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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, March 11, 1916, Image 1

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Funston Given Free Hand in Pursuit o
. . #
HARRISBURG TELEGRAPH
LXXXV— No. 55
GEN. FUNS TON GIVEN FREEHAND
IN PURSUIT OF VILLA BANDITS;
CARRANZA ASKS TO CROSS LINE
Will Move U. S. Troops
Across Border to Kill or
Capture Villa at Nightfall;
Proposal of Carranza to
Bring His Troops -Into
United States to Pursue
Outlaws Regarded as Fa
vorable
500 MORMONS ARE IN
CRITICAL CONDITION
Raiders Are Moving Toward
Settlement After Making
Attack in Arizona; Car
ranza Regrets Massacre
and Compares Situation
With Indian Troubles of
the Eighties
By Associated Press
Washington. March I!. —In-
structions conveying authority to
General I'uuston to dispatehe a
defensive expedition into Mexico
in pursuit of Villa and his bandits
are to-ilay in General Fnnston's
lu* nds.
Secretary lJaker specifically re
ferred to the expedition as "de
fensive" in line vvltll the adminis
tration's policy of regarding Ms
action as one to repel invasion.
By Associated Press
Washington, March 11. While
American troops are preparing to
move across the Mexican border to
exterminate the Villa bandits. Gen
eral Carranza. in an official com
munication delivered through Consul
Silliman. has asked the United States
for permission to send his troops into
American territory if necessary In
pursuit of outlaws.
W Administration officials regard Gen
eral Carranaa's proposal as favorable.
Tt seems to indicate that he will not
protest against American troops on
Mexican soil, as had been feared.
Practically such a reciprocal arrange
ment probably never would result in
a single Carranza soldier crossing the
lino, as the possibility of bandits tak
ing refuge in American territory is
considered remote.
Would Satisfy Carranza
It is realized that such an arrange
ment. however, would go far to satisfy
General Carranza and i>ermit him to
comply with popular sentiment in
Mexico. There was no indication early
to-day how the proposal would be re
ceived. but it is known thi.it the ad
ministration realizes the necessity of
avoiding a break with Carranza as
the Mexican situation is not to grow
into the status of armed Intervention.
Secretary Baker to-day referred to
Ihe American expedition as a "de
fensive" one. This was regarded as a
significant indication of the adminis
tration's policy to make it clear that
it is proceeding with scrupulous re
gard for the sovereignty of Mexico
and entirely in aid of the constituted
authorities.
Will Start To-night •
Up to noon to-day no American
troops actually had crossed so far as
was known here and it was believed
none would start moving before night.
All arrangements are being left in
the hands of Major General Funston.
A'illa was to-day reported moving
southeast and with not more than "00
men night's report gave his
force as 3.000 but that is believed to
include sympathizers in his territory.
By his movement southeast it was
thought a threatened attack on the
American Mormon colony at Casus
Grandes had passed for the present.
Mormons Want Aid
Senator Smoot, of Utah, received
telegrams to-day from Mormbn lead
ers urging him to impress upon the
War Department the danger to the
colony at Casus Grandes. The colon
ists want to reach American soil.
Senator Smoot took up the question
with the war department and was as
rContinued on Page 13.]
THE WEATHER
For llarrl*l»urg ««d vicinity* Full*,
••on tlnu«*d roh) to-night, with
lowest li'mpcrntun* about 22 dc
erffai; *unilay fair nml warmer.
For F.nHlfrn IVnimj Ivanla s Fair,
continued rol«l to-nlghtt Sunday
fair, altgktly wnrmeri moderate
u cMt and north went wind* becom
ing variable Sunday.
Illver
The main river will rise sllglitly.
It* branchc* will fall slowly or
remain nearly ntntlonnry, eveept
the lower |M»rtlou of the Went
llrancb. which will rise somewhat
to-night. A NtaKe of about 1.0 ft.
In Indicated for Ilnrrishurg Snn
\ day morning.
V (General Condition*
The storm that waa centrnl over the
I pper St. I.awreucp Valley on
Friday morning, ban moved off
northeastward. It caused Might
*now and rain the last twenty
fonr hour* from the l.nke Re
gion and l : pper Ohio Valley east
ward to the Atlantic coast.
It la 12 to 22 degree* warmer In
the 1 pper MlssinNlppl and I pper
MlßNoiirl Valley* and in Manitoba
aad Saskatchewan and slightly
warmer over the nouthenntern and
southwestern districts.
Temperaturel H a. m.. 22.
Sun: Hfsea, 6:22 a. m.j set*. (1:08
p. m.
Moon: Fall luoon, March 10. 12:2?
p. ra.
Illver Stage: 4.7 feet above low
water mark.
Ye*terday'* Weather
Highest temperature, 40.
I.owcmi temperature. JtO.
Mean temperature, .'ir».
4\ortuul temperature, XI.
BY CARHIEK « CENT* A WEEK.
SINGLE COPIES 3 CENTS.
FUNSTON TO LEAD EXPEDITIONARY FORCE INTO MEXICO
s
J&AJa. S~4ICK.FL-rtSTorU. XJiS- P■
t'niler command of Major-Genera 1 Frederick Funston, the heroic captor of General Aguinaldo in the Philip
pine Insurrection, at least 8,000 Amertcan troops, composed of cavalry, infantry, artillery and machine gun de
tachments. will go into Mexico in an attempt to capture the outlaw Villa, who led his men in a raid on Colum
bus, X. M„ killing sixteen Americans. It is expected that the uien will be sent over the border in three or four
columns in the hope ol* making a ring around the bandit leader.
WAITING FOR BABY,
BY VILLA S,m HE IS EXPECTING
GERMANY AND JAPAN
By Associated Press '
EI Paso, Texas, March 11, Mrs.
Maude Hauke Wright, the American j
woman who rode nine days with the
Villa troops preceding the raid on Co
lumbus. X. M„ is here to-day waiting I
the arrival of her baby, which was!
taken from her and given to a Mexi- :
can family at their home near Pear- ■
son. Mexico. The baby is safe and she 1
expects it to be brought to her to-day j
or to-morrow, liet husband was killed
bv the bandits.
"I want to go to my baby," Mrs.
PRICES OF PAPER
GOING UP; MAY BE
A FAMINE SOON
Mills 4 Months Behind Orders
With Situation Growing
More Acute
Prices of paper are going by leaps
«nd bounds. There is no end of the
advance in sight. Paper firms are
warning their customers against a
possible famine and are re-calling all
quotations. The situation is becom
ing desperate with some printers who
are short on lines now oIT the market
and for which they have contracts
standing.
The Johnston Paper Company of
this city yesterday issued the follow
ing card to its patrons throughout
Central Pennsylvania:
To our Customers:—
Further advances have been
made in printers' papers render
ing our "Chanees in Prices" list of
February 26, 1910, of little value.
Changes are coming so rapidly as
to make it impossible to issue a
correct list of prices.
I'ntil we can see our way clear
to issue a new list, all orders will
be filled at prices in effect when
f orders are received.
JOHNSTON PAPER CO.,
South Market Square.
Harrisburg, Pa.
The Donaldson Paper Company on
March 1 sent a special circular to its
| customers on the paper situation, in
I part as follows:
"The unprecedented conditions pre
; vailing in the paper market to-day
make it impossible to issue a price list
that would be of service, owing to the
I daily advances in all kinds of mate
rial entering into the manufacture of
i paper.
"The mills are four months behind
on orders and the indications are that
this condition will become more
acute.
"It is not unlikely that in a short
time price will cease to be a factor
and the question will be one of obtain
ing raw materials In sufficient quanti
ties to meet the normal demand.
"The manufacturers have reserved
the right to bill paper at the market
price at the time of shipment.
"We will protect our regular cus
tomers In every way possible, as it is
our earnest desire to co-operate with
them.
"You- may rest assured that any
orders you send us will have our most
1 careful consideration in the way of
1 service and price."
DIES ON WEDDING DAY
Heading. Pa.. March 11.—Two hours
' before the time for his daughter's wed
ding William E. Ebert died at his
home in Topton. The wedding day
was hastened because of bis oerious
illness, but before his daughter could'
become the bride of Jonas K. Schott,
Mr, Ebert succumbed to pneumonia.
The wedding took place soon after.
HARRISBURG, PA., SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 11, 1916.
Wright said. "It would only take me j
three days to walk to Pearson."
Mrs. Wright retold her story of the i
nine-day trip with the bandits as)
though it were commonplace. She
had suffered so much that she had
apparently lost all sense of fear.
Because-she suffered in silence and
held herself aloof, she was called
"Earoyna," queen of the Villistas. by
the troops.
Villa had told one of the officers that
(ConUnucd on Page 16.1
PUBLIC INTEREST
IN "BABY WEEK"
IS INCREASING
Prominent Physicians Will Ex
amine Babies on the Different
Days of the Exhibit
\
TO MOTHERS
Authorities say that a baby seven
months old should sit alone, un
supported. At from eight to ten
months it should start to creep,
and at ten months begin to stand.
At one year it should start to walk.
At two years a baby should be able
to put two words together.
Can your baby do all of these
things? Will you see to it that
your baby is norma land healthy
and receives the start that will
make of him or her a splendid
citizen? "Save the Boby; Save the
Nation!" You will be given a
chance to learn mor« than you al
ready known about HOW you can
improve conditions for your baby.
"Baby Week" will start officially in
ITarrisburg next Wednesday nft
Rabies ncc;l I'rcsb ail* niglit and
liny. Open windows at night
menus a well baby. Closed win
dows at night nnniis a sick baby.
Which shall it be?
Dr. E. Emmet Holt says that in
fant mortality is one of the great so
cial and economic problems of our
day. "A nation may waste its forestry
Its water power, its mines, and to some
degree, even its lands: but if it is to
hold its own In the struggle for
supremacy, its children must be eon
served at any cost. On the physical,
intellectual and moral strength of the
[Continued on Pace 4.]
MAYFLOWER AT OLD POINT
By Associated Press
Norfolk, Va., March 11.—The yacht
Mayflower with the President and
Mrs. W r ilson aboard arrived off Old
Point at 1:30 this afternoon. The
vessel left Washington last night and
cruised down the Potomac river and
Chesapeake bay on a week-end rest
trip for the President. The Mayflower
continued on past Old Point towards
Newport News.
S IOO,OOO TOR tcco Finrc
By Associated Press
Eoulsville, Ky„ March It. Fire that
swept the tobacco rehandlinj plant of
Tunkerson and Company, here, early
to-day. caused a loss estimated at »10u,"-
OpO.
FORMER A. O. 11. HEAD DIES
By Associated Press
Syracuse. N. Y„ March 11.—James
E. Dolnn. for for years national presi
dent of the Ancient Order of Hibcr-j
nians, tiled here to-day.
QUINCY BENT, NEW
STEELTON PLANT
HEAD, IN CHARGE
Is Busy Familiarizing Himself
With Organization of Big
Works
ONLY 36 YEARS OLD
QUINCT BENT
Genera! Manager Steelton Plant
Pennsylvania Steel Co.
Qulncy Bent, who was appointed
general manager of the big steel plant
at Steelton Tuesday, has assumed his
new duties and is now in charge at
Steelton and Lebanon. He has spent
(he past few days in Moing over the
big plant organization and familiar
izing himself with the details.
Mr. Bent Is 3K years old and is the
son of the late Major L. S. Bent, who
in the early eighteen - nineties was
president and later a receiver for 1 lie
Pennsylvania Steel Company. Mr.
Hint's connection with Pennsylvania
Steel dates from 1901 when he gradu
ated from WiWlliams College. He came
jto Steelton for training in steel plant
| operations under H. 11. Campbell. In
1902 he was transferred to Lebanon
| and laler was placed in charge of the
blast furnaces there. In 1909 he was
made assistant to President. F. W.
Wood, of the Maryland steel Com
pany, Sparrows Point, Md„ in which
position he has been in charge of con
siderable construction which has been
carried on there.
Protests Against Seizure of
U. S. Ship by British
By Associated Press
Washington, D. C., March 11.—A
protest against the seizure of the
American steamer Kdna by a British
cruiser was placed before the State
Department to-day by Representative
Kuhn, of San Francisco, on behalf of
! the vessel's owners.
MORGAN HOMKWARD 11(11 M)
Hy Associated Press
Ixmdon, March 11. J. P. Morgan
sailed to-day from Liverpool for New
j Vork on the Philadelphia.
NO MOW LOAN
By Associated Press
New York. March It. J. P. Morgan
and Company announce,! to-day they
bad received no suggestion that the
British Government desires to issue an
other loan in America either secured
or unsecured.
GREAT LAYMEN'S
MISSION MEET
OPEN TOMORROW
I
Opening Gun of Convention to
Be Fired in Grace M. E.
Church
BIG MEN WILL SPEAK
Leaders in Home and Foreign
Fields Will Address
Gatherings
The opening meeting of t he big day
men's Missionary Convention Move-.
I rnent in this city will be held to-nior
i row afternoon at 3::»0 o'clock in Grace
| Methodist church, when two noted
missionary speakers will lire the
; opening guns of the campaign.
Nearly a thousand men— 942 to bo
exact—have registered for the ses
sions: practically every church in the
city will be represented, and large j
delegations are expected from twenty !
counties. Pine Street Presbyterian j
church leads with 117 and Market
Square is second with 101.
This the third big missionary con
vention of its kind lo be held in llar
[Continued on Page :».]
Measles Epidemic
Is Rapidly Abating
Declares Dr. Raunick
Harrisburg's measles epidemic is
rapidly abating and the city health
ffcjithorities now have the upper hand
in the light against this childish dls
i ease.
I "Only eight cases were reported to
day," said Dr. J. M. J. Raunick, the
| director of the bureau of health and
sanitation," whereas it had been not
uncommon for us to have twenty,
thirty and even forty cases a day on
our hands."
German High Fleet Is
Sighted Steaming Toward
Home in the North Sea
Copenhagen, March II. —A local
lvwspiiper says the Norwegian
steamer Bergen met on Thursday In
I the southern part of ii>" North Sea
■ a German flotilla of fifty dread
naughts, cruisers and large destroyers
1 ol' the latest type.
| The largest ship in the fleet was
.'the new dreadnaught Hindenburg.
One squadron was steaming in an east
erly direction followed by two air-
I ships.
200 Young Italians Are
1 Ready to Enlist Should
Uncle Sam Need Soldiers
i "There is not a hyphenated Amer
ican among the citizens of Italian
birth in this neighborhood," said C.
I Gaeta, President of the Italian club
to-day. At the meeting of our organ
ization in Sieclton last evening strong
{feeling prevailed over the Villa out
rage in New Mexico and over "Oo
i young men volunteered to enlist and
i leave in 24 hours after a call for
troops. We havo our own hand and
;it would enlist in a body."
Railroads to Be Given
30 Days to Answer
8-Hour Day Demands
Chicago, March 11.—Railroads of
the country will bp given thirty (lays
lin which to reply to the demands of
their 400.000 trainmen employes for
|an eight-hour flay anil lime and a
i half for over time. W. 8. Stone, grand
| chief of the Brotherhood of Bocomo-
I tive Engineers announced to-day. It
'is reported 98 per cent, of the" men
| voted for the demands. t
"Bill" Flinn Likely to
Take to the Warpath
According to word which comes to
\ this city from western counties, AVil-
I liam Flinn, the leader of the Progres
sives in the 1912 campaign, is hatching
a fusion game on the coming cam
; paign lor State Treasurer or Auditor
General notwithstanding the rout in
! 1914.
It is said that Flinn intends to op
i pose 11. M. Kephart for Slate Treas
urer and is engineering a move to
I nominate his own candidate in the
j event of Kephart becoming the Bo
publican nominee. The Flinn man
| would have the remnants of the Bull
| Moose and a fusion move would lie
! made with the Democrats. The same
i is said to be contemplated for Auditor
i General in the event that Flinn does
j not approve of the Republican choice.
| State political matters are com
: niencine to warm up, although Gov
\ ernor Brumbaugh, Senator Penrose
and others remain in the sphinx class.
1 The Governor has refused to talk poli
i tics or about rumors which have been
! coming daily from Philadelphia that
; he would issue a statement.
Candidates for Republican national
delegates are commencing to file nomi
nating petitions, but do not declare for
any candidate on the papers.
Churchill Expects to Die
inWar; Hence "Warning"
London. March It.—From a friend
'of Winston Churchill, whose word can
absolutely be relied upon, your corre
spondent heard the following extra
ordinary explanation of the reason
which impelled the Colonel to deliver
his famous speech of warning last
Tuesday. Tf Churchill were a Scotch
man he might be described as "fey."
According to the story, Churchill is
convinced he will not. come throiißh
the war alive.
"I know I shall lie killed." he told i
his friend, "and before I die I want
to make my mind easy." This was
preceding the debate, when Churchill
stated the grounds of bis uneasiness,
prominent among them being an ap
parent belief that bis own actions
were responsible for the country be-.
Ing deprived of Bord Fisher's service
at the Admiralty,
DRIVE ON VERDUN i
ENDED BELIEF OF
FRENCH MILITARY
Latest German Attacks on
Fortress Indicate Close of
Disastrous Effort
LOSSES ARE RESPONSIBLE
Paris Asserts Large Number of
Dead and Injured Influenced
Diminishing Intensity
The second great effort in the Ver
dun drive apparently is nearing its
close. The latest German attacks
have been directed at comparatively !
small sections of the front east and
west of the Mouse. Whether the pres
ent interval marks merely a lull be
fore another onslaught or the return
to ordinary conditions of trench war
fare is an open question, but military
! opinion in France is that the great
buttle is at an end.
In I'aris it is believed the diminish
ing intensity of the German attacks
i is Influenced by tlu< heavy losses the
assailants are said to have sustained,
hut a Merlin dispatch reports it is
believed there that the German losses
have been limited to relatively a few
thousand.
Take French Trenches
A new attack by the Germans in
the Champagne yesterday resulted in
the capture of French positions over
a front of 1 400 yards and about two
thirds of a mile deep. The attack
was made near Rheims, at a point
about 35 miles west of the recent
Champagne advance made soon after
the Verdun campaign was in
augurated.
Along the front east of Verdun the
; Germans have made some further
progress capturing part of the village
of Vim*. West of the Meuse, Berlin
reports officially, Corbeaux and
Cumieres woods have been cleared of
the French.
Portuguese Cabinet Gives
Way to National Defense Body
ISy -ialnl I'rcs.i
Lisbon. March 11. The Portuguese
cabinet has resigned to give place to
a national defense government, which
is now being formed. Tranquility pre
vails throughout the country.
Qit 'IA " W SIHCID '*
Si 2
1 Chambersburg, Pa., March 11.—Bert Hwninger, eldc f
1 son of Clay Henninger, the head of baseball here, an i x *
* ponent of the t, amc ' n { he Cumberland Val e> foi 2 ea f
f died in Mt. Hope Sanatorium, Baltimore, last ai : £
? cutting his throat with a piece of t,lass he broke o u of i S
I pictuie frame. He was 36 years, and until five Jays A'
9 seemed in perfect health. Clay, a brother, but a few years *
1 younger, hanged himself a year ago next week. Both were I
£ athletes and baseball players. T
J SENATE COMMITTEE ENDORSES ACTION f
i Washington, March 11.—The Senate Foreign Relations *
J Committee to-day unanimously endorsed the action of the |
1 Presiden hi sending American troops into Mexico to c 5
T ture Villa and his raiders. I
| GERMANS TAKE BIG STRETCH OF GROUND £
? Berlin, March 11, via London.—Capture of Fren f
I positions 1400 yards wide and about two-thirds of a mile 3
I deep south of Ville-aux-Bois, near Rheims, was announced *
to-day by the war office. •
T VILLA IS NOW AT ASCENCION f
1 Washington,. March 11.—Latest reports of the where T
I abouts of General Villa say he reach Ascencion, south of I
i Palomas, some time yesterday with 300 followers after his 5
flight following the attack of Columbus. This information f
J reach h:re to day in a message to the Carranza embassy |
\ from Consul Andreas Garcia at El Paso. <5
J VIOLENT FIGHTING AT VAUX i
? Paris, March 11.—There is still violent fighting for the 1
I possession of the fort at Vaux, according to an announce-A
S* ment of the French war office this afternoon. ' ,
5 LEG FRACTURED AT PIPE BENDING
I Harrisburg.—While unloading coal at the Harrisburg
1 Pipe and Pipe Bending Works this afternoon. John Send-' '
j le> ! 29 Norti Tenth ireel had his u L ht t «.• '
i e .! cn u the ..amsbuig Hospital for i.can. *
i MAkkIAGE UCbMSES * >
| Edwin llrmnviMvi-tl. Mnr.vnvlllr.nnd Marj Anne Rohr, Mcchnnlmbunc. >
J Dnnlrl Kilitin llrnry, .lr„ iiikl *l«r> Kdilh Shcnrcr. rtty.
t William llrnry lOnrnry. York, nml I'.ilnn Wriii'f < rniir, llinrr, l*n. . t
i l<loyd W. Kimfl, l.tuKlrxloMU, mill Mirnli >l. MntrliiS«'r, '•mi.'iirliiinnii *
jPllllMlßlllp. i
CITY EDITION
18 PAGES
SEVEN AMERICANS
ON STEAMER SUNK
WITHOUT WARNING
BY SUBMARINE
All Are Rescued When Nor
wegian Bark Silius Is Tor
pedoed ; Three of Crew
Are Drowned; Attack Is
Viewed by State Depart
ment as Serious
CONTRARY TO CENTRAL
POWERS' ASSURANCES
United States Will Make
Careful Investigation; Na
| tionality of U-Boat Not
Known and Washington
Has Nothing to Indicate
Whether Mine or Torpedo
Sent Her to Bottom
11 y Associated Vress
Washington, I>. C„ March 11.—Con
sul Osborn, at Havre, reported to-day
I that when the Norwegian bark Silius,
from New York to Havre, was tor
ipedoed without warning in Havre
1 ; roads on the night, of March !* seven
' Americans aboard were rescued.
The loss of i lie .Silius was first re
-1 ported last night from London. Three
members of the crew were reported
lost.
AlYair is Serious
State Department officials seemed
inclined to view the attack on the
! | Silius as a serious affair.
So tar dispatches to the State 15e
' pariment have simply said the vessel
1 was torpedoed without warning. No
| mention was made of the nationality
of the submarine and there was noth
ing to indicate whether a torpedo
: actually was responsible for the sink
ing of the vessei or whether she might
have struck a mine. It was presumed,
( however, that the American consul at
Havre not his information from mem
bers of the crew, some of whom were
Americans. The department will take
■ immediate steps to get positive in
i formation.
i If the Silius was torpedoed, such an
(Continued on I'age 1(1.)

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