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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, October 16, 1918, Image 1

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W HARRISBURG iffifjillt, TELEGRAPH
\ ®I it Stac-fn&epcn&cnl.
I.XXXVTT — No. 230 14 PAGES Da K^ e o^ HARRISBURG, PA.. WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 16, 1918.
CITY CONFIDENT
LOAN QUOTA IS
TO BE FULFILLED
Banks Finding Means to Aid
Further in Floating
Subscriptions
MANY HAVK YET TO BUY
Clerks doing Over Cards to j
See Who Failed in Pa
triotic Duty
All Harrisburg to-day is looking J
at the Liberty Loan proposition iiyaj
new light—as a nieuns vyhereby it j
ran back up the President in his |
demand that the German autocrats
come down. The Spanish influenza
epidemic "crimped" the Loan last
week, preventing the city from
"getting over" in the four-day per- J
iod, but the "flu" now shows signs .
of abatement and tho population of j
the city and district is determined !
that its apathy of last week will be
replaced with a vigor which will put
over the proposition in a walk.
Many of the Homes and Indus- j
trial workers were sick with influ
enza, and some of the most prom
inent captains and commanders
have had deaths in their families.
The result has not been helpful to
the loan proposition, quite natur
ally.
Loan Will Go Over
Hut the Liberty Loan is going over
so far as the Harrisburg district is
concerned —and it is going over so i
tyu- as the United States is con- :
eerned.
in all likelihood the banks of j
America will figure to-day on ways
and means to place the $3,000,000,-
000 worth of unsold bonds in the i
bands of the people. •
Hut the banks cannot bear this
tremendous burden themselves. It [
is up to the rank and file of the cit- ;
izenship to "hold up its end." If the :
banks were to handle the burden ;
themselves the result would be dis- j
astrous from a linancial standpoint. |
Many possibilities might become ac- i
tualltles.
Combing the Town
00 At Liberty Loan headquarters to- !
"day a force of clerks was going over j
the 30,000 cards in the Harrisburg t
tile. These cards contain the names ,
of every wage-earner in the city.
They are being compared with the
sheets showing bond purchases, so
that by to-morrow noon headquar
ters will know who has bought bonds
and who has not. ,
Income Comparison. Too
When these cards are compared a
further comparison will be made
with the income tax returns for the
city district, so that it will be known
definitely whether men who are
making over $2,200 a year have
bought bonds to the amount of which
they are capable.
, Gorman Woman Buys
One' purchase to-day was by a
German woman of German birth,
who lias six brothers in the German
army and a sister who is a German
army nurse.
"My sympathies were with Ger
many up until the time the United
States was compelled to enter the
war," she said. "I have lived in this
country 21 years and when the time
came to make a choice I did not
hesitate for a moment. This is 'ray
own United States.' I have $5OO
worth of first issue bonds; $5OO of
the second issue, and $5OO of the
third. 1 want $l,OOO of the fourth
issue."
Buys With Allotment Money
Mrs. Frank Zimmerman, of 653
Dauphin street, this morning bought
a $5O bond. Mrs. Zimmerman is a
soldier's mother. She received her
August allotment money—s3o—the
other day, and to it she to-day add
ed $2O cash and bought a bond.
Many instances of this kind are be
ing reported.
Workers All Busy
Abatement of the- "flu," having
begun, the various teams, composed
of hundrds of workers, to-day are
combing the city far more thorough
ly than they covered it last week.
They expect great results.
Lieut Geo. J. Shoemaker
* Is Wounded in Battle
Lieutenant George J. Shoemaker, for
nine years a member of the Harris
burg police force, has been severely
wounded In the left arm and leg while
serving In France, according to word
just received here. Injuries were re
ceived In a shell explosion on Sep
tember 5.
He was a former member of the
Governor's Troop, serving on the
Mexican Horder. He is now In Com
pany B. of the One Hundred and
Eighth Machine Gun Battalion. He
Is convalescing in a base hospital.
' PLEASE BE
INDULGENT
The Harrisburg Telegraph begs
Its readers to overlook for the
moment irregularities in its make
up typographical errors and omis
sions, The newspaper force has
tH 'been seriously reduced by the
epidemic of influenza and the
mechanical department in par
ticular Is laboring under great
difflcultl cs,
_
THE WEATHER
For llurrlslturK and vicinity! Fair
to-night and prohiilily Tbura
duM slightly Manner to-night.
For Eastern I'ennsylvsnlat Falr
to-ntght anil |>rahal>ly Thurs
dayt slightly Marnier to-night
In north and Mest portions! light
Meat Mlnlls/ becoming north,
lllter
The Susquehanna river and all lis
branches Mill continue to fall
slowly. A stage of about 4.23
feet Is Indleated for Harrisburg
Thursday morning.
We Nominate For Peace Commissioners as Follows:
V _r T • ALU IC,HT 0,0 ON A.ND~|
1 EVACUATE. '-AND oe /
7 AOouTIT J
Foil TIIK COMMISSION TO ARRANGE DETAILS OF EVACUATION
T" "r~\
Jp '-Ski Ww ■--
.!> FOII THE COMMISSION TO SETTLE "PRACTICAL DETAILS" OF WILSON'S PEACE DEMAN
ALL STORES TO j
CLOSE SATURDAY
EVENING AT 6.30
Trolley Cars Must Have at
Least Half of Win
dows Open
As there has been no decrease in
the number of deaths and new cases
of influenza in the city, Dr. J. M.
■ J. Raunick, city health officer, has
| communicated with the Chamber of
I Commerce, requesting them to have
j all stores and other business places
I close again at 6.30 o'clock on Satur
day evening. He has also asked all
other stores and small business
places not associated with that or
ganization to observe the closing or
der again. Only drug stores and
restaurants are excepted.
Every one should co-operate as
they did last week. Dr. Dr. Raunick
urged. Rumors that the present
drastic quarantine orders closing
theaters, churches, schools, saloons
and other places may he lifted soon
were denied to-day by Dr. Raunick.
"At present I could not say how
soon we will lift tho ban which the
city health bureau Imposed. The
situation Is not improving, but there
is no need to worry. It is under
control anil can be handled."
To Open Car Windows
Dr. ltaunick also announced that
he will issue an order to the Har
risburg Railways Company requiring
that at least one-hulf the windows In
each street car In service be kept
I open. "Tho request of the bureau
has not been generally compiled
with, and there has been some trou
ble reported to me. The car win
dows must he kept open, and it may
he necessary to have the panes of
[Continued on I'age 10.]
Garros, Noted French
Flyer, Shot Down in
Flight Over Hun Lines
Amsterdam, Oct. 16.—Lieutenant
I Roland G. Garros, the noted French
• aviator, who was poHtcd as missing
I on October 7 after a flight o\;er the
i German lines, was shot down and
| hilled on October 4, a Berlin message
, to-dny announced,
Roland Garros was a widely-known
(aviator before the war, taking part
i in many Important competitions. In
j eluding those at many American cities
| and performing numerous notable ex
i ploits. During the war until the end
I of April, 1915, when he was captured,
| he more than equaled his civilian rec
ord of daring in his new role of mut
uary aviator. He escaped from a Ger-
Snan prison In February of this year
innd again took up his army csreor
j as a flyer, winning further honors,
i Garros was born at Cape Town,
j South Africa, of French parents, in
1835, v
LARGE FAMILIES
LEFT BY DEATHS
Among tin- <lcntlis due to pneu
monia and the iiil'luen/a epidemic
wliich are particularly pathetic
are:
Samuel Olson, 226 Liberty
street, who leaves live children,
the youngest, one year old.
Mrs. l>uvid Martill, 25, Now
Cumlierlnnd, whose huslmiid died
Montlu.v; live children, the young
est three weeks old, survive. •
Harry Hake, of near New Cum
berland, 23. who leaves a wife
and seven children.
Charitable organizations now
are mukiiig p'ans to look after
needy cases.
DESTITUTION
MARKS WAKE OF
GRIP JIPIDEMIC
Parents Dying of Pneumonia
Leave Large Families of
Small Children
Extreme destitution is marking
the wake of the Spanish epidemic
to-day as disclosures by the score
came through police and Associated
Aid channels. The latter is furnish
ing coal, groceries and clothing in
quantity, the one most pathetic char
ity being the supplying of burial gar
ments for two little girls, sisters, who
lived with their parents in South
Cameron street and died on Sunday
at the Harrisburg Hospital. The
whole family Is down with the dread
disease.
( New Cumberland suffers In parti
cular. the seven children of Mr. und
Mrs. Henry Hake being bereft now
of their father, who died at the Har
risburg Hospital on Sunday. H© had
waited upon his family as one ntter
another fell victim. He lived at
Springer's l.ane, near New Cumber
land and was 33 years old.
Not far dlstunt another tragedy
Involved the death of Mrs. David
Martin, whose husband died on Sun
day last. This morning the mother
also passed away, leaving five chil
dren, the youngest of whom Is but
3 weeks of age,
In Harrisburg the epidemic
wrecked tho home of Samuel Olsen,
228 Liberty street, who died at mid
night at the Harrisburg Hospital,
leaving a wife and Ave small chil
dren In desperate circumstances.
Olsen was well krtown here, as an
employe ot the Wutor Department.
He worked for Major Gray at Middle
town went with him to Delaware,
and recently came home to succumb
to the disease,
The Associated Aids Hoclety Issued
a cell to-day for "personal subscrip
tions to finance this sad situation
and will appreciate gifts of money
. clothes or groceries. J
TWO BANKS OFFER
MILLION DOLLARS
TO BOND BUYERS
Harrisburg National and Har
) risburg Trust Put Up Fund;
Russ Bros. Buy $30,000
Announcement was made to-day
by the Harrisburg National Bank
and the Harrisburg Trust Company
lhat these two institutions are pre
pared to lend one million dollars
to those who want to buy bonds,
but who do not have the ready
money. The acceptance of small
cash payments, or security for the
first payments and a 4i4 rate of
interest for six months (the same
rate as the bonds), are inducements
offered, that leaves little, if any ex
cuse for anyone not to increase the
amount of his original subscription
for bonds of the Fourth Loan;
This offer, coming on top of
George W. Rally's letter yesterday
to W. M. Ogelsby, chairman of a
special committee of the loan or
ganization, offered In behalf of the
Harrisburg Trust Company to un
derwrite $lOO,OOO of the deficiency
of the Liberty Loan subscription, in
dicates the active effort and assist
ance which these two Market Square
institutions are putting forth to en
able Harrisburg to go over the top
In subscribing her quota of the
Fourth Issue. The Harrisburg Trust
Company yesterday added to its di
rectorate W. P. Sturkey, general su
perintendent of the Harrisburg Pipe
and Pipe Bending Company, nimself
a big holder of Liberty bonds.
Russ Bros. $30,000
Russ Bros., Ice cream manufactur
ers, to-day Increuscd their Liberty
Loan subscription from $5,000 to
$30,000, The letter of the firm to
George S, Relnoelil, chairman of
tho Industrial committee, follows:
Wo Inclose you herewith our
subscription for $26,000 Liberty
Loan Bonds which In addition
for the $5,000 previously sub.
scribed, brings our total to
$30,000 of this Issue,
We consider this not only our
patriotic duty but a financial
privilege, Inasmuch as corpora.
Hons earning over 10 per cent,
on their Invested capital will
save not less than 11,40 per
cent, annually on this amount In
their Federal taxes. In addition
we feel confident that before we
are able to pay for these bonds
they will be selling at a hand
some piemlum,
Unclosed find our check for
$25,000,
Very truly yours,
W. M. RUSS,
Treasurer,
ALLIES DRIVE WEDGE
INTO BELGIAN SOIL
Pershing's Troops
Easily Repulse
Counterattack
YANKEES HOLD
GROUNDGAINED
With the American Forces!
Northwest of Verdun, Oct. 16. —
(12:10 p m.) —The Germans to-da.v j
continued their resistance against I
the advance of the American forces
on this front, the strength of the I
opposition fully equalling that of,
yesterday.
With machiae guns, some artillery i
fire and minor counterattacks the
Germans this morning interposed j
desperate resistance to Pershing's j
men all along the line.
All the counterattacks were easily |
repulsed. They had the appearance I
because of the small numbers of men
employed, of being efforts to throw
confusion into the American ranks in i
order to gain time.
The principal American activity
this morning was on the left of the
battle sector. There was some ac
tivity in the district east of the river
Meuse. The enemy threw gas shells!
into the Chatillon woods last night |
and bombarded Tulleries farm. The |
advance of the Americans yesterday I
has been maintained everywhere
and some slight gains were recorded j
during the night. .
Substantial Gains
Washington, Oct. 16.—Substantial!
gains on both sides of the Meuse j
against stubborn resistance by a re
inforced enemy was reported to-day
iby General Pershing in his com-
I munique for Tyesday.
i The dispatch follows:
"Our troops to-day continued their
attack on both sides of the Meuse,
encountering stubborn resistance
from a reinforced enemy. East of
tho Meuse French and American
troops have gained ground. West
of the river the fighting has in
creased In violence and our troops
have made substantial gains includ
ing hill 299, which changed hands
three times We have broken the
Kriemhild-Stellung at new points,
where our men closed with the enemy
In a series of hand-to-hand encoun
ters In which they took prisoners."
Huns Bombard French
Seaport; Kill Civilians
Willi the French Forces In Flan
ders. Oct. 16.—The Germans to-day
resumed their long-range bom
bardment of the French seaport of
Dunkirk, on the Strait of Dover.
There were some civilian victims.
100 DIE IN PIATRA WRECK
London, Oct.' 16.—One hundred
persons were killed and 200 injured
In the derailing of the Bucharest
express near Piatra, Rumania, ac
cording to a dispatch to the Central
Neivs from Amsterdam quoting ad
| vices from Vienna. The dispatch
j adds that several of the coaches of
the train fell into the Bistrita River.
BAVARIANS NOW PACIFISTS
Zurich, Oct. 16.—At a meeting of
th£ Bavarian Socialist party in
Munich, Sunday, a resolution was
adopted urging the Reichstag to ap
point a state court to try all Ger
mans, even the highest personages,
I who have been guilty of frustrating
(•peace efforts.
j Self-government for the German
states also was demanded.
I
NATION SPURRED
TO RAISE EXTRA
THREEBILLIONS
Signs at Capitol Point to Suc
cess in, Raising Fourth
Loan to Quota
By Associated Press
Washington, Oct. 16.—With four
j more days to fro the nation to-day
i passed the $3,000,000,000 halfway
I post in the Fourth Liberty Loan race
, toward $6,000,000,000 before Satur-
I day night. Headquarters reports in
-1 dlcate favorable conditions for the
I closing days of the campaign,
j "T\je tlrst really encouraging re
ports began to arrive to-day," said
i the offlclul announcement, "These
j reports carried ample evidence that
' the country realized the serious bust
! ness It had ahead during the re
| malnder of this week to make the
| Fourth Liberty Loan a success."
Spectacular methods usod in the
Cleveland district for the loan In
cluded a series of modern Papl lie
vere rides through 120 towns of
thlrty-flvo counties in Ohio and
Pennsylviyila last night by crews of
workers in army motor trucks.
Towns were visited after midnight,
citizens called out of bed and met
by solicitors. About $250,000 In sub
scriptions were gathered In this way
during the night. At Brookllne, Pa.,
the Liberty Loan riders were mis
taken foi* hank robberrf and put In
the village Jail for three hours. At
Georgetown, Ohio, and Jefferson,
Pa., the raiding parties were tired
upop. The rides wll| be extended to
many other communities In the dis
trict to-night i
ONI,Y EVENING ASSOCIATED I'llKSt SINGLE COPIER unur miTIflN
NEWSPAPER IN IIAIIIILSIII:lit; TWO CENTS IHJITIE. ELM 1 IVflv
FOES BARBED V/IRE
DOES NOT HOLD UP
AMERICAN ADVANCE
Allied Armies Are Sweeping j
Through German Positions
in Belgium For Important 1
Gains Near Coast Lines
FALL OF LILLE ASSURED \
BY FOCH'S BAP ID BLOWS j
By Associated Press
Paris, Oct. 16.—The German'
extreme right wing is being
thrcatehed more and more as the)
Allied wedge in Flanders is
driven deeper. Already the ad
vance of the Allies is from two
and one-half to five miles on a
thirty-mile front. The Belgians
are approaching Thourout, only
twelve miles from Bruges and
within twenty miles of the Dutch
| border.
i There ate signs that the Gcr
( mans realize tlie days of their
! occupation of Belgium are num
| bered. They already have bc
i gun the work of destruction in
I western Belgium. According to
j information reaching Paris the
Germans are preparing to evac
uate Bruges and Ghent, and even
Brussels.
Sweeping steadilv ahead over the
! lowlands of Belgian Flanders, the
British, French and Belgian armies
are rapidly tearing away the ex
treme right flank of tho German
| battlellne. Twelve thousand prls-
I oners have b*en captured in two
idays, according to official state
ments.
Allies Cross Lys River
I Allied forces have captured Menln
land Wervicq, and are across the
| Lys river in the neighborhood of
the latter town. There are unoltic
jial reports that Thourout has been
taken and It is confirmed tbat the
; British are within two miles of
lOourtrai. This completely out
flanks Lille from the north and the
Germans probably will be forced out
of that city in a very short time.
The Allies now are about eleven
•miles from Bruges and twenty-five
!miles from Ghent. They have ad
vanced about seven miles since
Monday morning.
Yankees Fierce Krlemlilltl Line
Fighting through a maze of
barbed wire defenses and over tan
gled lines of trenches, the Ameri
cans west of the Meuse river are
slowly but surely cutting through
Ithe Kriemhild line. They have ear
jried Hill 299. a height which domi
nates much of the country west of
I Roniagne, and have penetrated the
second line of defense in the vi
cinity of Landres-et-St. Georges.
Huns Get Fresh Troops
The battle in this area has been
of a most savage nature. The Ger
mans are pouring fresh troops into
the struggle in the hope that the
American onslaught may be stayed
before it reaches the important rail
road lines in the rear of the Ger
man front. A victory for the
American in tho Argonne sector
would decide the fate of Germany
ion the western front anil compel a
general retreat by the enemy from
MEN BEYOND 37
TO BE CALLED TO
WAR BY MARCH 1
General Crowder Tells House
•Committee 2,339,000 Will
Be Summoned by July 1
By Associated Press
Washington, Oct. 16. —Draft calls
' for men who have passed their 87th
j birthday are expected to begin about
March 1, Plans for bringing the old
| er class of new registrants Into camp
j have not been completed, but the
, approximate date of the rst call was
disclosed to-day by publication of
testimony by Provost Marshal Gen
| eral Crowder before the House Mili-
I tary Committee.
Ail army of about .1,000,000
men, eighty divisions in Franco
ami eighteen in training at
home by July 1 next, Is what
the new program calls for. To
prepare and maintain It, the
amount now propocsed is
sought in addition to $17,500,-
000,000 provided by the annuul
army hill and the fortllleatlons
bill. It will bring tlie total of
appropriations and authoriza
tions for the year up to thirty
six billion dollars,
(General March, appearing Ih>-
I fdro the committee when tlio
bill was drafted, descrilied it
It as the "maximum elTort for a.
dellnltc maximum preformauec."
lie |M>IIIUNI to tlie moral effect
of sueli a measure.
In nil Qenerul Crowder told the
committee, 2,399,000 newly reglster
i Continued on Page 10.J ,
BERLIN IN PANIC
AT U. S. ANSWER
By Associated Press
LONDON, Oct. I.—President
Wilson's reply to the German ]
peace note produced "u most tin- j
favorable Impression" in Berlin, |
says a Central News dispatch from
Amsterdam to-day. The publica
tion o fthe reply, it adds, was fol
lowed by a panic in Berlin bunk
ing circles anil on the Stock
Exchange.
Tho German Supreme Com
mand, the advices states, will
conic to Berlin at the end of tho
present week, "to deliberate on
mobilization, conccntrnt lon of the
national strength uiul the raising
of the military age."
A
most of the French ground he still
holds.
* Germans Leaving Pocket
French and Italian troops are
moving more slowly along the Oise
to the Aisne than they did on Sun
day when they wiped out the great
er the Laon-Le Fere salient. The
Germans, it appears, are gradually
emptying the [Socket formed when
the Allies broke the lines north of
St. Quentin and along the Aisne at
Berry-au-Bac.
The French, however, have passed
jSissone, formerly one of the prin
ciple concentrating points for Ger
| man troops in this part of the front,
i General Gouraud's army has cross
led the Aisne west of Bethel and this
i advance apparently jeopardizes the
| position of the enemy farther east.
;The Germans in the Chainpaigne
sector seems to be slowly involved
•in another pocket.
raj i f|jv w< i
► •
4 LOAN TOTAL IN CITY $4,894,300
j Reports receiyed by Liberty Loan head
' '■ " I ■' ' this afternoon showed that
,368,000 has been added to the Liberty Loan total for the
• ■ !
i
4,894,300, including to-day's figures. Ten reports to-day
'
1
(
I 29,700.
Hoffman division, I
( ,
Hunter division, $9,600. '
Pass division, £.3,400.
' BERLIN HAS WILSON REPLY *
i . Basel, Switerland—President Wilson's reply to the
German peace proposals reached Berlin at noon yesterday, i
I
to 6 o dock List night. ' (
■ BIG GUNS IN WAR PROGRAM . *
, Washington—General Homey, head ,of the ordnance
mmittee that the new war pro
gr\; " : . ? r il." rr ■. ar.fd ai till cry. \
1 I
constructing 14, 16, and 18 inch guns will be increased, 1
i
GERMANY STUDIES WILSON ANSWER t
j
char.c'o: ' !••-><• . • Pen t*.-d the matters
1
c ... • <
patcVr . from Copenhagen to the Exchange Telegraph
'Company. . .. .*3
*
, COUNT HUSSARE KRESIGNS I
V" ' rM in Vienna, act ending to ,
an official dispatch from Switzerland to-day that Emperor d
Chn:' • .." he ' . sation of Count Hussarek, i
,thc Austrian premier, and instructed Count Silva Taronka j
I *
with the task of forming a new cabinet. '
MARRIAGE LICENSES
f Emory I„ obrrilorf, York county, mul Kntc Woultef, l.onilon-
Hrrry towmthlpi l.ouln W. Durcru, ronton, ond l.llllnn U. I crdue,
Harrlaburg.
Lys Is Crossed by
Haig's Men as
Menin Falls
ALU US PRESS
ON IN THE RAIN
With the Allied Armies in Bel-
Shun, Oct. IG.—Menin has fallen.
Allied troops aro a mile east oi
Itoulers and advanced patrols are.
according to latest reports, withir
a mile of Courtrai. The L>ys rivea
seems to have been crossed betweet
Comines, which has been captured,
and Warneton Another crossing o:
the Lys has been effected at Wor
ried. it is reported.
The enemy has begun a with
drawal from Pont-a-Vennin nn<
Berclau and from the Rolleghort
front. Here British patrols havi
reached the .outskirts of Neurchln.
Everywhere the Germans an
fighting rear-guard actions. Thi
battle is being fought in a contlnu
ous rain. |
Cucrne Has Been Taken
Cuerne has been taken. The Bel
gians have captured Bevern station
They are cast and north of the Bev
ern Canal and are before Iseghcm.
Yesterday's gains further turne<
the German lines both north am
south of the area under attack an<
the enemy retirement reported fron
the southwest is the result. Addi
tional fires and explosions are re
ported.
There was an impressive scene a
Roulcrs when the place was taken
A French major gathered the res
cued civilians and German prisoner
around a battered piano in tlv
square and, as the shells sereamci
[Continued on Page 10.]

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