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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, November 26, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038411/1918-11-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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I.XXXVII- Xo. 261 16 PAGES "•U.gKT. WK„ SWn.-HSSSSiS"* HARRISIIURG. PA.. TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 26, 1918. ""VmWftlSt "*SS!A. l SS.ino M * "tWdBSP HOME EDITION
* CHANGE IN METHOD
OF ASH COLLECTION
URGED BY COUNCIL
Present System Is
Unsatisfactory
Throughout
RIVERSIDE
GETS WATER
Mains to Be Laid
at Once; Plan
Quarantine
Important business, pending for
some time, was disposed of by Coun
oil at its sessions this morning. An
informal conference was held again •
at 4 o'clock this afternoon to dts- ;
cuss plans for ash collections In
1919, and a special meeting may be
held to-morrow to pass an ordinance t
on first reading to provide necessary j
urles for this work.
Commissioner. Hassler first pre
sented a letter from \V. S. McOaleb. j
of the Dauphin Consolidated Water
I'ompany, with whom the officials
have been conferring on the pur
chase of the water lines in the re
cently annexed Fourteenth ward. ,
Cost Pared Down
The company originally asked
$21,000 for the lines but after a
number of meetings agreed to accept
$13,500. I'ouneil unanimously agreed
to buy the mains at this price and
directed Dr. Hassler to start neces
sary arrangements at once to take
them over. He was also authoris
ed to have workmen connect the
Fourteenth ward lines to the city
mains as soon as possible.
Dr. Hassler said this will he done
within a week after which arrange
ments will be made for laying new
mains in the ward as the present |
supply system is inadequate. New i
tlreplugs will be installed also, lie ,
said, and every wtil-htt pupi.'
kto have much of the .work dcuui
fore winter weather "interferes.
Many Complaints
Discussion of the ash situation
followed the introduction of the
public comfort station ordinance, j
• 'onimissioner Hassler told the other'
members of Council that it was
necessary to act at once on the |
ordinance which includes rules and ;
regulations for ash collections next j
year. Proposed specifications for the i
1919 contract also are to be approv- i
ed, he said. The councilmen finally •
agreed to meet at 4 o'clock in the ,
afternoon to discuss the ordinance
and the specifications and a special :
meeting may be,called fo to-mor
row to pass the former on first read
ing. . !
The commissioners then question
ed Dr. Hassler about the present ■
situation and suid that they are Rett- ;
ing many complaints about inade- ;
quate service. Commissioner Lynch
declared that ash collections every '
two weeks were causing much trou- '
ble in the city and that he did not \
know about the agreement that the i
ashes were not to be removed often- !
er. Mayor Keister said he has re
ceived eotuplaints also about irre
gular garbage collections. Com- i
[Continued on Page 14.]
Senate Finance Committee
Abolishes Tax on Vehicles
By Associated Press
Washington, Nov, 26.—1n further
revision of the war revenue bill, the j
Senate Finance CtinmLi-q to-day !
struck out entirely the proposed Fed- i
rral license tax on use of automobiles ■
and motorcycles, which ranged from [
ten to fifty dollars annua'ly in the j
House bill, according to horsepower,
and from live to twenty-five dollars
under the plan previously ndopted '
by th eSenate committee.
Amos C. Reese Killed
in Action in France
Amos Cement Keeese, Company K.
One Hundred and Twenty-eighth In
fantry, was killed October in France ■
after being on the firing line out nine
days.
Private Heese resided at J? North
Tenth street and was conductor in t
the yards of the Bethlehem Steel Com
pany prior to leaving for tile Service I
with the last draft. He trained at!
i'amp McArtliur, Texas.
THE WEATHER
For IlnrrUhurg nnil vicinity t Fair
to-night, with freezing temperu
ture; Wedneadny Increasing
eloudiness ad slightly warmer.. !
Vnr Eastern Pennsylvania I Fair
to-night Wednesday Increasing;
cloudiness and slightly nnrmrr;
gentle to modernte northwest
winds, becoming variable.
Illver
The Siusquehnnnn river and all Hs
branches will continue to fnll
slowly. A stage of about U
tret Is Indicated for Hnrrlsburg
Wednesday morning.
General Conditions
The disturbance that wns central
over the Klo Grnnde A nllej, |
Monday, hns moved sonthrnst
ward Into the Gnlf of Mexico)
It has caused snow In the Inst
twenty-four hours In %'ew '
Mexico, Oklahoma ' and West
ern Texns nnd rain In the Gnlf
nnd South Atlantic State*. An
other dlntarbnnre has niuienred
In Mnnltobn. hat ns yet If has
caused no precipitation of con
sequence within the field of ob
servation. High pressure pre
vails over the remainder of the
eountry-
I
0
The High Points
APPOINTMENT of Augustus j
11. Haines, 24 North street,
to succeed the late Patrol- 1
man \V. Meivhi Kepford.
Aeeeptnnee of offer of Dauphin j
Consolidated Water Company to ■
sell witter mains in Fourteenth I
ward for SI3,.MML. Original priee
asked was $21,000.
Commissioner 8, F, Hassler
authorizetl to have Fourteenth
ward water Hues collected with
1 elty MA in- at once, and to make
arrangements to luy new lines in
annexed district.
ConfeeeiK'e on ash speoiiica- I
tlons and proposed ordinance
called for 1 o'clock tills afternoon. ]
Special meeting may lie held to
morrow. ■
Commissioner- eoniplain about T
present ash and garbage eollcc- J
tions and direct Dr. Hassler to get j
better service.
Authorized quarantining houses
in wlileh inlluenza cases develop, I

COUNCIL PASSES
'BUCK' TO MAYOR
IN CITY SCANDAL
Conimissioners 'Waiting' For
Keister to Probe His Own
Department
AND HK KNOWS NOTHING
No Charges to Be Brought i
Against Men Asleep
on Jobs
"WELCOMES CLEAN CITY " ,
•Cb+e4'-K*ecutive Sure Harris-;
burg Is as Good as
Other Towns
Members of City Council said to-,
! Jay that Mayor Keister was thej
| only one who had authority now to i
j investigate any inefficiency in the j
i Police department, or cases of negli- j
gence, since the Federal authorities |
| visited the city and raided about
j twenty places, arresting 175 persons.!
The commissioners all took the l
position that they could not inter-!
fere with the Mayor or take any ac-
I lion at present, as he has full charge j
over the police department, and is'
! the one to make an., charges against j
; officers for failure to perform their i
duty.
Nothing to lie Done
I Mayor Keister, when asked what j
action he intended to take, declared
he had no charges to make against
i any officers on the force and knew
of no inefficiency. "I think the force
at present is as efficient as in any!
.other ci'\ We could not have fol-'
lowed the same method as used by;
the Federal authorities. I welcome I
anything which can be done to make j
Harrisburg a cleaner, better city, but
with the information the department!
had we could not have raided anv'
lof those places. Some of them, in !
fact, .have never been under suspi-i
jcion. ■ Others we have raided and)
have taken more out of them than I
| the Federal officers did. The Bucket j
| of Blood on one occasion was raided
i by city patrolmen and fifty-four were
j arrested. They were fined and soon
|after returned to their old haunts.
If there is anything we can do to
get rid of the undesirables. I want
to know what it is. We have ar- •
I rested them over and over, fined I
| them, put them in jail—and they!
• just return to their old p'aces.
No Charges
"I have no charges to bring against ;
any of the officers on the force. If
jany one has a complaint t'o make'
about negligence or inefficiency T!
will investigate it personally and act
accordingly."
Mayor Keister's statement that he !
| did not intend to take any action or j
conduct any Investigation despite the I
! fact that the Federal officials came I
i here and caught in their net many!
scores of people in the big raid on
disorderly houses, aroused a storm :
jof criticism agaipst the police de-;
partment.
Residents in all parts of the city;
declared that the raids here furnish
I conclusive evidence of negligence or
inefficiency in the city police depart
ment. whicli should result in an offl- !
cial investigation by the other mem- j
: bers of Council If the Mayor will I
' take no action. The other eohtmis- i
i sioners, • however, "pass the buck," 1
! and say they will not Interfere with <
■ the police department.
! Commissioner W. H. Lynch said: !
i "It Is up to the Mayor to act about
affairs In his department. Speaking i
l'or myself, I can say that 1 ,have no '
authority to take any action. He has |
charge of the police department anil :
it is for him to decide what to do." !
Commissioner C, W. Burtnett ex-!
] pressed the same opinion, saying: :
| "Council cannot take any action so)
far as 1 can see. The Muyor is t! e '
person to bring charges against any'
of the officers for not doing their!
! duty."
Commissioners S. F. Hassler and I
K, "/. <Jrosß made simi'ar statements)
that Mayor Keister should make any;
1 investigations and prefer charges of
negligence or inefficiency, then dis
i charge the patrolmen for failure to
)do their duty in enforcing the law
ju'nd reporting any disorderly houses.
i
0
< ■ 1
It'll Make a Good Start' Toward Arming Our New ,
International Policemen
WILSON TO BE
AWAY A MONTH
! ON PEACE TRIP
President Hears From North-1
cliffc His Presence Is
Essential
By Associated Press .
\\asliiiigton. Nov. 26.—About one;
i month is the time President Wilson
'expects to bp in Europe for the
i opening of the peace conference and i
| preliminary discussions. No definite i
I limit has been fiixed but it was said |
authoritatively to-day that the Pres- !
; ident plans to be back on American i
' soil within six weeks after Ills ship j
| sails for the other side.
It became known also to-day that j
) the Italian ambassador, Count D! i
Cellere, as well as Ambassador Jus- !
serand of France and the American)
peace delegation, will cross on the j
ship with the President.
Preparations for the President's)
I trip are going forward rapidly at the;
j White House.
Among many messages received •
■ front England, France and Italy, I
) urging Mr. Wilson not to let unfa-!
] vorable criticisms interfere with his)
j plans, is understood to be one from I
i Lord Northcliffe. earnestly suggest-!
| ing that all objections should be dis- |
! regarded by the President, whose |
! presence is essential.
; It was said that there was no
foundation whatever-for talk of a'
censorship over news of the peace!
1 conference, nnd that American news- )
paper correspondents would be j
* given all facilities possible for trans- !
I mitllng their dispatches. I
THREE TONS OF PEACH PITS
PUT UP FOR SALE AS FUEL
Not Needed Now For Gas Masks, Red Cross Seeks to Get
Needed Revenue From Fruit Stones
) FOR SALE Approximately
three tons of peach stones and
nutshells to be used as fuel. Ap- I
plication should be made to Mrs. )
Mabel Cronlse Jones. 106 Locust ,
! street. Bell phone. 4214.
! Cheer up. you Harrisburgers who
! haven't been able to get the precious
black lumps of anthracite to keep
i >our kitchen stove a cooking and the
! furnace sizzling hot! King Coal has
been dethroned and his kingdom has
) been turned into the peachstone and
j nutshell republic!
Democracy Rclgncth Once More
| The whole thing came about
through the war. The local Red
Cross chapter was instructed some
months ago to start collection of nut
shells and fruitplts for the manufac
ture of carbon to be used iu gas
i >
COMMUNITY SING
IS PLANNED FOR
THANKSGIVING
'Hundreds of Voices to Be
; Raised in Song on (ircat'
Holiday
, Following the plan of the Xa
! tionul Council of Women, whose 7,-
) 000,000 members have endorsed
community singing in every city and
(town in the United States for
j Thanksgiving, members of the Com
i munity Singing committee, have ar
| ranged for such a celebration in 1
[ Harrisburg. The sing will he held in
| the rotunda of the Capitol at 4.15
! o'clock Thursday afternoon. The
I Municipal Band will support the sing
! and selections by this organization
; will be a feature of the occasion.
, Hundreds of patriotic Harrisburg
! ers are expected to turn out for the
1 event. The plan, besides having the
j endorsement of the National Council
) of Women, has the unqualified sup
i port and endorsement of Secretaries
! Baker, Wilson and Daniels.- Pronii
) nent citizens in New York appear on
) the committees of arrangements at
| the celebration there, besides en
! dorsing the movement whole heart
) ediy.
j The sing Thanksgiving Day will be
i under the direction of Abner Hart
| man, who will conduct the chorus. I
! The arrangements of the committee
) were completed to-day. It is desired
j that alien born citizens especially be
| present. The Community Singing
; committee is headed by Mrs. J. G.
I Sanders, chairman. Other members
j are Miss Cora Lee Snyder, Mrs. Ed
| win J. Decevee, Howard Oensler,
1 Frank A. McCarrell, Alfred C.
I Kushwa and Fred C. Hand.
t masks. Great quantities were col
lected. with J. William Bowman and
; Mrs. Mabel Cronlae Jones playing
[ prominent parts In the gathering.
: Yesterday there came to Mrs. Jones
a telegram from the War Dcpart
i ment ordering that the collection be
stopped since there Is no further
need for gas masks, the aynistlce
having been signed. And there are
three tons or more of peachatones on
a railway siding at Seventh and Cur
tin streets.
Some bright young chap, perhaps
a sufferer from the tyranny of King
Coal suggested that the collection be
sold to the people of Harriaburg as
fuel. The Idea was seised upon and
it Is now on sale. The proceeds are
to go to the Red Cross to assist In
caring for refugees and wounded
alike.
GOV. BRUMBAUGH
IMADE HISTORIAN
;| AT $lO,OOO A YEAR
McClain Cuts Down Expenses
of State Defense Coin
mission
j The State Committee of Safety and
Defense to-day created a war service
! bureau in the Adjutant General's
! Department for the collection of in
] formation relative to the share of
j Pennsylvania and its people in the
l great war and selected Governor
i Martin G. Brumbaugh at a salary of
1 i ) 10,000 u year to be director. He will
1 i enter upon his duties February I.
This action of the commission wns
) I taken by the votes of Auditor Gen
'! eral Charles A. Snyder, who put the
1 i motion; State Treasurer H. M. Kep
hart, who made the motion, and Ad
) j jutnnt General Frank D. Beary, who
'] seconded ihe motion. Governor
: , Brumbaugh did not vote and Lieu
j tenant Frank B. McClain, declined
' ] to vote, saying that he had alreadv
' authorized an appropriation of $5."-
j 009 for the joint work of the Penn
! sylvania Historical Commission and
) the Pennsylvania War History Com
; mission, both of which are headed
i by Governor-elect William C. Sproul,
| und would consider a vote in favor
1 of creation of the new bureau to be
! inconsistent.
. | $:o,OOft l'or Work
i ] The Governor stated after the
i ! meeting that the commission had
; | authorized an appropriation of $30.-
j 000 from the $2,000,000 fund
i by the last Legislature for the work
and that such clerical assistance as
would be needed would be approved
by ttie Defense Commission. The
[Continued on Page B.] '
Senator Beidleman Is
Given Ovation at Home
of City Republican Club
| Senator Edward E. Beidleman,
! lieutenant-governor-elect, was greet
i ed by the largest attendance in years
at the Harrisburg Republican Club
| last night, at a banquet and recep
tion given, In his honor bv the mem
bers. Many of his friends who had
! not seen him since lie was elected to
1 the second highest office In the state,
: congratulated him on his successful
campaign and the overwhelming ma
jority accorded him.
1 Kd. A. Falter, president <)f the club.
had charge of the reception when It
i opened and immediately called on
. Prothonotary Charles E. Puss to pre
, sldj during the evening. Mr. Pass
• then made the opening address, wel
! coming the lieutenant-governor-elect
i for the hundreds who had gathered
. at the club, crowding every room.
His address was followed by a short
talk by Senator Beidleman who ex
i pressed his deep appreciation of the
. honor conferred upon him in his elec
) tlon and for their support of the Re
publican party.
1 Representative-elect Albert Millar,
1 Auditor General Charles A. Snyder,
; Mayor .Daniel I- Keiater and Cltv
Chairman Harry F. Oves, also were
called upon to make short addresses.
Following the reception a banquet
was served
[COMFORT STATION;
IS TO GO UNDER!
THE COURTHOUSE
Council Takes First Step To
ward Long-Delayed
Building
| COUNTY TO CO-OPERATE *
Commissioners Agree. With
Lynch, Who Introduces
Ordinance
| PASSES FIRST READING j
i Decision as to Location Not i
Final; Willing to Take
Advice
Members 01" City Council anil City j
! Solicitor John K. Fox will confer |
j with the County Commissioners to
j obtain permission to use the vacant | 1
! space, between the courthouse anil |
j Court 'street for a public comfort |
| station.
j An ordinance authorizing the con-j
; ference. directing Commissioner W. ]
J H. Lynch to secure an architect to j
I make plans for the work und au- ]
thorizing advertisement for bids was',
introduced in Council this morning'
I by Mr. Lynch and passed tirst read
| ipg. Trie building of the station has |
i been delayed because of the fight j
! against building it in Market Square, j !
j Immediately after it had been read j
Commissioner Lynch explained to the
' other members that in naming the j
] location for the comfort station he |
[did not intend to have the com mis-I
! sinners think he believed it to be j
, the best place, but that it was u ,
suggestion so that the ordinance |
I could be presented. Other council
[ men took the same position and said
I that if another place is found which
I will be a more suitable site, they will
consider, it.
Commissioner Lynch also explain
ed that there is increasing need for
the comfort station because of the
shorter hours of the large stores and i
the lack of such facilities for the
public except during certain hours
of the day. Other officials expressed
'fnefr approval of the move to cOn
i struct the station,'
Council Commissioner C. C. Cumb
' ler. when he learned of the action .
' taken by City Council, said the coun
ty officials will be willing to meet
the councllmen and po-operate with!
j them. County Solicitor Philip 8.1
I Moyer will be requested to attend I
j the joint conference when the ques- I
I tion of whether the county property j
I adjoining the courthouse can be used j
j for the comfort station, will be de- j
: cided.
| A fund of s2o,ooo'was authorized:
| a few years ago for the erection of i
this improvement but definite action j
I I has been delayed frequently. The ,
city commissioners after the ordi- j
' I nance passed first reading to-day,
| said they had no preference in a I
, ! site for the comfort station, but j
> j that question could not be settled:
! unless a certain one was named.
: Then if objections were raised and
a better one can be obtained, a I
, change will be made.
! Yankee U-Boat Chasers
Start For Home; Sirens ,
Sound Farewell Blasts i
■ j tlneenstown, Nov. 26.—A number |
i of American submarine chasers, ac- |
! companied by the parent ship Buck- J
,! Nell, left yesterday for the United j
| States.
' The flotilla was given an enthu- j
j siastic send-off. The harbor resound- |
! ed with the shrieks of sirens and j
j crowds assembled along the water- I
j way cheered us the vessels steamed I
out to sea.
Frank C. Bosler Found
1 Dead in His Office
Carlisle, Nov. 26.—Frank C. Bos- i
, ler, a local millionaire, interested
■ largely in western cattle, irrigation
i and metallurgical enterprises, aged
\ ts, was found dead from an apoplec
| tic stroke early this morning in the
, ' office building close to his residence
I I on practically the same spot where
. j his father, James W. Bosler, a
►, pioneer westerner, was found dead
: | thirty-five yearH ago.
i i Mr. Bosler, who three years ago
I I married Miss Elizabeth Swank, of
; I Denver, is survived by liis wife and
! infant children, Frank C. and James
j D. Bosler.
Mr. Hosier was a member of the
j Union , league, Philadelphia; Har- j
vard Club, New York City, and many |
j social organizations In the west. He j
! was president of the Diamond Cattle
) i Company, Kock Creek Conservation I
i Company, both at Rock River, Wy- j
, | oming; Iron Mountain Alloy Com- i
| pany, Denver, Col.; Iron Mountain |
1 i Ranch Company, Bosler, Wyoming; !
' ] Carlisle Deposit Bank and a large i
stockholder in local banks. Industrial |
and public utility enterprises.
Penn-Harris to Open For
First Time New Year's Eve j
| it has been tentatively decided
' that the Penn-Harris will be formally
| opened on New eYar's eve. Some
' belated equipment for the kitchen
has arrived this week and the fur
nishing is going ahead with renewed
energy.
The chefs, the head waiter,' thej
steward, the head bellman, and the |
maids have all been organized as to!
their respective courses. The ell-|
boys wi ; I wear a forest green utii. .-m j
with tlic lettering "P-H", and these,
ar# now being made ready. Reser- j
vatlons are being made every- day ,
for rooms and fo i various dinners
and other occasion* H
LUDENDORFF GETS
OUT OF GERMANY
By Associated Press
Copenhagen, Nov. 26.—General
Ludendorff, reputed to have been
long the actual directing head of
Germany's military affairs, lias
quit-German soil, according to the I
Frankfort Gazette. It says he has
left Sassnltz, Prussia, for Sweden, j
His titular position in the German
military system was that of first
quartermaster general.
1
CITY IS TO HAVE
SHARE IN MAKING 1
PARK BEAUTIFUL
Commissioners to Meet State
Board of Public Grounds
and Buildings
THE PLANS ARE SPLENDID
Harrisburg's Part Is to Rear !
range Highway Lines
in Capitol Zone
Harrisburg city commissioners will
be incited to meet with the members
of the State Board of Public Grounds 1
und Buildings to discuss the city's
share In the improvement of Capitol i
1 ark, tlie extension and the construe- ;
tlon of the monumental bridge. This !
meeting will be held In a few weeks |
so that preparation of the necessary,
legislation, bills for the general as- !
sembly and ordinances for the Harris- )
burg council, can be started with a
full agreement on state and muni
cipal co-operation.
City Solicitor Confer*
City Solicitor John K. Fox met
George A. Sh miner, superintendent
of public grounds und buildings;!
[Continued on I'ugc 14.]
FMkfN KXTEit 1,11 Al-'.tl III; l(U
I'nrl*. Nov. 26.—0n the French front I
the troops 'continue their advance >
during the course of the dav in Dux-]
emburg, where they occutiied Merzig!
Bellen, Heiderscheld and Lemeri, and 1
also in Lorraine, where the French I
are along the river Lauter. French I
cavalry lias entered Luxemburg.
ffa a-.'Xfcf J g i fcll lili >t f-'TiT f?■ 9 . ■>*?. j>7 ■!?<> |>7* • tft - *.-
HtTm ■f*Tr , TTi T TTTT •••
if ST/ 7 STREET BR!D\. TO EE 1
|f MEMORIAL TO MEN OF SERVICE 1
t *
J HARRISBURG—THE STAT}'. BDARD OF BUILE ii
X iNGc AND GROUNDS TO-DAY DECIDED TC
t M . Hie BRIDGE ACROSS THE PENNSVt £
? VANA RAILROAD COtftfRCTNQ CAPITOL f
J . • ENSION WITH iiu: ALLISON HILL 9
jr DISTRICT A MEMpRIA f
|Z SYLVANIA WHO SERVED IN THE GREAT WAR. M
1 1
?> BRIDGE TO THE SOLDIERS AM > SAILORS OF Z
[| WHO SERVED FN THE GREAT jfi
I WAR. THIS WAS DONE AT THE SUGGESTION OF 3
i NNER, |
| AMD TH |
T , f
| EVERY PENNSYLVANIA SOLI >IBR AND SAILOR jS
A FOCI! IS IN LUXEMBURG
T 2
T T*
f* 0
j i |
' ' jl
. MEET TO DISCUSS STRIKE MOVE *
X il
T '
T of Railroad R
il -Telegrapher., whose fteadqtiartei timore, | I
25 nitely to divide whether the members of the order shall >9
fqu; t:> t: ro <• unless t' r
. crcar I pay and improved working conditions, r hail have, !j£
II been complied with meanwhile. X
{NEWBERRY WINS 8Y.7,567 9
-rHrp, Mich.—Official tabula'! t f the vote cast 'fc ;
A No-n;nbtT 5 as announced by the X
shows that Lieut. Oomhiandcr Newberry, Re* £■
4 publican, was elected United States - ator from Michi- *9
ipran• over Henry .Ford,, Democrat, by a margin of 7,567. |k
The figures were: Newberry, 220,054; Fo rd, '12,487. . X
3!u ui9
r~*x
4* UiHtitit/iUL ULUV&IS %
7* hntHfkor nntl Mnrr cr-d.
! JUVENILE CRIME
WAVE GROWS IN
ALARMING SIZE
Fifty Boys and Girls Arraign
ed Before County
Officials
OFFENSES ARE SERIOUS
I "
(Petty Thievery and Truancy
Plnvs Little Part in the
Charges Brought
I THE PARENTS AT FAULT
In Many Instances Children
Do Not Have Proper
Attention
For the second time this year
) about fifty boys and girls charged
witli offenses ranging' froni felon
j ious entry and lurccny to incorrigl
) bility and truancy, will be brought
j before Judge S. J. M. McCarrell,
presiding at juvenile court sessions
lon Friday. The cases to be heard
have been continued since October
11 becuuse off the epidemic of in
fluenza.
The increase in juvenile crime in
the city and county during the year
j has caused much comment in ofti
; cial circles. At the January sessions
; there were 22 children brought into
: court; in March, 49, and in June, 16.
Make Big Until-,
j A surprising feature in the theft
icases, officials said, is that the youthk
are making big hutils in most in
stances. instead of petty thefts. In
making a study of the situation prq
hatlon officers at each session make
a separate report on each case. lit
1 some instances the children are
without proper parental care, while
In other cases association with other
I boys in the neighborhood who are
constantly stirring up trouble re
sult in the arrest of youngsters who
under other conditions would com
mit no offenses. -
One of (lie boys to be heard on
I Friday is charged with stealing an
; automobile, valued at $5OO. Inves-
I ligations show that the boy is a tru-
I ant at times and causes his parents
[Continued ou Page B.J

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