OCR Interpretation


Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, September 06, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038411/1918-09-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

NIGHT EXTRA—Yankees Pursue Fleeing Germans in Automobiles*-? 77 7 ITRA
HARRISBURG TELEGRAPH
* olor En&cpenbcnt ' <
LXXXVII— No. 198 16 PAGES Dal Matte"£t th" d Posi omc^it^H^sbur^' 88 * HARRISBURG. PA.. FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 6, 1918. ON V AT IV A IHl'l SHI I i'i C S S s 'two L CENTS 8 NIGHT EXTRA
BATTERED HUN ARMIES RETREAT
BEFORE ALLIES IN ALL SECTORS
Chicago Starts Winners in Second Game of World Series
HAM ENCIRCLED
BY POILU ARMY;
AISNE REACHED
ON LARGE FRONT
French Now Within Sight of
Laon, Having Taken Posi
tions Within Ten Miles of
Circat Base
FOE SEEKS TO SAVE
PART OF HIS GUNS
Great Fires Raging anil Ex
plosions Shake Whole of
Territory Over Which the
Germans Arc Retreating
By .-tssociateJ Press
Paris, Sept. 6. —3.35 P. M.—
General Debeney's army is
steadily advancing in the direc
tion of Ham which has been
completely encircled.
General Mangin's troops now
are in sight of Laon, having
reached positions within ten
miles of that city.
General Berthelot's soldiers
have reached the Aisne on a
large front.
General Humbert's army is
making steady progress and has
succeeded in completely remov
ing the German menace from
Nov on.
Canal <lu Sard Now
in Hands of the Allies
London. Sept. fi.—British troops
to-day capturta Neuvc Chupelle and
Bnssu.
field Marshal Haig's forces cross
ed the Canal du Ford on the whoie
front except from Havrineourt north
to the Scarpe.
Between the Somnie and the Oise
French troops have captured the
hlock of hills known as the Ontrc
court massif, which is within three
miles of Chauny.
The French have secured a good
hold on the northern hank of tc.e
Ailette and on the terrain between
that river and the Oise. They are
approaching if they are not actually
on. the llindenburg line at St. ,Oo
bam massif.
Enemy Artillery Eire
Dwindles lo Nothing
[Continued on I'nge 11.]
Willi tile liritish Armies in
France. Sept. B.—Australian troops
have cros.seft the river Soninte on a
wide front to the south of Peronne.
British trc-cps have captured the
towns of St. Christ, Brie, Ise Mesnil.
Doingt and Athies and now are ad
vancing to Ihe east of those places.
Along the whole front from Its
southern extremity to the Bapaumc-
Camhrai road the fire of the enemy's
big guns is dwindling. This indi
cates that the Germans are making
strenuous efforts to get their artil
lery behind the Hindenburg line.
Foe Uses Much Gas
The British have captured more
rosts around Havrincourt wood.
„ In many places north of the Sen
see river the Germans are firing thou
sands of gas shells indiscriminately.
Huns Fire Supplies
The Germans launched three coun
terattacks against Hill 63 in the Lvs
salient. Two were repulsed and once
the British fell back to the north of
the hill for a moment. Farther
north the British have reached the
crest of the important ridge north
east of Wuiverghem-
West of Ha Bassee the British have
reached Canteleux and are pushing
towards Violaines. Many fires are
raging and explosions are occurring
over the whole area from which '.he
Germans are retreating.
BUILDING OPERATIONS IN
STATE TO GIVE WAV TO WAR
Philadelphia, Sept. 6.—Construc
tion work in the state of an esti
mated value of more than $2500 will
in the future have to be approved
by the Pennsylvania Council of
National Defense.
The purpose of placing prospective
building work under the control of
the council is to check all construc
tion that fs not absolutely essential
to the prosecution of the war.
THE WEATHER
For HarrUbsrs and vicinity: Fnlr
and somrwhnt cooler to-night;
lowest temperature about M de
grees: Saturday fair and slight
ly warmer.
CHICAGO GETS
EARLY LEAD ON
BOSTON TEAM
123456789 RHE
Boston Am. BHE3EIEMBBIH Ml
Chicago Nat. mBQQZSBHBEi HM
Chicago, Sept. 6.—Despite the
| return of good baseball weather
| to-day tlie crowd for the second
; game of the world series between
L Boston Red Sox and Chicago
j Cubs was nearly as slow in as
sembling as yesterday. Half an
! hour before game time the in
' creased attendance was visible
'in only a few sections of the
I bleachers and stands.
Boston Players Happy
: The Boston men bubbled with
good nature as they went
{through their practice stunts,
'jigging when the band played
i ragtime, jostling their opponents
| and otherwise showing their con
! fidence of being able to repeat
; yesterday's victory.
The umpires to-day sacheted
to the lett, from yesterday's for
; mation, the movement placing
j Hildebrand at the plate; Klem
COUNTY'S WOMEN
; ORGANIZING FOR
FARM SERVICE
Each Township to Have Unit
to Develop Agriculture
to Fullest Extent
I Permanent organization of farm
j women of Dauphin county as a
j branch of the Agricultural Labor
j Service Committee of Pennsylvania
j Council of National Defense and
I Committee of Public Safety will be
effected soon, according to W. It.
| Zimmerman, farm labor manager in
| Dauphin county. Membership in the
; society is open to every woman ac
lively engaged in some department
of farm work, according to Mrs.
Frank B. Black- State Chairman cf
the Society of Farm Women.
Mr. Zimmerman has named the
following township chairmen in
Dauphin county: Conewago, Mrs.
J. K. Foltz, Elizabethtown. It. L. 4;
[Continued on Page 2.]
Bonniwell Files
Fair Play Papers
Nomination papers for Judge Eu
gene C. Bonniwell, of Philadelphia,
as candidate for governor on the
Fair Play ticket were filed at the
State Department at the capital to
day. over 7 000 names being on the
petitions entered. Papers were also
filed for these candidates for Con
gress-at-Large: Fred Ikeler, J. Cal
vin Strayer and S. R. Tarner. J. J.
Breen tiled 5.100 names from Phila
delphia and D. D. Bishop, 2,700 from
Allegheny county for the state ticket.
Nomination papers for Justice Alex
ander Simpson, Jr.. for Supreme
court justice on the non-partisan
ticket were filed from a dozen or
more counties, many attorneys being
among the signers. Justice E. J. Fox
tiled a few days ago.
Albert Davis. Scranton. filed to run
for senator in the Lackawanna dis
trict on the Surface Protection ticket.
Fair Play party nominations were
tiled as follows:
Congress—A. G. Dewalt 13th; J. J.
Casey. 11th; Evar. R. Clinton, >sth;
H. E. Grim. Bth.
Senate—W. E. Savacooi, 10th;
Thomas F. Harrison, 22nd; J. T.
Nulty, Bth.
House—A. C. Schaeffer, Ist Schuyl
kill; W. J. Morris, Ist Lackawanna;
A. E. Hiltebeitel, Bucks; J. J. Cron
in, 2nd Montgomery; and the follow
ing from Philadelphia: Edward Hin
kei, Francis W. Dougherty, 18th;
Julius J. Lewis. Nicholas di Lemmo,
3d; Edward Honer, C. H. Hersch.
19th; D. S. Mails, Ralph Ponzello, 3d;
T. J. Nestor. 10th.
at lirst base; Owens at second
and O'Day at third.
liusli anil Tyler the Twirlcrs
The batteries were announced as
Bush and Agnew for Boston and
Tyler and Killifer for Chicago.
Boston Chicago
Hooper, rf. Flack, rf.
Shean, 2b. Holloeher, ss.
Strunk. cf. Mann, if.
Whitcman, if. Paskert, cf.
Mclnnis, lb. Merkle. lb.
Scott, ss. Pick 2b.
Thomas 3b. Deal,
Agnew, c. Killifer, c.
Bush or Mays, p. Tyler or
Hendrix, p.
Hooper Walked, Slicau Fans
First inning, first half: Hooper
walked. On the hit and run, Shean
fanned. He interfered with Kil
lifer's throw and Hildebrand called
Hooper out at second. Strunk popped
to Deal. No runs, no hits, no errors.
Hack Gets First Hit
First inning, second half: Flack
singled. Holloeher forced Flack,
Bush to Scott, the batsman taking
tirst on a fielder's choice. Strunk
purposely dropped Mann's fljy to
short center and then forced Hol
[ Continued on Page B.]
FIFTY MEN SENT
TO CAMP DIX FOR
LIMITED SERVICE
Special Call Takes Another
Quota From Dauphin
County
Fifty men were sent to camp by
the local draft boards this afternoon
to fill the call for special limited ser
vice selective* for duty at Camp Dix,
Wrightstown, N. J. Thirty-two men
were sent by the city boards, and
eighteen by the county boards.
The men left at 3.15. They entrain
ed on a special at tlie Pennsylvania
station. They reported at 2 o'clock
to the local boards' offices for final
instructions.
The Elizabethville hoard sent its
eight men this morning. The quotas
were as fellows:
City Hoard No. 1
Clyde S. Atticks, 250% Broad street:
Lambras Droganis, 237 Broad street:
John M. Koch. 504 Woodbine: Joshua
l-'lickinger, 401 Iteily: Edward Ander
son. 1111 Green: George Kinneard.
220 Lewis; Edward Downey, 1278 S.
Cameron: Jacob Kinneard, 1008 N.
[Continued on Pago 2.]
Senate Paves Way
For Bone Dry Order
Washington, Sept. 6.—Under a
joint resolution adopted by the Sen
ate the President would have author
ity to make the entire country a
"dry" military zone at any time dur
ing the period of the war. The reso
lution, sponsored by Senator Kellogg
and adopted witli or.ly one dissenting
vote, went to the House for consid
eration.
The resolution carries precisely the
same regulation as to the declaration
of military zones as the Sheppard
amendment, which was attached as a
rider to the war time prohibition
amendment to the food stimulation
bill before it was adopted last week,
except that the Kellogg resolution
removes the time limit of July 1,
1919, as carried in the Sheppard
amendment.
The "Sheppard amendment is tied
up with the food stimulation bill.-
There is no certainty as to when the
food bill eventually will pass Con
gress, and Senate leaders, impressed
with the situation in Wisconsin and
elsewhere, in which "wet" spots have
appeared in the immediate neighbor
hood of "dry" zones, wanted to get
iiulcker action.
BAKKH ORDERS CLASS 1
CAPS FILLED FOR WAR
Washington. Sept. 6. —Secretary
Baker has ordered the chief of each
bureau in the War Department to
replace by December 31 all men
within the draft ages who would be
classified in Class 1 now assigned to
duty in Washington or in War De
partment branches elsewhere, with
men physically disqualified for gen
eral military service.
FOE IS UNABLE
TO HOLD LINES
AT ANY POINT
Continuing their pressure along the front from Rheims to
Ypres, the Allied forces are pushing back the Germans on virtually
this entire 150-mile line.-
Telling progress has been made in particular by the French
and Americans along the southern part of the front. The French
are before the old Hindenburg positions along a considerable
stretch in this sector, where they are closing in upon the bastion
of St. Gobain, the keystone of the German defensive system in
the west. <
Farther north the enemy armies still are in retreat before the
French and British who are capturing town after town as they
make rapid strides towards the line front which the Germans
attacked in their, offensive of last March. Ham is almost within
the allied grasp and Chauny is seriously threatened.
The Americans have moved up along the Aisne line, reaching
the ground immediately south of the river. The Germans north
oi the stream appear inclined to hall temporarily but there seems
to be no question that they will be speedily lorced to resume their
[Continued on Page 2.]
WM. JENNINGS
IS VINDICATED,
POTTER RULES
Buckwheat Coal Not Regu
lated by Government as
to Price or Delivery
William Jennings has been vindi
cated of the false charges brought
against him through the columns of
the Harrisburg Patriot that he had
violated fuel regulations by purchas
ing buckwheat coal without knowl
edge of the fuel administrator of
Perry county or through a local
dealer.
Koss A. Hickok, Dauphin county
fuel administrator, sot into telephone
communication with William Pot
ter, state administrator, at Philadel
phia, to-day and received the follow,
ing ruling from Mr. Potter:
"The state fuel administrator
does not consider No. 2 buck
wheat coal us a prepared size
and therefore it is not reg
ulated by the government as to
price or delivery."
In other words anybody is entitled
to buy any quantity of No. 2 buck
wheat coal anywhere wthout restric
tion.
I'ublie Indignant
There is a general public resent
ment over the Jennings attack which
is believed to be an effort to place a
leader in war activities jn this com
munity in a false position before the
people by the Harrisburg Patriot.
i'nder pretense of performing a
public duty the McCormick morning
organ lias endeavored to create the
impression through long distance in
terviews with the Peri\- County Puel
Administrator and otherwise that
William Jennings, of this city, who
has a country home at Duncannon
Perry county, has violated a fuel reg
ulation in purchasing buckwheat
coal without notifying the Perry
county administrator ■or buying
through a local dealer.
Mr. Jennings stated explicitly when
the matter was called to his atten
tion yesterday that he was given
to understand that there were no re
strictions on this grade of coal, which
is not available for general domestic
use owing to its size. To burn this
coal it is necessary to have special
boilers, grates and drafts.
Puel Administrator Hickock, of
Dauphin county, confirmed this state
ment, and it is known that others
last winter bought buckwheat coal
without restriction, for even during
[Continued on Page 11.]
64 YEARS IN BUSINESS AT
SAME PLACE NEW RECORD
MADE BY GEORGE BALSLEY
• "The way to get along in life is
to like everybody and think they
like you," said George lialsley this
morning, as he pared oft half u
pound of cream cheese in his ancient
little grocery store at the corner of
Second and Cranberry streets. Mr.
Balsev's observation was echoed by
half a dozen customers, whose coun
tenances reflected the merry one
of the man who for 64 years has
"tended" store in this same spot;
what is believed to be a record for
the whole United States. "If you
can find any man who has run a
grocery store for this period of time
Ml give him, let's see, a sack of
flour," challenged the venerable
merchant, who has just passed his
V Sth year.
Talk about old Harrisburg.
Charles Dickens would have loved to
saunter about this ancient booth,
CONGRESS GETS
POOR START ON
BIG WAR BILL
No Quorum Present When
Kitchin Calls Up $24,-
000,000,000 Measure
Washington, Sept. 6.—The war
revenue bill, greatest measure of its
kind ever brought before the legis
lative branch of any government,
passed into the second stage of its
progress through Congress to-day
when it came up to-day in the House
with less than one-third of the mem
bers ready in their seats to begin
its consideration.
In fact, there was not even a
quorum present when Democratic
Leader Kitchin arose to call up the
bill, which provides the means of
raising $24,000,000,000 to pay Amer
ica's share for the war for the com
ing year.
Representative Longworth. Re
publican, of Ohio, gave notice that
he would insist at all times on a full
attendance. The plan is to pass the
measure through the House and
have it ready for the Senate in about
ten days. The bill is considered by
both parties as a win-the.war meas
ure.
After almost an hour's delay the
House succeeded in getting to
gether aliout half of its membership
—but a quorum nevertheless—and
the actual consideration of the bill
began.
"Here's the bill." said the major
ity leader, holding aloft the sheaf of
pages which composed the volumi
nous measure, "which marks an
epoch in the history of the world.
ltj>roposes the issue of $16,000,000,-
000 in Liberty" Honds and to take
from the people in taxes more than
$8,000,000,000. We believe it can
and will be done without crippling
or hurting a single American indus
try or without financially embar
rassing a single individual.
"Eight billion dollars," continued
Mr. Kitchin, "is twice as much as
any nation since the beginning of
time has ever attempted to collect
from the people by taxation and it is
three times as much as the com
bined taxes und bonds pf the entire
Civil War."
| fragrant with memories of other
I generations, but so neat and efficient
to-day that the proprietor is busy
as a bapefoot boy in a bumble bee's
nest from morning to night.
Never a Vacation
"Since I started to keep store
here," observed Mr. Bulsey. lilllng a
kerosene can, "there have been
about thirty fellows come and go in
the grocery business right around
me. Guess they didn't understand
the philosophy of things as well as
I do. 1 just stayed on the Job and
never took a vacation, 'cept to go
lishin' on holidays, and the folks in
'.he neighborhood knew I was always
he*e to supply 'em."
Mr. tialsey began at the old sland
which was built in 1846, helping his
uncle, Andrew Poltz. His father was
[Continued on l'ngc o.]
1,100,000 BOCHES j
LOST IN BATTLE |
SINCE MARCH 21; ji
RESERVES GONE
Germans Still Have Enough
Men to Make Allies Fight
Hard For a Final Victory,
Which Is Now Inevitable
LL'DENDORFF MAY RISK j
ONE MORE OFFENSIVE!
American Army in France!
Next Spring Alone Will Ex- j
ceed Fighting Strength of
Entire Enemy Army
YANKEES PURSUE ]\
ELEEING ENEMY i
IN AUTOMOBILES j
By Associated Press
With the American Forces on \
the Aisnc Front, Sept. . —ln !
their endeavor to keep tip with |
tile Gerinans who are retreating
beyond the river Aisnc the Atner- :
leans have organized automobile
machine gun detachments with
three men to each ear.
.More titan thirty cars were op- > j
crating north of the Vcsle rivet' ;
early to-day.
The outfit had supplies of food !
and equipment to enable them to j
keep after the Germans for days.
V ./
By Associated Press
With the French Army in France,
Thursday. Sept. 5. —The retreat cf
the Germans, provoked in the lirst j
instance by their second defeat on :
the Marno, is continued and extended :
in order to release enough divisions
to form a maneuvering mass and <e j
gain a liberty of action of which
Marshal Koch's brilliant operations'
deprived them.
That is ;h£ expert opinion of the;
situation based on the best obtain-j
able evidence of the condition of urn;
German army and concerning the
views prevailing among the German'
officers.
Russian Reserves Used tip
The Germans still have resources j
that will enable them to continue'
a stout defense and oblige the Allies
to make a hard effort to clinch the'
victory, which thougli inevitable, mayi
still be further off than it would a,)- j
pear to be from optimistic specula- i
tions that have been based on recent!
successes.
Calculations based on the most ao-1
curate information available show
that the Germans have lost i.i 00.000,
men since March 21. Of this total
about a half million were killed, per-)
manently disabled or taken prisoner, •
leaving about 800,000 recuperable in
four or five months. Their reserves!
dwindled during the same time in I
about the same extent, which means!
that the reinforcements brought from'
Russia were used up.
Rig Yankee Army
The American Army in France
next spring will alone exceed the I
whole Sighting strength'of the Ger-{
man army, but in the meantime divl-'
sions released by the shortening of I
the line if the retreat is effected sue-1
cessfully and with a half million!
men recuperated from the wounded f
and 400,000 men of the 1920 class l
now training, will constitute ai
maneuvering army which General j
Ludendorff may be tempted to hazard |
another stroke.
Quiet Observance of
Lafayette Day Here

To-day is Lafayette Day. Through-1
out the city it was generally oh-:
served in a quiet manner as a day,
of Tespect to the Prench people in |
recognition of the service the dts-!
tlnguished Frenchman, Generul [
Lafayette, performed for the colonies j
during the days of the revolution.
At the request of Mayor Kotster, !
French flags were hung in front of j
business places and private resi- j
dences. Some of the city school j
teachers commemorated the day by j
reading to their pupils descriptions
of the brilliant Frenchman's life and
deeds.
YOU CAN BRING
THE BOYS HOME |
EARLIER BY LOANS
TO UNCLE SAM; BUY
WARSTAMPS
WATCH XXT WORK j
LATE NEWS
MARKETS CLOSE IS WEAK
o: , ntinued in large volume during
t> • t hour extreme losses among important stocks from
3 ' > 5 ponits. The closing was weak. Final prices on
liberty Bonds to-day were*. 3 l-2s, 101.84; first con.
4s, 05.06; second 4s 94.94; first con 4 1.4, 95.10; second
con. 4 1-4 s 94.32; third 4 l-l4s, 95.78. Announcement by
the Stock Exchange to-day of its intention to co-operate
jn the curtailment of credits provoked heavy liquidation
j ee- ire list. Sale sup- . atec 700,000 shares.

V
AMERICANS EXTEND LINE
With the American Army Along the Aisne—The Amer
ican line on the Aisne front extended this forenoon
Revillon and across ' deleted) and then southeasterly to
th- line held by the. "F- ";,ch. The latter had not yet left
, r, Rhr "■
SOLDIER J LLP FATHERLESS
amp Dlx N. J —Officer? and men cf the Sandstorm
di- '■ on, now stationed here, have rahed'sl?/JOO and in
v> it in Libert;,' Bonds to aid in supporting the two
•>. ■ .u French offu-r assigne :
t struct the divi i n while it was at Camp Cody,
v was killed recently in an automobile accident.
f LEADS WC LD IN SHIP PRODUCTION
"Hthingtcn—America now is leading the world irt
fh p production. Comparison of figures on deliveries an*
: •. by the Sit •* Board with uncni.-ixl fi&uv
... hf.output yards in the United Kingdom show that
| n' thi ft delivered 1,635,403 dead weight
for t:e Jeta liary ' wlriljc Bptteh yards have turned out.
!,! •' A 26 tons.
'1 L T -OAKp * DORSES
MILITARY TRAINING IN SCHOOLS
HARRLiBURL HARRISBURG SCHOOL
} . D IN SESSION THIS AFTERNOON VOTED
Ol SLY I O \CCEPT THE OFFER Or THE
HA' RTSBURG RESERVES TO GIVE MILITARY
IF '"RUCTION TO UPPER CLASSMEN IN THE
T' ) HIGH SCHOOLS. ROBERT A. ENDERS,
P ESI DENT OF THE BOARD; SUPERINTEND
ED F. E. DOWNES, CAPTAIN H. M. STINE AND
TH PRINCIPALS OF THE TWO HIGH SCHOOLS.
W' U APPOINTED ON A COMMITTEE TO AR
RANGE THE DETAILS.
STANDLEY SUCCEEDS NULTON
Annapolis, Md.—Captain Louis H. Nulton, command
ant of midshipmen at the Nava! Academy for the last
several yea, ~ he- r-r. detached from that duty and is
succeeded by Captain William H. Standley, formerly in
Charge of buildings and grounds at the academy, it was
announced here yesterday.
. TWO TAKEN IN BOMB PLOT
t cago —John W ("Shorty' ) Wilson, a leader of the
I. ' . W., and Mrs*. M inriic' Wymann, sister of William
D. Haywood, convicted secretary-treasurer of the I. W.
V • rfe taken into cu. (ody early to-day in a raid made
on- j west side house in connection with the bomb ex
pl : nin the Federal building on Wednesday, resulting in
the death of four persons and .the injury f more than
thirty others. In keeping with a plan- to safeguard all
important public buildings, double guards were placed
about the city hall, county buildings and jail last night.
THREE HELD FOR HIGHWAY ROBBERY
lUnAburg— Herman Gillipasie, SSbert Gaynor and
Enoch Myaft, who are alleged to have knocked down
M :.: Gros; and taken $25 from him last night, were held
f our? under S3OO bdl at this afternoon's session cf
pe 'lee court.
Washington—The Navy Department was informed
to-day that the American steamer Lake Owens had been
s ruby a submarine. Five mtm'tfz of the civilian err."
MARRIAGE LICENSES
Rny Stoncxlfcr nntl Annie K. Allen, Hnrrlahurai Sidney Coblena
and Sunnn I. Rube, ilnltlmore.

xml | txt