia visa tsaa WW1;.
thy hand fedcthto do, o -i
all thy mi sit ;" ho bid co?:a crs
ccd fin ha vfd,tbou:b .
ah oil! J bum cpca-Lis
should all act oa ths Vaca Triad- -pie,
and many of the cloaca cf li.V
bo dissipated; tL lioa ia
will be found to be only a jickasi ;
mind once set in motion will tad
in tho play of it ow fac-., .
and bo proof u.eninirt tit cor- .
cares of life. .No matter what
employment may be, so loug as it
innocent ; read, think, write, fish.
Paist form, go down m a diving
UP ,n ,a haioon '' d? . ny tbing
f,hoosc but above d things never
or7ou socn become a croa
Vt'eshall - - - , .,
iriman'ti 1iai
fn ttia 4t iU

xml | txt