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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, August 12, 1914, Image 1

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THE BIRMINGHAM AGE-HERALD
*-■- —- \ ...-5- -—=
VOLUME XX XXIV
\_ TUKMINGHAM. ALABAMA, WEDNESDAY, AV(HTST 12, 1!H4
1 !’A(iKS
MM BUR OS
FRENCH TROOPS IN CONTACT WITH GERMANS ALONG ENTIRE
FRONTIER; REPORTED GREAT BRITAIN HAS FORBIDDEN ALL
FOREIGNERS TO LAND UPON HER SOIL; U. S. TO PROTEST
inm
i OF NAVIGATION
(Neutral Passenger Vessels
Carrying Americans From
Europe Are Confronted
With New Dangers
MAY CLOSE NORTHERN
EUROPEAN SEAPORTS
AS RESULT OF ACTION
4 .
England Informs U. S. That
She Will ,Adopt Tactics
Already Attributed to
Germany—Tourists Safe
Washington, August 11.—Mining
Khe North sea as part of the plan of
the European war not only may close
most of the northern European ports
to navigation, but the gold laden
Cruiser Tennesse, the cruiser North
Carolina and neutral passenger vessels
bearing Americans from Europe will
be confronted with new dangers.
The American government was ad
vised formally during the day by the
British embassy here that, inasmuch
is Germany had been “scattering
mines indiscriminately,” Great Britain
no longer could refrain from planting
mines near her own ports.
I Secretary Bryan said tonight Amer
icans at home might rest assured that
the passenger liners plying between
northern European ports -vould take
rfc chances that would imperil life. It
Is believed thpt Americans in northern
ports will remain there for the present
or make their way south and southeast
to such ports as Marseilles or Lisbon
to obtain passage for the United
States.
Itinerary Not Announced
An intinerary fur the crulsetH Ten
nessee and North Carolina bearing mil
lions in gold for the relief of Amer
icans has never been announced but
as both Great Britain and Germany
have given warning of the dangers in
l{ie North Sea, It is being taken for
granted here that neither of the Amer
ican warships will venture Into those
waters. After touching at Falmouth,
England, the treasure ships probably
will land at some port in France and
then head for the Mediterranean, en
deavoring. it is thought, to reach
Americans in both Germany and Aus
tria from points in the Adriatic.
One diplomatist pointed out today
that the ports of four neutral nations,
Norway, Sweden, Denmark and The
Netherlands, as W'ell as one of the bel
ligerents—-Belgium—were practically
blockaded through the promiscuous
planting of mines in the North Sea.
The Hague convention, which regu
lates the use of contact mines, stipu
lates that the belligerents shall un
dertake to their utmost "to render these
pjtoies harmless within a limited time
Mud should they cease to be under sur
veillance, to notify the danger zones
as soon as military exigencies permit.”
Naval observers here believe, however,
that in view of the titanic struggle
this article in the convention will be
•f little incment.
Formal Memo Presented
The formal memo presented by the
British charge d'affairs was delivered
to the state department so that ships
under neutral flagp might be turned
back.
In only one or two places in Kuropc,
notably at Genoa, in Italy, and in Swr
jd *n does the financial embarrassment
W Americans runtime, according to
reports received today by Secretary
Garrison. The situation lias improved
■o much that it may be unnecessary to
deposit any gold in Europe for the re
lief of Americans. Nearly all of the Eu
ropean governments are believed to tie
desirous of establishing heavy credits
with America to draw upon In pay
ment for the vast quantities of food
and supplies of other kinds which they
must have during the continuance of
hostilities and for a long time after
ward.
Secretary Garrison thinks, therefore,,
that as soon as the first panicky feel
ing is over and financial conditions have
been readjusted, the mere announcement
t Aat the United States of an individual
Was deposit specie in an American bank,
subject to the draft from European
countries, will be sufficient to establish
eredtt for Americans in Europe.
Everywhere on the continent the scat
tered tourists and business people who
desire to leavt^are gathering at the sea
ports and arranging for transportation
homeward. Mr. Garrison believes that,
owning to the facilities offered by tip
regular steamship lines it will he un
necessary to send more than one or
tw-o government vessels.
official 1-eportH to the state depart
ment. from Hamburg today cleared up
the last apprehension for the safety of
Americans in the German empire, with
the exception of those special cases
Which have been take up by Ambassa
dpr Gerard.
Vhe little colony in Hambulg. ac
Mfmng to consular dispatches, is not
only in comfortable circumstances, buL
cmeerful and disposed to regard thu
Situation as fee from any danger what
ever. Personal telegrams from Mrs.
Benjamin Harrison, widow of the for
mer President, Btated that she was safe
in H'Gravehage in Hcandanavia. Senator
•liver of Pennsylvania cabled that he
•s Face Twelve)

_EUROPEAN PRINCES WHO ARE TAKING ACTIVE PART IN WAR
I. .1" • --rl-3ri
&D£fcJC:fc
■WILKIIR. Of GERHAOTZ
•••••• ........
ENGLAND N/A YBAR
FOREIGNERS; U. S.
ENTERS fAOTEST
Reported Great Britain Has Forbidden All Non
British Subjects From Landing on Her Shores.
Bryan Instructs Page to Investigate and Enter
Urgent Protest Against Edict, if True
Washington, August 11.—Reports that (treat Britain has
forbidden the landing of all foreigners on her shores caused
Secretary Bryan tonight to cable Ambassador Page instructions
to investigate and if he finds the reports true, to lodge an ur
gent protest with the British foreign office.
WIFE OF PRESIDENT
LAID TO REST IN
LITTLE CEMETERY
OF GIRLHOOD HOME
Last Sad Rites Over Body of
Mrs. Woodrow Wilson Held
in Rome, (ia.—Touching
Tributes Paid Her
Memory
Koine, <la., August 11.—Mrs. Wood
row Wilson, wife of the nation's Pres
ident, Was buriet, at Myrtle Hill ceme
tery here today. Her gruve is beside
those of her father and mother, al
most within sight of the house in
which she lived as a girl. Tonight
the President was speeding eastward
on his return to Washington.
Although thousands of visitors came
to Rome today to do honor to the
memory of Mrs. Wilson, a Sabbath
like quiet prevailed. The special force
of police, augmented by members of
Georgia National Guard, found little
to do beyond warning traffic from the
streets through which the procession
moved.
It was exactly 2:30 p. m. when the Pres
ident's special arrived, and a. few minutes
later the casket, covered with gray broad
cloth and surmounted by a single wreath
of flowers, was lifted from the funeral
car b\ eight of Mrs. Wilson's cousins and
borne to the hearse. As the train steamed
Into the station, church bells throughout
ilie etly were tolled. A wide space had
tContinued on Pnge Mne)
LATE WAR BULLETINS
Brussels, August 11.—(2 p. m., Via London 10:10 p. m.)—Hos
tilities began Monday between German cavalry and Bel
fian cavalry outposts in the Hesbaye district. This district is
west of Liege and north of the Meuse and forms parts of the
provinces of Liege, Limburg and Namur.
The Germans have begun a systematic reconnoitering ol
Hesbaye to discover the positions of the Belgian field army
rheir cavalry patrols are followed by infantry detachments.
Paris, August 11.—(Via London 9 p. m.)—According to late
advices, the Germans made a determined attempt to take
positions occupied by the French outside Meulhausen, bul
failed.
The'Germans did not re-enter the town.
Juan Del Sur, Nicaragua, August 11.—Fifty German anc
French reservists left here yesterday on a neutral vesses foi
Panama, where they will separate.
The government has prohibited the exportation of grain be
cause of the European war.
Genoa, August 11—The steamer Principe di XJdine will sai
for New York tomorrow. She is crowded with Americans. Th<
British government has guaranteed her passage of the Straii
of Gibraltar.
Dispatches from consular represeu-1
tatlvef at'f i ristiana, Norway, ana
Havre, France, said it was understood
at those places that, Great Britain was
excluding all non-British subjects, re
gardless of their nationality.
Secretary Bryan, in his cablegram to
Ambassador Page, emphasised the opinion
that nationals of friendly powers should
not be denied permission to land in Rng
land. Such a prohibition would seri
STORING OF COTTON
Three or Four Million Bales
Should Be Held for Next
Year’s Market—Com
mittee Busy
Washington, \ugu*t II.— How to
finance the Ntorlng of 3,1100,000 or 4,
000,000 l»nle* of col ton to he held for
next year’* murket because of the clon
ing of the cotton market* of Europe by
war wa* taken up h! hearing* today
before the public agrieulture commit
tee. Cotton grower*, ocnler* and bunk
ers of the Mouth begun preneutatlon of
their view* on the situation.
While the House committee was lis
tening to statements of the cotton men,
southern senators were conferring on
further means of relieving threatened
ilnancial stringency in the south. As a
result of their deliberations amendments
to the Aldrich-Vreeland section of the
currency laws were introduced to in
crease from do to 70 per cent the amount
of currency that may be issued on com
mercial paper, to recognize cotton and
other staples, drafts, etc., as commercial
paper upon which 75 per cent of cur
rency may be issued; and to assure state
banks joining the reserve association of
partictipation in emergency currency dis
tributions. The amendments were referred
to the banking committee for early con
sideration.
Before the House committee James F.
Hunter, a Memphis banker, said the ex
tension of emergency currency and gov
ernment funds to cotton growers witn
their product as security would ilnance
the situation. VV. G. Turner of the Mem
phis Terminal corporation, a warehouse
concern, explained the need of caring
Tor the physical product by means of
warehouses. He sketched a scheme of
temporary warehouses in which the sur
plus product might be stored until next
year. Members of the committee esti
mated that three or four million hales
would have to be carried over and next
year's crop correspondingly curtailed to
prevent a gross oversupply in 1915. One
witness today intimated that at least
n bale wfutild be required to finance st6r
ing.
Commissioners of agriculture of the cot
ton states .and representatives of the
Southern Farmers' union will be heard
tomorrow.
No Undue Excitement
Paris, August Vi.—There has been no
undue excitement in Paris over the re
ported losses or victories to French
arms. There have been painful scenes,
however, around the ministry of war on
the news of engagements. Great crowds
of soldiers’ relatives have been seeking
names of those killed or wounded. No
list* have been published.
ously complicate the plans of the Wash
trig fo t.\t^nvnfriirraot for the rcUet of Amer
icans afijinded abroad. Thousand* of
tourists on the continent are making their
way to England, expecting there to board
ships for home.
It was suggested tonight that any or
! <ler issued by the British authorities in
I all probability would not be enforced
! against neutral foreigners desiring to
land temporarily to await the sailing of
I a vessel for their own country.
NEW HIGH RECORDS
IN SUGAR MARKET
New York. August 11—The sugar mar
ket continued io soar loday and new
high records were made in both raw and
refined.
Sales ol' Cuhas occurred at 4'« and 4'4c
basis test title. Centrifugal equalled 5.14
audit if).27c ditty paid. Fine granulated was
advanced to 6c by some refiners ami to
6%c by others, with sales of 50,000 bags
reported to the United Kingdom. The do
mestic demano Is also large and with
drawals are very heavy, with some of the
refiners already behind on the orders^
Federate Evacuate
Mazatlan Garrison
On Board United States Ktearpship Cali
fornia, Muzatlin, August 10. (Delayed ir
transmission.)—The evacuation of Mazat
lan by the federal garrison and its occu
pation by the constitutionalists tonight
was complete.
Fifteen federal officers and two volun
teers were executed, in the presence of all
the federal prisoners assembled at the cus
toms house. One of the doomed men was
given time in which to compose a letter tc
Ids wife. The bodies were left all day in
the sun where they fell. The city Is
luiet. There was no looting.
Americaiw navy surgeons mi board the
California ttuned over tlie ship's hospital
department to wounded constitutionalists
and lent their professional services.
IPEACEFUL TRANSFER
MEXICAN POWER III
REBELS U WAV
Federal Troops Evacuate
Mexico City to Await
Announcement of
Amnesty
THE BITTERNESS OF WAR
-1-:
Washington. August II.—The peace
ful transfer of the Mexico Pity gov
ernment from the Parliajnl administra
tion to the eonstltutlonallsts actual!?
began today, according to olVielnl ad.
vices to the state department.
Federal troops evacuated the capital
leaving the city in charge or niunielpa
police, who by agrement wore to b<
regarded as neutral. The federals with
drew to a nearby point, there to awai
an announcement of amnesty from Genl
eral Carranza. Should guarantees be re
fused, officials here do not doubt tha
an immediate counter revolution wil
be set. in motion.
The Brazilian minister to Mexico, win
is earing for American interests. Gov
ernor Iturbido of tin* Mexican iVd. r.i
district, and a commission of two <dh
<*rs left today for Tula, north of Mexie.i
Git5', where General Obregon, command
'd' of one of tlie three big constitution
alls! army divisions has headquarters.
General Carranza, is expected to gu
there immediately. The «-ommission is
endeavoring to arrange details «»f tie
• ornd i t at ionalist entry . N" definite word
lias been received up t*» bit* today as to
i'rovisioual President caibujul, but it
was understood lie would leave tlie cap
ital for Vera Fruz within 2 1 hours.
Question ol Itvi'OKiiition *
SVIth tjm constitutionalist entry into
Mexico City tin- question of recognition
of the new government will confront
Washington. There is eveiy reason to
believe it will be withheld until there
Is an election, or political convention,
at which there is some expression of
tin* attitude of the pimple toward tin
new government, 1 disquieting advices
again are corning from reliable sources
ilia' General Villa will not «•!>•>> Par
ranza's in clefs to marcli soutli, but will
temalri in the north -and demand a con
vention of representatives of the army
is agreed to in tlie Torreon conference.
Should Carranza refuse this a new rev
olution in t lie north would not sui—
prize many high officials here.
Secretary Bryan’s attention was
drawn My tlie Japanese ambassador to
day to a report that the honorary Jap
anese vice consul at Manzanillo, a
Mexican, had been arrest* *1 by tlie con
stitutionalists. Secretary Bryan sent a
message* of inquiry to American Consul
Stillman.
In tlie same message was an instruc
tion to secure the safety of tlie 200
Japanese in tlie City of Mexico when
the constitutionalists occupy Uio cap
ital.
TROOPS !N CONTACT
ALONG FRONTIER;
Early Skirmishes Probably
Preliminary to Extensive
! Engagements in the Near
Future, Is Belief
GERMAN TROOPS
TAKE OFFENSIVE
NORTH OF LIEGE
Both French and Germans
Claim Victory at Muel
hausen—45,000 Japanese
Embark and Await Orders
KYrnch and Herman troops
la re facing each other to the
north of Verdun. There have
been numerous clashes of a
minor nature, probably prelim
inary to an extensive engage
ment in tlie near future.
The respective positions of the Ger
mans and Belgians before Liege ap
parently are unchanged.
According to French reports, the
Germans have been unsuccessful in
their attempt to drive the French
from their positions outside Muel
■ hausen.
The British war office’s informa
tion bureau says there is reason to be
lieve the German cruisers Goeben and
Bresleau, for which B. it’sh and French
wai ships were waiting, have taken
[ refuge in the Dardanelles.
11 CLASHES ARE OF •
1 MINOR IMPORTANCE
i ClushoN between Autrlnas ami mis
sions so far have been of minor im
portance.
A Shanghai dispatch says 40,*100 Jap
anese have embarked on transports
I and are awaiting orders.
A Copenhagen dispatch announce!
i that itnsslan mobilization will be
complete August -1.
Several Australian warships hav e
Joined the licit islt stiundroh in cast
Atlantic waters.
Tite t'unaril liner Lusitania, in Iter
i dash across the Atlantic, lots reached
tite Mersey In safety.
IN CONFLICT ALONG
THE ENTIRE FRONTIER
Paris, August 12.—(12:30 u. m.)
The French troops along the entire
front are In eon tact with the Ger
mans. A l Manglennea, northeast of
Verdun, the Germans attacked the
French Monday night. The French,
reinfgrood by reserves, then took (ho
offensive and repulsed the Germans
with considerable losses. A German
battery was destroyed by the French
artillery fire, and another was cap
tured, with three gatling guns and
. ammunition.
A regiment of German cavalry suf
fered seriously. Near Aloncel, a Ger
man battalion with artillery was re
pulsed. The German losses are said
to have been heavy.
The village of La garde, in German
territory, was taken by the French at
the point of the bayonet.
German forces appeared at Longwy
and demanded the surrender of tin*
town, which was refused.
GERMANS ENTERING
FRENCH TERRITORY
London, August 12. (3.05 a. m.)
The Dally <’hroniele'a military expert
at unites the highest importance to
the British press bureau's announce
ment •that German troops are re
ported to he entrenching along the
line of the river Aisne." He com
ments as follows:
'This means the Germans in force
have penetrated a considerable distance
into French territory from the Bel
gian frontier. This Invasion Is of far
greater Importance from a military
point of view than the French incur
sion Into Alsace. The Germans tuns!
have penetrated In the rear of the
French lines along the upper reaches
of the. river Aisne. The mere fact of
entrenching suggests the presence of
;t strong body of Infantry."
TAKE OFFENSIVE
NORTH OF LIEGE
London. August 12. (3:50 a. ni.)
The Daily Mail’s Brussels correspon
dent sends the following under date
of Tuesday:
“The Germans have taken l he of fen*
(Continued on rage Twelve)
**••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••■••••••••••••••*
TODAY’S AGE-HERALD
l German and French in contact along
frontier.
Britain excludes foreigners from laud
ing in country.
Mrs. Wilson buried In Home.
Mexicans evacuate capital.
2- High prices of foodstuffs to lie In
vestigated.
3- Foreign exchange thrown Into breach
to keep gold Imre.
4- -Kdttorlal comment.
5- Militarism given blame for Kuropean
conflict,
Skyscraper jail successful In Minne
apolis.
Nesbitt talks on cotton situation,
Tilton issues war statement'.
•.--Society.
7 Sports
S B res na Imn and Zimmerman fight
•- Maxwell dealers meet here Friday.
11- Markets.
12— German cruisers tuku refuge m Dar
danelles.

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