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Harrisburg telegraph. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, July 19, 1919, Image 1

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Austrians Allowed Ten Days £o Cons Her Jerms of Peace Treaty and Far Any
HARRISBURG tfSllSi TELEGRAPH
®jc olar-3n&cpen&niL
1 —~—~— •• ,
LX XXVIII—XO. 167 16 PAGES HARRISBURG, PA SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 19, 1919. "'KJFZKKS $rS2£ES&v'Jg M • HOME EDITION
PRICES JUMP WHEN
FORESTALLERS GET
START AT MARKETS
People Have but
Little Chance For
Cheaper Food
ORDINANCE VOID
Market Rates Are
Quoted in Food
Situation
Fruits of forestalling were
; much in evidence this morning
at the Chestnut Street market.
Shortly after 5 o'clock, when
buyers started to get busy,
seven different persons were
given close scrutiny.
Each went about buying produce
from farmers. Vegetables appeared
to be in demand.
The forestallers all purchased
large quantities and within twenty
minutes had the vegetables on sale
on other stands at increased rates.
Women Among Buyers
Three women who were among
the buyers were watched. They
purchased among other things let
tuce, onions, red beets, rhubarb,
radishes and eggs. Prices asked by
the farmers were as follows:
Lettuce, six to twelve cents a
head.
Onions, five cents a bunch, eight,
ten and 1 twelve onions to a bunch.
Beets, five cents a bunch, six beets
to a bunch.
Eggs. 4S cents a dozen.
Here is what the forestallers
asked:
Forestalling Prices
Lettuce, six to tmelve cents a
bunch.
Onions, six cenits a bunch, with
two bunches made into three.
Red beets, ten cents a bunch with
five in a bunch.
Eggs, 50 to 52 cents a dozen.
Not long after the forestallers had
started business the farmers who
had sold their products had raised
the prices equal to those of the
hucksters.
One buyer told of an earlier trans
action. A local dealer purchased a
dozen or more chickens from farm
ers. He was seen placing them in
a box in an automobile. A woman
thinking the chickens in the auto--
mobile were to be offered for sale
Inquired the price. The answer was:
"I am shipping those chickens to
Baltimore." It was raid that the
buyer of the chickens makes ship
ments every Wednesday and Sat
urday, buying as early in the mar
kets as possible.
There is a forestalling ordinance
on the city statute books, but it
probably is obsolete. It was passed
in 1861 and added to in 1868. The
suggestion now is, in view of the
pernicious practice of forestalling,
that it immediately be made up-to
date. with the penalties heavy
enough to fit the crime of buying up
food from the farmers and truck
ers before the poorer people can
have an opportunity of purchasing
it The ordinance as it appears in
City Digest, pages 482 and 433, is as
follows:
1. Thnt no regular butcher or
other person shall, directly or in
directly, purchase or cause to be
purchased from any farmer or
other person, any fresh meats
(except pork in the hoe) offered
for sale within the bounds of the
city, and resell the same meats, j
or any part thereof, at wholesale
or retail, under the penalty of
five dollars for every offense.
2. That no htiekster, dealer or
other person whatsoever, shall
cause to be bought at the West
Harrisburg Market any articles of
provisions, fruit, vegetables or
other commodities for the pur
pose of retailing or reselling the
same, between the hours of 5
o'clock a. m. and 9 o'clock a. m.
on Tuesdays and Fridays or each
and every week and between the
honrs of 12 o'clock a. m. and 8
o'clock p. m. on each and every
Saturday.
3. That for every violation of
the provisions of this ordinance
the offender or offenders shall be j
fined in any sum not exceeding
five dollars, at the discretion of
the mayor or any alderman of
the said city, before whom the
offender or offenders may be
prosecuted to conviction.
Reason For Boost
As the situation is studied by the
local consumer he "finds that the !
forestalling regulations in Harris
burg are absolutely disregarded.
This is believed to be one of the
reasons for the increased cost of
food.
"Of course, there is forestalling
of the most flagrant kind." said a
man who does his own marketing.
"Those who go to market early in
the hope of getting the most desir
able produce see stall renters scour
ing the market and buying up at
the opening prices the best fruits
and vegetables and poultry to be
had and then return to their own
■tails and boost the prices as high
[Continued on Page 3.]
ITHE WEATHER]
Harrisburg and Vlcinltri Continu
ed unsettled weather with prob
ably showers to-night and Sun
day, Little change In tempera
ture, lowest to-night about 70
degrees.
Hirer. The Snognehanna river and
all Its branches wEI probably
flbll ■ lowly or remain nearly
stationary. A atage at about 4.0
fleet la Indicated for Harrisburg
, Sunday morulas.
FOOD FEATURES
OF ONE DAY
There will not be a drop in
the price of bread for a year.
Forestalling went on openly at
Chestnut Street market to-day.
Prices soared when the rate
forestallers charged became
known.
Two bunches of vegetables
made into three for profit.
Chickens sent from market to
Baltimore buyers.
Forestalling ordinance found
out of date. 1
Suggestion made that Council
revive law and fix drastic penal
ties.
Citizens write, suggesting re
lief from high prices.
BREAD PRICE IS
TO REMAIN HIGH
FOR WHOLE YEAR
Manager of Harrisburg Bak
ing Company Defends Boost;
Says Public Is Unjust
E. S. Manbeck, manager of the
Harrisburg Baking Company, de
fends the recent rise in price from
10 to 11 cents on the one-pound loaf.
He contends conditions necessitated
the rise. Mr. Manbeck said in part
that labor conditions for some weeks
past had been engaging the careful
attention of the bakers of Harris
burg. The demands of the workers,
together with the rise in price of
flour and other necessities of the
baking companies had made it ab
solutely essential for his company
to advance its prices, he insisted.
Although the bakers held out as
long as they could and did not raise
the price, Mr. Manbeck, said, the
time came when it was a question
of either raising the prices or sus
taining a considerable loss. He felt
that the bakers had been unjustly
treated by the public, since he had
received several complaints from
people who declared the rise in price
was unjustified and unnecessary.
At present there seems very lit
tle chance of a drop in prices, prob
ably not for another year at least,
according to .Mr. Manbeck.
SAMUEL F.BARR,
LONG PROMINENT
HERE, IS DEAD
Private Secretary to General
Cameron, Congressman and
Editorial Writer, Dies
In the news of the death of Sam
uel F\ Barr at San Diego, California,
old residents of this city will recog
nize a familiar name. "SAm" Barr,
as he was known, was for years a
citizen of Harrisburg and until his
death claimed this city as his place
cf residence.
As private secretary to General
Simon Cameron, editorial writer on
the Telegraph and Congressman
from this district, Mr. Barr was for
a long time prominent in the life
of Harrisburg. After his last term
in Congress, which terminated in
1897, he went to a little camp he
maintained on the coast of Maine,
and lived there until the late nine
ties. when he moved to California.
Prominent in National Life
"Sam" Barr was secretary to Gen
oral Cameron when he was Secretary
of War under President Lincoln, and
later when he was returned to the
Senate. When General Cameron
went to Russia as ambassador, Mr.
Barr returned to Harrisburg and as
sisted ex-U. S. Senator James Don
ald Cameron, who was then presi
dent of the Northern Central Rail
road, as confidential secretary.
Before the death of George Berg
ner in 1874. he was chief editorial
writer on the Telegraph, and after
Mr. Bergner died, became editor
in-chief. He was a brilliant writer
with a most forceful style, and many
people had cause to remember It
when his pen was directed against
them. About 1880 he decided that
he would like to enter Congress, and
accordingly he shaped his plans and
after a violent campaign was elected
from this district in 1882. He was
re-elected in 188 4 and served until
1887.
After his congressional terms. Mr.
Barr pursued his literary work for
several years in Harrisburg and then
moved to Maine, later going to Cali
fornia. In later years he would often
return to this city for the purpose
of seeing his many old friends. He
died of paralysis at the age of 89
years.
LIGGETT AND DICKMAN
ASSIGNED TO COMMAND
Washington, July 19.-— Lieutenant
General Hunter Liggett, former
commander of the American Army
of Occupation in Germany, and Ma
jor General Joseph T. Dickman,
former commander of the Fourth
Army Corps, have been ordered to
assume command of the western
and southern departments, respec
tively, upon their arrival from over
seas
Question: What to Do With the Piece That's Leftover
After the Puzzle Is Done?
OLO
Ja/gAItJ ~~
COST or LXVTNGr . Touß LITTLE OLD INCOME
BRANDS ACTIONS
OF COMPTROLLER
AS IRREGULAR
Pennsylvania Representative!
Accuses Williams of Taking
Part in Real Estate Deal
By Associated Press.
Washington, July 39. Charges;
that John Skelton Williams, comp- l
troller of the currency, aided his 1
brother-in-law. Louis B. Williams, 1
of Richmond ,Va., in negotiating for |
the purchase by the government of i
property in Washington valued at '
$4,200,000 and received part of the !
commission for the sale, were made i
before the House Rules Committee j
[Continued on Page 2.]
President Wilson Signs
$613,000,000 Sundry Bill
By Associated Press.
Washington, July 19.—The $613,-1
000,000 Sundry Civil appropriation ]
bill revised by Congress to meet his '
objections, was signed to-day by
President Wilson.
The new bill carries $14,000,000
for the rehabilitation and education'
of disabled service men as against j
$6,000,000 in the measure ve'oed by I
the President. Included in the bill j
are appropriations for various Gov- i
ernment departments some of which i
have been technically without funds
since the beginning of the fiscal year
July 1, 1
HARRISBURG WOMAN
. FLIES WITH HOUSER
Anna Hamilton Wood Describes Trip in Airplane at War
mensh Field; Sorry When Time Comes to Step Out
of Machine; More Excited at Coney Island
By ANNA HAMILTON WOOD
"I stood beside a Curtiss airplane
at the Warmenah Field near Phil
adelphia a few days ago and was
told to decide for myself If I would
go up. Immediately I felt a pecu
liar sinking sensation, but the bit of
Inherited sporting blood which
makes a thing worth trying once
spoke and I reached for cap and
goggles. I soon discovered one fact
—either airplanes or tight skirts
must go! But the skirt and I final
ly landed safely In the passenger's
seat directly behind the engine with
back to the pilot. It was like the
SAILORS TO SING
TONIGHT
No admission will be charged
j to the concert by the United
t States Navy Glee Club in Chest
i nut Street Auditorium this even
i ing. Secretary Warren R. Jack
| son, of the Chamber of Com
! merce, reiterated this in the an
nouncements to-daj'- The con-
I cert, given under the auspices of
! the Chamber of Commerce, will
] start promptly at 8 o'clock.
Forty men are included in the
I club, which will be under the
leadership of J. Swineford. The
, organization appeared at the Ma-
I jestic and Victoria Theaters dur-
I ing the afternoon.
.
ST. SWITHIN IS
MAKING GOOD AS
GLOOMPROPHET
Forecasts For Coming Days
Tells of Clouds and
Rain For City
Harrisburg people were less tut
j phatic to-day In their declarations
that all this talk about St. Swith'.n
j is "hunk," especially so in view of
j this afternoon's rain and the fore-
I casts of Weatherman E. R. Demain,
[Continued on Page 2.]
seat of a racing car, roomy but
sunk deep Into the framework of
the machine.
Belt Aboat Waist
"A wide belt was fastened about
my waist. Then the mechanic turn
ed the propeller until the engine
•caught' It reminded me of crank- I
ing a Ford. A moment more and :
we ran across the open field on the I
little wire wheels. It was then the ]
first surprising sensation came. Fear
fell from me like a discarded gar
£Ooottnoed on Face S.J
'CHRISTENS SHIP
NAMED IN HONOR
| OF BOND DRIVES
Harrisburg and Nearby Peo
ple Attend Launching of
the Dauperata
!
t t tarn
f
? A
MRS. LTMAN D. GILBERT,
Who Christened Dauperata at
Launching To-day
Before more than a score of rep
resentatives of Harrisburg, and
Dauphin, Perry and Juniata coun
| the 8,800-ton freighter, Dau- |
perata, was launched to-day at the 1
shipyard of the Baltimore Dry!
Docks and Shipbuilding company. I
Mrs. Lyman D. Gilbert, president |
of the Harrisburg Civic Club, was I
sponsor for the vessel. She went;
1 to Baltimore yesterday afternoon ac- !
I companied by Mr. and Mrs. Spencer i
| C. Gilbert, Mrs. Samuel Budd, Rich- i
I mond. Va.. and Mr. and Mrs., WII- !
liam Jennings. After the launching j
Mrs. Gilbert and her party were
{Continued on Page 2.1 '
BRITISH EMPIRE
j IS CELEBRATING !
REIGN OF PEACE
j Led by Americans 19,000 Pick-1
j ed Fighters From Famous
Allied Divisions Parade
I LONDON MAKES MERRY j
j Old-Time Country Dances;
Held in Parks; Thanksgiv- j
ing Services in Churches
London, July 19. —Nineteen thou-!
sand Allied soldiers—picked men from j
I famous combat divisions the names of
which are written large on the pages 1
of the history of the World War— i
marched through London's streets to- |
day in celebration of the return of j
peace.
I King George, with other members i
' of the royal family, army and navy j
j officers and leaders of both houses of i
Parliament, stood on the steps of the .
i Victoria Memorial, in front of Buck- |
j ingham Palace to receive the salutes !
! of the warriors.
j A magnificent reception was given '
i the marching hosts. The streets were j
j bright with Allied colors, some thor- •
oughfares being flanked by stucco py- |
I ions supporting allegorical figures of j
I victory.
From grandstands, 4,000 widows, j
mothers and children of officers and ;
men killed during the war witnessed !
the parade.
The marchers were drawn from' the i
British, American, French. Italian, j
Belgian, Japanese. Polish. Rumanian, j
I Portuguese, Serbian, Siamese and j
I Czecho-Slovakian armies, the contin- j
| gents being arranged in alphabetical '
' order. Thus the Americans led. Headed
by General John J. Pershing, they com
prised three battalions of 33 officers ;
j and 1.100 men each.
| Behind the Allied section came Vice
i Admirals Beatty and Keyes and other ,
j high officers of the Grand fleet, with a 1
[Continued on Page 2.]
Three More Put in
Petitions For Fall Ticket;
Three nominating petitiens were
filed at the County Commissioners'
| office to-day. A. L. Gantz, candidate
! for Republican nomination as super
j visor in Conewago township, was the
i first from that district to file a
| paper. In the city William A. Troy j
filed a Republican petition as can- j
didate for constable in the Seventh I
ward.
John A. Dinger was the first Dem
ocrat to file a petition. He is seek
ing nomination as inspector of elec
tions in the Second ward. Second
precinct.
LAFEAN DENIES
LOAN OF $10,000:
i IS ONLY $5,000
And This Will Be Paid to
Penna. Bank Which Failed
Soon as the Note Is Due
By Associated Press.
York, July 19. Former State
Banking Commissioner Daniel F.
Lafean denied to-day that he was
indebted in the sum of SIO,OOO to'
the North Penn Bank, of Phila
delphia, which Institution closed its
doors yesterday.
He said the only loan from this
bank in which he figured was one
of $5,000 by a local corporation
of which he was a director and
treasurer. This, he says, will be
paid, on July 2 8 when the note
comes due.
Mr. Lefean denied any knowledge
of the transfer of State funds from
Western Pennsylvania banks to the
Philadelphia institution.
Immediate investigation of all the
circumstances attending the closing
of the North Penn bank, of Phila
delphia, will be undertaken by State
officials. All the facts connected
with the placing of deposits of hun
dreds of thousands of dollars worth
of funds gathered by the State In
surance Department for policyhold
ers of the Pittsburgh Life and Trust
concern in the bank by Charles A.
Ambler when Insurance Commis
sioner will be looked into and State
Insurance and Banking officials will
co-operate.
State offlctals here have refused to
make any comments upon the de
velopments, but are keenly interest
ed in what may turn up. The story
heard last winter that Ambler was
retained on a personal plea to the
Governor to be allowed to close up
the Pittsburgh concern and his sud
den superseding by Thomas B. Don
aldson, who had been the special
deputy commissioner, are being dis
cussed.
Banking Commissioner John S.
Fisher remained In Harrlsburg part
of to-day so as to be In touch with
the situation in Philadelphia,- De-
I puty Commissioner Peter G. Cam
-1 eron reported personally to him.
Governor William C. Sproul also
kept in touch with the situation.
For months the Governor has been
I watching the Institution and follow-
I Ing Commissioner Donaldson's ef
; forts to get the $402,000 of the de
■ posit into other Institutions.
I Commissioner of Banking F sher
I hs gone to Philadelph n to be 'n
! closer touch w'th the North Penn
Hank, of which James W. Mc-
Burney has been named as special
receiver to represent the Commie- |
■lnner. J
I
Paderewski Closes
Piano Forever
New York, July 19.—Jan Ig
nace Paderewski never will move
j his thousands of American
i friends and admirers to ecstatic
j applause again. He has given up
music completely, according to
Constantin Radkiewicz, Polish
financier, who is in New York in
the interest of obtaining Ameri
can loans for his country.
"I said good-by to Premier
Paderewski less than four weeks
ago," said Radkiewicz. "With
his new responsibilities, which he
j is discharging so well, he has
neither time nor inclination to
think of music. He told me he
never would play in public
again."
PLEASED WITH
ATTITUDE OF
REPUBLICANS
j
Conferences With Senators on
, Peace Treaty and League
of Nations Gratifies
Washington, July 19.—President
1 Wilson's advisers said to-day he was
| highly pleased with the attitude ot
Republican Senators with whom he
j has conferred on the Peace Treaty
| and the League of Nations cove-
I nant. He was said to feel also that
i the conferences at the White House
j cleared up many doubtful points in
, the minds of the Senators he saw.
Senate Recesses
There was a recess to-day in Sen
j ate debate on the Peace Treaty as
; well as in its consideration by the
| Foreign Relations Committee. Sen
ators Pomerene, Ohio; Beckman,
Kentucky, and Harrison, Mississippi,
all Democrats, have announced tney
- will speak Monday and more than
j a score of others are known to be
j preparing to take part in the debate
i soon.
President Wilson had no engage
ments to see Senators to-day but he
is expected to resume his talks with
Republican members Monday.
To Rush Dry Measure
The House resumed consideration
I [Continued on Page 2.]
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4 ; TO MEET FLEET t 4
A T
f 3 leave Washington for the
? • igust 1 and would meet, the Pacific flee* at I X
*ja about Autnist 7.
t AERIA MAIL CARRIER KILLED IN X
J FALL OF MILE AT BELIEFO .T
X BELLEFONTE- LIEUTENANT CHAR LESS Jfif|
I LAMBORN, 33, OF LOS ANOELES, AN APR [AL S*
J AIL CARRIER. FLYING FROM THIS CITY : X
{ CLEVELAND, WAS KILLED THIS A FTP, PNO < > J
f WHEN HIS MACHINE, A DE HAVILAND |
? 0 FEET AT DIX RUN, AT THE X
]J NY MO' >i
HERE. ;H
i GROUNDED STEAMER FLOATED OF!
jf* Boston.—The Yarmouth steamer Governor C
♦ f
5 which grounded on Green Island, off Yarmouth, ' jg ,
X with 500 passengers aboard, early to-day. war- f .• . *•
| this afternoon. She proceeded to her dock at Yarmouth -a I
e3n L p
T under her own power, according to word received her- J
> • b
*> > |
± MARRIAGE jj
-3 Frank F Hnrth rnid Darn Korrn.Xtrrlton; John B. Lrtrr, Bar-* ►
i rlnknrn, and Dlanrhe M. Itlnnrr. t uniplu-lltonni Daniel S. Still and M
X \ lolrt V. Xyr, Dauphin; Herman f. (arnnlta nnd Aldla P. Arnold, Ball
*?< fa*; Floyd A. Gotham and IJLIri M. Mrnko, Hnrrtahur*; Ira B. Stew.*
At Itrt. Philadelphia, nnd Dalny I', iwlnrhnrt, Wllkra-Barrr; Oaear H.a .
Hurlner, Plillndrlphla, and Gertrude n. J. Fuller. Harriabnrg.
240,000 INFECTED
WITH BOLSHEVISM
ARE BIG PROBLEM
Disposition of Russian Prison
ers in Germany Causing
Allies Much Trouble
PROBABLY RUIN POLAND
Will Either Be Forced Into
Red's Army or Killed if
Sent Home
By Associated Press.
Paris, Friday, July 18.—The Su
preme Council of the Peace Confer
ence to-day discussed the disposi
tion of 240,000 Russian prisoners of
war still in Germany at. the request
of the Allies after the armistice and
who are being fed at Entente ex
pense.
As many are infected with Bol
' shevism, Poland and other coun
j tries through which they would re
| turn to Russia have objected to giv
ing them passage. Moreover, it is
I held, they will be either forced into
| the Bolshevik army or killed if sent
| home. The expense of maintaining
I theni in Germany, however, is be-
I coming burdensome. The council,
! unable to-day to reach a decision,
I referred the question to its military
advisers for a report.
Hoar of Greek Cruelties
The council received a protest
from the Sheik of Aidin, Asia
I Minor, concerning atrocities which
j the Greeks are alleged to have com
! mitted uprn Turks near Aidln. It
I was decided to send a military mis
| sion to inestigate. The American
delegation will cable to Washington
' for instructions.
I The council has taken no action
| con9erning the punishment of the
1 former emperor of Germany and
| has not even considered the report
from the commission on responsibil
ities which does not favor the peace
conference allowing Field Marshal
Von Hindenburg or anyone else to
be substituted for the former mon
arch.
Must Try ox-Kaiser
The council appears to be firm in
the conviction which is held by
military officials of the Entente pow
ers that William Hohenzollern must
[Continued on Page 2.]

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