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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, August 31, 1913, SPORTING SECTION, Image 14

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; OMAR HARDGROYE
! AND FRANK GREGORY
I blank the dobbers
###•#••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••
Barons Climb Into Third Position
ANDERSON WINS THE j
ELGIN ROAD RACE IN f
FRONT OF MULFORI) I
BARONS BLANK
BILLIKENS ME
AND RH THIRD
Hardgrove Wins the First
Closely and Saves Greg
ory in Second
CASE DID NOT YIELD
A CLEAN SAFE HIT
Messenger’s Daring Run Scores Only
Run in First—His Wallop Wins
Second—Montgomery Lacks
Timely Wallop
SOUTHERN LEAGUE STANDING
Played. Won. Lorn. Pet.
Mobile . 13t SO 61 .611
Atlanta .. 130 7 4 66 . 660
Birmingham .133 70 63 . 626
Montgomery . 127 6*1 61 .630
< hattanooga . 127 65 62 . 612
Memphis . 128 62 6*1 .484
Nashville . 130 66 74 . 431
New Orleans . 123 42 81 .341
Results Yesterday
Birmingham 1-2, Montgomery 0-0.
New Orleans 7-3. Atlanta 6-4.
Chaitanooga 6, Mobile 2.
Nashville 6, Memphis 3.
Games Today
Memphis at Nashville.
By REUBEN' A LEWIS.
Administering a double drugging to the
Billikens, the Barons supplanted the
vanquished in third place in the gruelling
finish of the Southern race. Crafty Omar
Hardgrove blanked the Billikens in the
first and came to the rescue of Recruit
Gregory and preserved the second battle
despite the perilous conditions. The Bil
likens failed to scoro in either battle,
losing the first 1 to 0 and the second
2 to 0.
While the Baron moundsmen were twir
ling in wonderful form, the Mongtomery
flingers performed in sensational style.
The venerable "Chuck” Case was beaten
in the first game, despite the 'fact that he
did not yield a single clean hit. Mes
senger’s daring base running proved the
downfall of the antiquated twirler.
In the closing setto, Young Frank.
Gregory twirled masterfully until the
closing round of the curtailed conflict.
Then he grew wild and was relieved by
Hardgrove. The veteran outwitted the
Billikens and saved the battle. Collegian
Eddie Manning twirled in winning form,
but the Billikens lacked the mortal blow
on the offense, and fell before the spurt
ing Barons.
Speedy Robert Messenger figured large
ly in the taking of both clashes. A won
derful fall-away slide after a remarkable
sprint won the opening clash, while his
timely double scored tooth tallies in the
second game.
• • »
Confining the Birmingham slugging to
two scratch hits, the venerable Case
seemed a certain winner. However. Omar
Hardgrovo proved just as consistent, lor
the Bllllkens garnered just three safeties
(luring the seven sessions. Every safe
slam occurred without a man on the
sacks, and did not endanger the battle.
The entire damage was registered in the
opening round, when Messenger tallied
the lone score.
Marcan drew a walk off Case, but Mes
senger grounded to Wares and forced
"Lll" at second. Speedy Robert put on
full speed and made up for his batting
deficiency by annexing second base on
Collegian Rodgers. Messenger gained a
line lead off second and was attempting
to steal third. On the hit and run, Mc
Donald walloped a terrific grounder to
Wares. The second saeker was hand
cuffed by the momentum of the slash
and failed to hold it. Messenger darted
to third and sped homeward. Wares
pegged rather erratically to Rodgers but
it seemed that Messenger would be nipped
at the plate.
But Bob dived around the youngster,
extended his foot toward the plate and
slid over the rubber. After tills event
ful round, the Barons were downed in
order, except in the fourth, when Mc
Bride hit a fast drive to Knaupp, who
could not hold it.
Wares reached third m the first on
s lilt, a steal and Walker's grounder, but
failed to score. Jn the third Knaupp sin
gled and stole second, but the three fol
lowing batsmen failed and he remained
at the keystone. In tlie sixth, Elwert
gained third when he beat out an in
field rap. stole second and went to third
on a wild heave. Walker failed to score
him.
Messenger stole hut one base in tlie
first, while McDonald McBride, Knaupp
and Wares also purloined 'a sack.
The Barons opened the second engage
ment with Gregory opposing Kd Man
ning. Tlie young Baronial slabsman
pitched excellently after the first two
rounds, but weakened in the seventh.
Manning pitched consistently throughout.
Despite Manager Dobbs' effort to shake
the jinx by switching his line-up, the
llillikens lost.
The entire output of scores occurred in
the fifth round, after Montgomery and
" Birmingham had threatened often in the
opening sessions. Fast double plays killed
Montgomery's liope in the first two
rounds, while Gregory strengthened and
retired the Bills In tlie third and fourth
by effective pitching. The Barons threat
ened also but could not hit the youth
ful Montgomery flinger at the critical mo
ment.
But In the fifth, after Kllam had been
fanned, Clifton lilt a slow roller in
front of tlie plate and outspeeded Dll'
rap to first. Gregory forced ills receiver
at second on a grounder to Knaupp, |
but Marcan singled sharply to right |
field. Messenger drove a low fly in til
groove between center and left field
biv it seemed as though Walker would
capture the rap. Extending his glove
hand Walker just touched tlie drive and
Gregory and Marcan registered. .Mes
senger was held at second base, but
McDonald retired the side with a fly.
Gregory grew more effective during !
BASE
1 ■ ■ ——
A BIRMINGHAM |
MONTGOMERY
L2 Games Mondaj7 S
10 A. M. and 3:30 P. M. K
All Grandstand a n d H
Bleacher Tickets for H
L games on sale at Tyson's ■
Cigar Store, 4th avenue H
and 20th street. ■
ft
PEPPERY JOHNNY DOBBS WILL LEAVE SOUTHERN IN 1914
tlie fifth and sixth, but seemed spent
in the seventh. Elwert, after fouling
several strikes, was passed to first
base. Knaupp singled to McBride, send
ing Elwert to second. It seemed as ff
Gregory was doomed to donate the
battle for Manning was given three
consecutive balls.
Hardgrove, who had been kept in
waiting for such a rally, entered the
box and heaved the fourth ball to
Manning and filled the bases. Gribbens
was baffled when he received a decep
tive slant on the third strike and was
retired on three swings. Snedecor was
given two balls and expected the next
offering to split the platter. But Hard
grovef made the youngster go after a
low ball with a subsequent pop up to
McGilvray. Wares ended the agony by
hoisting a pop foul to Clifton.
GIRST GAME.
Birmingham— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Marcan, 2b. 2 0 0 0 3 0
Messenger, rf. .. 3 1 U 3 0 0
McDonald. 3b. .. 3 0 1 1 o o
Knisely, cf. 2 0 0 2 0 0
McBride, If. 2 0 1 I 0 0
McGilvray, lb. .. 2 0 0 1) 0 o
Ellam, ss. 2 0 0 0 3 0
Clifton, c.2 0 o f> o o
Hardgrove, p. . . . 2 0 0 0 1 0
Totals . 20 1 2 21 7 0
Montgomery— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
McDonald, rf.-lf.. 3 0 0 1 0 0
Wares, 2b. 3 0 1 0 3 0
Elwert. 3b.2 0 1 0 1 0
Walker, cf. 3 0 0 o 0 0
Jantzcn, If.1 0 0 0 0 0
Sloan, rf. 2 0 0 1 0 0
Knaupp, ss. 2 0 1 2 5 0
Snedecor, lb. ... 3 0 0 11 0 0
Rogers, c. 2 0 0 3 0 0
Case, . 2 0 0 0 2 0
•Manning. 1 0 1 0 ft 0
••Gribben . 1 0 #0 0 0 0
Totals . 25 0 4 IS 11 a
•Batted for Rogers in seventh.
••Batted for Case in seventh.
(Seven innings by agreement.)
Score by innings:
Birmingham . 100 000 *—1
Montgomery. 000 000 0—0
SUMMARY.
Stolen Bases—Messenger, McDonald,
McBride, Wares, Elwert. Knaupp.
Bases on Balls—Hardgrove 2. Case l.
Struck Out—Hardgrove 5, Case 2.
Wild Pitch—Hardgrove.
Time of Game—1:22.
Umpires—Hart and Breitenst din.
SECOND GAME.
Birmingham— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Marcan, 2b. 3 1 2 2 2 o
Messenger, rf. 3 0 1 1 0 0
McDonald. 3b. 2 0 0 1 0 o
Knisely, cf. 2 0 <» 1 l o
McBride, If. 2 0 o 1 0 (I
McGilvray, lb. 3 0 1 .8 1 <j
Ellam, ss. 3 0 0 4 2 0
Clifton, c. .. 2 0 1 3 0 0
Gregory, p. 2 1 0 o 2 o
Hardgrove. p. 0 0 0 0 0 •>
Totals . 22 2 5 21 8 0
Montgomery— AB. R. II. o. A. 1 \
Sloan, rf. 3 0 1 l o 0
McDowell, If., cf... 2 0 1 4 0ft
Walker, cf. 3 0 I 0 o 0
Jantzen, If. 0 o 0 0 0 ^ 0
Elwert, 3b. 2 0 1) 0 0
Knaupp. ss. 2 0 1 4 1 ft
Manning, p. 1 <> ft <> \ o
Gribbens. o. 3 0 0 4 0 ft
Snedecor. lb. 3 o 0 2 o 0
Wares. 2b. 3 0 0 2 2 0
Totals . 22 0 5 18 4 0
Sf veil innings by agreement.
Score by innings:
Birmingham .. (¥D.02i) *—2
Montgomery .000 WO 0—0
SUMMARY.
Two Base Hits—Marcan, Messenger.
Double Plays—Ellam to McGilvray;
Knisely to Ellam.
Sacrifice Hits—Manning, McBride.
I Johnny Dobbs in Diamond Poses
Dj^El BEX A. LEWIS
Peppery ,®inny Dobbs, the active lead
er of the Montgomery Billikens, will be
missing from the Southern league in 1914.
After the close of the present campaign,
no longer will the fans witness the pilot
toss his cap into the air, clap his heels
together and scream, "We gotto win it;
we can’t miss."
After the first game yesterday after
noon, Manager Dobbs announced that he
would leave the Southern next season. "I
will not be with Montgomery next sea
son,’’ said the Dobber pilot, "as I have
several more lucrative offers. I will not
manage in the majors, as rumored, but
will probably lead a club in a Class AA
league.
"Although I have just returned from
St. Louis, I was not offered the manage
ment of the St. Louis Browns. How
ever, I had several propositions offered to
me by other club owners and either will
be a better position than I now have.
In fact, everything is about settled that
f will manage a club in a Class AA
league in 1914."
With the passing of Johnny Dobbs the
Southern will lose an able leader. He |
has made a wonderful showing in spite
of great handicaps and has built' up a
formidable club from youngsters and a
few cheap ball players. He Is idolized by
his players and is popular with the
fans.
While it was not announced, It is prob
able that he will manage a club in the
American association. 1l* is believed that
Kansas City is his future destination.
However, it is known that he had an
offer to manage in the International.
VOLUNTEERS WALLOP
LOWLY TURTLE CLAN
Nashville, August 30.—Parsons was
hit hard today, while Beck was steady
most of the time, and Nashville won
from Memphis 6 to 3. Young led the j
batters with four hits in as many times i
at bat. A brilliant catch by Schweitzer j
and Lindsay's fielding featured. Umpire
Wright and Young came near engaging
in u personal encounter in the ninth,
when Young was called out at the pult
on a close decision. They were parted'
by players. Score:
Memphis— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Shan ley, ss.4 1 2 3 2 ft
Merritt, 2b. 2 0 0 4 3 0
Baerwald, rf.4 0 1 2 1 0
Ward, 3 b. 4 0 1 0 1 0
Schweitzer, If. . . 4 0 0 3 0 0
Abstein, lb. 4 l l 6 1 o
Snell, cf.3 1 0 / 2 0 (T
Seabough, c. 3 1 0 2 0 0
Parsons, p.3 0 1 1 4 0
Totals .31 3 7 24 16 1
Nashville— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Raley, If. 3 0 2 2 0 0
Callahan. If.4 o l 5 o 0
Spratt, 3b.4 0 1 1 1 0
Holman, lb.3 0 1 0 0 Oj
Young, rf. 1 0 i 0 1 0
Perry, 2b. 3 1 0 4 3 0 !
Gibson, c.4 2 1 4 1 0
Lindsay, ss. 4 1 3 2 3 0:
Beck, p.4 1 1 0 2 0
Totals .33 5 M 27 11 0
Score by innings:'
Memphis.110 000 100—3
Nashville .010 400 00*—5
Summary: Base on balls, Parson 3, 1
Beck 3. Struck out. Parsons 1. Beck 2. '
Sacrifice hit. Merritt. Stolen bases, Da
ley, Gibson. Two base hits, Daley, Lind
say, Callahan. Three base lilts. Young,
Abstein. Double plays, Baerwald to Ab
stain; Lindsay to Jlofman. Passed balls,
Gibson. Time, 1:60. Umpires, Wright]
and Stoekdale.
—■—■ .
Appalachian League
At Knoxville: Knoxville G, Middles
boro 2.
At Morristown: Morristown 7,
Rome 1.
At Bristol: Bristol 2, Johnson City 3.
TEXAS LEAGUE
At Dallas: Dallas 5, Waco 1.
At Houston: Houston 3. Galveston 4.
At San Antonio: San Antonio 6, Beau
mont 4.
At Fort Worth: Fort Worth 8, Aus
tin 3.
Base on Balls Gregory 3, Hardgrove 1,
Manning 2.
Innings Pitched— Gregory, 6 (fabno out
in seventh), with 5 hits, no runs; Hard
grove, 1, with o hits no runs.
Shuck Out—Gregory 1. Hardgrove 1,
Manning 1.
Wild Pitch—Manning.
Time of Game—1:3*.
Vmpircs—Breitenstein and Hurt.
JOHNSON TOWERS
ABOVE * TWIRLERS
IN THE AMERICAN
Walter Johnson, holder of this year's
record for consecutive wins, towers high
above the pitchers of both the National
and American leagues. The Giant Swede
has such a secure hold on the topmost
pinnacle as a result of his two long -win
ning streaks that it is probable that he
will top the pitchers of his league and *of
the parent organization for the entire
season.
Johnson has humbled opposing teams 29
times while he himself has been forced
to acknowledge defeat only five times.
Houck of the #high flying Athletics Is a
distant second to the speedy Senator with
11 victories and four defeats, while sensa
tional young Joe Boehling ranks third
with 13 wins and five defeats. Of thd 10
leading hurlers, three are Athletics, three
are Naps, two are Senators, while the
remaining two are on the payrolls of the
Tied Sox and White Sox.
Y\ . Li. I'Cl.
Johnson, Washington .•. 29 6 .803
Houck, Philadelphia . 11 4 .733
Boehling, Washington . 13 5 . 722
Bender, Philadelphia . 18 7 . 720
Wood. Boston . 12 5 .700
Walsh, Chicago . 7 6 .700
Blanding, Cleveland . 13 6 .084
Falkenberg, Cleveland . 17 8 .030
Brown, Philadelphia . 10 8 .067
Mitchell, Cleveland . 12 6 . 067
Gregg, Cleveland . 20 11 .643
Plank, Philadelphia . 16 9 .64')
J. Bush, Philadelphia . 12 7 .632
Clcotte, Chicago . 16 9 .625
It. Collins, Boston . 13 8 .619
Moseley. Boston . 5 4 .556
Scott, Chicago . 17 14 .54$
Russell, Chieugo . 18 15 .545
Bedient, Boston . 12 10 .545
Hamilton, St. Louis . 13 11 .542
Lake, [^etroit . 8 7 .533
Ford, New York . 12 12 .500
Dubuc, Detroit . 11 11 .500
Dauss, Detroit . 9 9 .600
Foster, Boston . 3 3 .500
White, Chicago . 3 3 .500
Steen, Cleveland . 3 3 JjOQ
Groom, Washington . 12 13 .4S0
R. Mitchell, St. Louis . 11 13 .45$
M. Hall, Detroit . 10 *12 .435
Willettv Detroit . 10 12 .455
Baumgardner, St. Louis _ 9 12 .459
Lei nard, Boston . 8 12 .400
Culiop, Cleveland . 2 3 .400
Caldwell. New York . 3 5 .375
Benz. Chicago . 4 7 .364
Engel, Washington . 5 9 . 337
Schulz, New York . 6 11 .355
Wellman. St. Louis . 8 16 .333
Kahler, Cleveland . 5 10 .333
Keating. New York . 6 12 .294
Fisher, New York .. 6 15 .286
Leverenez, St. Louis . 5 15 .250
Hughes. Washington . 4 12 .2jo
C. Hall. Boston . 2 7 .222
McConnell, New York .... 4 15 .211
1 ■••••••»&«
BUNCHED HITS WIN
GAME FOR LOOKOUTS
Chattanooga, August 80.—Bunched lilts
off Berger gave Chattanooga an easy
victory over Mobile today, 6 to 2. Kroh
was In fine form and deserved a shut out.
A running, one hand catch by Clark feat
ured. Score:
Chattanooga— AB. R. 11. O. A. E.
King, cf. 4 0 2 2 0 1
Flick, 2b. 4 0 0 1 2 0
1 Coyle, lb. 4 0 0 15 2 0
Johnson, If. 4 3 2 1 0 0
Elberfeld, ss. 2 112 6 0
Graham, rf. 2 0 1 2 0 0
Street, c. 3 1 2 4 0 0
Graff, 3b. 3 110 4 0
Kroh, p. 2 0 0 0 4 0
Totals . 28 0 9 27 17 1
Mobile— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Stock, ss. 3 0 1 2 2 2
Starr, 2b. 4 1 1 0 2 0
P. Odell, 3b. 4 0 0 2 4 0
Paulet, lb. 4 0 1, 12 0 0
Robertson, cf. 2 0 110 0
Schmidt, c. 4 0 0 1 2 0
Clark, If. 4 10 110
Miller, rf. 4 0 2 5 0 0
Berger, p. 3 0 0 0 3 0
•Sentell . 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals . 33 2 6 24 14 2
•Batted for Berger in ninth.
Score by innings:
Chattanooga . 010 211 10*—8
Mobile . 000 000 110—2
Summary: Two base lilts, Street 2, John
son, Elberfeld, Graff. Double play, Odell
to Paulet. Struck out, Kroh 2. Bases on
balls, ICroh 2, Berger 2. Hit by pitcher,
Kroh (Robertson 2). Time, 1:35. Umpires,
Kerin arid Fllield.
South Atlantic League
At Charleston: Charleston 0, Savan
nah K.
At Jacksonville: Jacksonville 6, Ma
con 2.
At Columbus: Columbus 3, Albany 0.
Russellville Downs Mount Hope
Russellville, August 30.—Russellville won
an Interesting game over Mount Hope!
yesterday on local grounds by the score
of 5 to 3. It was evident after the first
innings that the visiting team was out
classed. Mount Hope was unable to do
much with Bradford after the fourth In
ning, while Russellville hit Martin hard
throughout the game. Score by innings:
R.H.E.
Mount Hope .000 300 000—3 6 10
Russellville .100 100 300-5 11 4
Batteries: Martin and Martin; Brad
ford and Robbins.
Call Main 1375
FOR TAXICABS
Onr Cars Are Newest mid Best
JENKINS TAXICAB CO.
315 N. 20th St.
American Association
At Kansas City: Kansas City 4, Mil
waukee 2.
At Minneapolis: Minneapolis 3, St.
Paul 2.
At Indianapolis: Indianapolis 1, To
ledo 5.
At Columbus: Columbus 1, Louis
ville 3.
FEDERAL LEAGUE
At Pittsburg: Pittsburg 1, Indianapo
lis 0 (10 innings).
At Cleveland: Cleveland 10, St.
Louis 0.
At Chicago: Chicago 6, Kansas City 5.
Uses Ice in Her Bonnet
Alton. 111., August 30.—(Special.)—Mrs.
E. B. Clarkson, 94, of Alton,-is using ic®
on lier head on hot days to make the trip
to and from the First Presbyterian Sun
day school weekly to keep up her record
of 14 years' consecutive attendance.
Fourteen years ago she sought to es
tablish a record for perfect attendance.
Recently she was forced to give up her
class, but this did not stop her from at
tending church.
Mrs. Clarkson takes a small chunk of
ice and puts it under her little old-fash
ioned bonnet. In a paper carried at her
side with her Bible she puts another
piece. When the first piece melts the sec
ond piece Is substituted and she makes
the trip successfully.
WON WINS
an NATIONAL
ROAD RACE HANDILY
Anderson, in Stutz Car,
Breaks Record for
Race
WAS HAILED AS A
HARD LUCK DRIVER
_*
Ralph Mulford Finishes Second and
Wishart Third—No Serious Acci
dents—Made 71 Miles
an Hour
Elgin, II!., August 30.—Gil Anderson,
driving k Stutz oar 302 miles at the rate
of 71H miles an hour today won the Elgin
national road lace in 4:13:38. Ralph Mul
ford finished second end Spencer Wis
hart third. Summary;
Postition—1. Driver, Gil Anderson; car,
Stutz: time, 4:13:38.
2. Ralph Mulford, Mason. 4:20:31.
3. Spencer Wishart, Mercer. 4:23:58.
4. Harry Grant. Isotta, 4:42:14.
5. Rulpli DePalma, Mercer. 4:17:21.
Jow Dawson, driver of a Marmon, was
on Ills last lap when the race was culled,
and Hill Endicntt with a Case, car had
completed 259 miles. |
The weather was perfect and 50,000 per
sons saw the contest, in which 12 cars
started Rickenbacher, pilot of a Mason,
went out th'e race in the first lap. The
car ahead of him had skidded and to
avoid bumping l(. Rickenbacher drove
Into a ditch, breaking a rear axle. Haupt,
another Mason drivat, was a contender in
the race for 24 miles when his engine
burned out and he limped off the course.
Bob Burman drove a pretty race in liis
Keeton, but lie quit at 159 miles with a
cracked cylinder. Hennings Vclic car
lasted only 33 miles. Bcrgdoil, who drove
an Erwin special, seemed to have third
place secured at 259 miles, but he ran out
of gasoline on the back stretch and ceased
to figure.
Anderson, by Ills performance today,
broke tlie record for tile event. Ills
speed, 71 *3 miles an hour, compares with
•Si 14 made by Mulford In 1910; 00.43 in 1911
b.v Den ilerizel and 08.4 a year ago w’lten
DePahna won.
Anderson did more, for he emerged
from under the shadow of racing mis
fortune which had gained him the title
of the champion hard luck driver of the
country, At lndlnnapolls last May he
held second position until the last 30
miles and in tills city a year ago he
again was second.
| Today's race was the first win of ills
career as a driver for which he forsook
the earlier calling of a marine engineer.
The race was remarkable for the number
of cars that stayed on the track and for
the closeness of the contest as Indicated
in the summaries. At 100 miles Dawson,
Haupt and Burman were only a few
seconds apart. I
■--•- -
International League
At Buffalo, first gume: R.H.E.
Newark . 4 8 0
Buffalo .3 8 3
Batteries: Bee and Higgins; Fulen
welder and Gowdy.
Second game: R.H.E.
Newark . 0 3 3
Buffalo . 5 8 0
Batteries: Holmes and Higgins; Jame
son and Gowdy.
At Toronto, first game: R.H.E.
Baltimore . 9 30 1
Toronto . 2 7 4
Batteries: Cotreli and Egan; Brown,
Kent and Graham.
Second game: .R.H.E.
Baltimore . 3 8 2
Toronto . 5 7 2
Batteries: Taff and Bergen; Maxwell
and Brown. Called in eighth to allow
teams to catch train.
At Montreal, first game: R.H.E.
Jersey City . 4 8 2
Montreal . 3 4 5
Batteries: Thompson and Blair; Clark
and Madden.
Second game: R.H.E.
Jersey City . 1 4 1
Montreal . 3 30 J
Batteries: Coakley and Wells; Dale and
Madden.
-- t
At Rochester: R.H.E.
Providence . 2 7 1
Rochester . 6 8 3
Batteries: BaFitte and Kocher; Wilhelm
and Jacklitseh.
-Open ’Till 1—-Labor Day ~b
Autumn
The notable feat-/
ures among an all
star -stock are
Blach’s ’American’
French Soft Hats
•4.00
\Durstt
lino”
Italian
Soft Hat 95
‘‘Stet
sons” DIKMINtiMAM
*3.50 » j Blach’s “
■ pv%nr«i And, of course Blach,s ««v1,icant» $3
hi ^ 4'- \< •

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