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The Democratic advocate. [volume] (Westminster, Md.) 1865-1972, March 24, 1922, Image 7

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JheDemocraticAdvocate
WESTMINSTER. MD.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MAR. 24 1922
few crooks escape
Daily reports of murders, bank rob
beries, train hold-ups, swindles, prison
breaks, and so on through the cate
gory of crimes, big and little, some
times lead one to wonder whether
most criminals escape punishment or
are caught and made to pay the pen
alty exacted by law. As a matter of
fact relatively few escape. Fortunate
ly for society fate always stacks the
cards against the crook and the per
centage is almost unbearable, says
San Francisco Chronicle. No matter
how clever the criminal may be, soon
er or later he overlooks some essen
tial detail and right there is where a
joker has been slipped into the deck.
Officers of the law may make a hun
dred mistakes and still win. The crook
need make but one mistake to lose.
The criminal inevitably plays a los
ing game. The odds against his suc
cess are prohibitive. Even if all ques
tion of right and wrong could be
Ewept. aside it still would pay a thous
and times over to go straight.
VSE OF NEWSPAPERS.
A good band at figures has figured
it out that :!0.000,000 newspapers are
eoUI in the I’nited States every day.
This is five to every sixteen people.
A century ago it required months for
one part of the world to learn what
the other half had been doing. The
one half was not much interested in
what the other half was doing or had
done, because there was little or no
relation between them and their af
fairs. Today the world is a small unit,
ay the Illinois State Journal. One
man’s affairs are the affairs of many
other men. What affects one commun
ity will affect many others. Hence
every citizen should be able to read
and to understand what he reads.
Furthermore, he should be a daily
reader of at least one reliable news
paper that prints the news impartial
ly. whatever may be its opinion on
public questions or on the news that,
comes into its office. The greatest
menace to newspaperdom today is the
newspaper that colors the news or dis
torts.! group of facts so as to give aid
and support to its personal or politi
cal friends or its own particular
views as to what should be and what
should not be. Editorial opinion is one
thing. The uncolored, unbiased facts
which are news are another.
CiYPsY PRINCESS OVERBOARD (T
--I’llf TRIUMPHS IN TROPICS
New York, Feb. 21.—’Twas a story
of life in the tropics, romance under
the southern moon, that the good ship
Caxias brought into port today.
The heroine was lyena, a Gypsy
princess: the hero, a young Barbadian
planter, with the spirit of d’Artagnan;
the “villain,” King Alexander of the
Gypsies who led his band aboard the
('arias at Barbados for a journey to
Mexico. Here is the plot:
Infatuated with the planter, lyena
is taken aboard the ship by force and
confined to a stateroom by her fath
er. Several hours pass, with the ship
due to sail at midnight. Tolls 11
o'clock.
Alongside the vessel draws a row
boat. with the lover, to kidnap his
hride. The father discovers him and he
is driven away.
Interval of halt an hour during which
the princess induces the stewardess
to free her. and climbs down a rope
ladder swinging over the stern. A gen
"e splash and the lover again is along
side with his boat. Then the sound of
oats, moving shoreward.
The king discovers his daughter’s
fijght and threatens the captain with
dhe things if he does not pursue. It
I s sailing time, and the captain re
fuses
At Havana the king learns through
•he authorities that his daughter has
w ert. He smiles as the curtain falls on
a happy ending.
ROCKY RIDGE
Mr. Ira J. Miller, of Baltimore.
s rcnt Sunday with his family at this
Place.
•Mrs. John Clem and children of
near Motter’s, spent Sunday with her
■■am, Mr. Charles E. Clem and wife.
Mr. Clarence C. Pittenger, of Loy’s,
an *l Mr. Luther Fox, of near Creagers
•°"'n snent Sunday * with Mr. and
Mrs. Harvey M. Pittenger and fam
ily, of Rocky Ridge.
A lot of movings tor next week.
Mr. Charles E. Clem, to near Thur
mont; Mrs. M. A. Dorsey to Motter’s
and M. G. Reilholty to Mrs. M. A.
Dorsey’s house.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence HiVty and
children and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Smith
and child, all of Gettysburg, Pa.,
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Hor
ace A. Smith.
Since Secretary Mellon will perm”
•he payment of income taxes in Vlc
j" r .v notes, all that remains now is
o gel the Victory note?. —Pittsburgh
Gazette-Times.
] DID NOT SUPPORT PETITION.
1
w A petition circulated that, from the
wording, would appear to have had
the endorsement and support of the
- American Legion was referred to the
commander of the local post who ans
jwered as follows:
Mrs. D. F. Shipley,
■County Sec’y W. C. T. U.,
j Carroll County.
My. dear Mrs. Shipley:
In reply to your letter of the 15th
instant wherein you ask "If the
American Legion authorized, and sup
ported the wet petition that is being
circulated.”
, The petition states “We, the under
signed citizens of Carrol! County, Vet- j
erans of the World War, and mem-'
bers of the American Legion.”
The reference to members of the I
American Legion is an ambiguous
one. and in my opinion, one that was ,
used to mislead the citizens of Car- !
roll County, and the public at large.
If that was not the case, then al-1
most every organization, club, socie- j
ty, etc., would have been mentioned I
;in the same manner, for in looking |
over the list, I find the proportion of |
legion members names to be very |
small.
The American Legion charter is an:
act of Congress, protected by law i
against the illegal use of its name, j
uniform, and insigina. Any petition ‘
endorsed and authorized by Carroll
Post, American Legion, or the Nation
al Headquarters will be published in
our papers, over the signatures of the
Post Commander and Adjutant.
Carroll Post No. 31, American Le- i
gion did not authorize, and does not
support the petition referred to.
Very truly yours,
Carroll Post No. 31, American Legion.
C. C. BEACH,
Post Commander.
Leeds K. Billingslea,
Adjutant.
A QUILTING PARTY
A very pleasant day was spent at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. George
Grimes, of Mt. Airy, when she had a
quilting party and invited some
friends to join her. The guests began
to arrive at an early hour and be
gan ns busy as bees with their need
les. About 12 o’clock they were in
vited to dinner where they all did jus
tice. They again returned to their
work but found it quite a task, but
soon finished the quilt and at 3
o'clock they had it all hemmed and
ready for use. About 4 o’clock they
were invited to supper when the tab
le was laden with lots of appetizing
things. Among those present were |
Mrs. William Gosnell, lively and
gay, was the first to start on the
quilt that day;
Mrs. Clarence Baker also came to I
sew, but they all laughed and said j
she was very slow;
Mrs. George Grimes, a quilter true,,
hut ]jad to laugh a time or two;
Mrs. Chas. Wright marked off the j
quilt you know, so all of our stitches
would be in a straight row;
But her own stitches if you should |
just glan.ee, would be so zigzag it
would make your eyes dance;
Mrs. Robert Penn, among us too,
quilted until we were all through;
Another among us 'was Mrs. ’ JCSse f
Hood were too small to quilt, but they ;
could:
Mrs. Basil Gosnell, was the Queen,
when she grew tired of quilting,
would play the organ and sing:
Miss Eleanor Ey, another guest, but
did not quilt as much as the rest;
Miss Anna Hood was also a guest,
but did not quilt like the rest;
She enjoyed her supper. I’ll not say
why,
Just ask a certain young man who
passed bv;
Miss Katheline Penn and Margaret
Hood wre too small to quilt, byt they
were very good.
Mr. Charles Wright kept us all
grinning, it was quite a hard task to
keep a wav from the women;
Mr. George Grimes thought the
quilting a grand success, so they will
have another don’t you guess;
Though he was puzzled and wonder
ed and thought in vain.
How a quilt could be made in a
three piece frame;
Master Ralph and Raymond Grimes ;
came from school, after learning the
golden rule.
Master Orville Wright came last,
after the quitters had finished their
task.
IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH,
.MANCHESTER.
Rev. C. G. Leatherman, pastor. On .
.Tuesday, March 14, Mr. John Miller, j
died at the home of his daughter. Mrs.
Clayton Black, at Manchester, aged j
66 years. 4 months and 9 days. There
were five brothers and three sisters, |
two sons and three daughters, who
survive. Interment in St. Peter’s cem
etery, Alesia. The services were con- j
ducted bv Rev. C. G. Leatherman.
Mr. Henry Sterner died at his horn"
near Melrose, March 15, aged 821
years, 11 months and 16 days. He is ;
survived by four sons, three daugh- j
ters. 15 grandchildren and 34 great- i
grandchildren. Interment in Munches- i
ter cemetery, March IS. The services j
w-ere conducted by Rev. C. G. Leath
erman.
The funeral services of Mrs. Jere
miah Stansbury was held Tuesday,
March 21. at 2 j.. m. Mrs. Stansbury,
' who has been ill for a few weeks j
1 died at the home of her daugh- j
ter. Mrs. Mattie Krandall, near Sny
dersburg. Services were conducted by
her pastor. Rev. C. G. Leatherman.
A quiet wedding took place at the
• Lutheran parsonage. March 18, at
i 5.30, when Chester M. Cullisbn. Jr., of
Hampstead, and Treva A. Reed, <>l
Poresten. were united in marriage oy
the bride’s pastor, Rev. C. G. Ljai'i
■ erman. The attendants were Mr. El
mer Cullison, brother of the groom
5 and Miss Sadie Cox. Miss Mary C.
Reed, sister of the bride, and Mr. Wal
ler Boose. The newly-weds will re
-1 side mar Hampstead.
1 Class in catechise each Saturday
- 1.30 p. m.
March 26. Bible class. Ail are wel
come. Rcaulai services 19.30 and 7.30
The morning study, “Jesus Feeds the
” Five Thousand." Evening. "Children
>- of Promise.” Mid-week services every
s Wednesday 7.30 p. m. during Lent,
b The subject for the 29th wiii l.<> the
| Lord’s Prayer. . . _.
THE DEMOCRATIC! ADVOCATE. MARCH 24,1922
MILLERS
s On Saturday evening, March 18, a
1 surprise party was given in honor of
3 ,Miss Emma Bollinger’s twenty-sec
s iond birthday, at the home of her par
- ents, Mr. and Mrs. Emory Bollinger,
on Sweet Air Hill.
After indulging in all sorts of
games and enjoyed, both vocal and in
strumental music, the guests were in
vited to a table laden with refresh
ments. The hostess received many
‘ beautiful and useful gifts. At a late
(hour the guests departed after wisb
-1 ing Emma many more happy birtli
j days. Those present were Messrs, and |
Mesdames Emory Bollinger, Harry:
J Brilhart. Clinton Bollinger, Preston;
| Bollinger, Lloyd Miller, Clarence 80l- |
linger, Ernest Lippy, Mrs. Chas. Mil-I
| ler, George Hoover, Nora Shorb, j
\ George Kerchner, Misses Emma 801-1
linger, Eva Gilbert, Nellie Willison, j
! Minnie Zepp, Eva, and Myrl Miller, j
! Myrl Rinehart, Myrtle Cape, Mamie |
I and Erma Wynand, Virginia and Al-1
ma Shipley, Francis Miller, Elsie Mer
jkle, Ida Herbst. Anna and Seranda I
: Redding. Phyllis Bollinger, Marie!
j Bollinger, Messrs. Charles Leese, Mi
| cheal Leister, Harry Martin, George 1
Reding. Austin Brilhart, Milvin Mil-1
: ler. Charles Shorb, Murray and Milton i
i Miller. Jesse Bollinger, Harry Graf.!
j and Harry Bollinger.
I We are glad to note Mr. John Graf i
: and Mrs. Wm. Graf, who were confin- j
ed to a Baltimore hospital, have re
turned to their homes and are improv
ing rapidly at this writing.
I Mr. and Mrs. Frank Reed, of Sny- j
j dersburg, spent Sunday last visiting:
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Bollinger.
S Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brilhart and j
son. Austin and Mrs. Leah Barbar
spent last Sunday visiting the latter’s
I A BANKING INSTITUTION |
I FOR THE PEOPLE |
1 I
Visitors visiting this Institution have often remarked as to
the number of accounts we have In our Saving Department.
We take this as evidence that this Institution is popular (s£,
® with the people. vy.
0(t) X
u ♦ * <|
1 We pay 4 p er cent, on Saving Accounts. p
and Interest Is compounded semi-annually. Qjt
J We Pay 4 Per Cent, on Certificates of Deposit. <S
ON ACTIVE OB CHECKING ACCOUNTS WE PAT S PE*
£*) CENT. ON DAILY BALANCES ON SUMS OVEE AND X
INTEREST VS CREDITED EVERY MONTH. X
Will be glad to have you call and discuss the question of sav- ri
!f Ing with you and will appreciate your account, whether large or V
small. X
WESTMINSTER DEPOSIT * TRUST COMPANY |
Capital, |1M)00.Ml *rplus & Undivided Profits, IS,OM, @
SSSSI ®S3S3S3O3®®S®
p The R. I. Rollings Companies I
§ Combined Capital $7,000,000 v
| *7 % AND SAFETY |
to " to
w ASK A DOLLINOSSTOCKHOLDER g
M ffi
| Martin D. Hess J. Ralph Bonsack J. S. Gushey |
M 6 Times Bldg., Westminster, Md.
M July 15-tf Phone 207. S 3
w m
t INTENSE HEAT but LITTLE WASTE
Our Coal
Use It and realize what coal satis
faction really means. It requires min
imum attention and gives maximum
results. It is the very acme of heat
production.
LUMBER COAL <a SUPPLY CO.
Westminster, Maryland.
I RAY STORAGE BATTERY. |
g SB
2 Year Unconditional Guarantee. ffij
}S A New Battery Free should one Fail. No Adjustments,
M No Arguments. tIQ
CH The Lavier Formula Plates assure a battery Instantly M
M ready with ample Power—-the only battery that can be (■§]
S 3 Unconditionally Guaranteed. S 3
S 3 Be Fair to yourself. Come In and learn about the Ray TO
TO Battery. gs
KLEE & HOFF, Distributors,
ITO Westminster, Phone 286 Maryland. to
TO :> :: JOI
' MSjBjRBPPHSiS^
. •
brother, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Miller
and family, of Alesia.
• A number of our women folks are
f busy quilting.
Misses Virginia and Alma Shipley
-of near Westminster, spent several
. days the past week visiting Mr. and
Mrs. Emory Bollinger and family.
[ Mrs. Lloyd Miller and son Melvin
. spent last Thursday visiting relatives
. at Baltimore. _
WOULD HAVE CANAL MADE
SPEEDWAY FOR AUTOISTS
Cumberland, March 13.—Local mo
| torists are discussing the feasibility
! of filling the bed ■of the Chesapeake
| and Ohio Canal for a roadway, now
1 that it is thought it is to be abandon
led as a waterway within the next few
I years.
j It is thought it may not he operat
; ed this vear, as it is a losing proposi
| tion and the prospects are not very
I bright with the impending coal strike
| and the already heavy loss of coal
contracts by Georges Greek operators j
It is contended that it the canal
I bed be filled from bank to bank it
■ would become the finest law-grade
! highway, in America, extending from ;
I Cumberland to Washington. Such a
i road would be the autoist’s delight,
I winding along the valley of the Poto-!
I mac and eliminating steep grades am ■
\ hills, of the National Highway be- j
I tween Cumberland and Hancock.
It would be the key to the South i
: also, it is said, for tourist traffic ;
from the West, which would be divert
' ed at Harper’s Ferry.
I How would Alcohollywood do tor a i
, name for the Los Angeles movie su
burb?—Philadelphia Evening Public-
Ledger.
1 Seven Inches Above iW Pavement.
, Even the Salvation Army lassies. I
who should not only be helpful to hu
. manity. but show a right example.
I are trying to imitate the decrees of i
I fashion by wearing short skirts. The j
leaders of the Salvation Army, real- j
izing that they have workers in 77 I
countries of the world, have passed I
an order that the skirts of the Salva- i
tion Army girls must not be more
than seven inches oft the pavement, j
It is said this new order will not af- j
feet China and Japan, as the majority
of women in these two countries wear |
trousers. 1
C.C. BEACH I
Salesman and Demonstrator
HUPMOBILE AND DODGE CARS
PALACE GARAGE, PHONE 211 |
Salesman and Demonstrator of j
WHITE Trucks
Phone 16. House Phone 70-J I
Jan.l3-tt j
-—— l
Sullivan
!
Farm Agency
Farms, Town Properties,
Building Lots.
• '
MILTON A. SULLIVAN
AGENT
51 W. Main Street
Wetminter, - Maryland.
Bell Phone 218
DR. J. FRED. WAESCHE
DENTIST
Arcad Building, SYKESVILLE, MD
DR. E. C. ROYER
Chiropractor
Tuesdays and Saturdays
Hours: 10-12 a. m. 1-4 p. m. ;
1 17 Park Ave. Westminster, Md I
iC.& P. Phone 108-M. sept 10 |
DK. GEO. E. BAUGHMAN
SURGEON DENTIST
I ALL. BRANCHES OP MECHANICAL DEN ,
TISTRY A SPECIALTY.
CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK.
PAINLESS EXTRACTING.
GOLD AND ENAMEL FILLINGS.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED.
Office 114 E. Main St., Opposite Union
National Bank,
3iv WESTMINSTER. MD
FOR SALE
One Reo-G 1921 Touring Cars, me
;
I chanically perfect, and in first class
I
i condition. Apply to
II
'
i E. M. D. BOYD
i 1 i
{ nov 4. Westminster, Md.
i Fine Dairy Farm For Sale.
Daary Farm of
fill ACRES,
near Linwootl, on
SATURDAY, MARCH IS, 1922,
j at 10 o'clock, a. in.
I Will offer first 44 acres, in heart
I 1 of ."Priestland Valley with public roads
. on two sides.
Will then offer it as a whole the 90
I acres. Possession given April Ist, i 922..
! Ka.sy terms if desired.
E. It. GARNER.
m.ir3-3t '
COMMUNITY SALE'
Aprils, 1922, at 12 o’clock, at
Pleasant Valley Canning Factory,
wtJI sell anything delivered by any
\oire. Live Stock must be delivered
by 11 o’clock on day of sale. All
other goods can be delivered at
ai.\y time before the sale.
T. A. MARTIN,
Manager and Auctioneer.
m hr 10 4t p
SWP, LOOK, LISTEN, then go
i to the Automobile Oarage of
JOHN E. ECKENRODE
at Ithe old established Buggy and Paint
Shop, George and Liberty streets,
W istminster, where you can get flrst
clfiss work. I have been in the busi
j ness for thirty-five years and claim to
| know when a job is up to standard. 1
Shave a painter that worked for Me-j
Renell’s Bros, of Washington, D C.,and
| can give you first-class work. I paint
automobiles and put on new tops and I
Ido repairing of all kind. lam still in j
1 'he BUGGY BUSINESS. Glad to havtj
you call and look my work over.
George and Liberty Streets,
WESTMINSTER, Ml).
Phone IBM.
] . ■
DON’T LEAVE WESTMINSTER
WITHOUT LOOKING NASH OVER.
i ■ THOUNFELTIIH BROS.
| ODD LOTS |
A Odds and ends are bound to accumulate and it is con* Sj
g sidered good merchandising to get rid of them quickly gM
even if we do lose, HENCE THE ODD LOT SALE.
w 10 Dozen Arrow Brand Dress Shirts, Worth ®
® $2.00, $2.50, Now $1.39. ®
® A Lot of $2.00 and $2.50 Hats, Now 1.50. M
A Lot of Good Style Knitted Ties, Worth SJ
§ 75c to 1.25, Now 39c. B
H A Lot of Men's and Boys Caps 25c gj
® m
rn Look over our Center Counter for Real Bargains in
S Shoes. rjfl
® The Special Sale on OVERCOATS, - |
ERS, and WINTER GOODS is continued. gj
M Look over our new line of MADE to measure H
s so/rmes.
1 S. W. BOND, I
£ Westminster, - - Maryland. £<
2 XySOOOOOOCV-XXVOOOOOOOOCOQOOfXI-X?-OOC, > O<~K'>OGOOOOOOOOOOOOO<J
I I
| Be Persistent In Your Savings II §
J M k He who persistently saves a small a
5 vl amount from a small income, or dur- Mil S
O ing periods of hard times or adver- ml ft
Q BLiJm sity, will be well intrenched in the ft
0 saving habit, when the income grows wMM ft
5 larger. i I 5
| Then Financial Success Is Assured I j 8
I'iTHE. WESTMINSTER]
| | - SAYINGS BANK I §
WESTMINSTER MARYLAND yj |
NOCKXXXXXSCXXXXXJOOOOOOCOOOO
®®®®®®®®@®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®@®®®®®®®®®®®@®®®®®®®®®®®®®®
8 I
1 for sale.
I - s
(•) Single Comb White Leghorn *
S Hatching Eggs from 1 and 2 JMM
® year old Hens, $6.00 per hun-
Single Comb Ancona Hatch-
Red Hatching Eggs SI.OO per |
• These Eggs are from Blue . $
f) Ribbon Winners at the Big K&
Shows. 36 Ribbons Won Last
' £ Season. - p
EASTVIEW POULTRY FARM |
• ray C. HOOK, Prop., R. D. 5, Westminster, Md. 3m |
ii I
F. A. Sharrer & Son
J. FRANCIS REESE, Prop.
Funeral Directors g Embalmers
Courtesy Efficiency
Service
DAY AND NIGHT PHONES 117
Automobile Equipment
"SEHSEHSHSSMSHSSISSSSSHSSIHHH
I DEAD ANIMALS I
g PROMPTLY REMOVED. ®
M Ai sa Pa, Special Cash Price For Old Or Disabled Horses Delivered To Our Plant.
M '■ ■■ tSd
W] “ALWAYS ON THE JOB” M
i CALL LEIDY |
rgs Phone 259 apr 8-tf Westminster, Md. g!
7

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