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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, April 20, 1913, Image 9

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INCIDENTS IN STATE POLITICS WHICH
j KEEP THE COMMON PEOPLE INTERESTED
By HUGH W. ROBERTS
Whai is MOfIB WiThOuT A Mother f
HOBSON
BANKHEAD
OLIVER
HEFLIN
/TTIGHLY diverting incidents featured
I 1 the political situation during the
l * week Just gone. In the first
place there was the Interesting exchange
lof personalities between Governor O'Neal
and Tom L. Long. In the second place,
there was the complimentary correspon
dence of J. Tom Heflin and R. Pearson
IHobson ifi regard to the challenge of the
former and refusal of the latter to de
jbate that all-enthralling topic of
[woman's suffrage. And last, but not
[least In Importance was the announce
jment of W. B. Oliver of Tuscaloosa for
It he seat In congress which Hobson will
| resign when he meets Senator Johnston
on the hustings.
In regard to the O'Neal-Long contro
versy, it Is reported on excellent au
thority that the ennui of the participants
Is second only to that of the common
people. It may be, therefore, considered
a closed Hjcident. But there will be an
other, and still another, chapter written
concerning woman’s suffrage, and each
succeeding contribution will deal directly
with Heflin and Hobson—for these two
eloquent and erudite sons of Alabama
are now considered the gallant leaders of
the rival factions of the nation.
* • «
There was deep regret in Alabama when
Congressman Hobson, the earnest ad
vocate of woman’s rights and woman’s
votes, declined to meet Congressman
Heflin tn joint debate. Alabamians
were anxious to hear the two gentlemen
discuss an issue which is burning in
America and troublous in England. TKN
anxiety was not directly the result of
popular interest, because it is a state
ment beyond question true that the rank
and file of ordinary citizens, those who
stand firm against the encroachment of
fads, the virtue of which is their novelty,
have been no more moved by the out
bursts of the Pankhurst than by the
starting of a new expedition to the pole.
It was the result, however, of a feverish
and irresponsible desire to hear the hero
of the Merrimac present his views on a
subject admittedly not understood in
"unprogressive” communities, and the;
champion of Uje “home and fireside” re
late the sad denouement of the suf
fragettes’ inaugural parade in which Hob
son was a gallant leader, and "dark
hued” patriots of various sexes boldly
tramped behind.
Hobson declined to meet Hefliin, it is
remembered, on the ground of his claim
that the challenger was not a candidate
for the Senate suoh as the challenged was,
and on his secondary contention that the
question of suffrage was not and would
not be an Issue in Alabama. Heflin, as
is remembered, replied that inasmuch as
Hobson stood for votes for women, and
inasmuch as there was a chance that he,
in case of his election to the Senate, would
endeavor to write a female suffrage
douse in the constitution, the question
was on issue—especially in Alabama. Thus
the first cTfapter ended.
• • •
The three or four individuals whom
the political writers have declared to he
preparing with patriotic zeal to make an
effort to acquire the gubernatorial nom
ination. have for some time remained
exceedingly quiet, and unless the plain
people consider their unusual peaceful
ness the calm before the storm, we may
with propriety omit Its further discussion.
As a matter of fact, there Is fast de
veloping a more interesting situation.
The Sixth district, for eons renowned for
the splendor of its political battles and
tbe marvelous energy of its astute pol
iticians, is already forging to the front
with an embryonic congressional cam
paign. Some months ago, William B.
Bankhead of Jasper, announced himself
a candidate for thr seat in congress to
be vacated when Hobson plows his ambi
tious furrow in another field of endeavor.
No sooner was the announcement pub
lished than Tuscaloosa county shuffled
its deck of candidates in an effort to
find a suitable opponent. Col. Frank S.
Moody announced that he would not run.
Judge William W. Brandon followed
suit. Solicitor M. T. Ormond thought for
a moment and decided finally to make
a lasting marriage with his practice of
the law. Judge Henry B. Foster gave
the matter long consideration, and de
clined to permit the honor to he thrust
upon him. And then W. B. Oliver, the
well known attorney and dean of the
law school of the University of Alabama,
did what he had in previous campaigns
“A New Sure Way to Make
Birmingham Grow” His
Subject Tuesday
At the weekly luncheon of the Ad club j
at the Gold Lion tearoom annex Tuesday i
at 1 o’clock, Prof. James S. Thomas of
the University of Alabama will deliver
an address on “A New Sure Way to Make
Birmingham Grow.” Professor Thomas is
I a deep thinking man and the address is
expected to be of great interest. President
Sparrow' stated yesterday that any one in
terested would be welcome to come and
hear the speech. The luncheon to be
served will be a Dutch treat.
The luncheon Tuesday is very important
to the members of the Ad club, stated |
President Sparrow’, as a campaign for
ticket selling for the combined carnival
of the club and the Shriners this week at
East End park will be started. The carni
val of the Ad club and the Shriners, which
is to begin tomorrow and last through
out potlatch week, Is expected to draw
big crowds, and both clubs plan to work
all week selling tickets.
Besides this there will be a general
lino up for Baltimore Tuesday, said Mr.
Sparrow'. The Ad club is planning to
send many delegates to the National Ad
Men’s convention.
threatened to do—announced his candi
dacy.
• * *
There will probably be no other can
didates, and the race promises to be
close and exciting. Both men are pop
ular and both have large personal fol
lowings. The campaign will be devoid
of the sensational because both candi
dates will refrain from personalities.
There will be hard fighting, however,
all down the line, because both are men
of vigor as well as valor.
The ghost of Hobson will ride like Tam
O’Shanter—to the very end. As a matter
of fact, unless the eradication of Sum
ter county ticks forges to the front as
the vital issue. Hobson, himself, may be
the issue. The ardent and enthusiastic
followers of Hobson, unless they have
been partially weaned as a result of the
gallant captain’s female suffrage tenden
cies, will not be enthusiastic In their
support of BankheadAand may not rush
madly to the support of Oliver, for Oli
ver is not too strongly convinced that
the country’s wealth and prosperity de
pends entirely on a mammoth navy. But
the Hobson following will be In the thick
of the fight, and may insist on voting
for one of its own “progressive" persua
sion. This insistence may result In S. A.
Hobson, brother of the congressman, car
rying out his reported intention of en
deavoring to succeed to the seat of his
kinsman.
Judge R. L. Bradley of Lamar, and
John A. Rogers of Sumter have been
mentioned in connection with the Sixth
district race, but it is considered prob
able that neither w'ill run. That the bulk
of the light will be bourne by Oliver and
Bankhead seems certain, as certain as
the outcome is uncertain.
Bankhead will make a clean sweep In
Walker, and Oliver, a clean sweep in
Tuscaloosa. They will leave their respec
tive counties, the largest In the district,
incidentally, practically neck and neck.
Sumter, Greene and Fayette should be
Bankhead counties, with Hale and La
mar and probably Marion, in the column
of Oliver. ,
WORKING GIRL IN
FRANCE ANI) AMERICA
New York, April 19.—The Frenc h work- ;
Ing girl can live well on 80 cents a day'
because she has no desire to emulate
the dress and mode of living of her more
fortunate sister, says Mine. Alice Do I,a
Ruelle, special agent of the French de
partment of commerce, and one of the
five women admitted to practice before
the French law courts.
Mme. De La Ruelle arrived today from
Paris to investigate industrial conditions
surrounding working women in the big
cities of the United States.
CLARENCE GUILTY;
LIFE SENTENCE
Portsmouth, O., April 59.—A jtfry
brought in a verdict today finding Os
car Clarence, “Jack Wooten,’ guilty of
second degree murder.
Wooten killed his wife and T.ot Mc
Cumber when he found them together
on February 55. *
Woolen will be sentenced to life im
prisonment.
Big Stock Barn Burned
Jackson, Miss., April 59.—(Special.)—One
of the big barns on the La Vernet stock
farm, three miles west of Jackson, was
destroyed by fire last night at an early
hour. This barn was used almost ex
clusively for sheep, but a few line hogs
were also quartered there. All were cre
mated, and a considerable quantity of
hay and other foodstuff was also lost.
Peebles Confesses
Siopx City, la., April 19.—William F.
Peebles, alias William Conley, accused
of setting a number of fires here, con
fessed today, lie also confessed, said
the police, to numerous robberies in va
rious parts of the country. Peebles said
he formerly lived in San Antonio, Tex.
Baxter Surrenders
-Columbus, ()., April 19.—Frank E. Rux
ter, former state inspector of banks, to
day surrendered upon an indictment which
charged him with converting to his own
use $27,000 belonging to the Columbu.s
Savings and Trust company. He entered
a of not guilty.
B. V. P. U. INSTITUTE
TO BE HELD IN IUIAY
Joint Meeting of Baptists of
the District Convenes
May 4-8
The Baptist Young People’s unions of
the various Baptist churches in the dis
trict will from May 4 to 8 hold a Joint
Institute at the First Baptist church of
Birmingham.
On Sunday afternoon. May 4, a mass
meeting will bo held to outline a schedule
for the approaching work, after which the
various unions will receive their pro
grammes. The work of the institute
proper will begin at 5 o’clock Monday aft
ernoon, and will continue through Thurs
day, beginning each afternoon at the same
hour and continuing until 8 o'clock with
a minute intermission for lunch, Which
will be served free to those participating
by the various young people’s societies.
H. I,#. Strickland, who Is Held secretary
of the Baptist Sunday school forces in
Alabama, with Arthur Flake, director of
the B. Y. P. V. work east of the Missis
sippi, will be in charge of the meetings.
During the course of the meetings Mr.
Flake will take for the class lessons sev
eral topics from the B. Y. P. U. manual,
while Mr. Strickland will teach a text
book training in Bible studies. The time
of the lectures will be from 7:15 to 8
o’clock. From 8 to 9 o’clock demonstra
tions will be given by some of the unions
in the district, illustrating practical work.
Indications point to a large enrollment
In both the study classes and for the night
lectures.
MAP OF NEW YORK CITY FHKE
on request to those contemplating n
visit to the "Big City.’’ Just send your
address to Hotel Southern, 203 W. G4th
St., New York City. 4-G-8t-su
THE HEINION MEETINGS OF THE
ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED SCOTTISH
HITE WILL IIEGIN AS FOLLOW si
LODGE OF PERFECTION TUESDAY,
APRIL 22. AT !» A. M.; C HAPTER OF
HOSE CROIX, WEDNESDAY I P. M.f
COUNCIL OF K ADOSH, THURSDAY, *1
A. M.i CONSISTORY, FRIDAY, » %. M.
CHARLES J. GEOHEGAN, SECY.
Briefs Printed
At 80c Per Page
BIRMINGHAM LINOTYPE
COMPOSING CO.
1703V2 3d Ave. Phone 5495-3V
This is the Store that Lends a Helpful, Appreciative
--Service to Its Customers.-j
The First Briton
English throughout—the smartest “low cut” in town to
day. Designed for those close followers of fashion who arc
exacting as to tlie cor
•ectness of their foot
tvear.
$2.95 and $3.45
A Pair
Natural Foottorm Oxfords
That Makes a Friend of Every Man That Wears
®24S and ®34S ^
a Pair
By Nature’s own remedy cures
corns, strained tendons and turned
arch (often misnamed broken arch).
Makes standing or walking a real
pleasure for tired, aching feet and re- .
stores them to a healthy, normal con-f|
dition. ^
Child’s Russia Barefoot
Finest made
Sixes 2 to 6
$1.25
*l**« 5 to 8
$145
Barefoot Sandals
SIICM 0 to S
75c
Sl*c* 0 to 2
95c
Guaranteed not
k to rip
Cheaper
Grajle 50c
Child’s
Patent
Button
Oxford
$1.95
Sizes
8 1-2 to 2 I
Child’s Patent
or Canvas
Ankle Strap
Sizes 5-8
Nothing Is More Important to The
Woman ot Fashion Tir Footwear!
....It gives the finishing touch, without which the smartest costume
fails in its effect. Guarantee Shoes are the latest word in fashion. Every
model is distinctly new in its style, shaped to harmonize with the new
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Equally important with correct style is the matter of correct fit, for
on that depends the comfort of the wearer and the preservation of the
natural lines of the foot. Guarantee Shoes are fitted by experts who
have made a careful study of foot needs. You can put a pair of Guarantee
Shoes on and wear them, for they are made right and will cause you no
discomfort.
New Low Heel
Pumps
Tan Russia calf, patent gun
metal and snow buck; for
women and
college girls.
$2.95
A Pair (
THE LATEST
RIJRIIEK SOLES
'V Engli*h Walk
er*
rr -*opular among
tl»<* ,0 linger ladle*.
white JM ii—
buc*.
$3.45
V
WHITE CAN
VAS PUMPS
Light soles
^ $1.95
BUTTON OX
FORDS
Patent and gim
i metal, very sty
jlish.
b $2,95
Low Heel
Pumps
Patent and dull
leathers
$2.95
nine Suede Hut
ton Oxford*
Extension soles;
vrry stylish
$3.45
All sizes.
Gray rump*, all
Shade*
Over a dozen mod
els to select from.
, $3.45
All sizes.
Nothing Is More Important to the Children Than the Correct Fitting and Style of Their
Footwear
Specially designed to meet the needs of growing feet—shaped on natural lines—and fitted by experts who have
made a careful study of the fitting of children's shoes.
Baby Soft
Soles. All
colors
I n f a n t s’
Patent An
kle Strap.
Sizes 2 to 6
95c 4
Infants’ Can
vas Ankle
Strap. Sizes 2
to 6
85c
America’s most fam
ous Shoes. The
world’s best in Men’s
Shoes. Sold only at
lthis store.
Stacy Adams’
and Nettletons’
Perfect fitting Shoes. Por over a quarter
of a century these Shoes have led I he
world as to style, fit and
wearing qualities. They
are the best, that money
can buy.
$5.50, $6,
$6.50 & $7
The season’s
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styles.
Fractional or Combination Sizes for foot that are hard to fit.
Maker’s Editorial—Designed for the foot that is under regular meas
urements through heel and Instep, or for the trade that demands an ex
ceedingly close fitting Oxford at top and heel.
By numerous tests has proven to be a model of remarkable merit.
Girls’ Seamless Patent
Pumps
Size* 2 1-2 to <1 .. .92.-15
Size* II 1 -2 to 2, with
* I rti |is . >' I .!>.*»
Big Girls’ Patent Two Strap
Pumps
Ribbon bows, size* G* | nr
2 1-2 to 6 . • •/O
Boy Scouts
Sizes up to 2.
$1.75
Best grade.
$1.95
Boys’ and Girls’ Tennis Ox
fords
Sizes up to 2.
Hoys'—In all leathers
$2.95
Boys’-—In all leathers
$2.45
Mannish Shoes for Boys
Extra Good Wearing Quality
Boys with proud mothers should bijing them
here to see “Nifty” new low shoes. There Is no
place in town where so many styles are shown In
boys’ shoes. Sizes 1 to 5 1-2.
Boys’
In all leathers
$1.95
Boys’
In all leathers
$1.95
Big
Girls'
White
Linen
Hoots
! $1.95
Sizes 21-2
to 7
Misses* White Canvas
.95
Sizes 12to2
|«N IH IS 11
$1,75
Better boy
early, as at
thesp low
prices tbe
sizes will soon
be gone.
Big Girls’ Canvas Strap
Pumps
Light soles
T
Heavy
solct j
$2-«
&tees 3 to 7
Turn Sole White
Canvas
Sizes 8 1-2 to 11 $1.45
Larger Sizes $1.75
Child’s patent or gun
metal welt sole Pump
Slxem « to S.91.75
SIkch S 1-2 to 11.91.05
Slxrm 11 1-2 to 2..-92.15
Growing Girls’
Button Oxford
Newest style $2.95
Sizes 2 to '7.
TO OUR MAIL ORDER CUSTOMERS
You can get a pair by mail (no extra
charge) if you are too far from our tsore.
Send us the price and your size. That’s
all—nothing could be easier. We refund
the purchase price if not satisfactory.
OR OUR LOW PRICES 1904 Second Avenue—Bessemer
_■ -
Soft, Fine Kid One
Strap Slippers
Hand turned soles, i
shapes, round
and medium.
$1.25 fi

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