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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, October 21, 1917, Image 1

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THE BIRMINGHAM AGE-HERALD
VOLUME XXXXVII
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1917
46 PAGES
(IX FIVE PARTS)
NUMBER 168
GERMAN RAIDERS SCORE VICTORY IN NORTH SEA, SINKING
TWO DESTROYERS AND NINE MERCHANT SHIPS; FOUR
ENEMY ZEPPELINS ARE BROUGHT DOWN IN FRANCE
135 OFFICERS AND
MEN ON CONVOY
VESSELS ARE KNOWN
TO HAVE PERISHED
Patrol Boats Rescue Some
of Crew From the
Destroyed Neu
tral Fleet
NAVY OF HUNS GIVES
ANOTHER EXAMPLE
OF INHUMAN POLICY
No Effort Is Made to Save
Sailors Floundering in
Water Follow
ing Attack
All Small Ships
Christiana, October 20.—Of 12 ships
sailing In convoy from Norway to
England and sunk on October 17 by
German cruisers, five were Norwe
gian, representing a total of 3400 tons;
two were Danish, two Swedish, one
Belgian and two British.
So far, 71 survivors, alter strenuous
rowing, have arived at different
places on the west coast.
By the Amoetated Preaa
London, October 20.—Two
German raiders attacked a
convoy in the North sea on
Wednesday and sank two of
the British escorting de
stroyers, it was announced
officially today by the Brit
ish war office. The British
torpedo destroyers sunk
were the Mary Rose and the
Strongbow.
The official announce
ment says that three mer
chant vessels escaped in the
action, but that five Norwe
gian, one Danish and three
Swedish vessels were sunk
without warning.
Thirty Norwegians were rescued by
British patrol craft.
The raiders, which were heavily
armed, showed anxiety to escape be
fore they could be intercepted by
British forces, adds the official state
(Coatlnoed on Pave Two)
ASSOCIATED
SUMMARY M AR
FROM ’ \ A ZONES
Germany noorfd on the water in
Saturday’s news developments,
which recorded the breaking up of
a merchant convoy in the North
sea by raiding cruisers that sank
two British destroyers and nine of
the twelve convoy ships. She suf
fered little less than a disaster in
the air, however, when four and
probably live Zeppelin airships be
lieved to be returning from a raid
on England were brought down in
French territory by airplane and
anti-aircraft gunfire.
135 LIVES LOST
The sen tragedy cost the British
the lives of 135 of the officers and
men on the destroyers who were
left to their fate by the German
raiders In their haste to escape, as
were the crews of the sinking
merchantmen. About 100 of the
merchant sailors, however, arc
known to have reached the shore
In boats or in British patrol craft.
All except three of the trading
ships were of Scandinavian nation
ality, most of them apparently be
ing small vessels.
CHARACTER OF RAIDERS
The character of the raiding
warship is not exactly apparent.
The British admiralty describes
them as very fast and heavily
armed, while Berlin in its report
refers to them as flight sea fight
ing forces.”. They escaped the vig
ilance of the British guardians un
der cover of darkness, both on
their outward and homeward trips.
STORY OF AIR REVERSES
The story of Germany’s reverse
in the air began with the account
of a raid on England last night In
which the bombs the Zeppelins
dropped killed 27 persons and In
jured 53 others. Reports soon be
gan to be received, however, of
Zeppelins being brought down In
France. These were at first sup
posed to belong to an Independent
raiding fleet. Dispatches from
France late in the day,’ however,
declared them to be the raiders re
turning from England. They had
appeared over French territory, it
was stated, and were scattered to
various parts of the country as the
alarm went out and the French
airmen rose In swarms to attack
them.
LONG, -DESPERATE STRUGGLE
It, as appears from the dis
patches, these were the airships
which raided England, their strug
gle to get over German territory
was a long and desperate one, for
those brought down were far from
the sea when they fell. One of
them was chased through ,.several
districts of Central France before
being finally disposed of. The fact
that none of them dropped any
bombs in France seems to Indicate
that they had exhausted their sup
ply previously.
RUSSIAN SITUATION
The situation of the minor Rus
sian fleet which was caught by
the Germans in the waters around
the Gnlf of Riga 1^ apparently a
desperate one. The Germans have
sown mines south of Moon Sound
to block an exit to the Ruaalan*
there while they are closing the
route to the north by their oper
ations for taking possession of
Dago Island, which Berlin reports
say are proceeding according to
the German plan.
Sweeping Change
Made In Selective
Draft Machinery
Remaining 9,000,000 Registrants For National
Army Will Be Divided Intov Five Classes in
Order of Their Eligibility For Military
Service—Complicated Work of Local
Boards Eliminated
By Associated Plow
Washington, October 20.—A sweeping change in the inachin
) ery of the selective draft, based on division of the 0,000,00 re
maining registrants into five classes in order of their eligibility
for military service, was announced today by Provost Marshal
General Crowder.
Details of the plan, which has been approved by President Wilson, are not
disclosed. It is calculated, however, to do away with virtually all the com
plicated machinery of the first draft and to make the operations of the local
boards hereafter little more than rubber stamp proceedings.
Tit© plan was worked out at confer
ences with local and district board of
flclats and approved by the various stats
authorities. Its chief features are that
every registered man will know his er
ect position and be able to arrange his
affairs accordingly and that no man
deemed necessary in any important in
dustry or needed at home to support his
family Will be called to the colors un
til the military situation is desperate.
WORKING OUT DETAILS
Detailed regulations to govern the new
system are being made ready for dis
tribution to fiscal and district board
mprtibers. General Crowder, in a formal
,y"statement, assured them that they will
be given ample opportunity to familiar
ise themselves with these regulations be
fore the machinery provided is called
into use. As this next call to the colors
is to be made under \Tne new plan, thjs
assurance Is taken to indicate that tl^e
vin
second call is not to be expected before
the first of the year, although no au
thoritative statement on this point was
available tonight.
COMPLETE QUESTION AIRE
The success of the plan depends upon
the completeness of the questlonaire.
djjhe questions to be answered by the reg
istered men have been wotdeed out with
Infinite care from the vast fund of In
formation gleaned from the first, use of
the draft machinery.
Included In the plans of the govern
ment, It Is understood. Is a provision
which will place the services of a trained
attorney at the disposal of every regis
trant to assist him in making his an
swers. Presumably all the machinery
of affidavits to support claims for ex
emptions also has been absorbed into
this documents making the work of the
registrant In getting his situation prop
(Coatla«a4 m r*a» T«s»
ikM
■ %; ,;
Ibb
HOSTILE AIRCRAFT
RETURNING FROM j
ATTACK ON LONDON I
FAIL TO ESCAPE
Watchful Scouts Are Quick
to Give Chase and Suc
cess Crowns Their
Efforts
27 PERSONS ARE
REPORTED KILLED BY
BOMBS IN ENGLAND
Wounded Said to Number
53—Some Material Dam
age Done to Property,
Says Announcement
Thrilling Air Duels
Washington. October 20.—The day of
thrilling air duels between individual
aviators over the fighting lines in
Europe appears to be passing. Both
official and unofficial advices recent
ly have shown increasing use of
heavier machines with greater arma
ment and the development of air ma
chines appears to be paralleling close- j
Iv the development of fighting ma- i
chines.
By Associated Press
On the French Front in
France, October 20.—Four
German Zeppelins were de
stroyed or forced to land in
! various districts of France
jin the course of a raid under
taken by these hostile air
craft during last night.
London, October 20.—
There were 11 Zeppelins in
the original group that ap
peared over French terri
tory, Reuters’ correspon
dent telegraphed later, and
they scattered over various
parts of the country when
attacked after a general
warning was sent out. They
dropped no bombs in France.
REPORT FROM PARIS
Paris, October 20.—A Zeppelin was
brought down in flames late last
night at Rambervillers, near the Al
satian border, and two others were
forced to land. They belonged to a
squadron of a large number of Zep
pelins which flew over the Vosges.
TWENTY-SEVEN KILLED
London' October 20.—Twenty-seven per
sons were killed and 53 injured in last
night's Zeppelin raid.
The following announcement was made:
“In last night’s airship raid the casual
ties in all districts were: Killed, 27; in
jured, 53. There was some material dam
age to houses and business premises."
ZEPPELINS OVER ENGLAND
An East Coast Town. October 20.—Seven
or more Zeppelins crossed the east coast
at about 8 o’clock last night, tour going
in one direction and three in another.
(Continued on Page Ten)
TODAY’S AGE-HERALD
SECTION A
1— German rattlers score victory in the
North sea.
Four enemy Zeppelins brought down
in France.
Sweeping change made in selective
draft machinery.
Editor Edward Doty dangerously in
jured .and his associates arrested.
Alabama boys in Kainbow division
getting used to winter.
2— Ohio sergeant to be court-martialed.
3— Pat Harrison is winning support of
Vardamanttes.
4— Editorial comment.
5— Emmet A. Jones to make race against
Wade.
$4,000,000 goal is passed in local bond
drive.
Mrs. Jacobs names women for liberty
bond work.
Pennsylvania oil man praises gas dis
covery.
6— Washington is speculating as to who
will be chief of staff.
7— Wallace, hopes to unite forces of local
optlouists.
3—Candidate officers anxious over out
come of training.
SECTION B
1—What every woman wants to know.
2 and 3— Sports.
$ and 0— News of auto world,
i JO—Amusements.
SECTION C
1, 2 and 4—Society.
9— LaFollette painted in unfavorable
colors.
*—Dolly Dalrympls.
6—Carpenter's letter. {
8— Fashions.
10— Lady Mary's London society.
13— Markets. \
14— Story of comradeship amon^ English
■ soldiers.
SECTION D
Comic supplement.
BRINGING THE WAR NEWS CLOSER HOME
#mi ffjijq
m up
AMERICA'*
BUY
A
LIBERTY *
BOND
... i f i
EDITOR EDWARD DOTY
DANGEROUSL Y INJURED;
ASSOCIATES ARRESTED
I
Well Known Tuscaloosa
Newspaper Man in Hos
pital Following Fight
With Fellow Directors of
His Company
Tuscaloosa, October 20.
(Special.)—Edward Doty,
now editor of the Tusca
loosa News and president of
the Alabama Press associa
tion, lies in a critical condi
tion at the Druid City in
firmary as the result of a
fight in his office at noon
Saturday, and Washington
Moody, prominent Tusca
loosa lawyer; Percy Wil
liams, assistant editor of the
News; Prentice Blackwell,
advertising manager of the
News, and Olin Young, a re
porter, have been placed un
der arrest on warrants
charging assault with intent
to murder.
Mr. Doty, in a signed statement
made late Saturday evening; to Circuit
Solicitor Ormand, stated that he was
writing at his editorial desk when
Williams and Moody entered and de
manded that he sign a certificate,for
transfer of stock in the New Publish
ing company, this he refused to do
and attempted to leave the room, but
was prevented by Young, who stopped
him as he started to cross the thres
hold.
He then took up the telephone to
call the police, whereupon he was choked
and kicked Into insensibility.
DOTY S VERSION DENIED
A joint statement was issued tonight
signed by Mr. Moody, Mr. Williams, Mr.
Blackwell and Mr. Young, In which they
denied emphatically the facts as stated
by Mr. Doty. The statement contends
that Mr. Doty was not “choked, struck
or kicked," and that at the proper time
and place they will make a full and com
plete statement of the affair. They fur
ther state that they consider It would
be prematpre and not proper in view of
the fact that the matter Is now In the
courts to iro into tha details no,v.
EDITOK DOTY’S STATEMENT
The statement concludes by express
ing tbe hope that the public will with
(CtslIsaH « Pago Cltyem)
.1 '; ' y ■’
'fl. I. ; vA . iW.fc’/L
All America Will
Pray For Victory
Following Instruction of Congressional Resolution, President
Wilson Names Sunday, October 28, to Ge Observed
Throughout the Country in Asking Divine
Aid in Winning the War
Washington, October 20.—President -Wilson by proclamation today declared
Sunday, October 28, as a day of prayer for the success of the American arms
in the war, in accordance with the recent resolution of Congress.
The President’s proclamation foi- 1
lows:
“Whereas, the ^Congress of the
United States, by a concurrent reso
lution, adopted on the fourth day of
the present month of October, in
view of the entrance of our nation
into the vast and awful war which
now afflicts the greater part of the
world, has requested me to set apart
by official proclamation a day upon
which our people should be called
upon to offer concerted prayer to Al
mighty Ood for His divine aid in the j
successes of our arms;
“And, whereas, it behooves a great
free people nurtured as we have been j
in the eternal principles of justice !
and of right, a nation which has
sought from the earliest days of its
existence to be obedient to the di
vine teachings which have inspiried it
in the exercise of its liberties to turn
always to the Supreme Master and
cast themselves in faith at His feet,
praying for His aid, and succor in
©very hour of trial to the end that the
great aims to which our fathers ded
icated our power as a people may not
perish among men, but always be as
serted and defended with fresh- ardor
and devotion, and through the divine
blessing set at last upon enduring
foundations for the benefit of all the j
free peoples of the earth:
"Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wil- ;
son. President of the United States, |
gladly responding to the wish- ex
pressed by the Congress, do appoint 1
October 28, being the last Sunday of
the present month, as a day of suppli- J
cation and prayer for all the people
of the nation, honestly exhorting all
my countrymen to observe the ap
pointed day, according to their sev
eral faiths, in soremn prayer that
God’s blessings may rest upon the
high task which is laid upon us, to
the end that the cause for which we
give our lives and treasure, may tri- 1
umph and our efforts be blessed with !
high achievement.”
Guard Officers Must Not
Report to Governors
on Any Troop Movement
Washington, October 20,—Officers of the
national guard divisions now in federal
service got a sharp reminder from the
war department today that they no
longer are in the service of the states
and owe no reports of their movement to
their governors. The order expressly pro
hibits them from making reports on the
movements of their troops to the gov
ernors of the states. It was brought
about by two recent instances where
former national guard commanders ca
bled their governors of the arrival of
their units In Europe in violation of the
censorship.
Must Not Smoke
Copenhagen, October 20.—The Berlin
police have prohibited smoking by per
sons under 16 years of age, and the sale
of tobacco to such persons. The prohibi
tion Is inspired not alone in the interest
bf the youths, but also of the older
smokers who, on account of shortage or
tobacco, are forced to form lines in front
of the tobacconists to obtain the strictly
limited allowance of cigars and Cigar*
ettes permitted them dally.
Kerensky to Front
Fetrograd. Qelober 21).—Premier Keren
sky, it Is annodneed officially, has left
Fetrograd for the fighting front.
Four “Silent Pickets”
Including Alice Paul
Placed Under Arrest
Washington, October 20.—Silent sen
tinels of the woman’s party resumed
picketing the White House gates to
day and four of them, including Alice
Paul, were arrested. They later were
released on bond for trial Monday.
The pickets went to the White House
at an hour when government clerks
were leaving work and a big crowd
had gathered before the police arrived.
The only demonstration was the cheer*
ing and hissing of the women as they
were placed in the patrol wagon.
Liberty Day Is Celebrated
in Panama Canal Zone
Panama, October 30.-Liberty Day is
being celebrated In the canal zone to
day in the interest of the war loan sub
scription. All along the zone from the
Atlantic to the Pacific, aviators dis
tributed bond literature as a part of tne
demonstration which will culminate to
night in a mass meeting at Balboa, which
is to be addressed by the governor.
Canal employes and ofticers ami men
of the army in the canal zone so far
have subscribed more thun U,U0U,0UU to
Ui<- second liberty loan.
KITCHEN POLICE
AND REVEILLE ARE
REAL TERRORS OF
EVERY ARMY UNIT
Rainbow Boys Have Been
Getting a Touch of Some
Genuine Winter
Weather
BREAKING ICE TO
GET THEIR WATER
IN FRONT OF TENTS
The Bands All Turn Out for
Reveille and Merry Tunes
Help to Warm the
Men Up
n.r m. harvie
Catnp Mills, N. Y., October 17.—(Special
Correspondence.)~The Rainbow division
has been having some rather cool
weather of late, but today the old ac
customed Indian summer came bacK
again and everybody is happy.
The nights have been getting steadily
colder for a week or more, and on last
Friday the mercury settled down to the
freezing point. A heavy rain and wind
storm struck the camp, and on Saturday
morning we found ice in the water bucK
ets In front of the tents. A blow with
a tent peg or a half a brick disposed
of the ice, and a few minutes of brisK
exercise warmed us up enough to en
joy breakfast.
The daily schedule has been set ba^K
In conformity with the shortening days.
> and reveille has been mercifully placed
| at 6 o'clock. Even p.t this late hour ve
i turn out. at the call of the bugles with
i reluctance. No foldier in this world e' n
had.a good word for a bugler at reveille,
and our boys are no exception. The kind
remarks they make of these unfortunate
musicians would call for the blue pencil
pf any censor. And yet the buglers, in
order to perform their thankless task,
must arise long before any of us, ex
cept the cooks.
GATHERING OP BUGLERS
The buglers gather, with chattering
teeth, in the center of the main “street ’
of the regiment. As the hands of the
leader’s watch approach 6 the passerby,
if one be so foolish to be out at such
an hour, hears a subdued chorus of weird
and unearthly noises. These are pro
duced by the buglers in their efforts to
“tune up” their instruments and to get
the cold metal warm enough to permit of
being placed to their lips. Then, when
the hour strikes, the leader gives the
signal, up go the bugles, and from them
comes the “first call.” At the same time,
differing but a few seconds, from every
other regiment and separate unit comes
the same call. As the bugles ring out
up and down throughout the length and
breadth of the great camp, some 27,*Ml
men arise, with many mprecations and
muttered protests, to begin the routine
of another day.
To answer reveille is a hard matter
at any season, but on a cold morning it
calls for actual heroism. When a man
can throw off his blankets and struggle
into his clothes, while he shivers with
(Continued on Pnge Ninel
| ANOTHER COUNTY IN
TEXAS GOES “DRY”
Seventy Saloons and Five Wholesale
Liquor Houses in Waco and
McLennan Are Affected
Waco, Tex.. October 30.—Anti-prohibi
tion leaders early tonight conceded that
McLennan county, including the city ot
Waco, went "dry” in today's local option
election by about 1600 votes.
Seventy saloons and five wholesale
liquor houses are affected.
DALLAS IS DRY
Dallas, Tex., October 30—Today was the
last day on which 3)0 saloons and a num
ber of wholesale liquor houses in Dallas
county were permitted to do business,
following the “dry" election of Septem
ber 10. A population of 200,000 is affected.
Express Companies in
Mississippi Violating
Liquor Law, Is Charge
Columbus, Miss., October 20.—(Bpectal.l
Before leaving Columbus Friday newly
elected officials of the Mississippi Wom
an's Christian Temperance union, which
closed its thirty-fourth annual conven
tion here Thursday, sent to Governor
Bilbo a telegram, in which they alleged
j that prohibition laws of the state are
; being violated by the express companies
j and urged him to Inaugurate measures
j that will bring about a discontinuance
i of these violations. The telegram was
• signed by Miss Madge Montgomery of
! Starkville. president, and Miss Juliet
; Featherston of Port Gibson, correspond
■ ing secretary.
French General Killed
I Paris, October SO.—Gen. A. Baratier haa
j been killed in a first line trench. He
was a captain of the French command
| under General Marchand, whose occupn
1 lion of Faahoda in Sudan In 1891 brought
j about a ciash with Lord Kitchener, which
j threatened to' result In war between
' Franco and Great Britain.

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