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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, January 19, 1913, Image 38

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038485/1913-01-19/ed-1/seq-38/

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INTERESTING GOSSIP OF BIRMINGHAM AUTOMOBILISTS
By CLYDE AY. EX MS
ffiATH stalked abroad In automo
bile rlrrlrs last week and claimed
as Its toll the life of a promising
3-year-old chap. Brimmed full of life,
romping in the sunshine at his father’s
door, a bright-eyed youngster was reaped
In by the grim scepter with no warning.
That accident which has brought un
namable grief not only to the parents
and family deprived of a son, but to the
owner of the automobile driven at the
time by a negro driver, calls attention
again to the danger that lurks in the
streets of Birmingham from automo
biles. It emphasizes that which has
been said in this column time and time
again, that the greatest care is abso
lutely imperative in driving in this city,
not only down town, where traffic is con
gested, but in the residential districts,
where the same dangers takes on added
growth by reason of children playing and
crossing the streets.
There will be no attempt here to crit
icise the driver of that automobile which
claimed Its victim last Thursday after
noon, nor will his chances before the
courts be injured one way or the other
by any words here. However, the fact
that the owner of that automobile, a
gentleman, every inch of him, the father
of children and a man in whom all who
know him find manliness and truth is
bowed down himself with anguish, is
almost heartbroken over the accident
should be pointed out. If ever automo
bile owner could have witnessed that
grief strickened man as he called at the
house of death caused by the driv'er of
his car and could have seen the over
mastering grief swell his heart until
speechless he stood barheaded at the
door, it would have been a picture that
would have never efaced its Image from
the memory of the onlookers. His grief
as sincere and as heartfelt as the par
ents of that blossoming youth added to
the sorrow of the parents to say noth
ing of the anguish no doubt felt by the
driver of the car is a terrific price to
pay for any automobile antic.
Old railroad men console themselves
when serious wrecks occur on their lines
by the observation that is as long as
trains are operated there will be wrecks.
And It is taken that so long as auto
mobiles are operated there will be acci
dents. But in the recent years “Safety
first” mottoes have b§en hung by rail
roads at every tank station. Every pre
caution that can be secured from the
wisdom of many thousand railroad men
the being put into effect to minimize this
danger. So it seems meet that the auto
mobile dealers and owners of Birming
ham could gather here and devise some
was whereby at least the dangers of the
present may he lessened. It seems that
some traffic rules and examinations and
other safeguards could he arranged .that
would at least lessen the chances for
a repetition of such pictures of sorrow
as that was enacted this‘week.
In passing it should he taken to heart
by every parent in Birmingham that chil
dren should be more securely guarded.
They are allowed to play continually In
the streets and at corners. It seems that
Birmingham has sufficient open space
and sufficient parkage to provide places
of play for children removed from the
deaths that linger in the crossings. Then
again the danger from getting hold of
Your real emergency brake
.* is in the treads of your tires—noton
* the axle. The Safety Tread is equal
to any emergency. The forward bar
pushes the ooze ahead and leaves a
clean spot for the following'Bars to grip.
»
1 Things “ ‘brake’ your way” if you have
SAFETY
TREAD 9 |fCD
"Best in Hie Short Stop"
nirtnlnelinni Tire Depot, 420 Soul It 201 It Street
cars on bicycles and roller skates con
tinues unabated.
In the name of God protection should
be Invoked.
MRS. BARNETT SECURES
BROC ELECTRIC
It was announced yesterday by the
Highland Garage, that Mrs. J. Mercer
Barnett had purchased one of the latest
model Broc electric. The car lias been
delivered. Mrs. Barnett is very much
pleased with the electric and congratu
lated the local agents upon the well
proven efficiency. The local dealers have
under way several additional trades for
electrics which it inav be said arc grow
ing very popular in Birmingham.
MR. MOOIJY BUYS
ANOTHER MARMON
Iveo Moody, of Bessemer, whose letter
of felicitations to the Marmon company
was recently published has secured an
other car from 1 that company. It will
be In Birmingham Monday it is announc
er. Tt will be on exhibition at the local
agents, the Highland Garage on Second
avenue for one day only. The new Mar
mon is equipped with electric self-starter,
electric headlights and all the latest con
trivances Innovated this season. Mr
Moody is very strong for the Marmon
and continually boosts the car.
CONVICTS ON ROADS
NET RESULTS
The conversion fo New Jersey, a north
ern state, to the plan of prison labor
will be of mirch interest to all good roads
promoters of the country. For geveral
years some of the southern states have
been employing convict labor almost ex
clusively on toad work, hut In many of
the northern states the plan has met with
more or less opposition.
Col. Edwin A. Stevens, state road com
missioner of New Jersey, after one sea
son’s trial of convict labor on tiie roads
of his state, is enthusiastic in endorsing
the policy generally, in a communication
to the A. A. A. National Good Roads
Board the commissioner writes:
“The experiment of convict labor on
state roads, which was proved to lie a
success in one week, is only the beginning
of good road building beyond what w<
already have and at a price which will
spread out the money of the state beyond
its present confines.”
In describing the wrork in New Jersey
Colonel Stevens says: “1 gave orders to
the man in charge that he was to give
me a ‘swagger' job there. fn other
words, he was to build the best section of
road ever constructed in New Jersey. If
after a rain there was as much as a tea
cup of water remaining on any spot, the
road was to be torn up instantly and re
laid by these men This is my school,
and I believe that in the future men
trained in prison -short term men. if I
cannot get others men who have nothing
else to do when they are turned out info
private life again, can he taught the
highest class of road building. They can
be made to do the highest class of work.
“I do not expect, a bank president to
become a road builder, but there is ex
cellent material in prison which can be
trained in this way. and I expect to man
ufacture out of this labor a corps of
men who will continue the work from
choice* when they have served their time.
With the training I will give them they
MARMON
“The easiest riding car In the world1’
OLDSMOBILE
"A Leader for Fifteen Years”
BUICK
“Never Has Been Beaten"
Read These Three Names
Marmon--01dsmobiie--Buick
and Then Think
Tf you wore asked to name ton leading
automobiles with which you are most fa
miliar. you would name these three
among (hem.
WHY?
Because these three cars have been
known to you for years—you see them on
the streets every day—your friends own
them and brag about them.
Because these three cars perform good
service day in and day out—on city
streets and country roads—up hill and
down—in the mountains and on the
plains anti in all kinds of weather.
Because of Their Number You
Know Them
WHY ARE THESE CARS SO EX
TENSIVELY BOUGHT?
The buyer of a Harmon, an Oldsmobile
or a Buiek kuows before lie makes the
purchase just what service he will get
from his car—good service always. Year
after year, these factories have produced
new models—always built around those
distinctive principles that have made
them leading cars—but always the very
last word in motor progress; never be
hind the times, but usually very much in
ad vance.
Not “single hobby” cars. Their makers
have not specialized along any single
line. For instance—the transmission,
although it may be the best transmission
made, is no better than the most insig
nificant part of the car. Each individual
part is right and is proven to be so be
fore it goes into the car. Then, when
these parts that are right have been as
sembled into the perfect machine, the
machine itself is given a thorough and
practical test to see that all parts are
working properly. Only then is the car
allowed to leave the factory for sale.
This individual care is what keeps
these cars out of the shops and saves re
pair bills, tire bills- keeps upkeep ex
penses at the minimum.
MR. MOTORIST:
You think other cars may give you the
service von desire. YOU KNOW
THESE CARS WILL GIVE YOU
THAT SERVICE.
Get us demonstrate their adaptability
for your individual service.
Late Models on Display at Our Salesroom
Highland Garage Co., Inc.
2027 Second Ave. Phone Main 2328
will be a valuable asset to New Jersey
roads, and that is why I \vanted nothing
but the highest class of work done by
this experimental class of men. They
will get. if I can get it for them—and
the prison authorities seem to be willing
to co-operate in every way to make this
work successful—commutation for good
behavior, and excellent work beyond that
obtainable inside the walls."
MU- MORRIS SPEAKS OF
NEW EQUIPMENT
"Los Angeles police have recently called
the attention of the motoring world to
the importance of complete auto equip
ment.’* says Tom E. Morris, Jr., of the
Cadillac company, "by a request for an
ordinance covering automobile traffic.
I he law' requested in the western city is
one which would require motorists to
carry an electrical device with which to
warn the driver, the public and the offi
cers whenever the speed limit is being ex
ceeded.
"The device is a complicated affair, in
tended to he carried on the dash of the
car. It consists of three lights, red,
white and green, placed one above the
other and connected with the transmis
sion by a speed countershaft. The idea
is that when the car is making 10 miles
or less per hour the white light burns; at
30 miles per bour the gr^en light shows,
and at 25 miles per hour the red light
comes into play. At speeds in excess of
this, various combinations of flashes are
shown."
M ARMON AGENT TALKS
OF MR. HANCH
The automobile industry received sub
stantial recogntion on December 26. 1913,
when C. C. Hanch. treasuerer of the
Marmon company, makers of the Mar
mon car, was elected president of the
new Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce.
Says L. A. White Read, "the new busi
ness organization results from the con
solidation of six of the commercial and
civic bodies of the city and the signal
honor conferred upon Mr. Hanch in elec
ting him to the first presidency of the
Chamber of Commerce, comes as a re
ward for his efforts toward bringing
about consolidation.
Mr. Hanch has for several years been
associated with nearly every public and
commercial organization for the better- !
ment of Indianapolis. It was largely,
through the work of the general com- !
mittee of civic and commercial bodies of i
which he was chairman, that they were
united into the new organization.
The new' Indianapolis Chamber of Com
merce will have charge of all public |
movements for the bettering of business, 1
civic and social conditions and business I
men who are prominent in the organiza- i
tion welcome the new' commerce chamber j
as a distinct growth in the industrial de
velopment of the city. In view of the fact
that automobile manufacturing is the
greatest industry of Tndiaapolls, there is
a peculiar fitness in the election of such ;
a prominent man in automobile affairs ;
as Mr. Hanch to the presidency of the |
new chamber.
GUM SHOE
DEPARTMENT LATEST
“Another car stolen in New Orleans:
please take this letter to the ‘gum-shoe’
department."
A clerk in the office of the Overland
company recently gave the above order
to an office boy, as he handed the young
*
ster a letter he had Just opened. The boy
delivered the missive to a man in an
other part of the office, the latter lead
and filed it away and reached for a
telegraph blank. Thu# was the detective
department of the trig automobile organ
ization, an innovation which has become
very important in a short time, set to
work on its latest “case.’’
The “gum-shoe'' department, as it has
been dubbed by the office staff, doesn't
look anything like the headquarters de
tective agency, but it lias proved Its abilr
ity and worth on several occasions., to
the joy of automobile owners whose ma
chines have been stolen. The purposo
of the department is to assist In tracing
and restoring to their owners Overland
cars which are appruprited by motor en
thueiastics who do not believe in buying.
A REDUCTION,
THANKS BE TO ALLAH
, There will, be a reduction of 10 per cent,
in the prices of Goodyear Motor Truck
tires, according to a local announcement.
This reduction is made possible by rea- ,
(Continued on Page Forty!
WINTON SIX
if We are pleased to announce that we have taken the agency in
Birmingham and surrounding territory, for the Winton Six. To
those who know this splendid car, nothing more need be said, be
cause tjjose people who know the Winton Six recognize it as one
of the leading cars of America.
if Those who do not know this car, will want to see it, because it is
an exceptionally fine automobile in many ways.
if The Winton Six is manufactured by the company which first
started manufacturing pleasure cars. The Winton Motor Car Co.
was the first company to build six cylinder cars exclusively. They
have devoted all of their time and attention for six years to build
ing six cylinder cars only, and they know how to build sixes.
if The Winton Six was the first car to be placed on the market
equipped with a self starter. This self starter is the only starter
which has been in service for more than two years. There has
been no changes made in the self starter for four years—it is a
proven success.
if Many other features of this car are worth your attention. We
have interesting literature which you ought to read before plac
ing your order. This literature we will be glad to send to you on
request.
if We cordially invite you to come and see this car.
Brownell Auto Co.
323-325 South 20th Street Birmingham, Alabama

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