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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, August 22, 1913, Image 7

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f ! LIVINGSTON WINS
1 I THE ALABAMA STATE
j WITH A FINE RECORD
Barons Recoup For Past Losses
r m .-rt
TROUGH RETURNS AN !
EASY WINNER AFTER |
SUFFERING DEFEAT j
» 5 a
f J
From the Angle of the Bug
By REUBEN A. LEWIS
THE jinx, which has hovered
over tlie Baron camp from
the opening of the season,
continues to follow Birmingham.
Clyde McBride has been forced to
retire from the sunfleld with a
slight attack of malaria fever and
may be out of the game for sev
eral days. The sunfielder reported
for practice, quaky and weak and
was advised to retire to his bed.
Carroll, who has starred in the
utility role, relieved the stricken
player and exhibited his usual
cleverness. The utility youngster
has played every position except
pitch and catch and hopes to do a
little receiving before the curtain
falls.
* m * •
Bill Plough dodged the usual re
action that follows a winning^
streak. Although Boehllng, Fallc
enberg and Covaleski were followed
by a hoodoo after registering thetr
long string of victories, the elong
ated Baron pitched an excellent
battle against the Pels yesterday
afternoon—his first since his record
.was brok,eh.
Prough has a wonderful record
and unless unforeseen results
occur, he h&a won the medal
for the leading twirler. Prougft#
has captured 21 battles and has
dropped but five. Covaleski and Ca
vet, who are closely In the rear
of Prough, must take several
games while Bill can twirl ordi
narily and win out.
• * *
When Barge William Mcailvray
» delivered tliat luscious . wallop,
which won the battle for Prough,
the fans applaued vigorously and
sighed for Bill's former swatting
During the last few games Mc
ailvray has hit in fine form and
Seems to be recovering from Ills
batting slump. Mack is getting ills
hit regularly.
Another star, who is suffering
an' off year, is also recovering.
During the past few games Jud
Daley has cavorted like a young
ster and has hit like a phenom.
Mcailvray is slugging over the
.......
.260 mark, while Daley is still hov
ering around the .240 mark. Both
were conceded to be sure .300 hit
ters when the campaign opened.
• * «
Moles worth was tickled over the ex
hibition of his newest recruit—Ery.
“Ery showed up exceptionally well,"
said Manager Molesworth, “in his first
battle against the Crackers. He
seemed to have a lot of stuff and
promises to develop into a winning
pitcher. Should, he do well, we will
finish right up in first division."
The new Baron appeared €>n first
base in the capacity of eoaeher. Ery
will not participate in the present
series with the Pelicans, unless a
pitcher is forced to retire under fir#-.
'In all probability he will open the
coming series with the Gulls, which
begins Monday. Ery seems to be a
Southern league performer.
• * 0
The democracy of baseball was
evinced when the Woonsocket fans
honored their townsman—Joe Con
. nelly, outfielder of the Boston Braves.
Governor pothier, the mayor and 500
Ians recently journeyed to Boston,
presented the player with $500 and
cheered him with their most lusty
whoops.
When Connolly inhabited Woon
socket, he filled the rather obscure
capacity of milkman. Before dawn
broke, Connolly would mount a wagon,
deliver milk and then play ball in the
afternoon. It seemed somewhat ex
traordinary to witness the governor
shake hands with the milkman, the
mayor pat him upon the back and the
foremost citizens call him by his first
riame. But such is baseball.
• * •
Two former Barons are appearing
with tiie Pelicans. George Yantz re
ceived in the second game and stung
the ball viciously on several occasions.
The former Birmingham catcher still
show* the evidence of a broken leg,
but is putting up a good exhibition.
Although few recalled it, Roy Green,
who played right field, was a tryout
in 1911. When he appeared with Bir
mingham, it was in the capacity of a
moundsman. But heavy hitting con
verted Green from a pitcher to an out
fielder.
Yantz received rounds of applause j
v. hen lie entered the first game as a
pinch hitter and nearly proved instru
mental in depriving Plough of a vic
tory. He appears to be a little lighter
than he was when he played with Bir
mingham, but otherwise seems the
same. He will be first catcher as soon
as lie recovers from his injury.
....
BUT TEN REMAIN IN FIGHT
FOR THE SINGLES TITLE
JOHNSTON DEFEATED IN BRIL
LIANT GAME BY WILLIAMS.
M’LOUGHLIN AND CLOTHIER
WIN FROM OPPONENTS
Newport, R. I.. August 21.—Of the 14S
tennis players who entered the thirty
third annuul all-comers singles champion
ship tournament of the United States Na
tional Lawn Tennis association Monday,
there remain just 10 in the list tonight.
After a day of sensational contests, in
which the defeat of William M. Johnson
by R. Norris Williams was the feature,
It was conceded that the standard of play
had never reached the point of excellence
w hich marked the present tourney.
Williams required four sets in which to
win from Johnston, the scores being 6-3,
6-4, 3-6, 8-6, but the margin of victory was
far closer than the score of games would
Indicate. The Californian was forced to
now to the more finished play of ins op
ponent, hut not until he had put up a bat
tle which aroused another record gallery
in a manner seldom seen at the Casino
courts. It was a thrilling battle ot
racquets and wits and In the end tho
Philadelphian conquered because of his
experience and nonchalance under stress
of a gruelling contest.
Williams displayed Ills usual Indifference
to breaks In his game and played as
though according to a pre-arranged plan,
using a trifle more care and skill in dan
gerous pinches than ordinarily. It was
this facility that Anally gave him the
/ match. In service, volleying, hack court
and net play, he was little *f any superior
to Johnston, and it was his placement
alone that earned the victory. In nets and
outs he gave his opponent point after
point, but the skill that comes from long
play counted when It came to taking the
deciding ace at the end of a long rally.
| The summary and stroke analysis of the
i match, showing sets, games and points
won, nets. outs, placements, aces and
double faults follows:
WILLIAMS.
Set. 8. G. PT. N. O. PL. A. DF.
First . 1 6 33 9 8 10 2 1
Second .... 1 6 43 25 13 14 0 2
Third .... 0 3 23 12 11 10 0 1
Fourth .... 1 8 58 28 10 27 1 0
Totals ..3 23 156 64 42 61 3 4
JOHNSTON.
First .... 0 3 24 12 7 4 2 1,
Second .... 0 4 38 15 14 7 1 0
I Third . 1 6 32 6 6 ,9 0 1
Fourth ....0 6 55 23 6 16 0 1
Totals .. 1 19 149 56 33 36 3 3
Although the Williams-Johnston match
wus the grand court feature, the contest
| on other courts did not lack merit. As
| was expected. Champion M. E. McLough
lin defeated Robert Leroy in-straight sets
!and William Clothier likewise won from
W. L. Pate. Wallace Johnson and J. R.
Stracham also came through another
round, defeating respectively J. G. Brown,
Jr., and C. M. Bull, Jr. W. M. Wash
burn won from R. Evans, Jr., and Leon
ard Beekman eliminated F. W. Cole after
a hard five set match. The one upset of
the day was the defeat of G. P. Gardner,
Jr., by Nat Niles ht^our sets, reversing
the usual result when these players have
met heretofore.
In the interscholastic championship the
semi-finals round was reached with G.
C. Caner defeating W. L. McKim, and
J. C. Weber defeating William Blair. The
Harvard and Chicago scholastic title hold
ers meet tomorrow for the championship,
but the feature of Friday comes in the |
battle of M. E. McLoughlln and William
Clothier on the grand court. Experts
predict that the winner of this match will
next week be acclaimed the United States
champion of 1913.
FAVORITE BEATEN
! IN RACE BY COX’S
FAST LADY GRATTAN
Salem, N. H„ August 21.—Walter Cox
'made one of the best drives of the year
at the Grand Circuit meet at Rocking
ham park today and won the “Granite
State” valued at $5000 with Rady Grat
tan. Reusens, from the Geers stable,
had been counted a certain winner.
Lou McDonald outstepped the Held in
the opening heat. Tommy Horn led
to the wire in the second heat when
Lady Grattan nipped him. Rady Grat
tan led all the way in the third heat,
lteusens was running the last 20 yards,
but the Judges placed him second. In
the final heat Lady Grattan broke soon
after getting the word and lteusens
took the lead in the track stretch. In
the last furlong, however, Cox chal
lenged Geers and fairly outfaced him.
Tommy Murphy of New York, never
won a cheaper race than the pacing
division of the American Horse Breeder
futrity with Tilly Tipton. Of the $3000
tlie winner got $2100, while Homer
Baughman and Ella K. R. took $387.50
each.
Bon Ton had no trouble in winning
first money in the 2:30 trot. Early, Jr.,
the Canadian pacer, won the free-for-all
pace in which Braden Direct was fa
vorite.
V' 1 !
International League
At Rochester— R H. 15.
Baltimore . 4 10 3
Rochester . 3 8 0
Batteries: Roth, Cottrell and Egan;
Keefe, Quinn and Jaeklitsch.
At Buffalo— R- H. 15.
Jersey City . 3 0 2
Buffalo . 8 0 1
Batteries: Kooney, Davis and Wells;
Fullenweider and Lalong.
At Toronto— R. H. E.
Providence . 2 4 1
Toronto . 3 3 0
Batteries: Zamloch and Onslow; Max
well and Graham. »
At Montreal—Montreal-Newark, not
scheduled.
FEDERAL LEAGUE
At Pittsburg: Pittsburg 1, Cleve
land 4.
At Chicago: Chicago 2. Indainapolls 4.
At St. Louis: St. Louis 4, Kansas
City3-__
TEXAS LEAGUE
At Galveston: Galveston 6, * San An
tonio 4.
At Houston: Houston 4. Beaumont 6.
At Waco: Waco 4, Austin 1.
At Ft. Worth: Ft. Worth 2, Dallas 5.
4 ATHLETIC CRIPPLES RETURN 4
4 HOME FOR llKS'Y 4
4 Philadelphia. August 21.—Three 4
4 injured players of the Athletics ar- 4
4 rived from the west today to get 4
4 into condition for the final dash of 4
4 the American league dashers for 4
4 the championship pennant. The 4
4 players are: Catcher Lapp, who has 4
4 a broken finger; Outfielder Strunk, 4
4 wrenched leg, and Utility Infielder 4
4 Orr, who has a badly swollen hand. 4
4 Orr has been playing at the short- 4
4 stop position In place of Barry, 4
4 who wrenched his shoulder 10 days 4
4 ago. Barry left here during the 4
4 night to join the team. 4
SOUTHERN RAILWAY
f Til ROUGH ATLANTA
• ONE HOUR AND FORTY
MINUTES QUICKER TIME
TO NEW YORK. LVS. D»3© A. M. |
BARONS DOWN THE PELS TWICE
BY FIRST INNING RALLIES
PROUGH WINS FIRST HANDILY,
WHILE GREGORY BLANKS PELS
IN SECOND—BARONS OUTHIT
IN BOTH
SOUTHERN LEAGUE STANDING
Played. Won. Dost. Pet.
Mobile . 122 73 49 .59s
Montgomery . 117 65 S»2 .556
Atlanta . 121 6tf 55 .845
Birmingham . 121 65 59 .524
Chattanooga . 118 6<» 58 .508
Memphis . 120 59 61 .492
Nashville . 121 51 70 ,421
New Orleans ... 112 39 73 .>48
Results Yesterday ✓
Birmingham 3-3, New Orleans 1-0.
Mobile 4, NashviUe 3.
Atlanta 8-8. Montgomery 3-6.
Memphis-Chattanooga, rain.
Games Today
New Orleans at Birmingham.
Mobile at Nashville.
Memphis at Chattanooga.
Montgomery at Atlanta.
Scurrilous first inning assaults netted
Birmingham three tallies in each com
bat and these tallies enabled Birming
ham to capture both battles, 3 to 1 and
3 to 0. While the Barons gained the en
tire output in the first round, New Or
leans was helpless before Prough and
Gregory in the pinches. Despite the
double victory, Birmingham gained
fewer hits than the Pels in each con
flict.
Opposed by Walker. Bill Prough won
the first battle handily though the Peli
cans threatened to surmount the lead
on two occasions. The Barons batted
timely in both of the opening innings,
but thereafter were downed by the Bird
fiingers. Gregory twirled for the Bar
ons in the second conflict and proved
more consistent than Recruit Steven
son.
Both battles were fought hard and
featured by fast fielding. Ellam scintil
lated in the first with brilliant plays,
while Gardner Kyle effec^d several
difficult captures in the latter fracas.
The Baron catchers watched the bases
with a keen eye and picked Pelicans
from off the sacks at critical stages.
.r linger Walker opened the first game i
with oodles of speed, but terrific drives I
by Marcan and McGilvray produced ■
three tallies and Bill Prough continued
his winning streak. Marcan tripled ,
down the right field line as an opener.
Messenger hit a slow bounder to Clancy
but before the shortstop could recover
after a fumble Bob reached first base.
Expecting an out, Marcan hugged third
base, but scored when McDonlad
forced Messenger at second with a
grounder to McDowell.
McGilvray Wins First
Knisely lined out to Green, but May
er singled over second base and Me- 1
Donald was checked at second. With
a mighty swing, Bill McGilvray lined
a sizzling drive over second base for
three bases and cleared the bases.
El lam failed to fathom Walker’s de
livery and McGilvray was left on third.
Walker checked the Barons to two
more safeties during the remainder of
the abbreviated battle, while Prough
weakened in the sixth and seventh. Be
fore the lustful Birds /grew dangerous,
Prough extended himself in safety.
In the sixth, the New Orleans con
tingent grew dangerous as McKillen
singled to center. By a freak play,
Kyle was robbed of a hit. With Mc
Killen on first, Kyle hit a low line |
drive to center, but it seemed as if
Knisely would capture it. McKillen
hovered near first base, while Knisely
trapped the drive and forced him at
second. Kyle made up for this de
ficiency by stealing second, and scored j
when Kraft singled after McDowell’s I
out.
In the seventh, the Pelicans waxed |
dangerous. Hendryx walked but did
not advance on following outs by
Clancy and Green. Adams singled to
left and George Yantz was substituted!
to hit for Walker. The erstwhile Baron !
delivered a line drive to Knisely and i
ended the battle.
Gregory Cops Second
Recruits Gregory and Slevengon
waged a pretty battle in the second,
but the Baron youngster was invincible i
in the pinches and scored his first i
shutout. While the Pelicans hit safely i
in every round, .save the fourth, Frank !
twirled in line style and triumphed.
Again the result of the first inning
decided the battle. The eventful rally
opened when Marcan singled sharply to
center field. Messenger was walked by
the speedy Stevenson, while McDonald’s
perfect sacrifice advanced both a \ase.
Knisely slashed a sizzling driva toward
the Pelican twirler, but the scorcher
ricochetted off the dazzled ilinger’s
shins, caromed past McDowell and
scored both Marcan and Messenger.
Knisely purloined second, while MeGllv
ray hoisted to McKillen. Ellam was
struck by an erring slant.
Carroll grounded to Clancy, who made
an easy recovery, but hesitated as to what
base he should peg. Afteh the other run
ners had reached their'destination, Clancy
threw low to first and Knisely^tallied.
Tn the third, Stevenson singled and
reached second, when Ellam bobbled, at
tempting to retain Marcan’s toss of Me
Killen’s fielder’s choice. Kyle took ad
vantage of McGIlvray’s faulty fielding and
readied first safely, filling the bases. With
Yantz retired, tlie Pels looked dangerous,
but. Gregory extended himself, striking
out McDowell and Kraft in order.
The seventh developed a dark outlook j
when,* with one out, Stevenson walked j
and reached second on McKillen’s single. ;
However, Clifton nipped the pitcher off j
second base on a pitch-out and the rally I
subsided.
Chubby Kyle, cavorting in center for
New Orleans, enacted the hold-up role,
when he captured seeming extra base
drives of McDonald and Knisely in the
second and third. McDonald starred at
third for the Barons in accepting several
hard hit drives.
The Official Score
FIRST GAME.
Birmingham— AB. R. IT. O. A. E.
Marcan, 2b. 3 1 1 3 1 0
Messenger, rf. 3 0 1 0 0 0
McDonald, 3b. .... 3 1 0 1 2 0
Knisely, cf. 3 0 0 1 1 0
Mayer, c. .. 3 1 1 7 2 0
McOllvray, lb .... 1 0 1 « 0 0
Ellam, sh.. 2 0 0 3 2 0
Carroll, If. 2 0 1 1 o o
Prough, p. 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals .20 3 5 21 8 0
New Orleans— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
McKillen. If. 3 0 1 1 1 0
Kyle, cf. 3 1 0 0 0 (•
McDowell, 2b. 3 0 1 1 2 0
Kraft, lb. 2 0 1 7 0 0
Hendryx. 3b. 2 o 1 0 1 0
Clancy, ss. 3 0 0 4 1 1
[ CRANDALL JOINS GIANTS
»__,-tG im.
^ ^Vjro'-r-# ™ "*"' * '
CI5ANTDALL «
“Old Doc” Crandall will again be seen In a Giants' uniform. Miller Huggins,
leader of the Cardinals, traded Otis Crandall back to the New York club for
a cash consideration and a player, who will be handed over to the St. Louis
club later In the season, perhaps after the Giants win the pennant. The amount
paid for the return of Crandall and the name of the player who figures in the
deal were not revealed.
Green, rf. 3 0 0 10 0
Acf&ms, c. 3 0 2 3 2 n
Walker, p. 2 0 0 1 2 0
•Yantz . 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals . 25 1 6 18 0 1
•Batted for Walker.
Score by innings:
Birmingham .300 000 •—3
New Orleans .000 001 0—1
SUMMARY.
Two Base Hit—Adams.
Three Base Hits—Marcan, McGilvfay.
Sacrifice Hit—Prough.
Stolen Bases—Messenger, Kyle.
Double Play—MeKillen to Clancy.
Base on Balls—Prough 2, Walker 2.
Strnck Out—Prough 6, Walker 3.
Time of (lame—1:25.
Umpires—Pfenninger and Hart.
SECOND GAME.
Birmingham— AB. R. IT. O. A. E.
Marcan, 2b. 3 1 1 1 3 O'
Messenger, rf. 2 1 0 0 0 0
McDonald, 3b.4 2 0 0 0 3 0
Knisely, cf. . 3 1110 0
McGUvray, lb. 3 0 1 10 1 0
Ellam, ss. 2 0 1 4 3 1
Carroll, If. 3 0 0 1 0 0
Clifton, c. 2 0 0 3 4 0
Gregory, p. 2 0 0 1 1 0
Totals . 22 3 4 21 15 1
New Orleans— AB. R. IT. O. A. E.
MeKillen, If. 4 0 1 2 0 0
Kyle, cf. 3 0 2 3 0 0
McDowell, 2b. 2 0 0 2 1 0
Kraft, lb. 3 0 '0 7 0 0
Hendrix, 3b. 3 0 1 1 2 0
Clancy, ss. 2 0 1 2 3 1
Green, rf. 3 0 0 0 0 0
Yantz, c. 3 0 0 1 1 0
Stevenson, p. 2 0 2 p 0 0
Totals . 25 0 7 18 7 1
Score by innings:
Birmingham . 300 000 •—3
New Orleans . 000 000 0—0
SUMMARY. ^
Two Base Hit—Kyle.
Three Base Hit—Ellam.
Sacrifice Hit—McDonald.
Stolen Bases—Knisely, McGUvray, Car
rell 2.
Base on Balls—Gregory 3, Stevenson 2.
Hit by Pitched Balls—Gregory (Kyle),
Etevenson (Ellam).
Struck Out—Gregory 3, Stevenson 1.
Passed Balls—Clifton.
Time of Game—1:35.
Umpires—Hart and Pfeninger.
WILLIAMS BESTED
BY BILLY CAMPBELL
Nashville, August 21.—Mobile defeated
Nashville tills afternoon by a score of
4 to 3. Campbell had Blightly tile better
of Williams, although the locals staged
a batting rally in the seventh which
came wlthl none rnu of tying the score.
Spratt’s hitting and the fielding of Starr
and Daley featured. Score: »
Mobile— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Stock, ss. 4 0 1 2 4 0
Starr, 2b. 4 10 0 4 0
O’Dell, 3b. 4 0 0 1 3 0
Paulet, lb. 4 1 2 13 0 0
Robertson, cf. 4 0 110 0
Schmidt, c. 4 0 0 1 2 0
Clark, if. 3 1 1 3 0 0
Miller, rf. 2 0 0 0 0 0
Campbell, p. 3 0 2 0 2 0
Totals . 32 4 T 27 16 0
Nashville— AB. R. H. O. A. E
Daley, If. 3 0 1 2 0 0
Callahan, cf. 4 0 0 6 0 1
Spratt. 3b. 4 13 13 0
Gibson, 5. 4 0 0 5 1 0
Young, rf. 4 3 2 2 0 0
Perry. 2b.....4 1 1 2 3 0
Hofman, lb..... 4 0 1 8 0 0
IJndsay, ss. 3 0 o 0 3 0
Williams, p..3 0 0 1 2 .0
Totals . 33 3 8 27 12 1
Score by Innings:
Mobile . 001 003 000—4
Nashville . 000 000 300—3
Summary: Stolen base, Stock. Two
base hits, Campbell, Robertson. Spratt.
Double plays, Stock to Starr; Williams
to Hofman. Passed ball. Gibson. Bases
on balls, Campbell 1, William 2. Struck
out, Williams. Time, 1:28. Empires Breit
enstein and Plfleld.
Appalachian League
At Knoxville: Knoxville 0, Morris
town 3.
At Johnson City: Johnson City 4,
Home 3.
At Bristol: Bristol 3, Mifldlesboro 0.
South Atlantic League
At Albany: Albany 2, Jacksonville 1.
At Savannah: Satuinnah 3, Charles
ton 1.
At Macon: Macon 4, Columbus 12.
CRACKERS DIVIDE
TWO WITH THE BILLS
Atlanta, August 21.—Atlanta and Mont
gomery divided the double header to
day, the locals winning the first ,8 to 3 and
the visitors the second 6 to 3. Bisland *
hitting featured, the local shortstop get
tinx six eonsecutives hit|. The second
game was called at the end of the sixth
on account of darkness. Scores:
FIRST GAME.
Montgomery— AB. K; H. O. A. 13
McDowell, cf. 5 0 4 3 0 0
Wares, 2b. 5 1 0 6 2 C
Elwert, 3b. 5 1 0 5 2 0
Sloan, rf.-lf. 3 0 0 1 0 0
Jantzen, lf.-rf. 3 0 1 1 0 2
Knaupp, ss. 4 0 0 4 2 0
Snedecor, lb. 4 0 0 5 1 0
Gribbens, c. 3 1 1 4 3 0
C. Brown, p. 2 0 0 0 0 0
Case, p. 2 0 0 0 0 0
Totals . 34 3 7 24 10 2
i
Atlanta- AB. R. IL O. A. E.
Agler, lb.% 5 0 1 9 1 0
Long. If.’ . 3 12 10 0
Welchonee, cf. ... 4 0 o 5 0 0
Smith, 2b. 4 2 2 5 11
Bisland, ss. ...I... 4 2 4 2 0 0
Holland, 3b. 3 2 2 1 2 1
Calvo, rf. 0 0 0 1 0*0
Chapman, c. . 4 0 2 1 1 0
Price, p. 3 11110
Manush, rf... 2 0 0 1 0 1
Totals . 32 8 14 27 12 3
Score by Innings:
Montgomery . 001 020 000—3
Atlanta . 001 320 02*—8
Summary: Two base bits, Gribbens,
Bisland, Long. Three base hits, Smith,
Elwert, Long. Double plays, Bisland to
Agler to Holland; Knaupp to Wares to
Snedecor. I innings pitched, C. Brown 3
(none otu in fourth) with 5 hits and 2
runs. Struck out, C. Brown 1, Case 2,
Price 1. Base on balls, Brown 3, Price 3.
Sacrifice hit, Manush. Stolen,bases, Jant
zen. Smith. Passed ball, Gribbens. Time,
2 hours. Umpires, Stockdale and Rud
derhani.
SECOND GAME.
Montgomery— AB. R. II. O. A. B).
McDowell, cf. .3 0 1 1 1 0
Wares, 2b. .. 3 0 0 1 2 0
Elwert, 3b.2 1 0 1 3 0
Sloan, If. 3 1 2 0 0 0
Jantzen, rf.3 1 1 2 0 0
aupp,' ss.- i i 1 o*o
Snedecor, lb.3 1 2 7 1 0
Gribbens, c.3 1 1 4 1 0
Manning, p. 3 0 2 1 5 0
Totals .....25 ft 10 18 13 0
Atlanta- AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Agler, lb.3 0 O' 6 1 0
Long, If.1 1 0 2 9 2
Welchonee, cf. 3 1 2 3 0 0
Smith, 2b. ...'. 2 1 2 1 1 0
Bisland, ss. 3 0 2 3 0 0
Holland, 3b. 3 0 0 0 3 0
Manush, rf. 2 0 0 1 0 1
Dunn, ....... 2 0 0 2 1 0
Thompson, p.1 0 0 0 1 0
•Chapman .1 0 1 0 0 0
Totals .20 3 7 18 7 3
♦Hit. for Thompson in sixth.
Score by innings:
Montgomery .011 013—ft
Atlanta . 201 000—3
Summary: Two base hits, Knaupp,
Manning. Double plays, McDowell, Man
ning, Manning, Elwert to Knaupp. Struck
out, Manning 3, Thompson 1. Base on
balls, Manning 4, Thompson 1. Sacrifice
hits, Thompson, Holland, Manush, Mc
Dowell, Knaupp. Stolen bases. Wares,
Elwert, Welchonee. Wild pitch, Man
ning. Time 1 Umpires, Rudderham
and Stockdale.
American Association
At Toledo: Toledo-Columbus; rain.
At Louisville: Louisville 4, Indian
apolis 5 (10 innings).
At Kansas City: Kansas City 6, St.
Paul 5.
At Milwaukee: Milwaukee 2, Minne
apolis 3.
♦ *
4 MEMPHIS CAST-OFF SOU) 4
4 New Haven, Conn., August 21. 4
4 Pitcher Booth Hopper of the New 4
4 Haven Eastern Baseball association 4
4 team was sold to the St. Louis Na- 4
4 tionals today. He will report in 4
4 two \yeeks. Hopper has pitched 4
4 two no-hit games this season. 4
| Hopper gained a tryout with 4
4 Memphis in 1912, but was sold to 4
4 New Haven. 4

JOHN LIVINGSTON V/INS
THE STATE CHAMPIONSHIP
Shooters in Delayed Finish Fail to Equal Previous Mark.
Freeman Heads Professionals in Race for High
Gun—Leach Falters
»
The Alabama state shooting tournament
was concluded yesterday morning when
John R. Livingston was awarded the Ala
bama state championship over a field of
excellent marksmen. The wonderful score
registered by Livingston Wednesday was
not (‘quailed by any shooter in the shoot
off yesterday morning. H. D. Freeman, a
prcfesisonal. captured the coveted rank
of high shooter in the tournament by run
ning straight yesterday.
\V. E. Leach, who fired with wonderful
: accuracy in the Alabama handicap, was
unable to continue his n fast pace ana
| yielded to Livingston. In the state ohom
I pionship tourney, Leach broke but 95 out
! of igo. Several entrants shattered 96 tar
I gets yesterday in the UK) shots.
I E. R. Holt of Montgomery made a per
fect score In the shoot-off yesterday
morning, while his brother Elbert was
high In the handicap.
Below are the scores of those who com
peted in the state championship meet,
shooting 100 targets:
¥E. R. Holt . 100
*H. D. Freeman . 98
*\V. J. Fletcher . 98
J. R. Livingston . 97
•T. H. Fox . 9«
E. M. Cornwell . 96
J. A. Blunt . 26
ason . 96
W. H. Jones . 96
Key ... i*»
Charles Dunlap ...... ffl
0. L. Garl .
W. A. Leach .
J. O. Slrmon ... 9a %
G. Hillman .. ‘.;W
C. L. Gunn . 96
Carl Lay .„„ 94 l
fechraeder . 93
H. C. Rydlng . 93
A. Meaders .4. 01
C. D. Hunt, Jr. 92
J. S. Paden . Jl
P. M. Long . in.
Guy McMurdo . .'>1 Jj
B. S. Williams . !>0
W. W. Cocke . 90 j
C. E. Sands . 90 M
C. J. Broyles . 90 j
N. Tucker . 9o ||
J. P. Austin . 90.
J. R. Morris .,. 90
P. B. Plummer . S.M1
H. B. Blanks . m
« Hunter .
John Lambeth . Si
J. F. Joerg . S7
Mrs. O. L. Garl . SO |
F. R. Alexander . tiS.
James Hillman . S3 1
1. Andrews . &t ,
R. H. Baugh . SO §
♦Not eligible to win trophy.
FOREIGN ATHLETES WILL
ENTER U. S. EXPOSITION
1 Berlin, August $1.-Wam«s E. Sul
livan, secretary of the Amateur Ath
letic union, today obtained the prom
ise that a team of German athletes
would be sent to- San Francisco to
compete at the Panama-Pacific ex
position in 1916.
In return for this courtesy, it is con
sidered likely that the American team
which is to compete in the Greek Olym
pic games at Athens, in the spring of
1914, will make a trip to Berlin and
participate In the athletic meet there.
Representatives of France, Den
mark, Norway, Sweden and Finland
gave assurances to Mr. Sullivan during
the afternoon that their countries
j would be represented at the exposition
by teams of athletes. Hungary also
jWill probably send a team.
Berlin, Au^ist 21—The delegates also
showed a desire to exercise an inlluence
over future Olympic games by the ap
pointment of a "committee on Olym
pic games” under the chairmanship of
S. G. Moss.
The American delegates are President
Gustavus T. Kirby and Secretary .lames
E. Sullivan of the Amateur Athletic
union: Colonel Robert M. Thompson and
(Joseph B. McCabe. In the new federa-*
| tlon Mr. Hullivan^ls chairman of the
committee on rules and Mr. Kirby Is
a member of,committee on Jho deflint
tion of an amateur, which is under the
chairmanship of Franz Roiyhel of
France.
The federation will meet biennial be
ginning with a congress to be held at
Paris in 1914. It will he governed in
the Interim by a council composed of
seven members elected for four years.
The deliberations thus far have been
harmonious. Tidklish questions such
as penalties for false starts, the elimi
nation of walking events and umbidex*
terious shot putting as well us the defi
nition of tlifi amateur status have not
yet been reported.
The proceedings are being conducted
principally in English, the general In
ternational athletic language, and then
translated Into (Jerman for the benefit
of the few delegates who do understand
the English language.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
STANDING
Played. Won. Lost. Pet.
New York . 113 78 35 .#90
Philadelphia ..... 110 #5 43 .60 7
Chicago . 11# #3 54 .634
Pittsburg . 113 HO 63 .63 L
Brooklyn . 110 60 HO .4651
Boston . Ill 47 64 .4501
Cincinnati . 119 47 72 .396
St. Lon is. 11# 431 73 .371
Pittsburg Hits Hard
Philadelphia, August 21.—In a hal'd
hitting game here today Pittsburg de
feated Philadelphia by 9 to 6. Pitts
burg made 14 hits for a Vital of 28
bases. Every one of the visitors, ex
cept O'Toole got one or more safeties.
The bogie team never got close enough
to Pittsburg's score to be dangerous.
Score:
Pittsburg— AB. It. H. O. A. E.
Byrne, 3b. 6 2 2 ') 0 0
Carey, If. 4 2 2 3. 0 0
Vlox, 2b. 4 2 2 1 3 0
Wagner, ss. .. 5 X l\ 5 3 9
Miller, lb. 4 1 2 X 0 0
WllRon, rf. 4 0 2 2 0 0
Mitchell, cf. ... G 1 1 0 n 1
Simon, c. 4 « X 4 l o
O’Toole, p. 4 0 0 0 1 0
Totals . 39 ^ 14 27 8 1
Philadelphia— AB. IX. 11. O. A. E.
Beeker, If. 4 X 2 X 0 0
Knabe. 2b. G X 1 2*1 0
lxibert, 3b. 2 0 0 0 1 0
Dolan. 3b. 2 X 1 1 0 1
Magee, cf. G 1 2 3 (1 0
Crnvath, rf. G 0 1 2 0 0
Tvuderus, lb. ,. 4 1 2 7. 0 1
Doolan, kb. ... 2 0 0 2 1 1
Reed, ss. ■.. 2 X 1 X 2 9
Kllllfer, c. 2 0 1 7 2 0
Howley, c. 1 0 X 1 2 0
Alexander, p. , 1 0 0 0 1 0
Rlxley, p. II II 0 0 0 0
Marshall, p. ... 2 0 1 0 2 0
•Devore ,..,,,.,1 0 0 0 I) 0
Totals . 39 fi 13 27 13 s!
•Batted for Alexander In fourth.
Score by Innings:
Pittsburg.203 121 000—9
Philadelphia .002 000 022—6
Summary: Two-huse hits, AVagner,
Mitchell, Byrne, Miller, Becker 2. Ma
gee. Three-base lilts, Carey, Wilson.
Home runs, Byrne, Miller. Hits, Al
exander 6, In 4 Innings; Rlxey 3, In 1
inning; Marshall G, in 4 Innings. Sacri
fice hit, Carey. Stolen bases, Carey 2,
Vlox, Dolan. Crsvath. Base on halls,
O’Toole 3, Alexander !. Hit by pitcher.
Alexander (Wilson). Struck out,
O’Toole 7, Alexander 8, Rlxey . Time
2:00. Umpires, Brennan and Eason.
Mathewson Downs Cubs
New York, August 21—The New Yorks
had little trouble In winning from Chi
cago today 8 to 2. Mathewson kept the
hits well scattered, while the champions
knocked Stack out of the box In the
third and also hit. Moore hard. The hit
ting of Evers, Burns and Snodgrass fea
tured. Score:
Chicago- AB. B. H. O. A. E
I<each, cf. 4 1 1 3 0 0
Evers, 2b. 4 1 3 3 2 0
Schulte, rf . 3 0 0 1 0 1,
Zimmerman, 3b. ..4 0 2 1 2
Haler, lb. 4 0 0 0 0 0
Williams, If. 4 0 0 0 0^ 0
Ccirldon, ss. 3 0 2 1 4 0
Archer, c. 3 0 0 6 1 0
Stack, p. 1 0 0 0 0 01
Moore, p. 2 0 O' 0 2 0
Totals . 32 2 8 24 11 1 1
New York— AB. H. H\ O. X E.
Burns, If. r> 1 3 2 0 0
Shafer, 3b. 5 0 1 1 1 0
Fletcher, ss. 4 2 1 0 5 0
Doyle. 2b. 2 0 1 4 2 0
Merkle, 3b. 5 0 o ll 0 i
Murray, rf. 4 0 1 4 0 0
Snodgrass, ct. 2 3 2 4 0 0
McLeftn, c. 10 1110
•Cooper . 0 1 0 o 0 tl
A. Wilson, c. 3 1 1 0 6 0
Mathewson, p. 3 0 1 0 5 0
Totals . 34 8 12 27 15 0
•Ran for McLean in third.
Score by innings:
Chicago .001 010 000—2
New York .004 201 01*—8
Summary: Two base hits, Doyle, Burns.
Tltfee base lilts, Snodgrass, Fletcher.
Hume run, IOvers. Sacrifice Hide, Schulte,
Doyle. Stolen bases, Evers. Snodgrass,
Doyle. Double play, Zimmerman. Evers
to Saler. Base on balls, Stack 2. Moore 4.
Struck out, Moore 2. Hits, Stack 4 III
2 2-3 Innings, Moore S In 5 1-3 Innings.
Time, 1:45. Umpires, Bigler and Byron.
Reds Win in Ninth
Brooklyn. August 21.—Brooklyn and Cin
cinnati battb^L on even terms up to the
ninth today, when Bescher was lilt by a
pitched ball, Bates sacrificed and Egan
and Hoblltsel singled, which, with Wlck
letid's out, sent two runs across, giving
the victory to Cincinnati, 6 to 4. Hagan
was hit rreely. Score:
Cincinnati— AB. H. H. O. A. E.
Bescher, If. 4 3 3 2 0 0
Bates, rf. 4 112 0 0
Egan, 2h. 5 1 :l l 2 ' u
Wick land, cf. 5 o n ti o o
Hoblitzcl, lb. 4 0 3 9 0 „ ’
Tinker, ss. 2 t t 3 4 0
Dodge, 3b. 3 0 0 3 1 0
Clark, c. 2 0 0300
Ames, p. 4 0 0 0 2 0
Totals . 33 C 11 27 9 0
Brooklyn— AB. It. H. O. A. E.
Moran, rf. 4 10 2 10
Cutshaw, 12b. 4 0 1 2 2 0
Stengel, cf. 4 0 1 A 0 0
Wheat, If, . 4 0 1 1 1 0
Daubert, lb. 4 119 0 0
Smith, 3b. 2 1 1 (I A 0
It. Fisher, ss. 4 1 2 5 2 I
Miller, c. 2 0 0 3 3 0
*W. Fisher . 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ragon, p. 3 0 1 0 2 11
“Collins . 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals . 33 4 ft 27 16 1
•Batted (or Miller In ninth.
“Batted for Ragon in ninth.
Score by innings:
Cincinnati . 011 020 002 -6
Brooklyn . 002 101 000 -4
Summary: Three base lilt, Tinker. Sac
rllire fly, Dodge. Bacriflce hits. Bates,
Tinker, Miller. Stolen bases, Bescher,
Moran. Cutshaw, Smith. Double play,
Moran to Miller. Bases on balls, Ames 2,
Ragon 3. Struck out. Ames 3. Ragon 2.
Hit by pitcher, Ragon (Bescher). Wild
pitch, Ames 1. Umpires, Klein and Orth.
Time, 1:39.
Harmon Loses by Walk
Boston, August 21.—With the score tied,
two out and three men on the bases lit
the last half of the ninth inning, Harmon
gave Connelly a base on balls and forced
Whaling across the plate with the run
which gave Boston tlie victory over St.
Louis today, 7 to 6.
The visitors hit Hess hard and Boston
drove Griner from the box In the sixth,
©core:
St. Louis— AR. R. H. O. A. E.
Oleary, ss. 5 o 2 3 1 9
Oakes, ef. 5 0 110 0
Magee, If. 4 1 10 10
Mowrey, 3b. 2 3 1 S 2 O
Konetchy, lb. 4 2 3 8 2 0
Wbitted. 2b. 3 o 2 2 4 1
Gathers, rf. 2 0 o l 0 1
Evans, rf. 1 0 0 0 0 0
Hildebrand, c. 3 0 0 4 1 0
V/ingo, c. 1 0 0 4 2 0
Griner, p. 3 o o 0 2 1
Harmon, p. 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals . 31 6 10 *26 15 3
•Two out when winning run was scored.
Boston— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Maranvllle. ss. 5 114 3 0
(Continued on Lint Page!
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