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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, January 28, 1919, Image 1

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erman i wops Drwe Soviets Away From Libaa; Death Stalks in Perm Until Gaida Captures City
HARRISBURG TELEGRAPH' M
' SMac-Snbcpcnbenl.
VWVTTT \'n 14 PAPPQ Dally Except Sunday. Entered as Second Clasa
AAAViii i\o. -CO 14 XVVUiiO Matter at the Post Office at Harrlsburg
rUSTED POLICE PLAN TO LAY
BARE ALLEGED INEFFICIENCY
AND GRAFT IN
Ilisconduct in Office, Blackmail g.nd the
Selling of Protection to Criminals
Charged by Patrolman Magnelli Who
Is to Go Before the City Council
rA YOR REFUSES TO ORDER PROBE ALTHOUGH
NASTY RUMORS LONG HAVE SHAKEN FORCE
Repeating his sweeping charges of graft and alleged misconduct on the part of
her members of the police force, Theodore A. Magnelli, 112 South Second street,
ho last night was asked to resign from the force by Mayor Keister following the
scoverv that he had accepted 30 cents reward for the return of a strayed horse a
■ar ago. declared his intention of lighting the Mayor in an effort to retain his position.
Edward Schmehl, 81 Disbrow street' who also was asked to resign on the same charge, has re
sed to resign, and will make a strenuous effort to retain his place in the department.
To Bring Sweeping Charges
Magnelli stated that it council dismisses him from the force at the Mayor's request- he will bring
t eeping charges against particular members of the force. Graft, misconduct in office, blackmail,
id protective of vice by various members of the force were included in the list of misdemeanors
id by Magnelli to have been committed bV officials and members of the department.
Magnelli has promised to show how friends of the heads of the police department have had
oney refunded following police court hearings when they were forced to pay fines. He* said he
d his friends on the force will show from the police court ;
cords that such practices have taken'place.
Rumors Long Passed About
Rumors to the effect that graft, flagrant misconduct in office
d on duty, and partiality, including the refunding of fines, have
en passed about for the past year, but have never been sub
tntially charged. Considerable interest in the activities of the
ficials and workers within the offices of the police department
s been aroused by the deposed patrolman's charges.
Magnelli declared to-day he is backed by many members of the
lice force in his contention that he was unjustly punished, and
at his dismissal is unwarranted.
Mayor Is Satisfied
Mayor Keister declared that there is no hidden reason or ulterior
Dtive back of the dismissals. Although that the case of alleged
ift occurred almost a year ago, lie
d It was not brought to his atten
n until last week.
Magnelli charges the Mayor tvfth
litical motives and said that his
luested resignation came only a
v days after he declared to Mayor
ister that he would not support
n in another election.
Says It's Politics
'The Mayor's playing politics," de
red the policeman, "He's getting
idy for the next election."
dagnelli was emphatic in his state
;nt that his case was unjustly
atcd.
'Everybody on the force should
fired for graft if I grafted when
:ook thirty cents reward for re
ning that lost horse," he said,
radically every man on the force
j taken a reward under the same
cumstances.
'Because I admitted taking the
rty cents, I got tired," he added,
terly, "The Mayor's only doing it
try to re-elect himself. He can't
I haven's been doing my duty.
Direct Charges
The detectives tipped oft houses
ill-repute before they were raid-
They surely got something for
for every time we made a raid
inmates were gone. The Federal
ernment had to make a raid li
ly. because the department was
aid. The detectives were hang
up In those houses.
The detectives have been drunk
duty. Some of them are drink
all the time. Uniformed men
•e been on th# carpet for drink
, but they never got tired. Be
,se they were friends of the
yor's. they were let go.
"The Mayor's Gang"
Another man was on the carpet
indecent assault on a young girl,
was left off because the Mayor's
g was back of him."
"harges similar to these, and
iging definite cases to light, are
miBed by Magnelli and his friends
t week.
luestioned concerning the spe
: charges mentioned by Magnelli.
Mayor said that these men have
n reprimanded for drinking. He
lared he considered a reprimand
icient punishment for their cases,
disclaimed all knowledge of the
tors that detectives hang around
•th Seventh street houses. He i
ed for a specific instance and ;
1 he didn't believe it when in- |
ned of Magnelli's charge against!
-articular one of the detectives.
Cites Specific Instances
le asked for a specific instance of
sctives or department heads tip
s' off disorderly houses prior to
•aid. He was furnished Mag
i's assertion made this morning
t the house of Mollie Crum, South
rd street, was a notable example.
i Mayor declared the house had
er been raided.
layor Keister declared that in
opinion the force is good, and
will not bring charges against
one until he is informed of defi
[Continued on Page 12.]
HE WEATHER]
>r Harrlsborg and vlelnltyi Fair
to-night nnd probably Wednes- 1
dan not mueh rhnnsr In trrn
peratare, lowest to-alght about !
35 degrees.
>r Eastern Pennsylvania ■ Fair
to-night and probably Mrdaes
dayt moderate temperaturei
gentle to moderate south to
west winds.
Itlver
ir Susquehanna river nnd all Its
branches will fsll slowly. V
stage of about 5.4 fret is Indi- I
rated for Harrtsburg Wednes
day morning.
,3,
STATEMENT BY
MAYOR KEISTER
"I considered these two
men as good friends as I had
t on the force. There was no
i political reason back of my
request for their resignation.
Anyone who says I have not
' punished other officers against
whom charges of misconduct
'. f were brought, lies. This is
absolutely the first case of
1 graft I have had brought to
my attention. I do not con
,i sider the size of the amount
;j has anything to do with the
seriousness of the offense,
and the Clark Act especially
stipulates that discovery of
graft on the part of a police
official should be followed by
dismissal."
i :
DESERTED 21
TIMES IN FIVE
| YEARS, SAYS WIFE
■ First Offense Three Days
After Ceremony, Woman I
Tells Court
| " He deserted me twenty-one limes j
i in the five years we were married." I
Mrs. I„lllie GeSage, 44. 1329- How-!
i ard street, told Judge S. J. M. McCar-'
I rell in court room No. 2. testifying!
|in a nonsupport action against her'
i husband. Cornelius P. GeSage
i GeSage was discharged from Army
service because of tuberculosis, he
I said. He produced a discharge set
j ting forth these facts and stated he
J received a pension of $3O a month
j from the Government. Judge McCar
j rell ordered him to pay .Mrs. GeSage
| $lO a month. [
While on the witness stand Mrs. |
j GeSage told one of the most unusual!
marital tales heard in the Dauphin'
J county courts lit many months. She !
said that five years ago. when she
was to marry him. she gave him $25
on the day of the wedding so that j
they could go to Hagerstown.
Deserted First Week
"He wanted to get married there i
and I gave him the money to go. be- I
cause he had none. Three days after
we were married he deserted me and
went to I'niontown. Soon I received
- a telegram from a Salvation Army
I worker telling me he was sick and
[Continued on Page 12.1
,
German Reds Are in
Power at Wilhelmshaven; '
to Courtmartial Opponents]
Copenhagen. Jan. 28.—Spartacan!
forces have overturned the govern-'
nient in Wilhelmshaven, Germany,!
and occupied the banks and public'
j buildings. They have ordered the
j court martial of their opponents,
i Railway traffic to and from Wilhelm-
shaven lias been stopped.
' ' ?l
t?
M AGNELLI'S
AFFIDAVIT
State of Pennsylvania.
County of Dauphin,
City of Harrisburg.
1 Personally appeared before
me, an alderman in and for
the county aforesaid, Theo
' dore A. Magnelli, 112 South
Second street, and did affirm
, to the best of his knowledge
J | and belief, the following:
If taking thirty cents for
returning to its owner some
thing that was lost, is cause
for dismissal, then nearly
every member of the depart
ment should be dismissed
upon the same grounds as I
was.
Theodore A. Magnelli.
Sworn and Subscribed to this
28th day of January. 1919.
Signed,
Edward J. Hilton,
Alderman.
EVERYBODY JOINS
j IN MAKING DRIVE
A GREAT SUCCESS
Junior Red Cross, Silk Min
Girls, Motor Dealers Give
Generously For Children
The Junior Red Cross, made up
1 of the school boys and girls of Ilar
; risburg, has given $lOO to the Ro
| tary Club's fund of $5,000 for the
I j Children's Industrial Home and Nur-
I sery Home. The little folks gathered
"this money together to meet just
• such emergencies as now face the
j two homes and those at the head of!
] the movement are especially pleased
| that some of the money contributed
' by the boys and girls of the city goes
to the children of their own neigh
i borhood.
Money is coming in fast to-day for
[Continued on Page 12.J
STRIKES THROW
200,000 OUT OF
WORKOVERSEAS
Half of Toilers Away From
i Shops Are in Belfast; Lights
Bring on Attacks
By Associated Press
Ixnidon, Jan. 28.—1t is estimated]
i lhat nearly 200.000 men and women !
I are idle in the United Kingdom and i
i Ireland because of strikes in various
I trades, creating one of the most se
] rious situations industrially that the
| country has had to face in many
years. Half of the strikers are in
Belfast, where the strike movement
is continuing to spread.
The city of Belfast by night is in
[Continued on Page 12.]
! TRANSPORTS BRINGING 6,000
t Washington, Jan. 28. —Tp big
I transports, the Adriatic and Sibony,
] are due at New York Saturday with
about 6,000 men aboard. The Ad
riatic brings Companies E, F, G and
H of the 329 th Infantry, and the
322 nd and 324 th machine, gun bat
talions and headquarters of the
165 th Infantry Brigade, all of the
83rd division. Other units of the
32 9th Infantry, are returning on an
! other vessel.
HARRISBURG, PA., TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 28. 1919
HOUSE WILL PASS
TOY'RESOLUTION
ON NEXT TUESDAY
National Amendment Report
! Ed by Committee With Fa- j
vorable Recommendation
NO DISSENTING VOTES
Senate Swamped by Great j
Mass of Petitions; Out
look Is Very Bright •
. The prohibition amendment will
I likely pass the House of Represen
tatives of Pennsylvania next week.
| The joint resolution proposing rati
fication of the amendment was af
firmatively recommended by the
j House law and order committee this
i morning after a hearing, there be
; ing no votes in opposition. Half an J
I hour later Mr. Showalter. Union, re- |
| ported it to the House.
! To-morrow it will be on first read- i
; ing. Monday on second reudtng, like- j
i ly a special order and on third read- j
j ing Tuesday, when it will have right
] of way.
Petitions Presented
j Containing the names of nearly
'2 5,000 of the Comnioow-ealth's eiti- j
i zens, petitions for the ratification of
1 the National Dry Amendment, by
! the Pennsylvania Legislature, were
j presented in the Senate this ntorn
i ing by half a score of senators,
j The papers, which threatened to
I swamp the desk of Chief Clerk Gal
| lagher were referred to the comniit
-1 tee on law and order by Lieutenant
j Governor Beidleman. Senators pre
| senting the papers included Burr,
I Turner, Herron, Craig, Beidleman.
\ Snyder, McConnell. Tompkins, and
I Haldeman. Many also appeared in
the House.
For the first time in the memory
iof many, an open meeting of the
f Law and Order Committee of the
House of Representatives was held
this morning and the Vickerman
' resolution calling for ratification of
! the national prohibition amendment
was favorably reported to the House.
Even the representatives on the
I committee who favored the liquor
j interest voted in favor of reporting
; the bill unanimously. William T.
; Ramsey, of Delaware county, dis
sented from allowing reporters in
i the meeting while the vote was be-
I ing taken but Representative John
i W. Vickerman, of Allegheny county,
j leader of the "drys," insisted that
'this be done and the vote stood 9 to
I 6 in favor of Vickerman's attitude.
| It has been customary in past ses
sions to have hearings on bills open
! to all but the meeting became execu
! tive when the vote was taken. Mr.
j Vickerman wanted everything done
;at this morning's meeting thrown
; wide open and while Mr. Ramsey
i said this was not according to custom
j and made an argument along that
j line, the vote showed a straight
"dry" and "wet" tinge and was car
j ried in that light.
When Chairman B. F. Bungard
put the motion of Representative l
Sigmund I. Gans to the committee
j that the Vickerman resolution be re
| ported favorably, it was seconded
by Daniel Helt, of Northumberland
county and carried unanimously.
The bill was ordered given into
the hands of Chairman Bungard to
be reported to the Hohse. Mr.
Ramsey said that this question was
[Continued on Page 12.]
More Pennsylvanians
Are Released From
Hun Prison Camps
Washington. Jan. 28.—American 1
| soldiers released from German prison
camps and # returned to France, an-
I nounced yesterday by the War De-
I partment, include these Pennsyl-
I vanians:
I Lieutenant John J. Mclllvaine, Ben
Avon: Joseph Scarlata, Pittsburgh:
j August F. Meier, Hazelton: Michael
t V. Lacey, Philadelphia: Clair S. Rog
j ers. Wyalusing; William R. Renner,
| Danville: Howard Muller, Williams
i port; Frank E. Beatty, Fairchance;!
j William J. Becker, St, Clair; Harry
j Svitak, Philadelphia; Rlchrad J.
j Keenan, Jeannette; Ernest F. Watt,
I Warren: Antonio Heleniak, Philadel
! phia, and Arthur E. Boyer, Phlladel
l phia.
D.A.R.WELCOMED
TO THE CITY BY
LOCAL CHAPTER
Governor and Mrs. Sproul to
Receive Delegates This
Evening
The twenty-second state confer
ence of the Daughters of the Amer
ican Revolution was officially opened
at a little after 10 o'clock this morn
ing by Mrs. Anthony Wayne Cook,
the State Regent, who called the
meeting to order. Mrs. James G.
Sanders, Harrlsburg, led the singing
of "America," and the Rev. Dr.
George Edward Hawes, pastor of the
Market Square Presbyterian Church,
of this city, pronounced the Invoca
tion. The beautiful D. A. R. salute to
the flag was given. The words of
this eloquent tribute are:
X pledge allegiance to my flag
and to the Republic for which It
stands:
One nation, indivisible, with
Liberty and Justice for all. •
Miss Cora Lee Snyder, Regent of
the Harrlsburg Chapter, brought
greetings from the hostess organi
zation and Introduced Mayor Daniel
L. Keister, of Harrlsburg. Mayor
Keister welcomed the delegates and
[Continued on P*ge I?,] j
DEATH BUSY IN
PERM AS GAIDA
CAPTURES CITY
Conditions Terrible Under]
Bolshevist Rule; Infants
Die in Serbian City
TORTURE FOR PRISONERS
Bolshevists Shoot Inmates of
Jails to Make Room
For Others
GERMAN TROOPS
TO DRIVE POLES
By Associated Press
Paris, Jan. 28. —Two full corps |
of German troops have been as- |
sembled by the general staff to j
march against the Poles, and i
eight troop-trains are passing I
through Frankfort-on-the-Oder
daily, according to a Zurich dis
patch to the Journal, quoting the
Press of Baden-Baden.
By Associated Press ■ ,
Omsk. Central Siberia, Jan. 28. —
Death stalked the streets of Perm
until the city was captured by Gen
eral Guida, according to the orticlal
report o# an investigator who has
j ust returned from the Ural front.
So terrible Jvvere conditions under
the Bolshevist regime that the friglu
ed people of Perm have not yet re
covered. It is said that the few ped
estrians encountered there were
emaciated, with livid lips and a con
stant nervous trembling of the head'
and hands. There are no children
less than a year old in Perm, all hav
ing died, says •the. report, which adds
that in three months the whole pop
ulation would probably have per
ished.
Shoot Persons to Make Room
The report states 'that the Bolshe
vists regarded all bourgeois inhab
itants of the city even those ruined
and dying, as outside the law. When
the jail was overcrowded, the in
mates who had been imprisoned
were shot to make room for the new
comers, it is declared.
There are well authenticated cases
of torture, according to Uie report,
which says some -of the i>ndemned
were compelled to dig their own
graves and rehearsals of executions
were staged during the hours before
the doomed people were put to death.
Men were plunged into water until
nearly drowned and were then re
vived so that their torture could con
tinue. while some prisoners were
buried alive and others were muti
lated, the report states. Women were
forced to dig trenches, were often
flogged and sometimes even killed, it
is said.
Peasants were forbidden last June
to take provisions into the city.
Some people liid supplies, but these
were found and seized by the Bol
shevist, who spread terror through
out the whole region near Perm.
Bryan and Willis to
Address Big Temperance
Rally This Evening
William Jennings* Bryan, former
secretary of state, and ex-Governor
Frank B. Willis, of Ohio, will speak
at a huge mass meeting to be held
in the Chestnut Street Auditorium
this evening. The meeting will be
a victory jubilee in celebration of
the complete victories of the tem
perance forces over their wet foes.
Governor Willis will speak on
"Winning the War."
Mr. Bryan is well known as a
temperance orator. His subject will
be "Prohibition and Ratification."
The meeting is under the auspices
of the Pennsylvania Anti-Saloon
League. It will open at 7.45 o'clock.
There is no charge for admission
and no tickets are required except
for reserved seats.
MAHAXOY CITY EDITOR DIES
Mahunoy City, Pa., Jan. 28.
Thomas C. O'Connor, editor of the
.Mahanoy City Record for twenty
years, died here yesterday from a
complication of diseases. He was
postmaster from 1894 to 1898.
WHOLE FLOOR OF
PENN-HARRISFOR
CHARITY BALL
Demand For Dinners Almost
Swamp Hotel Man
agement
The Penn-Harris Hotel this morn
ing made the request that the hun
dreds of Harrisburgers who attend
the Charity Ball Friday night enter
the hotel through the Walnut street
entrance.
'This is necessary," said Manager
™ iKKins, "because of the congestion
which would naturally result were
automobiles and other vehicles to
use both Walnut and Third streets.
By using only Walnut street this
congestion will be avoided.
"We have arranged & turn over
to the ball the entire lounge and the
second floor of the hotel, on which
[Continued on I*ago 12.]
ORDERS NARVA RETAKEN
By Associated I'ress
Stockholm. Jan. 28. Premier
according to a report from
Reval, has ordered the Bolshevik
troops to retake the town of Narva
from the Esthonians within a week,
to- sack the town and to kill all the
boprfceoise. ,
*♦ i i ■ *
ONLY EVEXI.VO ASSOCIATED PRESS SIN QLB COPIES I I/tUP PniTIAV
NEWSPAPER IN HAKKISDURQ TWO CENTS JtlUMb LUIIIUIN
AMERICAN ENVOYS
TO POLAND
IN PEACE PROGRAM
Wilson Plan to Internationalize the
German Colonies Meets With the
Approval of Allied Delegates
GOMPERS MISTRUSTS SINCERITY
OF THE BERNE LABOR MEETING
Paris. Jan. 28.—Before the
Supreme Council of the Peace
Conference met to-day nt 11
o'oloek what had threatened to
t>e a eontliet over the represen
tation of some of the smaller
powers oil some of the Imisir
taut committees had been en
tirely cleared away by the unan
imous action of the spokesmen
of the small nations them
selves and the peace negotia
tions in general are continuing
to move forward.
Paris, Jan. 28.—Progress is mak
ing toward world peace and a solu
tion of the problems that must be
settled ]>efore a preliminary treaty
is presented for the approval of the
whole world powers. To-day the
American members of the commis
sion created by the Peace Confer
ence to visit Poland were named.
They are:
MAJOR GENERAL FRANCIS J..
KERNAN, for the Army.
PROF. ROBERT H. LORD, of
Harvard University, the American
Peace Commission's expert on Rus
sia and Poland.
It is expected that the Commis
sion will leave for Poland next week.
"President Wilson appears to
have put forward a general scheme
which may be termed the interna
tionalization of Germany's late pos
sessions," says the Paris correspond
ent, writing to the London Mail.
League to Guide Colonies
"This plan is not exactly defined,"
writes the correspondent, "but in
principle It would make it man
datory for the various powers to ad
minister the colonies subject to the
control of the League of Nations."
It is said in laindon that Great
Britain's delegates do not object to
such procedure respecting the colo
nies In Afrfca, although other na
tions, notably the French and Por
tuguese, do not acquiesce, and the
Union of South Africa definitely
claims German Southwest Africa.
As regards the Pacific, Australia
claims New Guinea and the Bis
marck Archipelago: New Zealand
claims Samoa, and Japan desires the
Marshalls and Carolines. Japan
also suggests an equatorial declima
tion between British and Japanese
influence in the Pacific.
The Mail correspondent refers to
the Angle-Japanese "secret" treaty
of 1915 which assigned the Marshalls
and Carolines to Japan, and adds:
"Such possession would be very
distasteful to the United States and
American political opinion is that
if President Wilson agrees to this
mot e his power will be seriously im
paired. It suggested that from this
comes his earnest demand for the
internationalization of all Pacific
colonies."
Gompers Mistrusts Berne Meeting
Samuel Gompers, president of the
American Federation of Labor, who
is in Paris to discuss the organiza
tion of an international labot; con
gress with French, Belgian and
English syndicalists, has declared to
France Libre that he would not yet
say whether American delegates
will attend the labor and socialist
conference at Berne. life declared
that first of all he wished to know
what organizations will be repre
sented; whether these organizations
are real labor organizations, and
whether the Berne conference is not
part of a direct German propaganda
plan.
Regarding the attitude of the
American labor party toward Ger
many, Gompers said:
"'Before we are willing to engage
ourselves to anything, the German
people must have a better concep-
TWO BIG ENTERTAINMENTS
SCHEDULED BY Y. M. C. A.
Two big open-house entertainments
will be held in the Central Y. M. C. A.
building on the last two nights of this
week. The first will be an entertain
ment for the men employed by the
local Pomeroy & Stewart store.
At least eighty men are expected to
be present.
The second entertainment will be
held Saturday evening, when men
from the plant of the Central Iron
and Steel Cgmpany will be enter
tained. President R. H. Irons, of
the steel company, has appointed a
committee of men, which met with
Secretary Robert B. Reeves, of the
"V," this afternoon to formulate plans
for the event.
PERSHING TO SPEED TROOPS
By Associated Press
ParU, Jan. 28.—General Pershing
reports that by April he will be dis
patching American troops homeward
from. France at the rate of 390,000
monthly. This appears to be con
sidered as rapidly as his forces can
be safely demobilized without add
ing to the difficulties of unemploy
ment.
.: I
BAN ON NEAR
BEERS REMOVED
By Associated Press
Washington, Jan. 28. The I
Food Administration announced j
to-day that President Wilson had |
signed a proclamation in Paris i
on January 23, removing restric- j
tlons on the manufacture of BO- I
called near beers. • "
t—M
tion of international duties and co
operation."
Tardlcu Against Censorship
Captain Andre Tardieu, French
high commissioner to the United
States and a French delegate to the
Peace Conference, in his speech yes
terday at a luncheon to members of
the foreign press, repeuted lite
pledge given by the French govern
ment that no censorship of foreign
cables would be exercised by France
and the promise that every reason
able facility would be given foreign
newspapers during the conference.
On the first point, according to the
official report of the captain's speech,
his words were:
"After rapidity of transmission
your second need is freedom. Thit)
liberty which you have from the
French point of view is total, abso
lute and unreserved. What you write
will be transmitted Just as you
write it."
Red Drive Fails Against
Americans and British
Archangel, Jan. 28. —Bolsheviki
forces failed in an attempt on Sun
day midnight to drive American am!
British troops from their positions at
Tulgas on the Dvtna river, southeast
of Archangel. Earlier the cnenty
had bomburded the positions with
artillery.
COUNCIL TO HELP HONOR
MEMORY OF ROOSEVELT
City Council to-day informed C.
E. Landis, chairman of the com
mittee arranging for the Roosevelt
memorial service, that its members
will take part in the Exercises.
T GIRARD COLLEGE BOYS HERE •£
4* Harrisburg—A large delegation of' Gfrard College buys"
X visiting the capito! and atter I jT
4* sessions.
I* 'J
T NON-PARTISAN REPEALER REPORTED • 4*
wl
4 X
4* to-day reported out affiri II to repeal the
A Non-Partisan Judicial Act. X
X MACHINISTS ORGANIZE J
X onvention In Z
£
T GA.R. H, j-<;ay rganized at te organization T
e| ; endorsed the |
governmnet ownership cf railroads. . X
X WITHHOLD SRETZ DECISION 4 I
X lirg—Representatives of the Dauphin County tK
s* _ ?
g Bar Association and counsel for Harry M. Bretz this X
X -iterncon arguec! the-rule against the attorney to show 4*
T <*t
X 4*
:Ca rell reserved their decision. M
X
X HALL HEADS COMMISSION I
4 . i
]• Hall, this city, was elected J
5 *eJ
T chr ■ - to locate a state home t
X g to-day when Lewis S. Sadlci * J
<w resigned Jj
X T
X DRY .PROGRAM ANNOUNCED X
*l* jiT
, u Harrisbur^ —The '"dry" amendment will be on first X
* * reading in the house to-morrow morning, special order on Z
* second reading 3 p. m. Monday and special order on third
reading Tuesday at 11.30 a. m. X
4 *f
X SAY ROSA LUXEMBURG LIVES
Copenhagen—A Munich dispatch to the PolitiUcii rc- 4* '1
X 4*-
■ ports that it has been learned from "quite reliable sources 1
that Rosa Luxemburg, who was reported to have been
shot and-killed January 15 in Berlin, is alive and is at J
| the house of a friend, where she will be concealed until
she has an opportunity to escape from the German *F
X capital. • |
| MARRIAGE LICENSES *
X 4
♦ „ J **" Miller, I'hlladrlphln, and Marnnerite M. Knton. \orth
JLHavea, Maine. lirorKr . Hnrelererie. Steelton, and Henrietta Kleltt, J
TJL , A rrl " b " r *- V "' ,Mrcri Hendeeavllle. and Mvra Hathburn, Eureka H*
X Hart Uror * e Hotk. Jeraey City, and Hnelta M. Kaufman, Schuylkill £
4 4* 4* 4*4*4*4 , 4 , 4-4 £ 4"f©i
LAW WOULD BAR
THE IMMIGRANT
FOR FOUR YEARS
House Committee Tentatively
| Approves Measure Asked
by Labor Leaders
ALIEN MAY BRING FAMILY
Tourists Not to Be Kept Out
For Temporary
Stay
By Associated Press
Wiiohlrtnrton, Jan. 28.—Legislation
prohibiting general immigration for
a period of four years following the
signing of the peace treaty was ap
proved tentatively to-day by the
House Immigration Committee.
Although no record vote was taken,
it is understood the committee di
vided, seven to two, for the legisla
tion, with six members absent. Pro
hibition of immigration the
peace reconstruction period baa been
strongly urged by representatives of
organized labor and others at hear
ings before the committee.
The bill as now drafted would per
mit an alien resident to bring his
wife nnd children (except bays over
18 years old) into the United States:
orphan nephews under 18 and nieces
of any age also may be brought into
the country. Tourists would not be
I barred from entry for temporal')
j stay.
Big Food Bill Goes
Through Congress; Now
Awaits Wilson's Name
Washington, Jan. 28.—Final legis
lative action was taken to-day by
Congress on the administration hill
appropriating $100,000,000 requested
by President Wilson for European
famine relief. The conferees' report
was adopted by both Senate and
House without debate and the meas
ure now goes to the President for
approval.

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