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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, January 06, 1914, Image 1

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Hope Fire Company Tonight Celebrates the Hundredth Anniversary of Founding
HARRISBURG dfSjjfUl TELEGRAPH <
LXXXIII — No. 5
Hope Fire Company, Second Oldest in the City, Will Obs ?rve Hundredth
Anniversary This Evening With Big Banquet at Chestnut Street Auditorium
Organization Formed Cen
tury Ago in Little Frame
Shanty at Front and Mar
ket Streets; Prominent
Men of Ten Decades Ran
With the Apparatus
MANY A BIG FIRE
FOUGHT BY MEMBERS
History Shows the Volun
teers Won Hundreds of
Prizes For Good Work;
350 Will Sit Down Tonight
to Feast Held in Honor of
"Auld Lang Syne"
One hundred years ago to-day when
Harrisburg was a little more than a
village and merely covered a territory.!
between Mulberry and North streets, i
a body of men gathered In a one-story
frame building at Front and Market
streets and organized the "I livers"
Fire Company, No. 2.
From this organization sprung what
is now the Hope Steam Fire l£ngine
Company No. 2, an organization not
only prominent because of its fire
fighting membership, but prominent
throughout Pennsylvania and in many
cities in other Slates. In commemo
ration of this 100 th anniversary mem
bers of the Hope company number
ing 250 and at leastt fifty invited
guests will banquet at Chestnut street
auditorium to-night.
Outside of the fact that the sec
ond company to organize in Harris
burg started January fi. 1814, and
developed rapidly into a real lire com
pany until in the no's, very little is
known about its history.
In 1834 when there was no appro
priation forthcoming, the members
refused to keep the records und
gave. Utile attention to the organiza
iniu: Tii-ti vantf 'v!»t on a* -ho
thought the organization shoftld re
main intact and a reorganization was
affected which has continued until the
present time.
Tim "Hivers" Start
The "Hivers," the original com
pany, was well named as its members
were as busy as bees at all times, and
it was not long until a hand engine
occupied the lower floor of the build
ing which stood near the present toll
house of the Market street bridge.
There were but two companies in Har
risburg at that time, tiie Friendship
having been organized in 1803.
With the advance of years the!
"Hivers" grew, but as it often the]
case with volunteer fire companies
during their career, there were in
ternal troubles and early in the 50's |
came a demand for fire protection j
in the vicinity of Front and North !
streets, where the water station is
now located. The "Hivers" decided
to move and reorganze and during
January, 1852, the Hope Fire Com
pany No. 2 was organized. Troubles
did not cease and in later years there :
was much difficulty in keeping up the
ranks.
Records were lost, in fact it is no I
secret that a number of books that
would give a more precise history ofi
the Hope Fire Company after a fail-!
ure <o secure, financial aid from the
borough nfflicals were actually thrown
away. Tli<> members, however, held
together and finally when the proper
support was forthcoming there was
again a reorganization and this time
the company took up an abode In
Second street where it Is now located
in a house which was reconstructed
[Continued on Pago 3] i
fr
Late News Bulletins
75 MEN REPORTED SWEPT TO DEATH
Winning. Man., .lan, 6.—Dashed to death on the rocks In tlic
Eraser river. British Columbia, or swept to tlielr doom hy the swift
current, was the fate of 75 laborers employed by the (irand Trunk Pa
<*ific Railroad, according to Angele Pugliese. one of the twenty-five who
managed to escape to-day when the flatboat in which they were Iwing
transported across the river was wrecked on a rock.
COMPETITION TO BE RESTORED
Washington. Jan. «.—After a two-hour conference to-day between
Attorney General Mcßeynolds and Chairman Howard Elliott, of the
New Haven and Hartford Railroad, it was understood that the New
Haven will agree to a reorganization to restore competition in transpor
tation throughout New England.
TEAR UP MEADOW LANE TRACKS
First steps In the Improvement in connection with the new Penn
sylvania freight ts talon imporvemcnt were begun to-day when the track
force of the Harrisburg Railways Company began to tear up the tracks
In Meadow l»ne between Second and Third streets.
WILSON AN HONORARY FIREMAN
Gulfport, Miss., Jan. 6.—Because he acted as a fire chief and helped
savo the home of Jndgo J. H. Neville from flames. President Wilson was
Invited to become an honorary member of the GvUport Fire Department
and to-day accepted. The President sent a letter to Fire Chief Camp
bell fc.mally accepting membership.
Closing Minutes in Wall Street
New York. Jan 6.—The market closed strong. Higliest quotations
were recorded Tor Union Pacific. Southern Pacific. Reading and numer
ous specialties in the final hour, when the activity of the early session
was resumed on an increasing scale of operatiom
LEADERS, PAST AND PRESENT, OF TMJHOPE FIRE COMPANY WHICH CELEBRATES ITS HUNDREDTH BIRTHDAY THIS EVENING
*
WILUAM'HEPNER HOPE • MOUSE
VICE - PWE3IDHWT j| pf?E3iDENT'INTHESIXTies* I==^^-== | °(V IN THE SEVENTIES
Labor Disturbances
Will Be Investigated
By Associated Press
Washington, .Tan. 6. Nationwide
Investigation of labor disturbances is
to be Immediately undertaken by the
Federal Commission on Industrial Re
lations, it was announced here to-day.
Decision to do so was reached fol
lowing a five days' executive session.
HARRISBURG, PA., TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 6, 1914. '
DEMOCRATS INGOT
OVER ELECTION OF
SOCIALIST IS CLERK
McCormick's Slate Would Have
Gone on Rocks Had Manning
Seized Opportunity Offered
Democrats are angrier than ever to
day over the election of a Socialist to
the clerkship of the county poor board
by Poor Directors Boyer and Walters
jat the dictation of Boss McCormick.
i When they came, into control of the
| office Democratic workers naturally
supposed that members of the party
I would be remembered when the good
ijobs were passed around and are na
turally disgruntled over the forcing of
a Socialist down the throats of the
directors for the sole reason that the
: man who has set himself up as the
! local party dictator wants a personal
>! representative in the department.
The outburst of President Jones, of
the Central Democratic Club, is only
the first of many protests that are be
] ing heard all over the city.
Democrats not in harmony with the
[Continued oil Page "1
NEGROES ATTACK LIQI'OR MAN*
Two negroes, whose identity has not
| been learned, last night attacked Fred
erick U Koenig, wholesale liquor
i dealer, In his office in Seventh street.
! Evidently Intent on rltlng the cash
register, the colored men hit Koenig
I over the head with a whisky bottle.
; Koenig's cries for help frightened off
! the two men and they obtained noth
| ing.
MAY PURCHASE BATTLEFIELD
Washington, D. t\, Jan. 6.—Plana
! for the government to buy the Bull
! Run battlefield and make of It a na
tional park are endorsed in a report
; by a board of army officers to Secre
tary Garrison. Belter care for the
i! monuments now Ihere is recorn
j mended.
CHRPENTER STILL
BOSS WHEN TBI
STATE OPENS TODIV
Six Gub Circuit Is Likely to Be
Continued With Atlantic
City Out
"When the annual meeting of the
Trl-State League opened at 3 o'clock
this afternoon at Hotel Columbus
President Charles F. Carpenter was
still boss and it was a toss-up as to
who would be the winner when the
meeting adjourned to-night.
A conservative view indicates the
continuation of a six-club circuit with
President Carpenter in charge tem
porarily. Atlantic City is to be counted
out, and either Reading or Lancaster
will succeed the "Buds.'" President
Carpenter positively refused to resign
after a three-hour conference with
the committee representing the club
owners last night.
In conference this afternoon the
club owners receded from their eight
club proposition, but Insisted upon
having a new leader. Representa
tives to the league meeting were In
structed accordingly and the fight was
on at 3 o'clock.
CHECK FOR 567.060 AND ONE
FOR PENNY, APPEAR AN ONCE
By Associated Press
Washington, Jan. 6.—One check for
$67,660 and another for one cent ap
peared at the Department of Com
merce to-day. The former made out
to Secretary Redfleld, was for the gov
ernment sale of Alaskan seal and
blue and white fox skins, recently held
in St. Louis. The penny check was
to George Johannes, disbursing officer
of the department, who formerly held
a similar position at the Census Bu
reau. When he turned over his ac
counts the Treasury Department dis
covered that he had cheated himself
out to one cent and returned it in the
form of a check.
coon VOTES TO
DROP TWO OF MHVOR
RUM'S PATROLMEN
Lively Debate in Which Lynch,
Taylor and Bowman Give Their
Reasons For Action
After a lively debate in which all
the commissioners but Mr. Gorgas
participated, City Council this after
noon adopted by a 3 to 2 vote the
resolution directing Mayor Royal to
drop two patrolmen from the police
force.
The men dismissed are James Mit
chell and A. H. Haines.
The men who by the same resolu
tion will replace the dismissed officers
fContinued on Pago. 7]
WILL CARE FOR GERMANS
By Associated Press
Berlin, Jan. 6.—At the request of
the commander of the German cruiser
Bremen, the Hamburg-American Lino
has ordt-ed its steamer Westerland
to remain at Tamplco in order to em
bark German refugees If necessary. It
It stated that the situation at Tampico
is again giving rise to anxiety.
GERMAN HEIRESS WEDS *
By dissociated Press
Berlin, Jan. 6.—The heiress to one
of the largest fortunes in Germany,
Miss Marie Anne Von Friedlaender-
Fuld, a daughter of Germany's "coal
king," was married to-day to John
Power Bertram Ogllvy Kreeman-Mlt
ford, a younger son of Baron Rede
sale, of the English peerage.
CHARGED WITH MUfIDUIt
John Thomas was last night formally
charged with the murder of Charles
Cook, alias. George Htrothers, who died
at the Harrlsburg hospital some weeks
ago after a lingering illness which fol
lowed a stabbing affray in an tOighth
Ward hotel, on the night of October i.
Thomas was charged by Detpetl.v Wal
ters and given H bearing before Alder
[man Nicholas.
DEPT. OE JUSTICE
IS ASKED TO ASSAIL
PEMA.COAL TAX LAtfl/
Attorney General Mcßeynolds Says
Complaints Show Measure
Caused Jump in Prices
By Associated Press
Washington, D. C„ Jan. 8. —Com-
plaints to Attorney General Mcßey
nolds from several eastern cities that
the price of hard coal is soaring, allege
that the Pennsylvania State tax on
every tone of anthracite mined within
its borders, is responsible. The De
partment of Justice has been asked
to assail the Pennsylvania law on the
ground that it Is unconstitutional. In
answer to letters suggesting such a
course the Attorney General has re
plied that it is highly probable that
sooner or later some individual will
| bring suit to test the law, and that, if
the department finds it advisable, it
may intervene.
The Pennsylvania tax Is 2% per
cent, of the cost of mining each ton,
and it is estimated that the State will
raise nearly $5,000,000 annually from
that source. According to the letters
to the Attorney General, the Pennsyl
vania mining companies have charged
the full tax up to the retailers and
they in turn have passed it on to the
consumer.
Officials of the Auditor General's
Department, which is in charge of the
anthracite coal tax collection, said to
day that the department was proceed
ing to obtain reports of production on
which to base the tax. BJanks have
been sent to each operator and the re
ports are required to be made during
January. Bills for the tax will be sent
later. No notice of any suit to test the
tax has been received, but It is stated
that the Commonwealth will be ready
to meet it.
I)ROTHKKIfOOD~TO >IIOKT
At the home of A. K.' Burkholdet-, 2WI
North fourth Htroet, this evening, the
Lutheran Brotherhood of Ht. Matthew's
I.utlieran Church will hold a business
[fleeting.
12 PAGES.
♦POSTSCRIPT.
TWENIY-TWDOFTHE
(Mill CREW HIE
NOW HCCOUNTED FOR
Five of Eleven Men Who Left
Steamer in Lifeboat Are
Rescued Alive
CRAFT CAPSIZED REPEATEDLY
One Lifeboat Is Found With Bod
ies of Three Men; Others
Were Drowned
By As social td rrtsst
New York, Ja.n. 6.—Five of the mis
sing twenty-seven of the crew of the
oil tank steamer Oklahoma which
broke In two off Sandy Hook early
Sunday were brought Into port alive
today. They were picked ud In a life
boat Sunday afternoon l>y the Booth
Line steamer Gregory, after having
been adrift in the bitter cold for si*
hours. They are:
Jacob Swanson, oiler; Wtljl Haaht.
seamanj Fred Booth, storekeeper;
John Kosich, mess boy, and George
Johnson, wiper.
The rescue of these five men and
their story that six of their compan
ions were lost from the life boat, ac
counts for twenty-two of the Okla
homa's crew of thirty-eight, eight hav
ing been rescued by the Uner Bavaria
and three found dead In a life boat
by the revenue cutter Seneca.
The five brought in to-day confirm
the story that the great tank ship
parted amidshlp without warning. The
weather was stormy and enormous
seas were breaking aboard, when, with
an agony of groans and creaks, the
vessel buckled, apparently suspended
on two huge waves at stem and at^rn.
Haaht was on deck at the time,
having Just come on watch. The en
gines were racing and could not be
stopped. All the engine room force
and those of the crew aft who were
able rusbed to the decks. The mess
boy. K.osich ( had on only his under
wear.
Two Boats Got Away
Two boats were got away. One was
crammed full. This was presumably
the boat In which the revenue cutter
Seneca found three dead and none
[Continued on l*ago 9]
HtNTS MtHIIKItFI) MASTER
"Push_' t. e bull dog owned by Joiir.
oush, the aged man who was found
•nurdtjrnd in th* burning farm house
near Tnglenook soveral weeks ago re
fuses to give up the search for his
master which has lasted since the
tragedy. He wanders from one haunt
of li s master to another sniffing about
| Inquiringly and th"n going on to the
next place. Dally he repeats the rounds
or old man Bush.
EATS ICE CREAM; DIES
Because he ate too much ice cream
at a party on Friday night, Ephralm
Major, 9 years, of 123 Monroe street,
died yesterday at the Harrisburg hospi
tal The boy was admitted yesterday
suffering from porltonitlß brought oh
by an attack of appendicitis.
iMiiwiTOiall
For Harrisburg and vicinityi Fair
and slightly warmer to-night;
lowest temperature about 30 de
grees i Wednesday fair.
For Eastern Pennsylvaniat General
ly cloudy to-night and Wednes
day, warmer; moderate eaat to
southeast winds.
River
No material changes In river stage*
are indicated. The floating Ice la
the river will diminish In quan
tity and probably disappear.
General Conditions
The storm 'that was central off the
New Jersey coast, Monday mara-
Ing, has moved off seaward. Fair
weather haa prevailed generally
throughout the country during
the last twenty-four hours ex
cept In the Middle Atlantic States,
where light local rains aad snows
fell Monday morning.
It Is colder In the Atlantic Statea
from New Jersey northward aad
decidedly warmer aloag the
northern border of the Great
l akes. Elsewhere In the United
States temperature change* have
been generally alight.
Temperature) 8 a. m., 24; a p. j*., |g.
Sum Rlaes, 7i20 a. in.; seta, 4iM
p. m.
Moont Full moon, Jaanary IX,
4iOR p. m.
River Stagei Four feet above low
water mark.
Yesterday's Weather
Highest temperature, SI. \
lowest temperature. SS. \
Mean temperature, 33. V
Normal temperature, SO.
MARRIAGE LICENSES
Steve Cesnar and Eral Trophonis
Steelton.
Franklin Eugene Stock and Ellsabetk
Catherine McAfee, city.
Teaching People
To Save Money
At a resent meeting of bankers
one of the speakers told them '
that it was the duty of the banks
and trust companies to advertise
in the newspapers.
Aside from the fact that it
would Increase their business it
was a service they owed the pub
lic.
In some of the cities the finan
cial institutions have embarked
on co-operative campaigns, the
object of which Is to teach the
people the uses of these institu
tions and what they do for the
publlo.
Not one vyoman in a hundred
could tell you off hand Just
wherein the functions of a bank
differ from those of a trust com
pany.
Yet there are many featurea
about a trust company's servloa
for which the woman of avera«a
means would be glad to pay. : <
Campaigns in„.tbe newspaper*
to Induce people to save money
have been carried on with great
success in many cities. 5|
The uses of advertising are aa
varied as the hues of tnlfjMic
trum.

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