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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, May 04, 1915, Image 1

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THE BIRMINGHAM AGE-HERALD
VOLUME XXXXIV ' BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA, TUESDAY, MAY 4, 1918 10 IM.i s NUMBER |
DREADNAUGHTS OF THE BRITISH FLEET IN ACTION IN THE DARDANELLES—OPERATIONS ON LAND AND SEA |
V | .. ....._____
THE QUEEN ELIZABETH BOMBARDING DARDANELLES
"** FORTS. © N.Y HERALD
(l
RUSSIANS BEATEN
DECISIVELY IN THE
EAST SAYS BERLIN
f -
8000 Prisoners Reported Captured
In Big Austro-German Victory
Along Entire Galician Front
_ i
AUSTRIANS RENEW ACTIVITY
• ALONG THE GALICIAN FRONT
Britain and France Make No Claims of Successes
in West—Germans Report Further Ad
. vance Toward Yprez — Submarines
* Continue Wrar of Destruction
Berlin, May 3.—(Via London, 9:35 p. m.)—Reports announc
ing a great victory in the Carpathians today impelled the en
tire city of Berlin to deck itself with flags. Telephone stations,
newspaper offices and hotels were besieged by crowds seeking
details.
j Excitement began when the authorities received orders to
fly the flags “on account of a great victory in the Carpathians.’’
Details of the reported victory are not yet known here.
i -
Vienna, May 3.—(Via Ixmdon, 8:43 p. m.)—The Austrian official statement
Issued today confirms the German reports of a big Austro-German victory
along the entire front in west Galicia, and says that 8000 Russian prisoners
k were captured.
Cettinie. May J.r-tVia Ixmdon, 11:56 ■ .......
i, p. m.)—A Montenegrin official statement
J says:
f "The Austrians are showing renewed
f activity along the entire Montenegrin
front, but we have repulsed all their as
•aults.”
l Wins Notable Victory
fc Ikmdon, May 3.—<10:30 p. m.)-Aerording
| 1 to Berlin and Vienna, the German and
t* Austrian armies have achieved a notable
victory In West Oaliola, crushing the en
tire Russian center along a front of
many miles, or as the Berlin official
statement puts It, across the whole west
ern top of Galicia, from n,ear the Hun
i garian border to the point where the
River Dunajec Joins the Vistula, right at
the frontier of Poland.
Though the 8000 prieoners the Teutonic
•Hies say they have taken does not com
pare with the number whieh some of
i Field Marshal Von Hlndenhurs's rushes j
netted him In the nortfy the achievement, |
If subsequent reports bein' It out, wll!
mean at least a temporary ebook to the
Russians hammering their way westward
* since the fall of Praemysl. 1
Ki Berlin is celebrating the victory to
night, though It la admitted flags have
flown before full details are to hand.
England and France make no claim to
gains in the. west, the British merely
saying that the German attacks on Hill
IB, in Flanders, have been beaten hack;
the French confirm this.
The Germans maintain they are pushing
forward to the northwest of Ypres and
toward St. Julen. which they captured
after the attack following their first ex
tensive use of gas, but which they were
' forced to yield under counter attacks.
In the fighting in the Baltic provinces
also Berlin finds cause to rejoice. Re
jecting the Russian contention that it is
only a sporadic cavalry raid, Berlin wire
less comment received tonight says it
seriously threatens the Russian right and
the fact that troops could be moved
>0 far northwest before they encountered
resistance is considered a reflection on the
Russian Intelligence system.
So far as claims go, It was an Austro
German day, A number of vessels, neu
tral and otherwise, fell a victim to Ger
‘man submarines, Norway being a particu
larly heavy laser.
If Yho Auetfo-German contentions
.relative to the Galician situation aro
Vrect, In the opinion of some English
Vlar?: writers, It will mean that the
lie .{Russian campaign In the Car
ailatik la seriously affected, making
Men?#* precarious | position of the
fclnn troops press!; ffoivn the south
■ sloped toward '' Ins . of
ijng butwbaa
E
Man Identified by Girl as
Her Assailant Is Put
to Death
Mobile May 3.—(Special.)—A special
from Fulton says:
Jesse Hatch, a negro livingat Dickinson,
was lynched by a mob of masked men on
the public highway between Fulton and
Dickinson Sunday for assaulting Miss
Leila Drink&rd, of Fulton, two weeks ago.
Miss Drlnkard was returning from Dick
inson to her home when the negro as
saulted her. The negro escaped.
Another negro was arrested the same
’evening and brought before her for iden
tification. but she positively said that he
was nOt\the negro, but he was placed in
the Claris county jail for resisting offi
cers and alt*, for carrying concealed
weapons. The .',effr°. Hatch, lattet
was arrested by o(T*''-pvrs and taken heforf
the girl to ^ Identified- she on sl*hl
Identified him.
Officers sty'ed with him tS'da11- bllt wer‘
met by a » of masked mSP and wen
overpowetea.'
Hatch, It Is claimed, was char
acter. Vr.
NEW RECOKD FOR
THE WIRELESS
Washington, May a.—Announcement tha
a wireless message had been Hashed foi
the first time during.daylight hours froir
Panama to Arlington waa made tonight
by the navy department.
The distance Is about 2000 miles uni
hitherto wirelesa communication has beer
at night. The new service Is expected tc
effect a saving in the government's cabli
bills, as it Is hoped to handle all official
messages between Panama and Washing,
ton by wireless. ,
■---—
Hungarian frontier was about 40 mllea
cast of Cracow. The Austro-Oermana
have been defending It stubbornly evei
since the beginning of the Carpathian
fighting.
n,. -The general British comment la some
what reserved pending the Fstrograd
version of operations.
I: jf -
1 (•••• BRITISH TROOPS)
All landing of troops British forces
covered by fire from land near
PLEET BULAlR LINES
60 000 TURKS REPORTED
AS FORCE DEFENDING <
. GALLIPOLI- PENINSULA ^
GERMANS REPORT
TRANSPORT OF
ENEMY SUNK OFF
AVIBURNO
BRITISH LAND
IN Suvla
BAY
, 8RITISH, AUSTRALIAN
and NEW ZEALAND
TROOPS DEFEATED
TURKS AT SARI
8AIR,
BRITISH LINE
ADVANCE
TOWARD KRlTHlA*
Also occupy
Cape teke is
CAPE Helles
> i
Bukhu
C.Te'fc
french
ADVANCE 0U'B
FROM
rum Kum
KALEH-n.. »
................
London, May 3.—(11 p. m.)—Dispatches from Mytilene say that the allies
have occupied Maitos, on the Dardanelles. 22 miles south of the town of Gal
lipoli. The British admiralty has not commented on these reports.
COLONEL ROOSEVELT
AND BARNES TO TAKE
STAND AGAIN TODAY
Colonel Will Seek to Show
He Held No Malice at the
Time He Made Speches
Attacking Barnes
Syracuse, N. T., May K—^Theodora
Roosevelt again will go on the witness
j stand in supreme court here tomorrow, j
and the prospects tonight were that Wil- |
ltam Barnes either would precede or i
follow him. Plans to these endB were
made today by counsel for the respective
principals in Barnes' $50,000 libel suit, after
many witnesses had testified for the de
fense.
It was believed the testimony of both
the former President and the former
chairman of the republican state com
mittee would be brief.
Colonel Roosevelt, under a new ruling
of the court, will be allowed to testify
in regard to facts not set forth in the
pleadings in mitigation of damages. An 1
he may produce evidence designed to
show that he held no malice for Barnes
at the time he delivered speeches in
which the plaintiff was named.
Barnes was called as a witness for the
defense today after Franklin Cralcy, sec
retary and treasurer of the Albany Jour
nal company, had sworn that honks of
the corporation which he was asked about
were In the possession of the plaintiff.
Barnes was to testify in regard to how
much stork he owned In the Journal com
pany and possibly other things. He was
on his way to the witness chair when
Justice William S. Andrews, presiding,
suggested that It might be a good idea
to hava Barnea get the books in ques
tion, which counsel said were In a Syra
cuse hotel. Attorneys for both sides
agreed and Barnes was Instructed to
bring the books to the court with him in
the morning.
To Produce Letters
More letters that passed between the
late Thomas C. Platt, former United
States senator, on one hand, and William
Barnes and Colonel Roosevelt on the
other, also will be produced In court to
morrow.
The testimony given today was of many
kinds. There was evidence regarding
printing in Albany. One witness Identi
fied books printed for the city of Al
bany bearing the line "Printed by tha
Journal c'ompany." and admitted that his
company, the Argus company, actually
had struck off the book. The same wit
ness told of the Journal company being
paid 15 per cent commlsalon on orders oy
> the Argus company.
City officials and a former city official
of Albany also appeared on the stand.
. One Identified official records which
; showed that the J. B. Dyon company was
given a contract over three other com
panies which bid lower.
The former city clerk of Albany said
he gave orders to the Journal company
because he knew and was friendly with
“.people there, including Barnes.
■ None of the witnesses testified that ha
| . M ever had business dealings with
Duties personally, or that Barnea ever
t had e°liclted Printing.
’’. Reporters Testify
i T Vprmer Albany correspondents for
L newspapers testified to con
versations'.they sa,d they had wlth
i II™, ThJ first, Jacob J. Dickinson.
of WaahlngtW *wore that EarneR' In
I df.cSaihgnGov>-h0.r(, Huj»
H^hea^h^Tolfhtat^vSSTSS
i 22E2L Matter of conscience. The
StU aa he had told tha
“JJU^fAat there wa. no com
mon ground between^m^anthe issue
was between oonacl f p *„a”d
, srtjsstv^'- sv'sj:s’:
WILL PAY FOR LUST
AMERICAN VESSEL
_
Diplomatic Representations
on Loss of the Gulflight
Await Official Investi
gation of Disaster
Washington. April 3.—Pending an
official investigation of the circum
stances of the wrecking of the Ameri
can steamer Gulflight in the English
channel, the United States will defer
diplomatic repr**«o»»<»tie:;« as well as
any pronouncement of policy.
Two mrsfagt's were received today
from American Consul Stephens nt
Plymouth, England, reporting the
Gulflight was torpedoed off the Scllly
Islands Saturday and that her captain
died of heart failure and two sailors
drowned.
Consul Stephens' last message today
was as follows:
"Gulflight lowed into Crow Sound,
! Scilly, by i d iltsh patrol. Torpedoe
struck bluff Low. Vessel down by head.
■•Freeboard forward about two f6et; fore
hold full. Ship cargo apparently un
damaged. Blowing gale southeast."
Secretary Bryan said he would ask
lor a thorough ami complete report
from the consul and would direct Am
I asrador Gerard at Berlin to make
similar Inquiry of the German govern
ment for such facts as it might have.
The secretary announced he did not
wish to make any predictions as to
the course of the American govern
ments policy until all the facts were
in its possession.
Will Ask Regret
Officials were careful not to take
tor granted the truth of reports tha:
a German torpedo struck the Gulflight.
Should the investigation bear out uis
patches claiming that a German sub
marine made the attack, the United
States probably will demand an In
demnity sufficient to cover the losses
Incurred by t%e ship and compensa
tion to the families of the victims. It
ie thought probable that an expres
sion of formal regret also will be re
quested. Any diplomatic action of the
United States probably will be based
on the treaty of 1828 with Prussia, ol
which the German government has
taken cognizance as binding in the
present day, having agreed to pay foi
the loss of the America^ ship Frye
under it.
If the attack on the Gulflight wa«
made by a German submarine with 01
without warning, officials hold, that
Germany is in the position ot having
violated the following article of tht
treaty of 1828:
"To prevent entirely all disorder anc
violence, it is stipulated that when th<
vessels of the neutral party, sailing with
out convoy, shall be met by any vessel*
of war. public or private, of the othei
party, such vessel of war shall not sene
more than two or three men In their boai
on board the said neutral vessel to ex
amine her passports and documents. Anc
<Continued on Page Tea)
TODAY’S AGE-HERALD
.... t •
1—Russians defeated, says Berlin.
Japan may Issue ultimatum to China
Arsenal laborers strike.
Think Italy ready to enter war.
I—First boats pass through canal.
3— Copper magnates amlle as prices ad
vance.
4— Editorial comment.
5— 1. C. traffic managers here today.
James Bowron on Jitney problem.
Negro confesses killing Farrell.
5—Society.
7—Sports,
h—Markets,
10—Fitter says walls In 10M condition.
FACILITATE TRADE OF
THE UNITED STATES
Issue Statement Advising
Shippers as to Best Means
of Escaping Detention
by Allied Warships
i ~~
Hshington, >lsy S.—The Brltlnh fin
| bn*».v isHiiod h Ntntemcnt tonight f«»r
the Information of American shippinp
| InterentM d on It; nod to fnollltnte trade
| of the I lilted Staten with neutral rouii
I trlen by pointing nut a way to gunid
HgnlnNl interference hy allied wnrahip*
| nllii cargoes not under the ban ol
I Great Britain's bluende order In couu
ell.
The Htatemcnt has been sent to ail
British consuls in the United States, to
whom shippers arc advised to Rive no
tice of the character of cargoes, so that
the British government may be advised
before ships reach European waters.
The United States does not recognize
the right of the allies to interfere with
legitimate cbmmercc between neutrals oi
with noncontraband goods even when ul
timately destined to Germany or Aus
tria and has set forth Its position in the
lengthy diplomatic exchanges on the sub
ject. In order, however, to prevent as
far as possible unnecessary delays and
detentions, the foreign trade advisors ot
the state department have been holding
informal conferences with British em
bassy officials in the Interest of shipper*
and to aid those, who desire to conform
to the requirements of the order in coun
cil they have had printed the re-export
embargo lists of the various countries
contiguous to the European belligerents
The text of the British embassy state
ment follows:
“The British embassy have received,
since the issue of the order In council
of March 11, numerous applications fron
shippers of American produce for int’or
mation and advice on general lines as tc
the steps which ought to be taken by then
to facilitate the quicker examination anc
passagu of consignments of goods to neu
tral destinations for neutral consumption
“The British embassy can give no as
surance as to the immunity from vis.
and search or detention of any partieu
lar shipments; hut with regard to con
signments of non-contraband articles ai
well as of articles of conditional contra
band, they are authorized to state tha
In cases where adequate information u
furnished by consigners to show that th«
goods shipped are neutral property am
1 are to be used exclusively for consump
tion in neutral countries or by the a I
lies, this will be taken into conslderatioi
by the authorities charged with the exe
eution of the order in council. This wii
also apply to shipments of certain do
1 scrlptlons of goods listed as absolute con
traband. Such goods are, however
| usually subjected to closer scrutiny am
control and in some cases to special ar
; rangements.
, Would Expedite Work
••It would greatly facilitate and expo
I dite the work of Hearing vessels boun
! to neutral porta, which call at, or ar
■ brought Into Brltiah ports lor examl
1 nation of their papers, It shipping house
• or their intents would give British eoti
I solar offleers a duplicate of the fins
: manifest of the vessel Immediately on it
■ departure for Kurope In order that, if poi
I slble, It may he transmitted to the Brh
ish authorities In 1-ondon In time for
to he received ami considered before th
vessel arrives.
•To further uecelerato proceeding
i manifests and hills of lading should dii
close the exact nature of the goods ah
wherever it is possible, the name and fu
business address of the ultimate cot
• slgnee as well as the name and addrei
of the consignor.
“Shippers should avoid the use of gen
rlc descriptions such as Hardware, di
- ealterlea. machinery, etc., which ai
capable of being employed to conceal tt
real Identity of goods classed as eoi
traband. An exact definition of the sp
clfic character of onnaignmenta will sa'
delay in their examinational It will all
facilitate their Identification with the a
tides comprised in the export embar,
xCeatlaaed ea race Tea! *
; - I
CLOSE V\EW OF DREADNOUGHTS GUNS IN ACT!
AGAINST THE FORTS OF THE DARDANELLES.
■ !
AN ULTIMATUM TO
CHINA, DECLARES
TOKIO NEWSPAPER
■.—
Intense Interest Felt in Jap
Capital Over Prospects of
Government Taking Final
Step—War Chiefs Confer
Peking, Mny 4.—<12:ir» p. m.)—The
sympathetic attitude of the foreign
press, especially the Rrltlsh papers, hus
encouraged the Chinese until they
now apparently have resolved to con
cede nothing further to Japan.
Chinese spirit has been aroused In
nn unprecedented manner nnd the gov
ernment Is faced with threatened In-,
ternnl trouble If It makes nuy addi
tional concessions.
Toklo, Tlay 3.—(BjJMI p. m.)—The «l|l
Shlmpo, n Japnnese newspaper of good
standing. Issued nn extra edition this
afternoon In which It made the state
ment that Japnn would send an ulti
matum to China, the < hlnesc reply 10
the latest Jnpnnese communication be
ing the objective regarding the dr
mauds of the Toklo government, all
i.ther answers being considered unsat
isfactory.
The Japanese cabinet wan in session
Hon tinned on Page Ten)
, ■. . n-v;,. .. a
|'—1
ARSENAL STRIKE
Men Constructing Houses to
Accommodate Workers at
Woolwich, Largest Eng
lish Arsenal, Quit Work
London, May 3.—(8:35 p. ni.)—Two
thousand lahorers who v ere construct
ing houses to accommodate workers
nt the Woolwich arsenal, the largest
in Great Britain, went on strike to
day. They demanded higher wages.
SEEKING TO BREAK
HUSBAND’S WILL
St. Louis, May 3.—Mm. Florence Cnmp
! bell, testifying today In the suit to break
i the will of her late husband, .fames ^
Campbell, millionaire traction magnate,
said she never bad seen Mrs. Ann Fllr.a
beth flicks, alleged by the will's contest
ants. to be the mother of Mrs. Lois t»
I bell Burk hum, named In the will aa
‘Campbell's daughter, and made bt^eflciary
to half his f14,Q00.<m0 estate.
The contestant* claim the Campbell*
adopted the Hicks baby.
Mrs. Campbell testified that Lois Camp
bell Rurkham was her daughter, and that
she was horti in the Grand I n inti hotel,
Now York, March 11. 1KU3.
AMERICAN DIPLOMATS
BELIEVE ITALY NOW
IS READY FOR WAR
Preparations Clearly Tend to Her
Participation In the Conflict In
Near Future Is Belief
Udine, Italy, May 3.—(Via Pari*. 4i4Ci
p. mul—-Italian consul* In Austria-Hun
gary are recommending that nil Ifiil
luna leave the country na noon a* pos
sible.
An a reault of tliln warning Italian
merchant*, manufacturer* and profes
sional men arc arriving today at I dine
from point* In Auatrla.
1 Washington. May 3.—Advice* reach
ing the United State* throngh official
1 and unofficial channel* within the !a*t
I few day* Indicate that Italy'* prepar
ation* clearly tend to her participa
tion In the war at nu early date.
Aside from her extensive military
l preparations and orders for war supplier
the expected public appearance of King
Victor Emmanuel at the Garibaldi cele
bration in Rome Wednesday is regarded
l there as of much significance and dem
onstrations then in favor of war would
not he surprising. Heretofore, alt such
popular outbursts have been given no
official sanction ami have nt times been
repressed.
American diplomatists hr fiurope, some
of whom are in touch with the Italian
situation, believe Italy’s decision now is
only a matter of days and arrangemeiyts
already are being made to accommodate
Italian Interests should tile emergency
arise. If Italy should enter the war, it
is understood sin* would ask the Amer
ican embassies In Vienna, Ilerlin an l
Constantinople to care for her diplo
matic Interest. Italy Is now tho cus
todian in the Turkish capital of Russian
interest and Ambassador Morgenthan
probably would have Petrograd’s subjects
and interest to rare for.
The recent recall to Rome of the Ital
ian ambassadors accredited to Great
Britain. France, Germany and Austria—is
taken to foreshadow Italy’s final decis
ion. Diplomats here would not be sur
(Continued on Page Ten-1
■ Four More Ships Sunk
: . By German Submarines
3 Copenhagen, May 3.—(.Via Condon, 6:10
- p. m.)—The Norwegian steamer Caila was
I sunk in the North sea on Friday by a
li
German submarine. Her crew wus landed
at Copenhagen today by the steamer An
na, which witnessed the sinking, and at
II the request of the. commander of the Ger
‘ man submarine took the crew of the Calls
3 aboa rd.
■' The Caila was a small freighter engaged
g In the North sea trade. Her tonnage was
10 466. Bhe was last reported as arriving
i- at Bergln on April 30.
The America Torpedoed
UJ Newcastle, England, May 3.—(6:56 p. m.)
0 The Norwegian steamship America was
torpedoed In the North sea on Saturday.
She veaael sank within two hoars. The
. . Ji* ■ M lb1.,■ ...
crew of the America, consisting of 39 men.
was picked up 13 hours later by the Nor
wegian mall boat Sterling and was landed
at Newcastle today. **
The Amorjea left Sunderland Saturday
morning for Bergen.
The steamship America was larger than
most of the vessels sunk by German sub
marines. Met* tonnage was '.'3Uo. Engaged
in the trana-Atlantic trade, she left Phil
adelphia March 2$ on her last trip from
this country.
The Baldwin Sunk
London. May 3- —:«>7 p. m.)—The Nor
wegian steamer Baldwin was sunk by *
German submarine in the North sea on
Sunday. The members of the crew, num
bering 17 men. were allowed to take to
their boats. Today they landed at LeUb,

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