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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, March 17, 1916, Image 1

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Wilson Signs Joint Congressional Resolution Increasing Army to Full Strength
HARRISBURG iSlßli TELEGRAPH
* WW \t a BY CAHHIKK <1 CENTS A WEEK.
LAAAV— IAO. OU SINGI.E COriES 3 CENTS.
"ADVANCETROOPS
EXPECT TO REACH
VILLA DISTRICT
BEFORE NIGHT
Reasonably Certain That Ex
pedition Is Close to Terri
tory Where Bandit Is Be
lieved to Have Many Sym
pathizers
ACTUAL FIGHTING
AT ANY MOMENT
Advance Squadron Is Closing
in; First Column Will Join
It Near Mormon Colony;
Pursuit Costing U. S. $40,-
000 a Day; Congress Up-
Holds Wilson
By Associated Press
£1 Paso, Texas, March 17.—Expec
tation- along the border was keyed to
its highest pitch to-day by the general
belief that before nightfall the ad
vance guard of the American expe
ditionary force would have entered j
A'illa territory ir> the mountains of the
Casas Grandes region of Mexico.
While the censorship prevented any !
official news of the whereabouts of the j
American columns, reports brought by i
Americans arriving from the interior,
coupled with the calculations of men
thoroughly familiar with the territory .
over which the expeditionary force is ;
passing, made it reasonably certain
that the I'nlted States soldiers must be
close to Ihe district where Villa is be
lieved to exercise his greatest influence
and have the larget number of sym
pathizers.
Making l ast Time
New definite facts about the Amer
ican expedition to-day stood out with
considerable clearness as the result of
official published reports and the news
brought here by Americans who have
been in touch with some portion of
the American movement.
It seemed certain that of the two
columns which are "somewhere in
S Mexico" one was constituted for
speed, while the other apparently was
moving more slowly. The swift
footed column was the auxiliary army,
seemingly mostly cavalry, which went
into Mexico fifty miles west of the
main army of General Pershing when
lii 3 forces crossed at Columbus, N. M.
Columns Will Meet
The secrecy which has surrounded
the movements of the main column
has been slight compared with the
record of this western force. There
is reason to believe, from the offi
cial announcements, that the western
column may have gone into Mexico
earlier than the main body. Every
report arriving here asserts that the
western wing has traveled the far
ther. By these same reports, the two
columns will form a junction near the
threatened American Mormon colo
nists, probably in the Casas Grandes
region.
Discus* Garrisoning
Carrania officials, it was learned to
day, have been discussing with some
concern whether American troops,
during the Villa pursuit, would have
to occupy any Mexican cities and the
effect of such occupation upon Mex
ican public sentiment.
The Carranza officers have frankly
expressed the hope that the garrison
ing of the cities can be left to their
own troops. The American army's
choice of the Chihuahua desert as its
place of entry precludes for the pres
ent such a problem as city garrison
duty.
It is estimated here that the cost
of the Villa pursuit at present is up
ward of $40,000 per day.
While the possibility that actual
lighting with the Villlstas might be
gin nt any moment,, interest was re
doubled in every item of intelligence
that threw any light on the attitude of
the Carranza adherents and more es
pecially on that of the Ave detach
ments of Carranza troops who are de
clared by the officials of the de facto
government to be operating against
Villa.
No Close Co-operation
Andres Garcia, the Carranza consul
here, who Is recognized as the closest
man to the first chief on the border,
refused to make any definite statement
[Continued on Page 13.]
THE WEATHER
For tlarr|Mhurg ami vicinity: Fair
and Nllglitly colder to-night, with
lowest temperature about 1.1 ilr
urrpm .Saturday fair anil warmer.
For FiiMtern IVnn*> l\aula : Fair and
Nlltchtly colder to-night; Satur
day fair. warmers moderate
northweat to north wlnria.
River
Mo important changea will occur in
water atageM or Ice condition** in
the Suf»<iuchaniin river and Itx
branchfH. A mtage of about 4.5
feet la Indicated for Ifarrlnhurg
Saturday morning, with Nurface
nearly covered with floating Ice.
Caenernl Condition**
The atorm over the nortlieamtern
part of the I'nlted State* haw pro
greaac«l Mlowly
with Increnalng atrengtli during
the lawt twenty-four bourn. It ban
raiiMed more anow in Xew Fag
land, and there hate been light
falla of nnow In the Upper lilo
\ alley, along the «outliea«t
nhoren of the threat Lake* and in
the Interior of New York stair.
It la • to IS degreea colder thU
morning In .\ew Englnnd, the
1 pper St. I.owrence Valley, over
nearly all the region of the threat
l ake* ind In the I pper MINIIIMIP
pI Valley and In extreme West
ern Canada.
Temperatures 8 a. m-. 18.
Suns Riftrn, Otl'J a. m.; aeta, <l:ir»
p. m.
Moons Full moon, March 10, I'J :J7
p. m.
Rlter stage: 4.7 feet above low
water mark.
Veaterdny'a \\ rather
lllghcat temperature, '27.
I.oweat temprrat tire, 1.1.
Menu Irmprraturr, 20,
.Normal temperature, 38.
C STARTING IN PURSUIT O I
l • J
j
cxvsujzy j=>u/zsvtT orse^ytuu
This photograph shows members of the 13th U. S. Cavalry, stationed at Columbus. N. jr.. starting in pursuit of the raiding Villistas, after the outlaws
had pillaged the town find killed sixteen Americans. Brigadier General Pershing ordered the pursuit of the fleeing raiders who were driven off by the
| troops in the army camp.
BILL INCREASING
ARMY TO 120,000
! SIGNED BY WILSON
Approves Joint Congressional
Resolutions Authorizing
Increase to Full Strength
By Associated Press
Washington, March 17.—Presi
dent Wilson to-day signed the
joint congressional resolution au
thorizing the increase of the
standing army to its full strength
jf approximately 120,000 men.
Under a rule limiting general de
bate to ten hours, the House to-day
began considering the army bill, the
most extensive proposal for increasing
the military establishment ever laid
before it in peace times. If possible
a final vote will be reached to-mor
row night.
Forty to Sjjoak
Forty speakers have asked for time.
Republicans and Democrats were
equally represented on the list and all
were expected to favor a wide de
gree of national preparedness what
ever their attitude might be on the
committee bill.
When the debate began no oppon
ent of the general plan of prepared
ness had asked to be heard. Chair
man Hay of the military committee,
and Representative Kahn, ranking
Republican member, apportioned the
ten hours equally. Speaker Clark,
who will deliver an address in sup
port of the measure, surrendered the
chair ti» Representative Garret, of
Tennessee, at the beginning of the de
: bate.
Representative Gordon, Democrat,
of Ohio, led off. for the bill. He had
[Continued on Pane !■!.]
Four Lives Believed to
Have Been Lost in Sinking
of Big Dutch Steamer
" By Associated Press '
Amsterdam. March 17. Tt is now be
lieved there was a small number of
lives lost in the sinking of the Tuban
, tia, either in the explosion or in an ac
cident which attended the launching of
a lifeboat. The steamship remained
alloat several hours.
According to all reports there was no
panic, every one 911 .board .behaving
splendidly. The boats were launched
,in their appointed order and the pas
senger* were ail taken off first. The
rescue work was difficult, owing to the
darkness,'the heavy, mis* ahd rile riiugli
sea. The boats were several hours in
finding the , Noordhinde'r lightship,
which was two miles away.
! The captain and part of. the drew re
mained op the gradually stnkjng ship
for some time, the wireless operator
keeping up the work or guiding Dutch
vessels to the rescue. The-captain" Was
on the vessel for two hours after she
was struck a.nd was the last, to leave.
1 The rescuing vessels took the passen
: gers and crew to Flushing, Amsterdam
and the IIOOK.
lAMKUICAN HAMvI'iHS TO
DEVELOP AFRICAN MINKS
By Associated Press
London. March 17. A group of
' American financiers, headed by Adol'ph
j and Sons, has arranged
with London capitalists to develop ex
-1 tensive gold-bearing properties for the
Far Eastern Rand, South Africa. This
; Is the first time that American capital
has been sought for the exploitation of
the Rand mining industry.
! The new American capital supplants
| that of German banks.
HOLLAXI) DEEPLY STIRRED
By Associated Press
The Hague, March 17.—The loss of
one of Holland's finest steamships has
stirred the country deeply. The sink
ing of the Tubantia, valued at $1,600.-
000 and insured for $1,240,000. means
loss of valuable cargo space not easily
replaceable. The opinion accredited
to the captain that the Tubantia was
torpedoed adds to the feeling of re
i.scntment aroused by the disaster.
FIVE HURT IN EXPLOSION
• By Associated Press
Kenvil, X. J., March 17.—The ex
plosion of about 1000 pounds' of
smokeless powder at the plant of the
Hercules Powder Company here to
day injured live employes, three of
j them seriously, and wrecked a bund
ling.
HARRISBURG, PA., FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH" 17, 1916
HARRISBURG BABI |
AND HEALTHY A
| Remarkable Showing at Exhibit; books at Library That Tell
How to Keep Baby Well
r
"Our birth is but a sleeping' and a
forgetting:
The soul that rises with us, our
life's star.
| Hath had elsewhere its setting,
And eometh from afar.
.... trailing clouds of glory, do we
come
Prom God, who is our home:
I Heaven lies about us in our in
fancy."
The poet Wordsworth was very fond ,
of children, but had he been fortunate i
enough to have visited Harrlsburg yes- <
1 terd.ay afternoon and made a brief |
sojourn an the fourth floor of Bow- ,
man's store about 4:30 in the after- !
noon, perhaps he would have been in- j
spired to even further beautiful
thoughts centered about the baby, j
This is what he would have found:—]
A large host of the prettiest, littlest,
heaviest, cutest, curliest-haired, bluest
eyed, blackest-eyed, tiniest-footed,'
huskiest, shapeliest, altogether the j
[Continued oil l a«c I I.]
HEADQUARTERS TO
BE OPENED HERE
Governor's Friends Will Start
His Campaign—Washing
ton Has a Rumor
Headquarters for the campaign in
the interest of election of delegates
committed 1o Governor Martin G.
Brumbaugh for President will be
i opened Monday in the Union Trust
! building. A publicity bureau will be
'installed and the petitions in behalf of
the Governor will be circulated.
The conference of men interested in
| the Governor's campaign held at the
Capitol yesterday was declared by At- ;
torney General Brown to be the start
of the campaign in the interior. The !
plan is to organize every county, to
i have the Governor make speeches!
throughout the State and to interest j
the young voters as well as the labor- j
Ing.men. ■ »•- *
An interesting statement regarding j
Senator Penrose's visit to Pittsburgh is :
made by the Pittsburgh Gazette-Times,
owned by'Senator,Oliver. The Gazette- i
Times says of the Senator: "Predic-j
lions are being made that in his dis
cissions with county leaders he will j
advocate the election of uninstructed
delegates to tlio Republican national I
convention, so that those charged with I
the duty of nominating a President..
' will be unhampered in any way in I
their endeavor to select a powerful
i standard-bearer."
l.ouis W. Stra.ver, Washington cor- I
respondent of the Pittsburgh Dispatch,
says in a signed article from the na
tional capital to-day: "That Gbvernor j
Brumbaugh's presidential campaign is i
I'o be diverted to Colonel Roosevelt I
was the declaration made here to-day |
i by one of the leaders in the movement i
j in discussing politics with one of the I
national leaders interested in the se- j
lection by the Republican party of a
progressive candidate who would 1
cement the party. According to the i
information given this national leader i
by a Pennsylvania politician in.a po
sition to speak with, authority, the
delegates that Governor Brumbaugh
'•an command will be thrown to |
Colonel Roosevelt at an opportune:
• time, or used in a way acceptable to
Mr. Roosevelt."
COMPENSATION HEARING
The application of .Margaret Smith.
111H North Seventh street, against Mrs..
Alice Heikes. 328 North street, for com- |
pensatlon under the new act, was heard
before Referee Saylur to-day. Miss
Smith claims she was injured by a fall
' downstairs while employed as a din
i Ingruom girl at a boardlnghouse kept
by Mrs. Heikes. The opposing claim is
that the girl was employed as a domes
tic, that she was not seriously hurt and
was paid two weeks' wages while suf
fering from the injuries. The case was
; not decided.
CAM, FOR REV. BOOTH
| The Kirst Baptist Church of Greens
| burg. Pa., has extended a unanimous
call to th«i Rev. W. 8. Booth, pastor '
lof the First Baptist Church of iiurris-
I burg, to become its pastor. |
PUBLIC LIBRARY'S
BOOKS ON BABIES
Belcher—Clean Milk
Clock—(>ur Baby
Conistoek—Mothercral't
l»avl*—Mother anil Child ,
Bennett—Healthy Baby
Gruenberg—Your Child To-day
and To-morrow
lierlejr—Short Talks With Young
Mothers
Key—Century of the Child
1/lppert At Holmes—When to Send
For the Ooetov
MaoCarthy—Hygiene For Mother
and Child j
Xewton—Mother and Baby
Itosonau—Milk Question
Smitli—All tlic Children of All the
People
Twcddell—How to Take Care of
the Baby
Wheeler—Before the Baby Conies
' I
DAPP IS STRONG
FOR LOCAL OPTION
"Xo Uncertainty as to Where
I Stand,'" He Says; Prom
inent as Fireman
Edward Dapp, candidate for the j
Legislature in the city district on the |
Republican ticket, came out to-day in j
a strong statement in favor of local
option. Mr. Dapp, who was elected j
Jury Commissioner as an independent j
Republican in 1913 by a majority that,
ran away ahead of his ticket, made j
the following announcement as to his 1
views on the local option question, ;
which will be one of the principal >
issues in the next Legislature:
"I have been asked by many of my
friends why I have chosen to be a can- i
didate for the State Assembly on a i'
local option platform. They and the
: voters whose support lam seeking are :
I entitled to a denite answer to this,
1 question. There is undoubtedly a very
strong sentiment in our community in
favor of local option as respects the,
sale of intoxicating liquors and it is for
i the purpose of getting an expression
j of the sentiment of my fellow-citizens |
j on this question that my own position ,:
i has been made so definite. I believe
in government by the people and that
the majority should rule the minority. ;'
I rather than the rule of the majority i
jby the minority. If elected, as I hope
to be, there will be no uncertainty as 1
| to what shall be my duty to my con
stituents. Their desire will have a
true expression in my vote, and I "am
willing to stand or fall according to
their will."
Mr. Dapp is well known in railroad I
I circles and as a volunteer fireman Is ;
j interested in getting the Legislature to
I adopt an amendment whereby all of
[ the 2 per cent, of the State tax on
| foreign (Ire insurance will go to the
relief of sick and injured firemen, in
! stead of 1 per cent., as at present. He j
Is also an advocate of the erection in
| Capitol Park of a monument to the
firemen of the State who died in the
protection of lives and property from (
fire.
Brewer's Secretary Is
Again Remanded to Jail
For Contempt of Court
IBy Associated Press
Pittsburgh, March 17.—Judge W. H. 1
| S. Thompson, in the Federal District ;
; Court here, to-day dismissed the writ
of habeas corpus on which Hugh F.
Fox. of New York, secretary of the j 1
) United States Brewers' Association,
was lecently released from prison and
! remanded him to the Allegheny county
jail for contempt of court. Fox had '
refused to answer questions put to him t
by the grand jury investigating the!*
alleged political activity of the United I'
States and other brewery associations. ■
Counsel for Fox later secured a t
writ of error and Fox was released on i
■bull pending an appeal from Judge 1
Thompson's decision to the United I <
I States Circit Court of Appeals, Jj
STEELTON STORE
TO BE DIVORCED
FROM STEEL CO.?
General Manager Denies
Humor; Based on Schwab's
Attitude in Bethlehem
Persistent rumors that tlie Steel-'
ton Store Company, Limited, one of:
the largest wholesale and retail estab
lishments in Central Pennsylvania,,
would be scparafed from its present
close collection with the Pennsylvania
Steel Company, were declared to be
unfounded by W. E. Abercrombie,
general manager and one of the in
corporators, this morning. •
"X have no knowledge of any change :
being contemplated," declared Mr.
Abercrombie. "To my knowledge this;
talk of changes is merely gossip."!
General Manager Abercrombie also
denied the report which was current
this morning that the steel company
to-day discontinued to honor the
credit books of customers of the
I store.
Reports that the management of
ihe store company would be made in
dependent of the steel works were
: started, it is said, by the fact that
j Charles M. Schwab, chairman of the
j board of directors of the Bethlehem
Steel Corporation which recently ac
i quired the Pennsylvania Steel Com
, pany and its subsidiaries, was instru
j mental in placing all stores in South
I Bethlehem on a cash basis following
the big strike there several years ago.
While there have been many rumors
of similar action here, there has been
. no intimation of such a plan from any
official quarters.
The Steelton Store Company,
Limited, is the largest single business
established in Steelton and one of the
largest in this section. It operates
, both wholesale and retail departments
: and is one of the most niodernly
j equipped stores in this vicinity. The
latest and best methods of merchan
dising have been incorporated in its
! management.
Swears Husband Called
Her "Belle of the Pigsty"
_____
Special to the Telegraph
i New York, March 17.—The trial of
the suit of Mrs. Augusta Palmer, of
; West New York, for divorce from
Claude Palmer, of Stroudsburg. Pa., a
' cousin of former Congressman A.
j Mitchell Palmer, on the ground of
cruelty, was begun yesterday in Jer
! sey City.
Mrs. Palmer testified that her hus
j band was fond of calling her a
"swamp angel" and "a belle of the
pigsty." Her husband • denied the
i cruelty charge and entered a cross
, suit, alleging that his wife was untidy.
Revolution in China Is
Reported to Be Spreading
By Associated Press
•Philadelphia, March 17. General
Hwant? Usiang, first secretary of war
| in the Chinese republic, who is tem
: porarily residing at Media, Pa., near
! here, announced that lie had received
to-day a cablegram from Changhai
that the revolution in China is advanc
ing rapidly.
The province of Kwang Si declared
its independence, the general said the
cablegram stated, and Tias been added
I fo the list of provinces in rebellion.
NEW DU PONT PLANT
By Associated Press
Wilmington, Del.j March 17.
mal announcement is made to-day of j
the acquisition by the Du Pont Com
pany of a site for a new dynamite
plant of moderate capacity on the;
York river'near Yorktown, Va. This
site comprises about 3,000 acres a few
miles northwest of Yorktown and j
about the same distance duo east of
Williamsburg, and easily accessible
by water or rail. The new plant, it is
said, will be In no sense another Hope
well, as it will not have to do with
the hurry-up work of munitions;
making.
TECH BOYS FORM GUX CLUB 1
Tech students are going to learn
how to shoot. At a meeting yesterday]
afternoon. Dr. C. B. Fager, principal,'
and other faculty momh. ry of the!
Technical High school, addressed the
students on the value of knowing how
to shoot, and recommended the or
ganization of a shooting club. I>r.
Fager issued a call and twenty-six
candidates signed up for the new or- j
jganization,
P. &R. DIVISION ]
ENGINEER MADE
SUPERINTENDENT
R. Boone Abbott, President ot 1
the Engineers' Society of Pa.,
Goes Up Ladder
PROMOTION IS RAPID 1
Got Training by Studying at i
Night While Draughtsman
in Reading Office
1!. Booiie Abbott, division engineer
| of Philadelphia and Heading Railway
('omp.tiy, with headquarters in Har
■ risburg, and president of the
Engineers' Society of Pennsyl
vania, to-day was promoted to the su-1
perintendency of the Shamokin divi
sion with headquarters at Tamaqua.
He went to Tamaqua to-day to take
Jup his new duties. He succeeds J. •
j 10. Turk, who was made general su
! perintendent.
1 The appointment of Mr. Abbott is a
recognition of hard and faithful ser
vice. He started us a clerk in the
draughting room of the division engi
neer'p at Heading and through his
own efforts has earned rapid promo-
I tions.
Mr. Abbott is a native of Phila
j delphia. He is 35 years old. He was i
| educated in the Pottsville public
| schools and studied civil engineering
at night. He entered the services of
! the Reading company in October,
: 1900. Two months later his tirst pro
i motion came and lie became assistant
supervisor at Tamaqua. On January |
!0. 1905, Mr. Abbott was made as-'
isistant supervisor at Reading. Early!
I in March of the same year he became
assistant supervisor at Harrisburg, a
position which he held until June, I
when the place of supervisor at Al
lentown was given him.
In March, 1906, Mr. Abbott Was;
transferred to the New York division !
with headquarters at Philadelphia, i
where he remained until April. 1909,!
' when he was transferred to Pottsville, I
continuing until March, 1910. 'He j
then became division engineer of the
I Harrisburg division.
Mr. Abbott was a member of the!
Engineers' Society of Pennsylvania
since April. 1910. He was treasurer
of the society for three years, and
last December was elected president, i
Xo successor to Mr. Abbott in Har
j risburg has been announced.
iiHi riyir** —
w
NEW YORK, MARCH 17.-MEV/5 WAS RKCEIV- I
S CrTY TO-DAY THAT THE STI 1
' KANAWHA, BOUND FROM NEW YORK FOR RIO |
JANEIRO BY WAY OF NORFOLK. VA„ HAD SUNK L
AT SEA. A BOATLOAD OF SAILORS.FROM THE '[
fcNAWHA WAS PICKED VP VY T HE STEAMER i;
SANTA MARTA. EIGHT MEMBERS OF THE CREW P
!| ARE STILL MISSING.
, f AMERICANS IN MEXICO UNEASY ■ !
[ E! Paso, Texas, March 17.—Rapidly growing uneasiness !
! < | 1 >
'! !j north and west was evidenced to-day by reports from various »
i
1 '
' to the border or were preparing to leave. ;
I P
. 1 i
• j | lorp<
. 1 been instructed to investigate the reported unsuccessful at- • >
| tempt to torpedo the French Liner Patria. ; '
GOVERNOR MEETS LEADERS I *
® Reading.—Following his address be'ore the Hot:- ,
i I ing Conference here to-day Governor Brumbaugh had a con- |
« 1 crence with Republican leaders of Berks county, who ' |
N ' assured him of their support»for delegates. The Governor ( L
! declared in his speech that better housing conditions were { ■
'• > essential for the health and well being of the people of the 1
' State. He also said that better housing means more eft i
m ciency and an aid to real Americanism. , ►
1 R. R. PRESIDENTS APPOINT EMBARGO BODY j 1
A New York, March 17. —The presi<ien*s of all the eastei • f
[ t railroads met here to-day with Interstate Commerce Com- \ '
|'l missioner E. E. Clark and appointed a rommitt«e with power | ►
1 . to disapprove or. modify all railroad freight embargoes to the i !
end that the present freight congestion may be relieved! j j
' * New Orleans. March 17.—The battleship Kentucky ' :
sailed to-day for Vera Cruz. Captain Dismukes said the J t
j'j ► warship carried her'full complement of men.
: <t MARRIAGE LICENSES • »
Koukl.. .Jr.. Strrlton, «„,| D or» Kthcl Smith, ill}.
, William I.i>limini iJuncnn, .lllnilp, anil Mnrmirrl Kvrl> n llnrri. Caul
Uiithrrf uril.
«/w- II A n i»A
22 PAGES CITY EDITION
FRENCH REPULSE
FIVE SUCCESSIVE
GERMAN ATTACKS
Violent Assaults in Vicinity of
Vaux Arc Broken by
Heavy Fire
RUSSIANS ARE AC T1 V E
Move Forward Along the
Stripa; Counter Drives
Stopped by Italians
The German drive :i t I lie Verdun de
fenses lias again shifted its direction.
Strong assaults were made by the Ger
mans on the lines east of Verdun dur
ing the nigllt, live successive assaults
in the Vaux region being repulsed by
the French. Paris announces to-day.
| .The German attacks were of. the
j most violent character, but each was
1 broken up by the French curtain of
fire, the Paris war office declares. 1 Sotli
the fort and the village of Vaux were
objectives of the Germans, two attacks
being made on each, while a fifth was
delivered in an effort by the Germans
to douch from a protected roadway
southeast of Vaux village.
Suffer llcuvy i,os«os
The heavy lighting in t lie past few
days has been to the northwest of the
fortress and only lust night Paris re
ported massed attacks by the Ger
mans. who drove at the French po
sition at Dead Man's Hill only to be
forced back eastward toward the Cor
beaux woods, suffering heavy losses.
Although a bombardment has been
continued In this region, the infantry
attacks have not been renewed.
important op«rations may be de
[Continiied on Page 7]
Missing Sunbury Boys
in Marysville Yesterday
I Charles A. Bateman, Jr.. 11, and
jThtirman Miller, aged 10, two small
! hoys who disappeared from their
i home in Sunbury recently, were in
! Marysville yesterday when the Ttev.
10. A. Parson, of that town, gave them
1 lunch at noon. The ttev. Mr. Parson
i did not know the boys, or that they
had ran away from home, but last
evening when he saw their pictures
and descriptions in the Telegraph he
reported the incident to the Harris
burg police. The railroad police had
| been notified to watch for the boys, aa
they told the minister that they were
on their way to Altoona.

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