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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, September 09, 1918, Image 10

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10
LAWYERS TO AID
IN FILLING OUT
QUESTIONNAIRES
Attorneys Will Sit Each Week
Day in Courtroom No. 1
to Help Registrants
• _____
Chairmen of the three legal ad
visory boards for the city appointed
by President Wilson President
Judge, George Kunkel, Charles C.
Stroh and A. Carson Stamm—have
made plans to assist in the answer
ing of questionnaires for the con
venience of registrants. It has been
decided to divide the bar into three
large groups who will meet daily in
courtroom No. 1 as soon as the first
questionnaires are sent out.
The hours will be from 11 to 1:1
4 to 6 and 7 to 9 o'clock every week-!
day until all the questionnaires have I
been sent out. City draft boards will j
lie requested to send wMh each ques
tionnaire a printed notice of these
hours.
Mr. Stroh, president of the Dau
phin County Bar Association, an
nounced to-day that a meeting of all
members of the bar has been called
for Wednesday afternoon at 1.30
o'clock in courtroom No. 1, when the
three groups will be definitely de- j
cided upon and each member will bej
assigned. It is anticipated that thel
County chairman will follow the |
plans of the three city chairmen.
Early in the year members of the I
county bar devoted many hours!
helping the registrants fill in their!
questionnaires and Judge Kunkel,
Mr. Stroh and Mr. Stamm said to-day j
that they believe the same patriotic |
response will be shown this time.
Soviet Russia Suffers
Under Burden of Hate;
Life Loses All Value
Stockholm, Sunday, Sept. S.—
Bolshevik Russia is suffering the
consequences of class hatred in its
most violent expression. Human
life has lost all value and foreigners
and Russians alike are at the mercy
f officials who kill without trial.
Such were the conditions, at any
rate, when the Associated Press cor
respondent at Moscow left Russia
recently and traveled hence with the
party of American refugees that has j
irrived here.
Since War Minister Trotzky pro- |
voked the Czecho-Slovak opposition |
by breaking his jiledge to let the I
fzech-Slovaks leave Russia in peace j
the class hatred upon which Bol
shevism is based has revealed it- j
self in its full horror. Before the j
Social-Revolutionists broke with the j
Bolsheviki they acted as a check |
upon capital punishment. Threat
ened by the victorious Czechs on the
Volga, the entente movements from
Archangel and Siberia and general !
internal uprisings, the Bolshevik
leaders are madly prodding their
Suspected opponents and filling the
prisons with hostages.
Ballots Drop Over Maine
Today in Fall Election;
Governorship Involved
Portlund, Me., Sept. 9.—Upon
Maine voters to-day devolved the
duty of deciding whether the pres
ent Republican state administration,
headed by Governor Carl E. Milli
ken and members of the Republican
delegation in Washington, includ
ing a United States Senator and four
Congressmen, should be retained. In
each case the present incumbent
was a candidate for re-election and
was actively opposed by a Demo
cratic nominee.
Governor Milliken was opposed by
Bertrand G. Mclntire, of Waterford,
and United States Senator Bert M. I
Fernald had as his opponent Elmer
E. Newbert, of Augusta.
CONTRACTORS' OUTFIT
—OF—
-155 Head of Horses and Mules
100 Dump and Lumber Wagons
80 Sets Heavy Double Harness
—AT—
PUBLIC SALE
On Friday, September 13, 1918
at 8:30 A. M.
At Middletown, Pa.
We will sell the following articles without reserve, consigned
to us by Kieffer and Fox, Contractors. These horses and mules have
been working for the U. S. Government the last six months in the
building of their aviation warehouses at Middletown and New Cum
berland. Pa., and having finished the plants they have no further
use for them, and will be sold for the high dollar. This is positively
one of the largest and best contracting outfits ever offered at public
sale in Eastern Pennsylvania, consisting" of 155 Head of Horses and
Mules as follows —
85 Head of Extra Good Big Draft Horses, as good as can be found
anywhere; also some good big second-hand horses. These horses
consist of extra good big mated teams, single truck horses, wagon
horses, farm chunks, single line leaders and general purpose horses.
These horses range in age from lour to ten years and will have
them weighing up to 1600 pounds each.
70 Head of Extra Good Big Mules. Among this lot of mules you
will find them as good as grows, with size, shape and bone, and
will have them weighing up to 2800 pounds to the pair, consisting
of closely-mated teams, single mules, single line leaders and a few
pairs smooth, fat mare mules.
100 Wagons of All Kinds, consisting of 60 dump wagons, mostly
all bought new this spring; 40 lumber and spring wagons, 2-, 3- anil
4-horse wagons; about half of these wagons were only in use the last
three months and all are in A 1 shape.
80 Sets Heavy Double Harness. Most of this harness was bought
new this spring. Seven sets spring-wagon harness, 200 collars, 200
bridles, 75 sets checklines and many other articles too numerous to
mention. '
p. S—lf interested you can't afford to miss this chance, as each
and every article will positively be sold for the high dollar, and will
say this will be one of the largest contracting outfits I ever sold.
You certainly can buy something at this sale that will be userul
as well as make plenty of money.
Don't Forget the Day and Date,
FRIDAY, SEPT. IS. 1018—8.30 IX THE MOItXIXG
A Liberal Credit Will Be Given
D. B. KIEFFER & CO.
MONDAY EVENING,
STREETS CEESR
OF AUTOMOBILES
Police Spot Few Slackers on
Second of "Gasless" ,
Sundays
"Gasles<? Sunday" was observed in
true 4juerican style in Harrisburg
and Vlcitjitv yesterday. Front street
looked as though it were just fln'.sh
ed iujd Had not yet been opened to
traffic. The main traffic arteries
leading from the city into regions
where the roads are a delight for mo
torists, were emptied of all but farm
ers' wagons and occasional motor de
live*' wagons. Boys on bicycles rode
up and down the River Road four
abreast, and no one disputed their
right to the entire road. A vontan
wheeling a baby carriage op the i
die of Front street was a sight that!
made old timers rub their eyes and
look again. .... I
There were occasional violations. I
however. Wherever a motorist was i
seen in the streets the occupants of
his car in most cases looked selt
conscious and sheepish. They could
hardly be called "pleasure ride's,
judging from their faces. '
An official of the Harrisburg Mo
tor Club recorded the following num
bers of apparent pleasure cars in the
city streets: 341.105. owned by
Aviation General Supply Station.
Middletown; 357.069, Carrie A einor.
Gettysburg: 338.199. James B Aik
ens. State College: 86,351, John F.
Ritter. Carlisle. .
At Shiremanstown there are fort>-
eight automobiles, this official said-
Onlv four of them were out. rney
ran to a church situated less ln^ n |
half a mile from tbe to^ n „. T "°;
owners are S. S. Rupp, J. C. We't ~
Jacob Slieely and J. W. Miller.
Captain Thompson, of tl } e 11 ,ol . 1 5t
department, reported the following,
list of eighteen numbers and names,
turned in by the police yesterday. oL
which four were front Harrisburg.
369, State I.unatic Hospital: 330,-
955* D. S. Helper, 1622 Market; 800,-
711 Bertram J. Sayles, Caytai Ord
nance R. C.. 1711 Forster; 78.036, J.
K. Beale, Lemoyne; 142,109. May C.
Hair. Carlisle street, Gettysburg,
155.719. Nestor It. Balr, New Cum
berland: 3.581, I. W. Sutton, '.'H
South Fifteenth street. Philadelphia, |
27,829. Fred B. Ammcrnian, .a-j
na'an street. Carbondale: 22,088, T. X. j
Risser. 5008 Baltimore avenue, Phil
adelphia; 29.334, Smith and McClen,
319 Main street. To wanda; 167,236,
B F Garver. Third street. New Cum
berland: 108,045. A. M. Whitmyer,
Marysvllle: *63,637, Charles Z. Weiss,
Abon street, Lebanon: 290,354, J. K,
Robb, Mechanicsburg; 320,077, G.
W. Gel wicks. 31 West Green,
Meehanicsburg. and 356,920, F. W.
Kennedy, 508 North American build
ing, Philadelphia.
Crowd of Wrongdoers in
Jail Awaits Hearings
Thp usual Saturday and Sunday
crowd of wrongdoers are in the
county jail awaiting hearing this af
ternoon on disorderly conduct
charges About seventeen were roped
in by the police on charges ranging
froni panhandling and drunkenness
to felonious assault and battery.
Aaron Swager, Harriet Smith and
Jennie Swager were in a drunken row
at 665 Broad street, at 3.35 this morn
ing, and Swager cut one of the wo
men with a knife. They were locked
up.
Ben Daugherty was arrested on an
original charge shortly after mid
night. It is said he had packages
of powdered alum which he was sell
ing to credulous negroes as heroin.
He was selling it at get-rich-quick
prices.
GKADIK ANTHONY
..Gradie Anthony, aged 19, died at
his home, 644 Calder street, Saturday.
Funeral services will be held to- mor
row afternoon at 2o'clock in the Har
ris A. M. E. Zion Church, the Kev.
Mr. Briscoe officiating. Burial will
be made in the Lincoln cemetery.
AMERICAN BLUE
JACKETS FIGHT
FOR RUSS TOWN
Yankees Get Out of Danger
ous Position; in Swamps
For Two Days
I
i Archangel, Northern European Rus-
I sin, Sept. 9.—A detachment of Amer
j ican blue jackets was among the
j Entente Allied forces fighUng re-
I cently In the vicinity of Obersers-
I kaya, which resulted in the capture
of the town. The Americans success!
fully extricated themselves from a
drngerous predicament when sur
rounded by the enemy.
The Americans were a part of the
expedition which approached the
town from the rear some time in ad
vance of other forces moving in an
other direction. Completely surround
ed the Americans fought their way
through but found themselves Im
bedded in deep swamps through
which they struggled for more than
two days.
RUTH BATS^RED
SOX TO VICTORY
short passed ball. Shean was given
credit for a stolen base by the offi
cial scorer, Shean having started
on the pitch Whiteman walked.
Hcndrix began to warm up for
Chicago. Mclhnis forced Shean at
third, Tyler to Deal. Whiteman
went to second on the play. Mcln
nis was safe at first. Deal's throw to
double him being late. Tyler tossed
up three straight halls and then put
over two strikes to Ruth. White
man and Mclnnis scored on llufh's
terrific three base hit to right center.
The stands were in an uproar. Scott
flied to I'askert. Two runs, one hit,
no errors
Killefcr Hits Into Double
Fifth inning, Chicago: Pick
popped a hit over Ruth's head.
Hooper came in and took Deal's
post. Killefer hit into a double play,
Ruth to Scott to Mclnnis. No runs,
one hit, no error.
Boston's Half Featureless
Fifth inning. Boston: Tyler took
Thomas' dribbler and tossed him out.
Deal made a nice play oh Agncw's
hopper and had his man at first.
Hooper sent a high fly to Flack. No
runs, no hits, no errors.
Ruth Walks Rival Twirlcr
Sixth inning, Chicago: Tyler walked
for the second time. Flack forced
Tyler at second, Ruth to Shean.
Shean threw out Hollocher at first.
Black going to second. Thomas
threw out Mann at first. No runs,
no hits, no errors.
Deal Nails Sliean
Sixth inning, Boston.: Deal made!
a sparkling play on Shcan's grounder
and got him at first. Pick tossed out
Strunk at first. Tyler took White
man's grounder and threw him out.
No runs, no hits, no errors.
Cults Put in Pinch Hitters
Seventh inning, Chicago: Scott
threw out Paskert. Merkle strolled,
the fourth ball being low. Zeider
batted in place of Pick. Zeider also
walked. O'Farrell batted for Peal.
He hit into a double play, Scott to
Shean to Mclnnis. No runs, no hits,
no errors.
More Applause For Ruth
Seventh inning, Boston: Zeider
went to third base for the Cubs. 1
Wortman went to second in place of
Pick. Mclnnis singled into left tield.
The stands rocked with applause
when Ifuth came to bat Ruth sacri
ficed, Zeider to Merkle. Tyler took
Scott's grounder and threw to Zeider
who touched out Mclnunia on the
line. Scott reached first. Wortman
took Thomas' high fly. No runs, one
hit, no errors.'
Chicago Ties Score
Eighth inning. Chicago: Killefer
walked. Hendrix batted for Tyler.
Hendrix drove.a long single into left
tield, Killefer going to second, on a
wild pitch Killefer went to third and
Hendrix to second. There is one ball
and one strike on Flack. Foul, strike
two. Mclnnis took Flack's grounder
and touched him out, Killefer and
Hendrix holding the bases. Hollocher
up. McCabe was put in to run for
Hendrix. Killefer scored while
Shean iwas throwing out Hollocher,
McCabe taking third. Mann up.
.McCabe scored on Mann's pretty
single to left. Paskert up. Thomas
threw out Paskert at first. Two runs,
fwo hits, no errors.
Boston Gets Third llun
Eighth inning, Boston: Douglas'
went into the box for .Chicago.
Schang batted in place of Agnew.'
Schang shot a single over sccontL
On a shoit passed ball Schang went
to second. Hooper sacrificed and l
when Douglas threw wildly past;
•Vlerkle, Schang scored and Hooper
reached second. One ball and two)
strikes on Shean. Foul. Ball two.
Shean flied to Mann. Strunk l'lew
out to Paskert. Zeider threw out
Whiteman at first. One run, one
hit, one error.
Bush Goes in For Boston
Ninth inning, Chicago: Schang
now catching for Boston. Merkle
singled over second. Zeider walked
for the second time, and Ruth was
called from the box. He hud weak
ened in the last two innings. Ruth
went to left field in place of White
man Bush vent into the box for
Boston. Bush sent a strike over to
Wortman on the first pitch. Mc
lnnis took Wortman's attempted
sacrifice and threw to Thomas, forc
ing Merkle. Wortman reached first,
Zeider second. Barber batted for
Killefer. Barber hit into a double
play, Scott to Shean to Mclnnis. No
runs, one hit, no errors.
Horses Draw Motorcar;
, "Saves Gasjo Win War"
Burlington, N. J., Sept. 9.—How
to solve the problem of getting to
town when the old family carriage
has been sold and the anti-motoring
edict of Mr. Garfield prevents using
gasoline on Sunday in the motorcar
which supplanted it was solved yes
terday morning by a Burlington
farmer.
Rigging a swingletrce to the axle
of his $3,000 touring car he hitched
up a team of farm horses, decorated
the car with the Hags of the Allied
nations and drove the strange out.lt
to town, in order that neighbors
might not misunderstand his pa
triotic motives, the horses carried a
large sign reading:
"We are helping Uncle Sam save
gas to win the war!"
Crowds cheered the outfit as it
rolled through the city.
CORN CROP DECLINES
Washington, Sept. 9.— Heavy de
cline in the condition of the corn
I crop caused a reduction of 317,000,-
i 000 bushels in to-day's Department
I of Agriculture forecast of production
j compared with last month's estimate.
Spring wheat production, however,
showed improvement with an in
crease of 21,000,000 bushels in tlie
estimated prcductlon, making a to
tal wheut crop this yeur of 899,000.-
000 bushels.
HARRISBURG TELEGRAPH
America Has the Will
to Win, Says Dr. Klein
in Rotary Address
Dr. H. M. Klein, professor of
history at Franklin and Marshall
College. Lancaster, made a stirring
address before the Haarrlsburg no
tary Club at Its noon meeting in
the Y. M C. A. to-day on "Keeping
up the Morale at Home."
"We here at home are at the very
heart of things, and when the heart
beats feebly the life-blood llowing to
our bows In France runs slowly."
"We must not expect the boys over
there to keep up our spirits, although
all their letters breathe an atmos
phere of good cheer and It Is our
duty to send them encouraging letters
and to let them know we are back
of them to the last man in our de
termination to win."
"The country is confronted with
two grave perils—that of too much
optimism due to war conditions as
they stand to-day, and the possibility
of an indecisive peace."
"The American people have reach
ed the stage of determination—we
have tlie will to win."
These were a few of the thoughts
in a sparkling address that brought
the Kotarians to their feet with
shouts that set the rafters ringing.
Dr. Klein has been engaged all sum
mer in Y. M. C. A. recruiting and
camp work.
CAPT. STACKPOLE
WRITES OF RETREAT
[Continued from First Page.]
speaks highly of their work. He
was himself slightly wounded in one
arm which he refers to as a scratch.
For several weeks the 110 th Regi
ment has been in the active zone. In
one letter ho says "We have dur
ing the past two weeks undergone
some of the heaviest shelling and
machine gun fire the war has 3csn
and other incidents have occurred
which will be the subject of my
theme some day, 1 hope, around a
warm fire. • • Naturally, my
company has suffered rather heavily
in casualties, the big majority being
wounded, but yesterday I received
somt new men ta partly rehabilitate
my command.
Germans Retreat Rapidly
"The Germans have retreated sd
rapidly the past week that it has
been all wo could do to keep up
with them. At present we are in a
small woods in • a reserve position,
getting a much-needed rest. I'ltc
strain was more than any of us, per
haps, appreciated and it's a great re
lief to eat a meal and not have dirt
scattered all over it from bursting
shells. Shell shock got a good many
of my men and it's a pathetic sight
to see a complete breakdown of the
nervous system.
The lloinc Support
"It helps over here." he ob
serves, speaking of the big pa
triotic parade in Harrisburg on
July 4, "to know about the in
terest and enthusiasm and war
work under way by all at home.
One feels he is being supported
to the limit and it is a comfort
able feeling." * (
"Have seen a good part of a cer
tain section of France in the last
month and a half. We are ever on
the move and indulge in trench war
fare only to the extent of digging in
where we happen to spend the night
or if we arc shelled. • *
"I've learned from persona! ex
perience that the American, man for
man. is above the German in courage
and pep. Americans in this present
counteroffeneit c have worsted Prus
sians and Bavarian reserves in hand
to-hand Combat. They are the Kai
ser's best scrappers and aren't in
the habit of yelling 'Kamerad,' as
did most of those against whom my
company was pitted. I learned also
just what war means and how de
structive the big shells are—ruined
towns and hole-dotted fields with
shell holes big enough to put a horso
and wagon in."
(u American Sector
"We have drifted into a sector
now that is eminently American, very
satisfactorily so. American trucks
predominate on the roads and Amer
ican aviators patrol the heavens with
their red, white and blue symbol
showing plainly on the under part of
their wings. Found a
dugout already constructed when 1
pulled in here with my depleted com
pany last night. We are still fight
ing in the open and matters look
y cry favorable for the Allies."
NKW YORK CURB STOCKS
following quotations furnished by
Howard A. Riley and Company, 212
North Third street, Harrisburg, Pa.;
Land Title Building, Phlla., Pa.; 20
Broad street. New York City:
INDUSTRIALS
Last Sale
Aetna 10
Carlight 214
Chevrolet 120
Maxim .'••• 14
Smith 7-16
U S Ship 6!4
United Motors 30
Wright 114
INDEPENDENT OILS
Last Sale
Barnett 14
Boston and Wyoming .... 17
Cosden 6%
Federal 3 94
Glenrock • •
Houston 77
Island 3%
Int Pete 1314
Met Pete IV4
Midwest 34
Okla P and It 6%
Okmulgc-e 2%
Sapulpa 614
MINING
Last Sale
Atlanta ..' 4
Big Ledge 13-16
Boston and Montana ..... 42
Caledonia 45
California and Jerome ... %_
Canada 1 15-16
Heel a 4
Jumbo Ext 1"
Mother Lode 34
Nipisaing
Ray Hercules 4%
Tonopah Ext 1 ®~ 4 ®
West End 1 4 *32
White Caps 16
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Chicago, Sept. !).—Board of 1 rade
closing; . .. ,
Corn October, 1.a7&; Noiembeq
1 57 %
"oats October. 7214; November.
''pork September. 41.20; October.
"'Lard October. 26.85; November.
J6 j°tibs "" October, 24.00; . November,
23.90.
PHILADELPHIA STOCKS
Philadelphia, Sept. 9.—Stocks closed
heavy.
Baldwin Locomotive 89
General Asphalt . 30
General Asphalt. Pfd. 61
Ijike Superior Corporation .... 17%
Lehigh Navigation 69%
Lehigh Valley • 60%
Pennsylvania Railroad 43%
Philadelphia Electric 21%
Philadelphia Rapid Transit .... 26%
Reading 66%
Storage Battery 53
Union Traction 37
United Gas Improvement 64%
United States Steel 109%
York Railways ...•. 8
York Railways. Pfd. 30%
MARKETS
NKW YORK STOCKS
Chandler Brothers and Company,
members of New York and Philadel
phia Stock Exchanges—3 North Mar
ket Square, Harrisburg; 336 Chestnut
street, Philadelphia; 34 Pine street.
New York—furnish the folfowlng
quotations: Open. Close.
Allis Chalmers 31% .31
American Can 46% 45%
Am Car end Foundry ... 86Vi 86
Amcr Loci 66 6594
Amer Smelting 7894 7714 :
American Sugar 108 108 I
Amer.Woolens 57% 5694
Anaconda 68% 67
Atchison 86 94 8 6
Baldwin Locomotive .... 92 89%
Baltimore und Oiiio 55 55
Bethlehem Steel 85% 84
Butte Copper 26% 25 14
Canadian Pacific 16 094 1 60%
Central Leather 68 67 94
Chesapeake and Ohio ... 57 57
Chicago K 1 and Pacific . 2694 36
Chino Con Copper 39% 3914
Col Fuel and Iron 16% 16%
Consol Gas 47 47
Crucible Steel 4294 41%
Distilling Securities .... 56% 56%
Erie 1594 1594
General Motors 12 494 122
Great Northern Ore subs 32 32
Hide and Leather 20% 19%
Hide and Leather pfd ... 87% 87%
Inspiration Copper 53% 53
international Paper .... 34% 34 94
Kennecott 33% 32
Kansas City Southern .. 18% IS%
Lackawanna Steel 85 84%
Lehigh Valley 61 60%
Mexwell Motors 27 94 37 9t
Merc War Ctfs 27% 36%
Mere War Ctfs Pfd 102 101%
Mex Petroleum 103 94 101%
Miami Copper 29 28%
Midvale Steel 53' 52%
New York Central 74% 73%
N Y NH and H 44V* 44%
New York Ont and West 21% 217s
Norfolk und Western ... 105 105
Northern Pacific 90% 90
Pennsylvania Railroad .. 43 % 44
Railway Steel Spg 68% 66%
Reading '. 89% 88%
Republic Iron and Steel . 91% 90%
Southern Pacific 87% 5614
Southern Ry 26% 25 94
Studebuker 46 45%
Union Pacific 12494 123%
U S 1 Alcohol 119% 119%
U S Steel 112 109%
U S Steel pfd 110% 110%
Utah Copper 85 83 94
Virginia-Carolina Chem. 54% 54
Westinghouse Mfg 43% 43
Willys-Overland 20% 2094
PHILADELPHIA STOCKS
Philadelphia. Sept. 9. Wheat
Nc -- --- 1 "•
,\o. 4. soil, red, 82.22,
Bran Tiie uiurKel Is steady, soft
a later, pel ton. He 50© 47.0u; spring
t , - .11. |ll 00 (ill 45.00.
Corn The market is easier; No. 2.
yellow, as to , grade and location,
[email protected]; No. 5. yellow, $1.80®1.90.
Oats The market is higher;
No. 2. white, new, 79 %c; No. 3, white,
77%® 78c.
Butter The market is higher;
western, creamery, extra. 52c; near
by prints, fancy, 58© 60c.
Eggs— Mai kvi mill. Pennsylvania,
ami otliei nearby firsts, free cases,
$14.40© 14.70 pel case, do., current re
ceipts. free cases, $13.80® 14.10 per
case; western, extras, firsts, free cases,
$l4 40©'14.70 per ease; do., firsts, free
cases, $13.80© 14.10; fancy, selected,
uai K>> (i o.">c per dozen.
Cheese The market is firm;
Neii York aiiu Wiseuusm. tull milk.
26% @27 %c.
Refilled Sugars Market steady;
powdered. 8.45 c: extra fine, granulat
ed. 7.26 c.
Live Poultry Market steady;
fowls, 34 ©36 c; young, softnieated
roosters. JJ©27C; young, slaggy roost
ers, 26® 27c; old roosters. 26® 27c;
spring chickens, not leghorns. [email protected];
leghorns, 32©34 c; ducks, Peking,
spring 32©33 c; d0.,01d,[email protected]; Indian
Runner. 27®29c; spring ducks. Long
Island, nigber. 36©37 c. turkeys. 27®
355, geese, nearby. 25®260i western.
25®26c.
Dressed Poultry Firm; turkeys,
nearby, eiioice 4o fancy. 39®40c; do.,
fair to good. [email protected]; do., old, 37®38c,
do., western, choice to fancy, 37®38c;
do., fair 10 good. [email protected]; do., old turns,
30c old common. 20c; fresh killed
fow'ls. fancy, [email protected]; do., smaller
sizes,[email protected]; old roosters,2 8 94c; spring
IdtUllU, (U'liOC, IIVf.C.I
;yui6, la lie y, do., fc'uod lo
Choice, 32© 34c, do., small Sizes. 28 y
30c; dressed Pekln ducks higher, 34©
36c; old. 30©32 c; Indian Runners, 27©
27 92c; broiling chickens, western, 36®
40c.
Potatoes The market is steady;
New Jersey, No. 1, $L00®1.25
pel basKel. d., No 2, so®ouc
pel basket, do.. 100-lb. bugs. No. t.
[email protected], extra quality; do.. No. 2,
$2.50© 2.75; Pennsylvania. 100 lbs.,
L.-.e'.— , .. luin. oiu, pei too iu*
sLi>u©L7s, western, per 100 lbs., $1.4.
@1.55; Maine, per 100 tbs., [email protected]
1.80, Delaware and Muryland. per 104
lbs.. 90curi.io. Michigan, per 100 lbs.
il.i>o©l-iO, Florida, per barrel,
$ 2.00 © -.00, Florida, per busf.el.
Hamper, [email protected]; Florida, per 150-ib.
bugs, l 00©3.00. North Carolina, per
out i el, 41.50© 4.00; South Carolina, per
••-rrri 11..-no i.oo Norfolk, per bar
rel. $2.00® 4.75; Eastern Shore, per
barrel. [email protected]
Tallow The market is steady;
prime, city, in tierces, 17 9ic; city,
special, loose, 18 %c; 'prime country,
i.e. Uuia, ia*i©ib%c. edible. lu
IH ©la %c. ,
Flour The market is steady;
and weak; winter wheat. new.
100 per cent. Hour. $10.2u©10.50 per
barrel; Kansas wheat, new. sll.oo®
11.25 per barrel Spring wheat, new.
sll.oo® 11.25.
Hay Scarce and firm; timothy.
No. 1. large and small bates, $28.50®
29.00 per ion. No. 2. small bale*, $37.00
©27.50 per ton; No. 3. [email protected] per
leu, sample, sl2.so®lboU per ton. no
... . . ail Mi per ton.
" Clover Light mixed. $26.50®
27.00 per tun, No. 1. light, mixed.
$24.00 d per ton; No. 2. light mix
ed, $19.00®2000 per ton; no grade,
I i.oo o 50.VU oer ton. %
CHICAGO CATTLE
By dissociated I'rcss
Chleugo, Sept. 9. (U. S. Bureau
of Markets). Hogs Receipts,
21,000; market generally 25c higher
tflan Saturday; packet grades mostly
50c above Friday; top, 20c to 3Uc;
butcher", $19.40®20.20; light. $19.50©
°0 30; packing. $18.65®>19.30; rough,
$l7 75© 18.50; pigs, good and choice,
$18.50 @19.00.
Cattle' Receipts. 28,000; steers,
good and better, steady to strong;
others and butchers' stock slow to
25c lower. Calves slow to lower.
Sheep Receipts. 40,000; market
slow and irregular, steady to 25c
lower; good, fat classes relatively
scarce.
LEGAL NOTICES
CLERK OF ORPHANS' COURT
Notiee is hereby given that the fol
lowing accounts -have been presented
to the Clerk of the Orphans' Court of
Dauphin County at Harrisburg, Penn
sylvania, which accounts have been
passed and allowed and the same will
be presented to the Orphans' Court of
said County for confirmation nisi Oc
tober 8, 1918. at 10 o'clock A. M. And
if no exceptions are filed thereto they
will be confirmed absolutely four days
and final account of Harris
burg Trust Company, guardian for
Kegina Barbara Kirchhoff, dee'd.
Filed September 7, 1918.
•JAMES E. LENTZ.
Clerk of Orphans' Court.
Comm. of Penna.. Ins. Dept.—Liqui
dation of the American Union Fire
Insurance Co. (Dauphin County C.
, p. No. 25; Comm. Docket 1913).
The undersigned's third account In
the above-named matter is stated, and
awards ten (10) per cent, disi.ibution
to claimants. Exceptions to the same
are to he filed not later than Septem
ber 20, 1918, immediately after which
date the account, and exceptions, if
any. will be referred to Court.
Charles A. Ambler, Ins. Com'r,
(statutory liquidator).
Harrisburg.
tours TROOPS rosr
STEADILY FORWARD
[Continued from First I'rc.]
St. Quentin, and now nre only fi\*e I
miles from the Hlndenbui g line in;
this area, where the German retreat!
has been slowest -and accompanied!
by the greatest resistance.
Successes also have been scored!
by the French in the St. Quentin j
region, where their lines join the I
British. There have been indications;
that the Germans intended making
a stand along the Crozat canal, de
fending thq stronghold of La Fere,
the principal outlying protection of;
the St. Gobain massif on the north.!
This plan appears already to have!
been frustrated by the French, how
ever, a crossing of the canal "op
posite Lle7 about three miles north
west of La Fere, having been forced
last night by General Petain's
forces.
Foe Is Desperate -
lblscwhere the French are right
up to the Crozat positions along vir
tually the entire length of the canal
with their infantry only four miles!
from St. Quentin and their cavalry
patrols hard upon La Fere. 1
There has been no further marked
advance by the French along the
more southerly stretches of the St.
Oobatn defenses before Laon, where
the German resistance now is of the
most desperate character. The enpmy
is reported to have massed enormous
numbers of guns in this region and
to he hurriedly strengthening the al
ready strong positions.
Berlin Claims Success
Infoads have been made upon the
ruubsif in the west by the French,
however, and there are no indica
tions that they intend accepting the
stabilizing of the line in this sector
whieh the Germans so evidently de
sire. Berlin reports an attack by
the French along this line yesterday
but declares it was repulsed uiong
the whole front with heavy losses to
the attacking forces.
Northeast of Soissons the Germans
reacted, counterattacking in the
Luffaux rcgiqn in strong force. The
French repulsed the drive and took
prisoners from five different regi
ments —an indication of a consid
erable massing of forces by the
enemy in this limited area.
End Is Not Yet
The German retrograde movement
in Flanders seemingly is not at an
end. Their artillery now is reported
to have been removed to the east of
LEGAL NOTICES
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE
CONSTITUTION SUBMITTED TO THE
CITIZENS OF THE COMMONWEALTH
FOR THEIR APPROVAL OR REJEC
TION, AT THE ELECTION TO BE
HELD ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5.
1918, BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF
PENNSYLVANIA. AND PUBLISHED
BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY-OF
THE COMMONWEALTH, IN PURSU
ANCE OF ARTICLE XVIII OF THE
CONSTITUTION.
Number One.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to article
nine, section four of the Constitu
tion of the Commonwealth of Penn
sylvania; authorizing the State to
Issue bonds to the amount of fifty
millions of dollars for the improve
ment of the highways of the Com
monwealth.
Section 1. Be It resolved by the
Senate and House of Representatives
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylva
nia in General Assembly met, That
the following amendment to the Con
stitution of Pennsylvania be. and the
same is hereby, proposed, in accord
ance with the eighteenth article there
of:—
That section four of article nine,
which reads as follows:
"Section 4. No debt shall be created
by or on behalf of the State, except to
supply casual deficiencies of revenue,
repel invasion, suppress insurrection,
defend the State in war. or to pay ex
isting debt; and the debt created to
supply deficiency in revenue shall
never exceed in the aggregate, at any
one time, one million dollars, be
amended so as to read as follows:
Section 4. • No debt shall be created
by or on behalf of the State, except to
supply casual deficiencies of revenue,
repel invasion, suppress insurrection,
defend the State in war. or to pay
existing debt; and the debt• fT®* 1 ®. 1 }
to supply deficiencies in revenue shall
never exceed in the aggregate, at any
one time, one million dollars: Pro
vided, however, That the General As
sembly. irrespective of any debt, may
authorize the State to issue bdbds to
the amount of fifty millions of dol
lars for the purpose of improving and
rebuilding the highways of the Com
lnSecttonh2. Paid proposed amend
ment shall be submitted to the quali
electors of the State, at the gen
eral elecUon to be held on the Tues-
Inv next following the first Monday of
November in the year nineteen hnn-
TunPfISFD AMENDMENTS TO THE
9 corMnl.Y OF TH E COMMON
OF PENNSYLVANIA. AND
WEALTH Ob tU'.:N. R OF THE
PUBLISHED BY Oi THR COMMON
SECRETARY p ITRS C/\NCE OF AR-
of R the CONSTITU
TIOX. dumber One.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an e"n of°the e Con
monwealth of That the follow
eral Assembly Constitution of
Ing a" ien of Pennsylvania
the Commonwea , g hereby pro posed.
be, and jhe Ba.rrL eighteenth ar
in accordance wuu
tide thereof:— | even> article six-
Ame ? .he e Constitution of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania, which
reads as bo dy to possess
shall be created without three
suance _of any b „ c no ttce. at the
months previo P , ocat i on , of the
place of the intenaeo pr(vne?es
Intention to app . b prescr ibed
s rp.
8h mhe re General Assembly shall have
Th ~„ hv ireneral law to provide
the e ,„ C orporation of banks and
mist companies, and to prescribe the
po A e tnie he cSpy of Joint Resolution
N°- CYRUS E. WOODS.
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Two.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to section
sixteen- of article three of the Con
stitution of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania in accordance with
provisions of the eighteenth
Section th i erel ße it enacted by the
c „° nl ' and House of Representatives
It thS Commonwealth of Pennsylva
nia in General Assembly met, and tt
Ts hereby enacted by the authority of
lie same. That the following is pro
',,„j as an amendment to the Consti
tution "'the Commonwealth of Penn
•vlvanta in accordance with the pro
vUlonof the eighteenth article
tb That section sixteen 6f article three,
ttrhieh reads as follows:
••Section 16. No money shall be paid
out of the treasury,, except upon ap
propriations made by law, and on war
rant drawn by the proper officers in
pursuance thereof." be, and the same
" hereby, amended so that the same
shall read as follows:
Section 16. No money shall be paid
out of the State treasury, except In
accordance with the provisions of an
act of Assembly specifying the amount
and purpose of the expenditure, and
limiting the time In which said ap
propriation shall be expended. All
public money shall be paid by the
State Treasurer on warrant drawn by
SEPTEMBER 9, 1918.
the L>s river.
Reports on the situation along the I
Aisne, where the Americans have 1
been facing the Germans abreust thej
canal paralleling the river on u long
stretch east fnoni Conde, were lack
ing to-day. The latest advices, how-1
ever, showed the Americans to have I
pushed their line farther forward to!
the east of itevillon, where it trended
off . southeastward toward liheinis. j
The village of Muscourl, about three]
miles east of Kevillon and in about!
the same relative, position to the (
river, was reported to be in Amer- j
icun hands.
As the allied armies draw nearer!
to Cambral, St. Quentin and the
natural defensive positions of the
Germans in the St. Gobain forest the
offensive movement begins to lose
much of the momentum it gained
and maintained while less important
enemy positions were being taken.
French Near St. Golmin Massif
Slow progress continues to be made
by Field Marshal Haig's forces in the
direction of Cambrai and St. Quentin
and, if the operations of the French
armies under Generals Humbert and
Mangin are successful in overrunning
or encircling the St. Gobain massit,
the German retreat must begin anew I
and with greater rapidity than at!
any time since the allied counter of-1
fensive started in the middle of July.
British Close to St. Quentin
Cambrai and St. Quentin the imme
diate objectives of the British forces
in the present phase of the offensive
movement aie almost within strik
ing distance. The British are within
six miles of St. Quentin at Willevque
and they have captured Roisel and
St. Emllie. Along the line between
Cambrai and St. Quentin the British
advance has carried them into their
old defense positions from whicn
they were driven by the Germans
last March. Further advances are
being bitterly contested by the Ger
mans.
Germans Stiffen Defensive
The Germans evidently realizing
that little less than disaster would
follow the fall of the St. Gobain for
est have stiffened their defensive by
taking advantage of the natural po
sitions. Strong counterattacks against
the French near Laffaux and north
1 of Celles-sur-Aisne seems to bear out
the belief that the Germans will not
give up St. Gobain without a struggle.
French Penetrate Servuls Outskirts
In addition to the protection it af
fords Laon the St. Gobain position, if
captured would weaken the entire
German line eastward toward
Rheims. Nortnwest of St. Gobain the
French have taken Mennesis and
Tergnier and are threatening La
[ Fere. On the edge of the forest the
IFGAL NOTICES
dred and eighteen, for the purpose of I
deciding upon the approval and rati- !
flcation or the rejection of said
amendment. Said election shall be
opened, held, and closed upon said
election day, at the places and within
the hours at and within which said
election is directed to be opened, held,
and closed, and in accordance with the
provisions of the laws of Pennsylva
nia governing elections, and amend
ments thereto. Such amendment shall
be printed upon the ballots in the
form and manner prescribed by the
election laws of Pennsylvania, and
shall in all respects conform to the
requirement of such laws.
A true copy of Joint Resolution
No. 1.
CYRUS E. WOODS.
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Two.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to section
eight, article nine of the Constitu
tion of Pennsylvania.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the Sen
ate and House of Rem-esentatives of
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in
General Assembly met. and it is here
by enacted by the authority of the
same. That the Constitution of the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in
accordance with the provisions of the
eighteenth article thereof:—
Amendment to Article Nine, Section
Eight.
That section eight of article nine, of
the Constitution be amended by strik
ing out the said section and inserting
in place thereof the following:—
Section 8. The debt of any county,
city, borough, township, school dis
trict, or other municipality or incor
porated district, except as provided
herein, and in section fifteen of this
article, shall never exceed seven (7)
per centum upon the assessed value
of the taxable property therein, but
the debt of the city of Philadelphia
may be increased in such amount that
the total city debt of said city shall
not exceed ten per centum (10) upon
the assessed value of the taxable
property therein, nor shall any such
municipality or district incur any new
debt, or increase its indebtedness to
an amount exceeding two (2) per
centum upon such assessed valuation
of property, without the consent of the
electors thereof at a public election
in such manner as shall be provided
by law. In ascertaining the borrow-
the Auditor General.
A true copy of Joint Resolution
No. 2.
CYRUS E. WOODS,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Three.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to article
nine, section eight of the Constitu
tion of Pennsylvania.
Section 1. lie it resolved by the
Senate and Hotlse of Representatives
in General Assembly met, That the
following amendment to the Consti
tution of Pennsylvania be, and the
samt is hereby, proposed, in accord
ance with the eighteenth article
thereof:—
That article nine, section eight, be
amended to read as follows:
Section 8. The debt of any county,
city, borough, township, school dis
trict, or other municipality or incor
porated district, except as provided
herein, and in section fifteen of this
article, shall never exceed seven (7)
per centum upon the assessed value of
the taxable property therein, but the
debt of the city of Philadelphia may,
be increased in such amount that the
total city debt of said city shall not
exceed ten per centum (10) upon the
assessed value of the taxable prop
erty therein, nor shall any such mu
nicipality or district incur any new
debt, or increase its indebtedness to
an amount exceeding two (2) per
centum upon such assessed valuation
of property, without the consent of
the electors thereof at a public -elec
tion in such manner as shall be pro
vided by law. In ascertaining the
borrowing capacity of the city of
Philadelphia, at any time, there shall
be deducted from such debt so much
of the debt of said city as shall have
been Incurred, or is about to be in
curred, and the proceeds thereof ex
pended, or about to be expended, up
on any public improvement, or in the
construction, purchase, or condemna
tion of any public utility, or part
thereof, or facility therefor, if such
public improvement or public utility,
or part thereof, whether separately or
In connection with any other public
improvement or public utility, or part
thereof, may reasonably be expected
to yield revenue in excess of operat
ing expenses sufficient to pay the in
terest and sinking fund charges there
on. The method of determining such
amount, so to be deducted, may be
prescribed by the General Assembly.
In incurring Indebtedness for any
purpose the city of Philadelphia may
issue Its obligations maturing not
later than fifty (50) years from the
date thereof, with . provision for a
sinking-fund sufficient to retire said
obligations at maturity, the payment
to such sinking fund to be in equal
or graded annual or other periodical
instalments. Where any Indebtedness
shall be or shall have been Incurred
by said city of Philadelphia for the
purpose of the construction or Im
provements of public works or utili
ties of any character, from which in
come or revenue is to be derived by
said city, or for the reclamation of
land to be used In the construction of
wharves or docks -wnod or to be
owned by said cit- m-h obligations
may be in an amount sufficient to pro
vide for. and may Include the amount
of. the Interest and sinking-fund
charges accruing and which may ac
crue thereon throughout the period
14 HUNS ATTACK T
AMERICAN FLIER
By Associated Press
With the American Army in
France, Sept. 9.—One of the
American observation planes on
a flight for the purpose of taking
photographs was attacked on
Saturday by fouHeen German
planes. By skillruT maneuvering
the pilot bropght the machine
safely back, into the American
line. The photographic mission
was a partial success.
J
i. —1
French have penetrated the outskirts
of Servais.
On the line between the Vesle and
the Aisne rivers additional ground
has been gained by the Freoch and
American forces. The German official
statement dealing with the fighting
here says It has decreased.
FOr, SALE
No. 1001 North Second Street
No. 1439 Vernon Street
Lots on Curtin, Jefferson and
Seneca Street
No. 1942 North Sixth Street,
3-story frame dwelling, 8
rooms and bath. All im
provements.
Frank R. Leib
and Son
REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE
18 N. Third St.
Harrlsburg, Pa.
-
I.FGAL NOTICES
lng capacity of the said city of Phila
delphia, at any time, there shall be ex
cluded from the calculation and de
ducted from such debt so much of the
debt of said city as shall have been
incurred, and the proceeds thereof in
vested, in any public improvements
of any character which shall be yield
ing to the said city an annual current
net revenue. The amount of such de
duction shall be ascertained by capi
talizing tlie annual net revenue from
such improvement during the year
immediately preceding the time of
such ascertainment; and such capitali
zation shall be estimated by ascer
taining Ihe principal amount which
would yield such annual, current net
revenue, at the average rate of in
terest, and sinking-fund charges pay
able upon the indebtedness incurred
by said city for such purposes, up to
the time of such ascertainment. The
method of determining such amount,
so to be deducted, may be prescribed
by the General Assembly. In Incurr
ing indebtedness for any purpose the
city of Philadelphia may Issue its ob
ligations maturing not later than
fifty (50) years from the date there
of. with provision for a sinking-fund
sufficient to retire said obligations at
maturity, the payment to such sink
ing-fund to be in equal or graded an
nual or other periodical Instalments.
Where any indebtedness shall be or
shall have been incurred by said city
of Philadelphia for the purpose of the
construction or improvement of pub
lic works of any character from which
income or revenue is to be derived by
said city, or for the reclamation of
land to be used in the construction of
wharves or docks owned or to be own
ed by satd city, such obligations may
be in an amount sufficient to provide
for, and may include the amount of,
the interest and sinking-fund charges
accruing and which may accrue there
on throughout the period, of construc
tion. and until the expiration of one
year after the completion of the work
for which said indebtedness shall have
been incurred; and said city shall not
be required to levy a tax to pay said
interest and sinking-fund charges
an required by section ten, article nine
of the Constitution of Pennsylvania,
until the expiration of said period of
one year after the completion of said
work.
A true copy of Joint Resolution
No. 2.
CYRUS E. WOODS,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
of construction, and until the expira
tion of one year after the completion
of the work for which said indebted
ness shall have been incurred; and
said city shall not be required to levy
a tax to pay said interest and sink
ing-fund charges as required by sec
tion ten. article nine of the Constitu
tion of Pennsylvania, until the expira
tion of said period of one year after
the completion of said work.
A true copy of Joint Resolution
No. 3.
CYRUS E. WOODS,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Four.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
An amendment to section one of r
tide nine of the Constitution of
Pennsylvania, relating to taxation
Section 1. Re it resLlved by th "
Senate and liouse ot Representatives
of the Common weal til of Pennsylvania
in General Assembly met, and it is
hereby enacted by the authority of
the same. That the following amend
ment to the Constitution of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania be ami
the same is hereby, proposed in ao
cordance with the provisions of the
eighteenth article thereof
That section one of article nin.
which reads as follows: nlne '
All taxes shall be uniform ~—_„
the same class of subjects,
territorial limits of the authorU?
levying the tax, and shall be levied
and collected under the general laws
but the General Assembly may hw
general laws, exempt from taxr'atmJ.
public property used for pur
poses actual places of religious
worship, places of burial not used o?
held for private or corporate profit
and institutions of purely public char,
ity," be amended so as to read
follows:
Ail taxes shall be uniform, upon the
same class of subjects, within th
territorial limits of the aSthorß?
levying the fax and shall be levied
and collected under general laws and
the subjects of taxation may be clas
sified for the purpose of laying grad
cd or progressive taxes; but the Gen
eral Assembly may, by general laws
exempt from taxation public property
used for public purposes, actual places
of religious worship, places of burial
not used or held for private or cor
porate profit, and Institutions of pure
ly public charity.
Section 2. Said proposed amend
ment shall be submitted to the quali
fied electors of the State, at the gen
eral election to be held on the Tues
day next following the first Monday
of November in the year nineteen hun
dred and nineteen, for the purpose of
deciding upon the approval and ratifi
cation or the rejection of said amend
ment. Said election shall be opened
held, and closed upon said election
day, at the places and within the
hours at and within which said elec
tion is directed to be opened, held, and
closed, and In accordance with the
provisions of the laws of Pennsylva
nia governing elections, and amend
ments thereto. Such amendment shall
be printed upon the ballots iu the
form and manner prescribed by the
election laws of Pennsylvania, and
shall In all respects conform to the
requirement of such laws.
A true copy of Joint Resolution
No. 4.
CYRUS E. WOODS,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.

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