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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, September 18, 1913, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038485/1913-09-18/ed-1/seq-7/

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I YANKS CRAWL OUT
i OF CELLAR FOR FIRST
| TIME THIS SEASON
Barons to Play Leeds Today
KY. WINS HIGH
HONORSAMONG THE i
AMATEURS AT SHOOT j
NEW LEAGUE SUCCESSFUL
DURING FIRST CAMPAIGN
Supposed War With Organized Ball Fails to Mature—Prepara
tions Being Made for Next Season.
St. Louis, September 17.—-The Federal
league ended its season Sunday. And
tile Federal league Is the only baseball
organization In this vicinity that could
provide St. Louig with a first division
Club.
When John Powers suggested an in
dependent, uot “outlaw” league, for the
Feds had just as much right as any
body else to play ball, he got the mer
ry ha! ha! There were shouts all up
and down -the line.
But the Federal league tlnshcd its
first season as per schedule, improved
its parks, added strength to Its club,
paid Its players and put up bonds of
$.ri0,000 per club to repeat in 1914.
Nothing but honor attaches to the
first year of the Federal league. It has
proved beyond tlie shadow of a doubt
that sportsmen can promote a league
and do it guccesfully.
' Supposed War Is Absent
The first year of the Federal league
saw no war with, "organized" baseball,
for the Federal league very carefully
avoided any clash. So did the “organ
ized” interests.
Cerl:/n weekly publications, always
on the other side, laughed at the efforts
of the infant league to gain a foothold,
hut It wad observed the daily press
received the newcomer gladly. In other
cities a great deal of attention was
paid tire Feds. In ,St. Louis the Times,
Iii keeping with Its policy of printing
all the sport news obtainable in the
pink, was the only afternoon paper to
carry the stories of the game play by
play,
tine of the big factors of the success
of tlie Federal league its first season
is Lloyd Rhkart, one of the smartest
baseball men .who ever had anything
to do with the national pastime in this
city. Klekurt was about the only prm -
tlcfN business baseball man identified
with the organization, but tlie way the
league finished Is ample proof that he
knew what he was doing. Rick lived on
Job. the league fulfilled all its
promises, and that most surely is the
mark of success.
Many Want to Join
Ho far as the local Federal situation
is uoncerned, the same people will back
the club next year. New grounds will
be obtained, more accessible to the
business centers, and tile Bow-Wonvs
will proceed to do some good. fc
Whether or not there will he'a base
ball war depends upon tile attitude of
tlie “organized" interests. Tile Feds
have been besieged by disgruntled
players, who thhik they have griev
ances against the established order of j
things as enforced by the older leagues.
Thus far these men have been turned
down.
“Organized" baseball has a big war
fund stacked away for tbo purpose of!
fighting anybody who attempts to in- !
vude the baseball field. If the war is
staged, the Feds have a few pennies
secreted in the cracks of the Iloor
which may he turned to good use.
ASPIRING SENATORS DROP
DOUBLE BILL TO THE TIGERS
. ...L_

ATHLETICS AND NAPS BOTH
WIN—THE WHITE SO£ EASILY
HUMBLE DENIZENS OF THE
CELLAR
STANDING
Played. Won. Lost. Pet.
Philadelphia . 138 90 48 .652
Cleveland . HI 82 .">9 .582
Washington . 140 79 01 - .504
Chicago . 143 73 70 .510
Boston . 136 71 70 . 504
Detroit . HO 63 77 .150
New York . 137 51 86 .372
St. Louis . 143 51 92 . 357
Wagner Spiked
Boston, September 17.—Cleveland shut
out Boston 2 to 0 today. Speaker cap
tured a terrific liner from Graney’s bat
in the ninth inning with one hand, there
by cutting off a home run. Captain Wag
ner's hand was spiked by Fa 1 ken berg dur
ing the third inning Hnd he retired. Wood
pitched the final inning, being his first
appearance in the box for several months
because of an injury. He fanned two
men and did not give a hit. The score:
Cleveland— AH. li. JH. O. A. 10.
Ltd bold, cf. 3 0 1 2 0 a
Chapman, s»s. 4 l l 2 o ]
Jackson, rf. 4 0 2 1 0 (I
Lajoie, 2b. .. 3 -0 2 2 5 0
Johnston, IJj. 4 1 o 12 .1 o
i Bates, 3b . 4 0 1 l 4 O'
Graney, If. 4 0 13 0 0
Carisch, c. 4*0 o 3 1 0
Falkenberg, p. 3 0 0 1 3 0
✓ — — — — — —
Totals . 35 2 8 27 14 1
Boston— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Hooper, rf. .. 4 0 1 0 0 0
Engle, lb. 4 0 1 5 0 0
Speaker, cf. 4 0 0 4 0 0
Lewis, if. 4 0 1 * 0 0 0
Gardner, 3b. 4 0 0 1 1 0
Verkes, 2b, .. 4 0 2 3 3 1
Wagner, ss.. 0 0 0 2 0 0
Jnnvrin, s». . 4 0 2 1 1 0
> Cady, c. .... 3 0 0 11 2 0
Leonard, p. 2 0 I 0 3 0
Wood, p.GO 0 0 0 0 0
•Rehg . 1 0 0 0 0 0
totals . 34 0* 8 27 8 1
•—Batted for Leonard in eighth.
Score by innings:
Cleveland .001 001 000—2
Boston ...000 000 000—0
Summary: Two base hit, Jackson. Three
base hit, Bates. Hits, Leonard 8 in 8
Innings; Wood none in one. Stolen bases,
Janvrin. Double play. Bates to Lajoie to
Johnston. Bases on balls, Leonard 3.
Struck out, Falkenbnrg 3, Leonard 8,
Wood 2. Passed ball, Carisch. Wild pitch,
Leonard. Balk, Leonard. Time, 1:55. Em
pires, Evans and Ferguson.
w
Three Players Injured
\ Philadelphia, September 17.—Batting
rallies in the sixth and eighth innings
gave Philadelphia victory over. St.
Douis here today by 8 to 4. Manager
Rickey assumed command of the St.
Louis team this afternoon. Outfielder
Clarence Walker had his forehead *pllt
by running into the left field bleachers,'
during practice. Pitcher Brown of Phil
adelphia ^wrenched his knee fielding a*
gryunder In the first Inning. Brown then
threw wild to first and Mclnnie In try
ing to make a one-hand catch, collided
with Pratt. Mclnnis. whose left arm
^ was Injured, remained in the game un
til the fourth inlngs. Shortstop Bisland,
formerly of Atlanta, played his first
game with St. LouLs, while Tomer, who
hails from Kent, Jvy., made h^s Ameri- j
©an league debut as a. pinch hitter in
the ninth inning and fanned. Score:
St. Louis— AR Tl. H. O. A. E.
Shotten, ef.3 2 2 2 0 0
Austin, 3b.3 1 1 2,2 1
Pratt, 2b.4 l o 2 2 0
BIslatid, ss.4 0 ft ft 3 1
Williams, rf; .... 4 o o l o u
Covington, lb. . . 3 ft 0 8 3 o
Balenti, If.4 o \ 3 j y
Alexander, c. ... 3 ft ft 3 1 u
Mitchell, p.3 0 1 3 2 1
Baumgardner, p, 11 u 0 ft o y
•Tomer . 1.0 0 0 ft u
Totals .9l 4 5 24- 14 3
•Batted for .Alexander In ninth.
Philadelphia— AB. R. H. o. A. E.
E. Murphy, rf. ..5 ft 2 ft ft ft
Strunk, of.3 0 0 2 ft 0
Collins, 21>.4 1 3/2 ft 1
Baker, 3b.3 1 2 n j 0
Melnnis, lb.1 o 0 4 () 0
Davis, lb.3 1 2 7 0 a
Schang, c.0 o 0 1 0 y
i Walsh. If. 4 ■ 1 1 1 ft 0
Barry, ss. 4 12 1 3 0
Lapp, e-lb.4 1 1 c; 2 0
i Brown, p.0 0 0 y 0 1
Pen nock, p.0 0 y y 1 ft
Houck, p. 3 y 0 y j „
Bush, p.y y 0 0 y y
*Drr . y j ft' 0 o ft
♦•Daley -! 1 1 1 0 y y
Totals .37 8 14 27 14 2
•Ran for Davis hr eighth.
••Batted for Houck in eighth.
Score by Innings:
St. Louis.300 1110 000—4
Philadelphia .^...000 004 01*_s
Summary: Two base hits, Shotten. Ba
ker. Walsh. Three base hit, Daley. Hits,
•Brown 1 (none out In Hist), Pennock 1
ill 2 innings, Houck 3 In (1 innings, Bush
0 111 1 inning, Mitchell 12 in 7 1-3 In
nings, Baumgardner 2 in 2-3 inr.lng.
Stolen base, Collins. Base on balls!
Houck 2. Hit by pitcher, Brown (Aus
tin), Mitchell (Baker). S(ruck out,
Mitchell 1. Baumhardner 1, Houck I.
Bush 1. Passed ball, Alexander. Time
2:00. Umpire, Hildebrand.
Sox and Yanks Split
New York, September 17.—New York
broke out of the cellar for the first
time this season today, split ting a
double hend.tr with Chicago while the
Athletics were beating St. Louis. Chi
cago won the first game easily, 9 to 3
New Y'ork took the second, an eight
inning atfair, 3 to 2. In winning the
first game, Whiteman, a Houston re
cruit, lilt Scott for three doubles and
drew a pass In four times up. Selialk
stole home In the ninth inning of this
game.
New York won the second game by
bunching hits with good base running
in three Innings, in the first inning
with men 5n first and second Chase
threw wild to third to catch Whiteman
and the latter scored. Scores:
FIRST GAME.
Chicago— AB. R. H. O. A. E
Weaver, ss.5 ft A3 ft u
Lord, 3b.S 1 2 1 1 u
Collins, rf, . 5 1 l 2 1 n
Chase, lb. 5 2 3 12 ft ft
Bodle, cf.4 ft 1 I u u
Chappell, If. .... 4 3 2 2 0 0
Sclmlk, c.‘..4 l 3 1 1 u
Berger, 2b.5 ft 2 2 ft ft
Scott, p. 3 1 1 u 3 ft
Totals . 40 9 18 27 18 0
New York— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Malse. 3b.5 0 u Z 2 1
Holden, cf.3 1 o 2 2 0
Whiteman, If. .. 3 1 3 1 0 .1
Williams, lb. ... 4 o o 4 o *o
Knight, 2b.3 1 1 D 5 0
Gjlhooley, rf. .. 4* 0 1 3 o o
Pecltlnpaugh, ss. 4 0 2 6 3 0
Gossett, c. 1 0 0 3 1 0
•Hartnell . 0 0 u 3 U 0
Reynolds, c.1 o » l o 0
Ford, p.2 0 0 U 1 U
••Caldwell . 1 o 0 0 0 0
Pith, p. 1 0 0 0 2 0
Totals . 32 3 7 27 16 1
•Batted for Gossett in seventh.
••Batted for Ford In seventh.
Score by innings:
Chicago . oil) 313—3
New York . OUU 600 210—3
Summary: Two base hits, Peckin
paugh, Whiteman 3, Lord. Stolen bases.
Chase, Chappelle. Double play. Scott,
Pecltlnpaugh to Gossett. Bases on balls,
Pieh 4, Scott 8. Struck out. Ford 2,
Pieh 1, Scolt 1. Wild pitch, Pieli. Hits,
Ford 14 In 7 Innings: Pieh 4 In 2. Time,
lkl». Umpires, Connolly and O'Loughlin.
SECOND GAME.
Chicago— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Weaver, ss. 4 o i 3 2 0
Lord, 3b......4 0 1 0 1 1
Collins, rf. ,.v. 4 0 0 1 0 0
Chase, lb. 4 0 0 8 1 1
Bodle, of.*. 3 1 1 2 0 0
Chappell, If. 3 0 2 1 0 0
Stthalk, c. 3 0 0 3 2 0
Berger, 2b. 2 0 1 1 5 1
Cicotte, p. . 1 0 0 0 2 0
•Easterly . 1 0 0 0 0 0
••Breton . 0 0 0 0 0 0
Smith, p.*0 0 0 0 0 0
•••Russell . 1 1 i 0 0 0
•otaW .. 30 2 7 21 13 3
New Yofk— AB. R‘. II. o. A. E.
MaHel, 4b. 4 0 2 1 1 0
Holden, cf. 4 0 0 1 11 0
Whiteman, If. 3 l 1 3 0 0
Williams.1 lb. 3 p O 8 11 1
Zeldcr, 2b. 2 0- 0 3 2 0
Gilhooley, rf. 3 2 3 0 0 0
Pcckinpaufh, ss. .. 3 0 1 1 p n
. + *
RIVINGTON BISLAND MAKES
FIRST APPEARANCE IN MAJORS
SENSATIONAL CRACKER SHORT
STOP MAKES DEBUT WITH ST.
LOUIS AMERICANS—FAILS TO
DISPLAY FORM
By ASA nOLATREE, .lit.
The Southern league contingent in the
majors received a further increase Yes
terday afternoon when Riyington Bislancl.
the sensational young shortstop of the
pennant winning Crackers, cavorted In the
sjiort field for the St. Louis Americans.
The young ex-Southerner played in rather
miserable form in his initial appearance
yesterday* but this was due to nervous
ness and over anxiety. Bisland failed to
register a blngle in four times at the
platter and lie also*committed a bobble
out of four chances. Jt is very probable
that after participating in a few more
major league games theft he will once
more round into form and deliver the
same brand of ball for Branch Rickey
as he did for Billy Smith.
Bisland is one of the fastest and best
all round shortstops that has ever grad
uated from the Southern league into ma
jordom. During the past season he
slugged the ball for the high average of
.306, ranking sixth among the league slug
gers. He participated in 129 games, and
cpmmitted only 47 inisplays In 667 chances
accepted. This playing garnered for him
third place among the shortstops of the
league. He also ranked among the first
10 sluggers of three baggers and was
second among the sacrifice hitters, with a
totHl of 31 hits.
With his entrance into the American,
tite Southern league delegation assumes
a greater degree of importance. Among
those who are claimed by the Dixie major
as native sons are, Tris Speaker, the great
outfielder of the Boston Red Sox, who
formerly played with Little Rock; Guy
Tutwller of Detroit, who last year cavort
ed in tire outfield for the Lockout; Clar
ence Smith of the White Sox. a former
Baron; Derrill P att, who is drawing a
monthly stipend from the St. Louis mogul;
Gibson, who is catching for the Tigers,
a representative of Nashville, and Slim
Love of tlie Senators, who was a team
mate of Bisland. and Bisland.
Slim Love made his second appearance
in big league company this season yes
terday afternoon, when he was sent in
by ciark Griffith to finish a game that
had already been lost by Gallia, the Amer
ican association recruit. Love allowed
only three hits in five innings and also
struck out two of the Tiger batsmen.
Gibson, the former Vol backstop, caught
for the Tigers yesterday in both games
of the double bill with the Senators. In
eight times at bat he rapped out a bingle
and scored one run. He also accepted
12 chances without a mishap.
Gossett, c. 2 % 0 1 4 2 0
Fisher, p. 3 0 0 0 3 0
Totals . 2« 3 8 24 8 1
•Batted for Cicotte In fifth.
••Ran lor Easterly in fifth.
•••lotted for Smith in eighth.
Score by innings:
Chicago . 010 010 00—2
New York . 110 001 0*—3
Called account of darkness.
Summary: Two base ^ hits. Bodie, Gil
liooley, Russell. Stolen bases. Bodie.
Chappell, Gilhooley. Double play. Zeider
to Williams. Base on balls, Fisher 1, Ci
cotte 2, Smith 1. Struck out, Fisher 4,
Cicotte 2. Hits, Cicotte, G in 4 innings;
Smith, 2 in 3 inings. Time, 1:43. empires,
O’Loughlin and Connolly.'
T?gers Cop Two
Washington, September 17.—Detroit in
augurated its farewell appearance of the
season here today by taking both games
of a double header from Washington, 5
to 1 and 4 to 2. Bunching of hits in two
innings, the fourth in the first game and
the first in the second, proved Washing
ton’s undoing. In both of these two in
nings Detroit failed to score. The only
run scored against Dubuc was the re
sult of a base on balls and a double.
Detroit jumped on Boehling at the start
of the second game. Bush and Bauman
hit for singles. Crawford was safe on
aq, error and Cobb brought him home with
a hit for the circuit. Score:
FIRST GAME.
Detroit— AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Bush, ss . 4 0 0 0 G 0
Bauman, 2b. 4 1 2 2 2 0
Crawford, rf. 4 0 3 0 0 o
Cobb, cf. 4 1 2 2 0 0
Veach, If. 3 1 1 6 0 o
Gibson, c. .......... 4 1 0 4 0 0
Onslow, 3b. 3 1 0 32 1 0
Louden, 3b. 4 0 2 1 3 0
Dubuc, p. 4 0 0 1 0 0
Totals . 31 * 5 10 37 13 0
Washington— AH. R. H. O. A. E.
Moeller, rf. 4 0 (I 2 0 0
Milan, cf. 3 0 0 0 0 0
Easter, 31). 4 0 0 2 2 fl
Gandil, lb. 4 0 0 12 0
Morgan, iib. 3 0 0 1 3 0
Ainsmith, c. 3 0 0 - 7 3 0
Spencer. If. 3 0 1 0 ' 1 o
McBride, as. 2 1 0 3 2 0
Gallia, p. '. 1 0» 0 0 1 0
Love, p. 2 0 1 0 1 0
Totals . 29 1 2 27 1(1 0
Score by innings:
Detroit .000 500 000—0
Washington .000 001 000—1
Summary: Two base hit. Love. Three
base hit, Veach. Hits, Gallia 7 in 3 1-3
innings, Love 3 in S 2-3 innings. Double
plays. Morgan, McBride to Gandil. Base
on balls. Dubuc 2, Gallia 2. Struck out,
DubuC 4, Gallia 1, Dove 2. Passed ball,
Alnsmlth. Wild pilch, Gallia 1. Time,
1:15. Umpires, Dineen and Sheridan.
SECOND GAME.
Detroit— AB R. H. o. A. E.'
Bush, ss. 4 1 3 3 3 0
Bauman, 2b. 4 11. 3 ;) o
Crawford, rf. 4 1 0 3 0 0
Cobh, cf. 4 1 3 3 » i
Veach, if. 3 0 1 3, 0 o
Glbschi, c. 4 o 1 7 l o 1
Onslow, lb. 4 0 0 0 0 0
Louden, 3b. 4 0 1 0 0 0
Williams, p. 4 0 1 ' 0 0 0
Totals . 30 4 11 27 7 *
Washington— AB. R. H. o. A. E
Moeller, rf. 4 0 1 0 0 0
Milan, cf. 3 1 0 2 0 0
foster. 3b. 4 0 1 0 3 0
Gandil, lb. 4 0 1 9 3 0
Morgan, 2b. 4 0 0 2 1 1
Henry, c. 4 0 2 7 2 0
Spencer, If. 1 1 o 1 0 o
Gideon, If.0 o 0 2 0 0
McBride, ss. 4 0 1 3 3 1
Poehling. p. 3 0 1 l 5 1
“Williams . 1 0 0 0 0 o
••Shaefer . 1 0 1 0 0 o
•••Daport . 1 10 0 o o o
•Y**Aln»n»lth .1. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals . 34 2 S 27 17 3
•Patted for Spencer tn seventh.
••Batted for Gideon In ninth.
•••Batted for Boehlmg tn ninth.
“•••Ran for Henry tn ninth.
Score by Innings:
Detroit . 400 000 000—4
Washington . 000010 010-41
Summary Two base hit, McBride.
Three base hits. Louden, foster, Gandil.
MAKES DEBUT IN AMERICAN |!
-—-'I
RlVI\GTO.Y HISI.VM)
The fast young shotstop of the pennant winning Crackers, who made
his deliut in fast company yesterday afternoon with the St. Louis \iner
Icnns.
m
BARONS WILL MEET FAST
LEEDS TEAM AT RICKWOOD
Unless Jupiter Pluvius interferes the
bold Barons will hitch up ttyis afternoon
;tt Rickv/ood with the fast amateur team
representing Leeds. According to reports
the Leeds team is composed of a number
of likely youngsters, and it is probable
that they will prove a hard nut for the
locals to crack.
The game starts this afternoon at 3:30.
Wee Willie Prough will very likely hurl
for the Barons, while Larry Brown will
clo the receiving. No announcement has
| been made as to the battery of the Leeds
team.
j the Barons are hoping to have a large
attendance this afternoon, and they are
making preparations for such.
The local bugs are all urged to attend
the game and give the. Barons splendid
support along the routing line. The las;, |
two exhibition games have not been as
well patronized as they should have been I
; nd the fans should make amends for this j
l y attending the game this afternoon.
Vancouver, B. C., September 17.—Freddie
Welsh, British lightweight champion, pro
poses to shadow box himself into the
world s .championship here next Saturday
afternon, the day he whs to have fought
Willie Ritchie for the latter's title. Hav
ing disposed of his imaginary opponent,
Ritchie’s forfeit, proclaim himself world’s
champion and set in motion legal machin
ery to obtain damages from Ritchie for
several remunerative matches Welsh de
clares he has lost through waiting for the
champion.
This is the British boxer's announced
programme for Saturday: Weigh Jn 2:15
p m. at 135 pounds; hop through the ropes
at the arena an hour later, shadow fight
ar. imaginary Ritchie; land an imaginary
knockout and declare himself world's
champion; visit his lawyers and make a
claim for the $2500 forfeit money.
Ritchie's forfeit was posted as a check
on, which he stopped payment before he
left for San Francisco.
Oppose Slaughter of Calves
Chicago, September 17.—Officers of the
American Meat Packers’ association de
clared today that tlie organization at its
annual convention to be held here next
week will go on record against the un
necessary .slaughter of heifer calves as a
step in a campaign inaugurated to pre
vent further shortage in the country’s
meat supply.
Home run, Cobb. Stolen base, Milan.
Double plays. Hush to Bauman to On
slow; Bauman to Bush. Babes on balls,
Williams 2, Boeliling 1. Struck out, Wil
liams 3, Hoeldlng 7. Time, 1:40. empires,
Dineeru and Sheridan.
Call Main 1375
FOR TAXICABS
Our Cara Are Newest anil Beet
JENKINS TAXICAB CO.
315 N. 20th St.
Mail by Aeroplane
to Pike County Fair
Tr»»v, September It.—(Special,)—Secre
tary Martin Folmar* of tho Pike County
Fair association lias received advice from
Washington, granting a postoffice for re
ceiving and forwarding mufti at the Pike
county fair grounds from November 3
to 8, inclusove. The mail is to be brought
to 8, inclusive. The mail is to bo brought
CYRUS B. BROWN SUED
BY INSURANCE CO.
Montgomery, September 17.—(Special.)
Suit for $347.U7 was entered today against
Cyrus B. Brown, secretary of state, and
insurance commissioner, by the Pittsburg
Fife and Trust company. The company
contends, that an unjust penalty was im
posed by the state. When the corporation
paid it gave notice that suit would be
entered for the recovery of the amount.
Electrical Railway Employers Adjourn |
Salt Lake City, September 17.—With
the election of~ol|f leers and the selection
of Rochester, N. Y., as the next meet
ing place, the thirteenth biennial con
vention of the Amalgamated Associa
tion of Street and Electric. Anil way Em
ployes of America was adjourned here
this afternoon for the calendar sea
son. With the exception of the presi
dent all other officers were re-elected.
Benjamin Commins of New Orica1,is was
.elected a vice president.
t 4 ♦
4 COLE DENIES THAT ' 4
4 HE IS DISIH.EASKD 4
4 - \ ♦
4 Chicago, September 17.—King 4
4 Cole, the former Chicago Nar 4
4 tional and Pittsburg pitched 4
4 whose good work this year hat- 4
4 been a factor in Coftimbus* post- 4
4 tion in the American association, 4
4 toduy here denied that be was 4
4 displaaed at being drafted by 4
4 the New York Americans. 4
4 Cole declared he would be glad 4
4 to play with the New Yorks and 4
4 would give them all he had." ^
♦ • ♦
KEY SHOOTS HIGH AT ENSLEY
.GUN CLUB’S TOURNAMENT
Huff Leads Professionals—Mrs. 0. L. Garl Makes Splendid
Showing—Rain Proves Serious Handicap
Jlravy rains and disagreeable weath
er cut down tho attendance at the Ens
ley Gun club registered tournament,
held yesterday afternoon at the fair
grounds, from what promised to be n
most successful affair to one in which
only ID shooters participated. The pro
gramme stated that shooting would bo
gin at 10 o'clock a. m.f but at t.iat time
the rain was so hard that it was im
possible to begin and it wits nearly
noon before the first shot wni fired.
Constant shooting, however, and good
management enabled them to finish the
programme of 275 targets in good time.
Of the 19 shooters nine were profes
sionals and Walter Huff led tho hunch,
winning high average With 2G0 out of
275 targets. Next came E. A. Holt with
257, while T. II. Fox twas third With
254. Of the 10 amateurs participating
G. M. \j. Key of Meridian, Miss., landed
high with 253, followed closely by E.
M. 001*11 well of Birmingham with 252
and O. L. Garl, also of Birmingham,
with 251.
The shooting of Mrs. O. I« Garl un
der the unfavorable conditions was a
decided feature, she making several
straight scores in the 20 target events
and breaking 48 out of her last 50.
Though the hard rain kept down the
attendance, especially from the local
cluh and nearby towns, those who did
attend felt more than repaid for brav
ing such unfavorable conditions ami
all enjoyed an otherwise pleasant day's
sport.
Following are the scores:
Shot at. Broke.
Walter Huff. 275 260
K. A. Holt . 275 257
T. H. Fox . 275 25 4
G. M. £$. Key . 275 253
K. M. Cornwell . 275 252’
O. L. Garl . 275 251
Mrs. O. L*. Garl . 275 2 42
Y. B. DeCroy . 275 239
R. H. Baugh . 275 232
R. M. Roland . 275 231
T. A. Casselty . 255 22 4
F. B. Plummer ...... 275 2is
Geoge Hillman . 275 211
C. J. Perry . 275 188
Guy Ward . 173 162
.1. H. Hillman . 73 65
A. A. Ray y. 25 12
J. L. Smjth . 25 11
SEWANEE WILL
ENTER PROTEST
Atlanta, September 17.—Word has been
received from Chattanooga to the effect
that the Sewanee athletic authorities,
peeved over Jean Patten’s choice of Geor
gia Teach in preference to the mountain
institution, will protest his eligibility to
play on the gridiron. It was not believed
that this lad would be bothered in the
least, it being figured that his skirts aro
entirely clear, especially in view of the
fact that most every southern college
tried overtime to land the young star.
if Sewanee is ,.0 protest the playing or
Patten, which is not given much credence
here, it is a bit out of the ordinary, 'in
view of the fact that the Tiger supporters
worked day and night for weeks to try
and land this young player. It is only
natural to suppose that before trying to
get the star to enter Sewanee that his
eligibility was thoroughly investigated
and he was found to be all right. Other
wise there would have been no reason to
try and enter , the school.
“I am eligible in every sense of the
word,” said Patten Tuesday morning n
discussing the talk of a protest. T have
never coached any football club and
don’t believe there is any truth in the re
port. that Sewanee intends protesting my
playing with Tech. 1 am strictly an am
ateur pluyer and have never done any
thing which would mar my standing.”
Jt is expected that the matter will soon
blow over. Sewanee has always been im
pure sports and there is no doubt but
that Patten's record is clear or the Se
wanee bunch would never have tried to
land him for work with the 1913 squad.
International League
At Newark: R.H.E.
Providence .*. 1 ft £
Newark . 5 6 3
Batteries: North and Onslow; Lee and
Higgins.
At Toronto: R.H.E.
Rochester . 2 10 o
Toronto . 1 4 4
Batteries: Wilhelm and Jacklitseh;
Herbert and Brown.
At Jersey City: Jersey City-Baltlmore,
postponed by agreement; two games to
morrow.
At Montreal: Montreai-Buffalo, rain.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
STANDING
Played. Won. Lost. Pet.
New York . 130 90 4'J .M2
Philadelphia . 331 SO 50 .015
Chicago . 138 7X 0» .565
Pittsburg . 137 72 65 . 526
Brooklyn . 132 58 73 .443
Boston . 132 58 74 .43!)
Cincinnati . 142 5ft s:j .415
St. Louis .141 47 94 .333
All games postponed on account of rain.
Town Damaged by Fire
Guayaquil, September 17.— Half the
town of Duran, the Ecuadorean seaport
opposite this city, was destroyed by
fire today.
Patten and McDonald Are
Performing Splendidly
in the Scrim
mages
Atlanta, September 17 The Tech Yel
low Jackets arc going to have the best
back field in the history of the school if
the quartet now working out as regulars
continue to show the same improvement
between now and the first game as they
have since they started practice.
Captain Homer Cook is at left half, and
Jim Preas, the star from the Riverside
Military academy, is working out at tlie
other. Both are of the same type of
players, and they have bfeen showing
worlds of speed, though as yet they have
not had to run in scrimmage.
McDonald, the brilliant little fullback
i and punter of last year's eleven, is back
in harness, with a little added weight*
and looks better than ever before.
At quarter, Patten, the Tennessee prep
school star, over whuff) a controversy
\yith Sewanee has arisen, in going about
his work in a brilliant manner, the re
volts not worrying him or his teammates
in the bast, as both know there is no
basis for the claims of professionalism.
These four men are working in perfect
accord daily and arc showing an apti
tude to adopt their own style of play to
[that of their fellow' hack field men. The
I result Is a maxing to those who have seen
them In action.
Tech supporters are of the opinion that
If the Tech line holds the opposition, this
hack Hold is going to lie as formidable as
any in the south.
MOTOR RACE ACROSS
DESERT PLANNED
Indianapolis, September 17.—A motor
cycle race across tlie desert, the long
time dream of San Diego motorcyclists, is
finally to become a reality, the route is
planned being from San Diego to Phoe
nix, Ariz. Although the date of the run
has not been definitely decided, it will
probably be during the Arizona State fair
week, November :!, and man>/ riders have
already entered for the tour/ Phoenix is
arranging a specia' motorcycle day dur
ing the fair as an inducement for the
San Diego riders to come at that time.
-.0. ——- ■ . rj
American Association ,
At Kansas City: Kansas City 7, To
ledo o.
At Milwaukee: Milwaukee 2. Indian
apolis 4 (first guinei; Milwaukee 4, Indian
apolis .** (second game).
At St. Paul: St. Paul *», Louisville 7
(first game); St. Paul 2, Louisville 5 (sec
ond game).
At Minneapolis: Minneapolis 1, Colum
bus 1 (13 innings, darkness).
B- ~ B
If you live out of town—write for Blach’s New Catalog
—so nearly ready that ink is almost dry. We pay de
livering charges on cash mail orders, $1 up.
&ari?tg Vrattb
C^wilfcjt 1919. AUrad Decker 4 Cato i I
<tAA Bttv 1(M —And to think such
<f*V ttnU Up garments are only
sold here by
BIRMINGHAM
B - B

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