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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, July 18, 1919, Image 1

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Fatal Clauses of Austrian Peace Treaty Are Nearing Completion and Will Be Delivered .AV j
HARRISBURG TELEGRAPH
==== ®K Sloe-Independent.
LXXXVIII— NO. 166 24 PAGES HARRISBURG, PA. FRIDAY EVENING, JULY 18, 1919 OXLV KVEM.O A SS OC,AT ED TWO CENT. UHMC miTinM
ALLIES MAY SEND
ARMY TO HUNGARY
TO QUELL RIOTING
Council Believes Intervention Is Only
Means to End Dangerous Situation
For Both Poland and Rumania
AUSTRIAN PEACE TREATY IS
RAPIDLY NEARING COMPLETION
By Associated Press,
Paris, July 18 (Havas). —The principal topic of discussion be
fore the Allied Supreme Council yesterday, the Journal says, was
Allied intervention in Hungary, "where military action seems the
only means to end a situation dangerous for Rumania and
Poland."
Paris, July 18.—The final clauses
of the peace treaty to be presented
the Austrian delegates are nearing
completion and the document will
be delivered shortly.
Bela Kan, head of the Hungar
ian Communist government, has
been ousted, according to dispatch
es from reliable sources in Vienna,
received by the Peace Conference.
Troops returning from the Czech
front were reported entering Buda
pest in large numbers. Budapest
was in disorder.
Herr Boehrn and Herr Lander
have taken over control of the Com
munist government.
Dispatches reaching Peace Con
ference circles from Budapest indi
cate that general demoralization
has struck Bela Kun's army, which
is straggling back from the different
fronts with utter lack of discipline.
Reports from the same source
received-' by peace delegates are to
the effect that Bolshevism in Hun
gary is confined almost exclusively
to Budapest. Peasants are said to
be obstructing shipments of food
LONDON PAYS
HER TRIBUTE TO
GEN. PERSHING
Presented With Gold Sword
of Honor in Presence of
Distinguished Persons
By Associated Press.
London. July IS.—London honor
ed General Pershing to-day by pre
senting him the freedom of the city
and a sword of honor in the pres
ence of a distinguished company of
Britons and Americans gathered
within the historic Guild Hall. John
W. Davis, the American Ambassa
dor. the embassy staff. Rear Admiral
Harry S. Knapp and his staff, mem
bers of the British government and
a number of British generals were
participants in the ceremony.
General Pershing was applauded
by the crowds that had gathered
when he made his entry into the
city, where the guilds and the al
dermen in their customary welcom
ing robes lent a picturesque aspect
to the scene.
Reviews Guard
The general found a company of
the Grenadier Guards, with its
band, drawn up in the f ard. He in
[ConCinued on Page 2.]
STATE BUREAU
FINDS WORK FOR
6,842 IN WEEK
More Persons Needed by State
Employers Than Are
Available
Efforts of the Employment Bureau
of the Department of Labor and In
dustry, Jacob Lightner, director,
were successful in placing fi.842 per
sons in positions throughout Penn
sylvania during the second week in
July, according to a report to-day
by Mr. Lightner.
This number of persons aid not
nearly fill the need of employers
throughout the State. Employers
issued a call for 9,500 persons. While
8.61" persons applied for positions,
only 7,197 of these were found to
[Continued on Page 18.]
GET FULL MEASURE,
STATE CHIEF SAYS
Bureau of Standards Head Urges Buyers to Act With Local
Sealers of Weights and Measures in Compelling Deal
ers to Give Worth of Monev
To assist the housewives of the
State in waging a campaign of war
fare against the high cost of living,
James Sweeney, chief of the Bureau
of Standards of the State Depart
ment of Internal Affairs, to-day
urged that purchasers of all com
modities co-operate with local seal
ers of weights and measures and
I I see to it that they are getting full
\ measure.
i , Under the laws of Pennsylvania,
School Head Driven
by Reds to Seek Death
Vienna, July 18.—A report
from Budapest says Major Bar
tha, head of the military school,
shot himself recently when he
learned that eleven of his stu
dents had been esntenced to death
and twenty-five others to
of imprisonment. Chief Justice
Kisks, who is a former black
smith, was unable to secure an
swers from Bartha when the stu
dents were on trial.
The report adds that Bartha,
on being questioned by the
court, replied: "I refuse to recog
nize the legality of this court
or you as a judge."
o the capital, which is rapidly
caching a desperate state.
The Inter-Allied Council has re
'used Italy's request that Austrian
concessions at Tien Tsin, China, be
ransferred to her.
CATHOLIC WOMEN
TAKE VEIL THIS
MORNING IN CITY
Bishop McDevitt Prominent
at Ceremony at Convent of
Mercy; Music a Feature
Three sisters were professed and
nine novices took the veil this morn
ing at the Convent of Mercy, Fifth
and Maclay streets. Sisters Mary
Irene. Mary Pierre and Mary Xor
bett were those who took the black
veil.
The ceremony at 8 o'clock was
conducted by the Rev. Dr. Philip R.
McDevitt, Bishop of the Harrisburg
Diocese, as celebrant, with the Rev.
Fathers P. J. Phalen and John
Stanton as chaplains. The Rev. Fa
ther Francis X. Feeser was master
of ceremonies. The Rev. Father
Benignus Brennon. O. St. C , Ab
bottstown, preached. Others of the
clergy present were the Rev. Fathers
James E. Donnelly, of Scranton;
William V. Dailey, W. M. Horrigan,
of Shamokin; J. R. Murphy. J. H.
Weber. J. J. Smythe, John R. Shields,
[Continued on Page 2.]
19,112 VOTERS IN
COUNTY WITH ONE
DISTRICT MISSING
Of This Number 12.215 Arc
Republicans and 3,284
Democrats
With only one district in the
county not reported, the total reg
istration of voters for the primary
election is 19,112, about 2,000 more
than the usual registrations in prev
ious years. The total Republican
enrolment is 12.215; Democratic,
3,284; voters with no partv choice
given, 3,115.
Enrollments in other parties fol
low; Washington. 90; Socialist, 258-
Prohibition, 125; Independent. 5*
The registry assessor in the East
[Continued ou Page 2.]
commodities may be sold by either
weight, measure or count. How
ever, it does not follow that either
may be used where the law estab
lishes a certain weight per bushel.
In the matter of fruit, much of
which is being purchased at the
present time, many dealers are sell
ing by the basket and no measure
or weight is us#d in making the sale.
It is not the intent of the law that
[Continued ou Pago 19.]
THE COURT IN'
He stood a spell on one foot fust Reid in Forum
Then stood a spell On t'other,
An' on which one he felt the wust
He.couldn't ha' told ye nuther.— LOWELL.
GOOD BEER OR
NONE WANTED BY
DRINKERS HERE
Prefer Soft Drinks to Near
Beer Stuff; Soda Foun
tains Picking Up
Harrisburg is drinking less beer!
The sale of beer ir. Harrisburg has
fallen off two-thirds. The saloon
keeper of the city themselves are
authority for this statement of the
decrease of this kind of liquid re
freshment.
The dropping off especially has
been noticeable ever since the war
time prohibition measure became ef
fective on July 1, it is said. Since
then the sales of soft drinks at the
bars have increased in just as amaz
ing quantities as the ratio of de
crease in beer sales. Soda fountain
proprietors report greater percent
[ Continued on Page 18.]
Ford Says He Hardly
Reads Anything but
Headlines of Papers
By Associated Press.
Mount Clemens, Mich., July 18.—
Henry Ford resumed his place on
the witness stand to-day in his libel
suit against the Chicago Tribune.
Counsel for the newspaper alluded
to the Tribune editorial of June 23,
1916, which was headed "Ford Is
An Anarchist."
"What is a headline?" asked El
liott G. Stevenson, one of the de
fendant's attorneys.
"It shows what is in the body
of an article under it."
. Mr. Ford yesterday testified that
an anarchist is a bomb-thrower, or
one who overturns government Mr.
Stevenson then read the text of the
editorial.
"Nothing there about bomb
throwing. is there. Mr. Ford?"
"No, but the headline—"
"But you said a headline shows
what is in the body of the article,
Mr. Ford."
This precipitated an argument in
the course of which Alfred G.
Murphy, attorney for the plaintiff,
contended it was the contention of
Mr. Ford that the headline was
libelous standing b); itself, for the
very reason that the text of the ar
ticle related nothing anarchistic of
him.
"It seems to me, Tour Honor,"
said Mr. Stevenson, "that we have
a right to know what the plaintiff
himself thinks—just how he thinks
he has been injured."
"1 hardly ever read anything
but th* headlines," put in Mr. Ford.
GUESTS AT "Y" PICNIC
HAVE SPEENDID TIME
Outing of Live Businessmen of City Proves Great Success at
Home of Former Mayor J. William Bowman, Near
Dauphin, Yesterday; Committes Arc Grateful
There were high jinks at the sum-1
mer home of ex-Mayor J. William
Bowman 01. the rim of Clark's Val
ley just north of Dauphin yesterday
afternoon. Three hundred of the
livest of the live businessmen of Har
lisburg foregathered on the plateau
overlooking the Susquehanna river
as members or guests of the Cen
tral Y. M. C. A. at the annual "Y"
picnic. This was a deluxe outing
in every way. And the next day Ir|
rained.
Hundreds Witness Start
For weeks all present had been
looking forward to the big day and
when the long convoy of automo
biles left the city hundreds of people
stood on the sidewalks regreting
they had neglected to become iden
tified with the Y. M. C. A. in time
to participate in the big occasion.
Even work on tho big State highway
reconstruction between Dauphin and
Clark's Ferry was suspended for a
time in order that the long line of
WANTS TO KNOW
HOW U. S. CAN
DROPLEAGUE
Will Ask President if With-;
drawal Any Time Is Possi
ble; Still Conferring
By Associated Press.
Washington, July IS.—President
Wilson continued his conferences
with Republican senators to-day, dis
cussing the Peace Treaty and the
League of Nations covenant at length
witn Senators Kenyon, of lowa, and
Kellogg, of Minnesota. Later he had
engagements with Senators Capper,
of Kansas, and McNary, of Oregon.
Neither Senator Kenyon nor Sen
ator Kellogg would discuss their
conversations with the President but
as he went to the White House
Senator Kenyon said he intended to
asg about the statement Senator I
Swanson, Democrat, Virginia, in the
Senate recently that the United
States could withdraw from the
league whenever It desired, adding
that this was an important point
which would clarify the situation.
automobiles might pass through in
a safe and sane fashion to the picnic
grounds.
Pages of this newspaper might be
filled with the many interesting and
humorous incidents of the day, but
these must be left to tho historian
■of the "Y". Mention must be made,
however, of the athletic contests,
midway features, the refreshments
and other things which contributed
to the pleasure of the most success
ful picnic ever held in Central Penn
sylvania.
Soldiers as Guests
Fifty of the convalescent soldiers
from the base hospital at Carlisle
were present as guests of the Har
risburg association and thev left the
grounds along toward twilight the
happiest bunch of soldiers that may
be imagined. They had served with !
the Sunset Division and many other j
units of the great army in France '
[Continued on Page 19.]
TRAINS CRASH
AND WRECKAGE
CATCHES FIRE
Three Hurt and 33 Cars Are
Smashed When Freights
Run Together
By Associated Press.
New Castle. Pa., July 18. —Three
men were seriously injured, thirty
three cars destroyed and damage
estimated at $250,000 caused by a
freight wreck near here this after
noon. C. Donaldson, general yard
master of the Pittsburgh and Lake
Erie railroad, was severely burned
when an air hose hursted. exploding
a tank of nitric acid, which started
a tire that burned eighteen cars.
The tracks leading to this eity
were blocked several houra by the
wreckage. A B. & O. freight train
of sixty cars crashed into another
freight bound for Cleveland. En
gineer Harris King and C. Jewel
were iniured and fifteen cars de
stroyed.
CITIES MA Y BUY SURPLUS
MEA TAND VEGETABLES AT
20 PER CENT. UNDER COST
I HOW WOULD YOU
CUT LIVING COST?
HOW would you out the high !
cost of living if solution of I
. the problem were left to i
I you?
Have you some suggestion or
recommendation that would help
the man of family keep his liv
ing expenses within reach of his
pockethook?
The problem as yet remains mi-
I solved. It is becoming more sc-
I rious every day. Every price
j change is upward. What will be
j the limit? How long can the
I public stand it? There must be
j some relief. Who can tell us
i how to get it?
j If you liave any ideas on the j
| subject, write a letter to the
| Telegraph setting forth your 1
views. Write plainly on one side
of the paper only and address \
j City Editor, Harrisburg Tele- j
j graph, Harrisburg.
i;
STATE BANK IN
PHILADELPHIA
CLOSES DOORS
I i
Commissioner Says Institution
Over Extended Itself
on Loans
By Associated Press.
! Philadelphia, July 18. The j
I Xorth Penn Bank, a State institu- ■
j tion closed its doors to-day.
; The bank's last report issued in ;
I June showed that it had deposits of I
! 82,066.643; resources $2,695,282 and j
| loans and investments of $2,304,533.
The State of Pennsylvania had
considerable money on deposit in
the North Penn Bank, of Phila
delphia, which was closed by the
State Banking Department to-dgy.
It is understood the bank had been
under observation by the. State offi
cials who had been looking up its !
loans.
Commissioner of Banking John S.
Fisher said that the bank had over
extended itself and had gotten to a
place where it could not function
and that Deputy Commissioner P.
G. Cameron was sent to Philadel
phia last night to look into the af
fairs of the bank. From what he j
reported, said the Commissioner, he i
had taken charge of the institution j
to-day. Under the law the Com
missioner can not make any state
ment about the bank's finances. It
is understood its assets were of a
character that could not readily be
converted into cash.
The State Treasury had a deposit
of $50,000 at the bank, fully pro
tected by surety bonds. Half of this j
was drawn out on July 15.
The State Insurance Department
had large deposits in the hank, in- !
eluding $60,000 realized from the j
| Union Casualty Company, of Phil
adelphia, and something like $200,-
000 from the Pittsburgh Life and
Trust proceedings. Originally the
latter deposit was larger, it is un
derstood, but when Insurance Com
missioner Thomas B. Donaldson
came in he withdrew some of it
and has been working to reduce the
holding. The Commissioner is in
I Philadelphia.
The State departments interested
| in the bank will have the assistance
lof the Attorney General's office if
I required.
City Health Officer
Wants Complaint Filed
as to Taint in Milk
Dr. J. M. J. Raunick. city health
officer, said he had received no re
port that farmers near the city have
been feeding garbage to their cows,
and that as a result at least one
milk dealer in the city stopped buy
ing the supply of milk because of
its taste. He declared that com
plaint should be made at once to the
health bureau if the report is
and It will be investigated. H. s!
Sheesley. superintendent of the
Bureau of Ash and Garbage Inspec
tion. said he did not believe any
garbage was being collected in the
city except by the contractors for
the work. Hagy Rrothrrs, who
maintain a piggery outside the city
limits and feed the waste to the
hogs.
Mother Sues Daughter
For $2,000 Damages
Alleging that her daughter, Mary
E. Swartz, persuaded her to place a
mark to her name on the back of a
certificate of deposit for S9OO. then
had the name changed and appro
priated the money for her own use,
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Bright, aged 85. of
47 North Cameron street, through
counsel filed a suit against the
daughter, asking $2,000 damages.
THE WEATHER]
Hnrrislitiru nnd Vicinity! Unset
tled weather probably .shower*
this afternoon tu-niKht mid Sat
urday. Not much ebtinKe In tem
peruture. l,owcnt to-nluht about j
4tl deitree* 1 -
hliiMtern IVnnny I vaiiin: Shower*
probably and Saturday.
Not much change in tempera
ture. ".Moderate loutheaot and
aonth wind*.
Lieutenant Boyle Still in
Washington Trying to
Get Better Price
BACON STANDS OUT AS SINGLE
INDUCEMENT FOR PURCHASING
NEW YORK, July 18.—Capt. A. A. Stewart, zone sur
plus property officer here, announced to-day that he was
sending communications to every municipality in New
York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut, offering to
sell surplus army canned meat and vegetables in carload lots
at a price of 20 per cent, below the cost to the government.
Similar information to that in the foregoing dispatch was
yesterday given to the Mayor's food committee by Lieut. J. R.
Bovle of the Reserve Depot at New Cumberland. He is in Wash
ington. D. C., to-day attending a conference of War Department
officials at which a new list of goods for sale and prices will be
arranged. On his return Lieutenant Boyle will submit the list
to the local committee.
Subcommittee Busy
The subcommittee, to make in
, quiries and ascertain the saleability
I of the food offered by the Govern
ment. was busy yesterday getting a
line on prices. Further informa
tion was secured to-day. This com
mittee will meet with Lieutenant
Boyle on his return and after this
conference will prepare a recom
i mendation for the general commit
| tee. It is probable the next meeting
I will be held Wednesday or Thursday,
j Unless there is a further reduc
' tion in prices which will enable the
I committee to offer the food to Har
j risburg people at a lower rate it is
j probable the purchase of a supply for
i this city will be deferred until an
other plan is taken up. One member
of the committee suggested yester
! day a plan to secure a list of prices
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3- MARRIAGE LICENSES i
X ,I™ <•';. Wlrth mill Hannull Hourm, llnrrlahiirei Samurl J. Lnbold 4*
', ;,n ' l FVtlli* H. RailPll, Wlillamatowß) H. Iriin.u Troutmnn and Han-IM
-s nail M. Urlkrr, Spring Uli'ni bWJaon H. Leltrr and Loulaa M. Car- J
J| ( umtlian, Harriaburx. <■>
® X X4\XXX X X X X X X A 4^ < 4*4!^4*4iX;lt4i4^4 i X4*X ®
I from large wholesale houses, and to
make a hid to the Government for
certain supplies based on the latest
wholesale prices.
It was figured yesterday that the
only inducement offered was in ba
con at 36 cents per pound for canned
; goods, and 34 cents for bacon packed
lin crates. The meat and corn beef
j prices were considered high.
May Be Changes
I Lieutenant Boyle admitted some
| of the prices were high compared
j with present wholesale prices, but
was of the opinion that when the
new list is submitted there will be
changes showing a reduction. That
j while some of the foodstuffs could
not reach the people at bargain
I prices, when the prices of canned
[Continued on Page 2.1

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