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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, June 27, 1906, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Alabama Libraries, Tuscaloosa, AL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038485/1906-06-27/ed-1/seq-8/

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Birmingham’s Leading Cloak, Suit and Waist House
Wanted
Head
Fitter
for
Altera
tion
Dept, i
Wanted
Head
Fitter
for
Altera
tion
Dept.
PRICE INDUCEMENTS THIS WEEK
Will be of an Exceptional Character
Lingerie Dresses Outing Suits
Linen Suits Traveling Suits
Taffeta Suits Linen Skirts
At Less than One Third Regular Value
1 ---——— -
Clearance of Values to $1.50 at 95c
WAISTS Values to $3.50 at $1.98
Continued Values to $5.00 at $3.50
Smart, Stylish and Effective
1906 FILL
LADIES’ WfllKiMfi SKIRTS
Advance display of recent arrivals—Exclusive
models in Fancy Panamas. Chiffon Panamas,
Cravenettes and Voiles
Prices $12.50, $15.00, Si7,51), $20,00
1908 EE3TCD 0 nrni# 1908
Second Ave. g ULI tLaS yjf OtLllI\ -Second Ave.
%G ER
Neck-and-neck with the best import
ed and the price is in your favor.
Made by the Sheboygan Mineral Water Company, Sheboygan, Wis.
DOSTER-NORTHINGTON DRUG CO.
EDUCATIONAL.
BIRMINGHAM SEMINARY
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA.
Select boarding anil day school for girls and young ladies.
Full seminary courses. Schools of Music, Art anil Expression.
Distinctive Features;
Development of highest type of womanly character; refined Christian
home; limited number of boarding.girls; ideal household comforts, steam
heat, electric lights, elegant baths; unexcelled city advantages, and out of
door sports; thorough instruction in all departments; special preparation
for collego and university. Also state teachers' examinations. Curricula
among the highest in the South.
For catalogue and full Information, please address,
MISS LOULIE COMPTON, Principal, 1722 Fifth Avenue, Birmingham, Ala.
6-10-3m-su-wed
FREE .«%.
BOOKKEEPING AND SHORTHAND
to FIVE persons in each county, desiring to take
personal instruction, who will within ilO days
clip and SEND this notice to either of
DRAUGHON’S
3&i&ineUf€clktfeb
Montgomery, Atlanta, Nashville, Lit
tle Rock, Dallas, Memphis or Jackson,
Miss.
We also teach BY MAIL successfully, or
Mu.'ii£Y, Law. Penmanship, Arith
metic, Letter-Writing. Drawing, Cartooning,
Business English, Banking, etc.
27 College in 15 State*. $300,000.00
Capital. 17 years’ success. Indorsed by bush
nose men. No vacation: enter anv time. ‘Write
for catalog. POSITIONS soeurcwl or MONEY REFUNDED,
you MUST in order t<»got Home Study FREE,
r.'SMMKMw write now. thus: “ I desire to know
juoreuboetvoupFnoHnl "••ado
In The Daily Age-Horald, Birmingham.
THE SOUTH’S REAL
MUSICAL CENTER
A Little South Carolina Town of 15,000
Awarded the Palm.
A person unadvised beforehand of t!u; !
facts, would lie surprise*! at the outcome 1
of his investigation if he set himself to
the task of determining tin- musical < »-n
ter of the south. One would scarcely
expect to find the people from such dis
tant cities as Memphis, Richmond, **i<-..
traveling the necessary hundreds of
onlles in order to hear the great musical
artists of the day in a little South Can»
Bina town of only I5,00u population
Nevertheless, this is t'he importance of
position enjoyed by Spartanburg, whose
annual May Festival is the ablest and
most widely patronized opportunity for
music lovers in the entire south.
The Immediate and primary seen t of
the town's great musical prominence lies
dn dts possession of one of the most
superior institutions for the education
Of women ever developed in the south —
Converse College, the delight ami glory
superior as the college is in music, it is
Just as thorough and as great in all that
Stands for the womanly education of
woman in every useful and lofty sense
of the ideal and the word.
BETHEL FEMALE COLLEGE,
Hopkinsville, Ky.
Select School for young ladies. Beau- j
tiful grounds. Instruction in Music, j
Languages. Literature and Science j
unsurpassed. 53d sessions opens Sep
tember 3. Write for catalogue.
EDMUND HARRISON, A. M., LL. D.,
►to-lSt-mon-wed-fri President. 1
State Normal College,
Florence, Ala.
A Training School for Teachers, Tuition
Free.
.’nil crops i.f expert teachers. Courses
in Pedagogy, Science, Literature, History,
-Mathematics, English, Latin, Manual
Training. Music and common school
branches.
Graduates readily secure good positions.
Special attention given to preparation of
teachers for tlie* public schools.
Fall term will begin Thursday, Septem
ber 13.
Board ?I0 and $12 per calender month.
Ncei-.ssury expenses $100 to $120 per ses
sion of nine months. •
Write for catalogue to
M. C. WILSON,
6-16-sat-su-wed-tf President.
ELIZABETH COLLEGE
And Conservatory ol Music,
Charlotte, N. C.
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
Ideal climat* midway between Asheville
and Pinehurst, New York and Florida.
Beautiful suburban location, overlooking
the city. Twenty acres of campus, $250,
000 college* plant, fireproof buildings; twen
ty experienced, university-educated teach
e:s. A. H. and Elective graduate courses.
Music, Art, Expression. Write for cata
logue. CHAS B. KING. President.
6-l-45t-frl-su-wed
Training School of the
Birmingham Free
Kindergarten Association.
Two years course of study
opens Sept. 24.
For catalogue and particu
lars address
MARY K. DREW, Principal.
2720 12tli Avenue, North.
Birmingham, Ala.
UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA
Charlottesville. Va.
Industrial and Analytical Chemistry
The demand for practical chemists,
graduates of the School of Chemistry of
the University of Virginia, exceeds the
supply. All who have thus graduated
within the past few years have been
promptly located us chemists for iron fur
naces, phosphate works, sugar and oil re
fineries. or similar industries. For fur
ther information apply to
EDWIN A. ALDERMAN. President.
6-20-lGt-su-wed
SOME EVENTS III
THE SOCIAL WORLD
The riolmes-Jemison Wedding
Takes Place Tonight
TO BE BRILLIANT EVENT
An Entertainment at the Southern
Club in Honor of the Bridal Party.
Other Interesting Weddings.
Notes and Personals.
The marriage of Miss Elizabeth Vir
ginia Jem Ison and Mr. Edward Thomas
Holmes of Macon. Ga., will be solemnized
this evening at 8 o’clock at St. Mary’s
on-the-Hlghhinds.
A large gathering of friends and rela
tives of the bride ami groom, from this
city, Atlanta, Macon. Ga., and Eafayette,
Ala., will be present, and the ceremony
will be one of the most impressive and
one of the mos»t beautiful that has ever ;
taken place in Birmingham.
The bride is a very handsome young ;
woman, with much dignity of manner !
and bearing. The young women, who will :
act as bridesmaids, are all of them daugh- j
ters of prominent families in this state
and Georgia.
Mr. B. B. Comer's charming daughter.
Miss Eva Comer, is one of the maids,
together with Miss Marie Pinckard, Miss
Roline Clarke and Miss Martha Whitman
of Atlanta. They will wear frocks of
pink silk tissue and carry La France
roses.
Miss Jcmison's bridal gown is of rich
white satin, made princesse—a style par
ticularly becoming to her.
A reception at the bride's home will fol
low the wedding.
The wedding presents are displayed on
a large old mahogany table, which be
longed to the brides great-grandmother.
In fact, they fill one entire room of the
house; chests of silver, silver services, cut
glass, rare china, books, lamps, pictures,
fans and jewels—an unusually elaborate
and choice array from old friends In
every section of the south.
The members of the Holmes-Jemison
bridal party were given a charming
luncheon at 'the Southern club yesterday
! by Mr. Eugene Haynes of Atlanta.
The large center table near the rath
skeller fireplace was deco catted with white
roses and Formosa fern, and especially
reserved for the bridal party. Those
present were: Mr. E. T. Holmes, Miss
Jemdson, Prof. Moseley of Macon, Miss
Marie Pinckard. Mr. Osgood Clarke, Miss
Eva Comer, Mr. Mercer Barnett, Miss
Martha Whitman. Mr. William Davies
and Miss Roline Clarke.
Another event In honor of the bridal
party was the dinner tendered them by
Mr. William Davies, also at the South
ern club, Monday evening, at which were
present, In addition to the bridal at
tendants, Mr. Theo Koenig and Mr. Car
roll Long.
JARRETT-HARDY.
The marriage of Miss Cora Hardy,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick
Hardy, formerly of this city, and Mr.
Edwin Scion Jarrett of New York took
place yesterday at St. Paul's church, Nor
folk. Va. No cards were issued. The
marriage unites one of the most brilliant
young women In the south to a prominent
New York man. Miss Hardy is a gradu
ate of Bryn Mawr. where she won the
European scholarship. She studied later
at Oxford university and ait the Uni
versity of France at Sorbonne. She has
recently hold positions in several of the
colleges of the country, hits traveled ex
tensively and has also written for sev
eral of the leading magazines.
Mr. Jarrett Is of English parentage, and
is a highly educated and cultured man.
He is a mining and contracting engineer
by profession. Mrs. Hardy was formerly a
member of Oadmean Circle of this city. A
n if ruber of the oldest and most prom
inent families of the city were close,
friends of the Hardy family and many
or the younger matrons and young girls
here were Miss Hardy's school mates and
associated with her in club and socJai
life.
MORRISON-HITT.
A recunit wedding of much interest
throughout the south was that of Miss
Saida Marie Ilitt and Mr. William B. 1
Morrison o*f Savannah, Gu., which took
place Monday.
The groom Is a cousin of Hon. Hoke
Smith of Georgia and the bride is a rel- i
atlve of Congressman Hitt of Illinois and ,
Congressman Allen G. Thurman of Ohio.
It was a elvariming home wedding. Rev.
l\ D. Mooney officiated. The hride was
given away by her father, Mr. W. II. i
HKt.
Her wedding gown was of point de sprit
over silk with bridal veil, and she carried
bride roses. A reception was held after
the ceremony. The wedding was notable
for the large number of out-of-town
guests, which included the bride’s grand
mother, Mrs. C. H. Wood, also Mrs. W.
A. Price, Mllss Ulfie Park. Miss Anna
Morrison. Mr. S. W. Morrison, all of Way
cross. Get., l>r. E. A. Morrison of Savan
nah, Mrs. K. W. Morrison of South Caro
lina. Mrs. R. M. Roberts, Miss Mary and
Miss Katherine Roberts of Pernandina,
PI a.. Miss Jennie and Miss Pauline Lewis
of Monteagle, Term., Mr. James B. Morri
son, the groom's father, of South Caro
lina. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison left for Sa
va nn<a*h, where they will take a steamer
for Baltimore ami will visit In Washing
ton and later will spend a portion of the
summer at Tybee. They will reside perm
anently in Savannah.
MILAM-SYFRETT.
Mrs. M. J. Syfrett announces the en
gagement of her daughter, Joehe, to Mr.
Horcc W. Milam, the wedding to take
place Wednesday, July 18, at 5 p. m., at
the bride’s home, 1612 Avenue G.
———
MATT I SON-LUCKY.
T’he marriage of Miss Minnie Luekle of
Sybil. Alu., the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Walker Buckie, and Mr. Ross Ernest
Matt Ison of Birmingham will take plate
tonight at 8:30 o’clock at the Baptist
church of Sybil.
After the ceremony an Informal recep
As A Bank Deposit.
is the way you can buy diamonds of
us. A small cash payment and a small
amount each week or month until paid
for. It’s just like starting a savings
account.
J. Lowinsohn,
1921 Second Avenue. I
tion will be held, and the bride and groom
will take a short trip to Butler’s Springs,
and on their return will make their home
in Birmingham.
Mr. John Stovall, Miss Alice Doyle ana
Miss Nell McCreary of Birmingham will
be among the out-of-town guests. Mis??
Susie MtLane and Miss Clint Sullivan of
Livingston will also attend the wedding.
BROWN-ROYSTER.
The wedding of Miss Mateline Eleanor
Ryster and Mr. Eugene Brown, son of
! Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Brown of Elyton,
took place Monday evening in Dr. Stagg s
study, Dr. Stagg performing the cere
mony.
A few' friends and relatives of the bridi*
and groom were present. The bride wore
a white costume.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown left for Cincinnal i
after the ceremony and will make their
future home there.
MOODY-M’COL LISTER.
Miss Grace Wilmer McCollister. the
daughter of Mr. und Mrs. Alexander Mc
Collister of Piedmont. Ala., and Mr. Mar
tin T. Moody. Jr., will be married this
evening at the Episcopal church at Pied
mont.
Mr. Moody is a brother of Mr. Arthur
Moody of this city and has a number
of relatives and friends in Birmingham.
JOLLY-RAVENSCROFT.
The marriage of Miss Louise Raven
scroft of Artesia, Cal., and Mr. James
Richardson Jolly will also take place this
evening in Artesia.
Mr. Jolly is a son of Mrs. S. W. Jolly
of this city. He Is pastor of the First
Christian church of Artesia. His wedding
will be of Interest to many friends in Bir
mingham.
SOROSIS MEETING.
The Sorosis will meet Thursday after
noon with Mis. George R. Stamps at No.
2308 Sixth avenue. North, at 5 o'clock.
RUMMAGE SALE.
The Howard College Co-operative asso
ciation will start a rummage sale Thurs
day,, at No. 400, South Twentieth street.
Other socities are urged to collect ma
terial and send to the above address.
NOTES AND PERSONALS.
The party consisting of Mrs. F. M
Gardner, Mrs. Norton L>. Whitley, Mrs.
John Farmer, Miss Sammie Harris, Miss
Irene Cosby and little Miss Dorothy
Whitley left yesterday afternoon for
Philadelphia, Washington and Atlantic
City.
* • •
Mr. Joe D. Rountree, accompanied by
Ids two little sons, Hamer and Walter,
returned yesterday to his home at Hart
selle, Ala., after several days’ visit to
his brother, J. A. Rountree.
• • •
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Cramton left las*,
night for Lapeer, Mien., having been call
ed home on account of the sudden death
of Mr. Cramton's mother.
* * •
Mr. and Mrs. Terence Mackin and little
daughter, Margaret, are at the Sweet
water Park hotel, Llthia Springs. Ga.
* * •
Mrs. Bowie Strange Tutwller is visit
ing her sister. Mrs. Charles Frederick
Horst. Jr.
• * •
Mrs. Della Soper has returned from
house party In Walker county and wilt
leave next week for the Sapphire country
of North Carolina to be absent until
fall.
• • •
The Missionary Society of the First
Presbyterian church will meet today a*
4:30 o'clock with Mrs. R. B. Harkness,
1101 North Twenty-fifth street.
• * •
Mrs. Sydenham Moore has as her guests
this week Miss Dusia Richardson and
Miss Ella Sayre of Montgomery.
• * •
Mrs. B. F. Moore has gone to Knox
ville.
CONGRESS TO STAY
TILL WORK IS DONE
SPEAKER CANNON’S DICTUM MAY
MEAN THAT AN ADJOURNMENT
WILL NOT BE TAKEN UNTIL
NEXT WEEK.
Washington. June 26.—Congress will stay
In session until its work is finished. This
Is the dictum of Speaker Cannon and 'his
lieutenants, and is being emphasized at
this time to counteract any impression
that the pure food bill at least might go
over until the next session.
There is ulso trouble on the meat in
spection bill, and the “tie up" on the rate
bill Indicates delay. The Immigration bill
Is also In conference, as are several of the
appropriation bills.
All of these things must he worked out
without any date of adjournment being
set according to the decision of the House
leaders. When the work Is done, an ad
journment resolution will he forthcoming
In short order.
While the situation today spells delay
until next week, the work on the floor
progressing. Members say there is no
need of prolonging the session beyond
Friday, If the conferees make up their
minds that the work must be done, or that
agreements which will meet all demands
eun be arranged on all matters before
that time, and that if the idea of prolong
ing the session for the purpose of killing
certain bills is abandoned, this week will
see the end.
TAFT BOOM BOOSTED
AT HIS ALMA MATER
Justice Brewer, Amid Applause, Says
Secretary Will Carry High Ideals
to White House.
New Haven, Conn., June 2*».—'This was
alumni day at Yale, when hundreds of old
graduates, coming from every quarter of
the country, gathered in Alumni hall to
listen to the annual report of President
Arthur Hadley of the university, and to
hear words of greeting from a few of the
liiany sons of Yale who have won dis
tinction in business life. President Hadley
in ills report said that the financial con
dition of Yale was much better now than
in past years. Before the alumni gather
ings there were many class reunions.
Justice David J. Brewer. ’5t>. who was
one of the speakers at the alumni meet
ing, referred to Secretary Taft as a man
who had safely guided the country
through the intricacies of the Philippine
situation, and was at present carrying on
successfully the great canal problem, and
predicted ‘‘that he would carry to the
presidency the same strength of character
he has shown in dealing with the othci
problems.”
“And when he is in the White House,”
said Justice Brewer amid great applause.
“I hope and I know he will put into the
administration those same high principles
taught by Yale which he is showing in his
public life.”
COOK’S SPRINGS.
Pried chicken and more of ft. Fresh
lamb and still more. Ask the crowds
who visit Cooks Springs about It. Chick
en is the word.
LOUIE REESE, Prop.
BIRMINGHAM BRYAN
CLUB GITS BUST
Committee on Arrangements
Has Been NameJ
HEADQUARTERS ARE NAMED
Alabama Delegation to Join With the
Commercial Travelers’ League In
Welcoming Mr. Bryan From
His Trip Around World.
The Bryan club of Birmingham, which
’has been an active organization since
!Si*6, held a meeting yesterday In tlie First
National Bank building for the purpose
of making arrangements for attending the
Bryan reception at Madison Secure Gar
den, New York, on August 30. The follow
ing letter was read by John W. Tomlin
son from William Huge, the president of
the Commercial Travelers’ Anti-Trust
league of New York, under whose aus
pices the reception is to be given:
“Way back in January 1 received a
number of letters from the 'boys on the
road.' asking me why the Commercial
Travelers' Anti-Trust league did not ar
range a reception to the Hon. William J.
Bryan upon his return to New York after
a trip around tlie world. In obedience to
these requests, Mr. Henry Walker and I
wrote to Mr. Bryan, and he accepted the
Invitation of the Commercial Travelers’
Anti-Trust league. Mr. Bryan in his let
ter said that he was anti-trust, and also.
j considerable of a traveler, and that he
would be pleased to attend a reception.
We also suggested something about a ban
quet, but Mr. Bryan thought about the
trouble there is in having a banquet, and
that it is always to a certain extent ex
clusive.
“There 'have been a great many mis
statements* in the press regarding the
management of this proposed reception,
and 1 can but reiterate the statement sent
out through the Associated Press on be
half of the league. It says:
“ ‘The league is incorporated under the
laws of New York, and Its membership is
made up of traveling men from all part*
of the country. It was very active in the
campaign of 1900, and Mr. Bryan under
stands all about the organization und its
membership and aJms. Mr. Bryan has ac
cepted an invitation of the organization to
give him a reception on Ills arrival here
in Madison Square Garden. It was under
stood in accepting the invitation that all
of Mr. Bryan's old friends would be in
vited to participate. In his letter to us
Mr. Bryan so requested.
“ ‘A large portion of our membership is
in St. Louis and Kansas City. As a com
pliment to them. Governor Folk of Mis
souri has been selected as chairman of
the reception committee. A majority of
our members desire that Augustus Thom
as make the speech of welcome on behalf
I of the league.’
“In order to have t'he matter of the re
ception as broad as possible. I have, on
behalf of the organization, invited a num
ber of prominent citizens in this and other
states to co-operate with us."
Yesterday’s Meeting.
It was unanimously decided at yester
day’s meeting that the club would at- i
tend the reception to Mr. Bryan, and that
the headquarters of the club would be at
the Hoffman house, and all democrats of
the state who could do so were extended
an Invitation to attend. The following
arrangement committee was appointed:
John W. Tomlinson. John C. Pugh, Sam
\Y. John, Joseph H. Collins, John \V.
O’Neill. E. VY. Barrett. N. C. Miller. John
L. Parker, H. K. White. J. H. McCleary,
R. M. McCullough. R. P. Wetmore, J. S.
Gillespy. W. C. Garrett.
A resolution was passed, authorizing
this committee to confer with the demo
crats of the state with a view of ar
ranging for all democrats who care to
attend to meet at the Hoffman house.
New York, on August 29 and 30. and go in
a body as a reception committee from
Alabama, and to participate in a general
reception to Mr. Bryan on his return from
a trip around the world. Alabama demo
crats desiring to attend are requested to
write to any one of the above committee
or to William Hoge, president of the Com
mercial Travelers’ Anti-Trust League,
Headquarters Bryan Reception Commit
tee. Room 100. Hotel Victoria. Broadw’ay
and Twenty-seventh Street, New York.
John L. Parker, secretary, was instruct
ed to write letters to all the railroads re
questing a one fare rate from all points in
Alabama.
Continues Dreyfus Argument.
Paris. June 26.—Procurator General Bau
douin, in the supreme court, today con
tinued Ids argument in the Dreyfus ease,
detailing the errors made at the Rennes
court-martial, warranting the quashing
of the sentence.
Best Hosiery]
\ Monarch
j I Hosiery
“Knit to fit and
fit to ii>ear”
25c 50c 75c
Are you looking
for a cool, comfort
ible, beautiful stocking ?
If so, get the Monarch
Hosiery, Made Best, Fin
Best and Lasts Best.
Your dealer can supply
you.
The word ‘‘Monarch’’
is stamped on the
World’s Best
Hosiery.
Rice-Stix
Dry Goods
Company
mgm st. lmjb
;— ---.-1
There’s no mistake about this weather,
its hot, and you’ve got to shop, so don’t forget
the coolest place with the best bargains. Re
member the Blue Pencil is doing double end
duty this week.
Shirt Waists
$2.00 Waists $1.15
These are the white lawn kind.
In all the latest styles, button front
or back, long and elbow sleeves,
lace and embroidery trimmed, mak
ing a good knock-about or dress-up
waist, our regular $2.00 value.
Blue Penciled to $1.15
New ‘‘Peter Pan”
The new Peter Pan Shirtwaist
is now in vogue for this sudden hot
weather—extra fine quality white
lawn, brings $1.50, value $2.00
—then comes the polka dots, a $1.30
waist for $1.25.
Blue Penciled to $1.25
Then there’s all our high quality waists, such as lingerie
hand-embroidered, etc., overy one stunning and becoming
to anv wearer. There is surely something to please the
most fastidious in this large assortment of high grade waists
Blue Penciled to One-Half of Regular Value
Wash Goods Specials
Another case of our popular Auto
Cloth just in 36 Inches wide.
Blue Penciled to 15c
15 yards, good yard wide,
bleached or unbleached Domestic.
Blue Penciled to$1.00
90x90 Pepperell Sheets, torn,
hemmed and Ironed and ready for
use, regular 85c value.
Blue Penciled to 70c
42x36 Hemmed Pillow Cases, reg
ular price 12i6c.
Blue Penciled to 10c
Brodine American Silk Dimity
and Silk Radium, solid colors with
brocaded effects (washable), all the
popular shades, regular price 35c
and 40c.
Blue Penciled to 25c
Solid color Tissues, orange, gray,
brown, tan, red, green and blue,
regular price 20c.
Blue Penciled to 10c
SAVE
FUEL
SAVE
MONEY
Use a “ Eureka Cook ’’ and you will do both.
EUREKA STOVE WORKS
34thSt. and 3th Are., Birmingham, Ala.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Eureka Stoves and Ranges
ME DO HIGH GRADE FOUNDRY MORK
AND SOLICIT JOBBING MORK OF ALL KINDS
Bell Phone 1286 P. O. Box 333 Peoples Phone 1283
Preserving Time Now
Are you ready? We are, with all kinds of
PRESERVING KETTLES, fruit Jars, Jelly
Glasses and everthingfor the house wife’s
convenience in putting up the years’
supply of fruit and vegetables,
SPECIAL RJEDUCED PHICES THIS WEEK.
Mason’s Fruit Jars, pints, per doz.60c
Mason’s Fruit Jars, quarts, per doz.75c
Mason’s Fruit Jars, half gallon, per doz.1.00
Extra Caps for Jars, per doz.25c
Best Jar Rubbers, per doz. 5c
Half-pint Jelly Glasses, per doz.30c
Pint Jelly Glasses, per doz.35c
Reduced Prices on Preserving Kettles, Stone Preserve Jars, etc
2020 Secmd Ave.
2021-3 Third
Avenue.
/f/f
i
1
TIE FAIR
Phone 8)
]
Ask the physicians about
BOWDEN LITHIA WATER
It will cure
RHEUMATISM
I
GOUT j
STONE IN BLADDER
KIDNEY AND BLADDER TROUBLE
I
. !
Bowden Lithia Springs Water Co.
Depot 110 S. 18th St. Phone 4060. Birmingham, Ala.
"Ask your physician abont it.”

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