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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, June 30, 1918, Image 1

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THE BIRMINGHAM AGE-HERALD
VOLUME XXXXV1I1 A BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA, SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 1918 42 PAGES (IN FIVE PARTS) NUMBER 55
TROOPS ARRIVE IN ITALY DIRECT FROM
AMERICA, SAYS GEN. MARCH’S REPORT
Allied. Attacks Past Week For Vantage Ground
Against Renewal Hun Offensive Entirely Successful
Enemy Realizes Purpose of Foch in These Local
Engagements and Is Making Effort to Re
gain Lost Positions By Counter Attacks
ENTIRE BATTLE FRONT IS NOW
QUIET, BUT VON HINDENBURG IS
EXPECTED TO START NEW DRIVE
There Is No Tendency to Discount Great Struggle,
Which Is About to Begin, But Everywhere
There Is Absolute Confidence in Result
fly Associated Prrsi
Another week has passed without the Germans resuming
their offensive along the western front. In fact, the entente
allies have shown the greatest activity during this period and in
several parts of the battle .zone have carried the fight to the
enemy.
These actions have been local in character, but have been
fought for important immediate objectives which strengthened
the allied line where it needed bolstering before the breaking
of the storm of shot and shell expected at any time. At various
points the allies have placed in jeopardy the enemy’s tenure of
certain parts of the line and have extended their control over
wide sectors of the front.
This was the notable result of the attack near Belleau wood, on the
Marne front, by the Americans on Wednesday. They did not seek to break
through the German line, but wanted to reach high ground which would
command the villages of Torcy and Boureschcs. This ground is now secure
ly in their possession.
The French, attacking southwest of
Soissons, on the Aisne front, had the
same object in view. They hurled
themselves at the German line with
such gallantry that in little over an
hour they penetrated to a depth of
more than a mile over a front of al
most three miles and captured more
than 1000 prisoners. German counter
attacks against the new French post
tions have been repulsed with heavy
losses to the enemy
ACTIVITY IN FLANDERS
The British, on the extreme west
ern tip of the I.ys salient on the Fland
ers front, cut deeply into Hie Ger
man lines on Thursday and succeeded
in shoving the enemy from his posi
tions in several little ridges of land
to lower levels from which he will
find it more difficult to attack.
There is reason for believing that
preparations are now nearly complete
for a resumption of the German drive
somewhere on the western front.
TERRIFIC BLOW EXPECTED
Just where the blow will fall is not
known, although the allied command
seems by its confident attitude to have'
some clue as to the intentions of the
foe. The blow, when it comes, is ex
pected to eclipse the ferocity of the
attack before Cambrai on March 21,
or along the Aisne on May 27. An
epidemic of influenza In the German
army is reported and this together
with the prevelence of typhoid, dys
entery and other diseases, may delay
the onset for a time.
ITALIAN TRIUMPH
A week ago the Austrians began
♦heir flight across the Piave river
from the western bank where they had
received a sanguinary check at the
hands of the Italians. It is possible
now to view the event in its true per
spective and estimate the victory of
the Italians as a great defensive tri
umph. General Diaz, the Italian com
mander in chief, has not pursued the
Austrians farther than the Piave, ex
cept for the setting of bridgeheads on
the western bank of the river.
There is still danger of another at
tack being launched against Italy,
thife time from the mountain front and
with German forces leading their al
lies in their attempt to force their
path down into the Italian plains, rut
this reason, apparently, General Diaz
is content to hold the Piave strongly
and wait for the moment at least, any
further attacks against his vital moun
tain positions.
RUSSIAN SITUATION
The situation in Russia is very ob
scure, and while there are indications
that the sway of the bolsheviki in that
country may be near its ^nd, there is
no confirmation of the reports that the
government of Lenine and Trotzky has
been overthrown. The same situation
obtains as in Siberia, where the bol
sheviki and the German-Austrian
prisoners of war are fighting against
the Czecho-Slovaks on the west, and
General Semenoff’s* army on the east
VON SEYDLER HOLDS ON
The Emperor of Austria has refused
to accept the resignation of Premier
Von Seydler’s cabinet, 'and he has
called on Parliament to meet on July
16. It has been said in recent dis
patches that the programme to be laid
before the Austrian Parliament will be
quite limited in scope.
British and German torpedo-boat pa
trol fleets off the Belgian coast had a
brief encounter on Thursday evening,
but when the Germans received rein
forcements, the British withdrew with
out less apparently having been in
flicted by either side.
German Report Admits
British Made Gains
On Flanders Front
Berlin, June 29.— (Via London.)—The German war office admits in its
official communication today the advance of the British into Vieux Berquin,
but adds that a counter attack drove the'British beyond the western border
of the village. At other points, it is declared, the British attacks broke
down.
movement were homha.rried hv our a_nrt
“North of the l,ys infantry attacks
were launched by the British after vio
lent artillery fire. Three assaults against
Morris broke down with heavy losses.
"In the middle battlefield the enemy
penetrated into Vieuxberquin. A coun
ter attack brought him to a standstill
there and threw him back beyond the
western border of the village. North of
jierville the enemy's attacks broke down
under our fire. Southwest of Bucquo*
strong attacks by several reeonnoitonns
detachments were repulsed.
“South of the Aisne the French at
tacked after strong artillery preperation.
They were replsed near Ambleny after
stubborn fighting. They gained ground
at Cutry, but our counter attacks threw
them back on the heights on both sides
of the place. An attempt by the in
fantry to carry the infantry attack fur
ther by bringing armored cars into ac
tion broke down.
"At the Villers-Cotterets forest we pur
sued the retreating enemy as far as his
position of departure and captured pris
oners. * The enemy suffered a heay de
feat
ITALIAN STATEMENT
Kama. June LH.—"The artillery strug
gle, which remained moderate on the re
mainder of the front, was suinew.iat live
ly yesterday on the Asiago plateau,"
■aid the official statement issued today
by tha Italian war office. "Our patrols
with their usual activity effectively har
assed the enemy and damaged his de
fenses at several points.
“Hallway centers and enemy troops in
allied airmen. Three enemy machines
were brought down.”
AUSTRIAN STATEMENT
Vienna, June 29.—(Via London.)—The
Austrian war office statement today
says:
“Near Zenson-Noventa di Piave enemy
reconnoitering detachments attempted to
cross the river.
“On the remainder of the front there
have been artillery <sue^s of varying
strength everywhere.”
BRITISH STATEMENT.
London, June 29.—Quiet prevails on the
British front in northern France, ac
cording to the official report from Field
Marshal Haig tonight. The text of the
statement follows:
‘ Beyond the usual artillery activity on
both sides there is nothing to report.”
London, June 29.—British aviators m
aerial combats on the western front Fri
day shot down 17 German airplanes and
sent six others down out of control.
Three British machines are missing as a
result of the combats.
FRENCH REPORT
Paris, June 29- The war office announce
ment tonight says:
“There is nothing to report except quite
marked artillery activity between the
Oureq and the Marne and the region east
of Rl.etms.
“Lastern theatre, June 28: The enenn
artillery dispayed particular activity in
the Dorrain sector along-lhe Vardar and
north of Mayadag. Our batteries replied
with destructive and harassing fires. An
enemy detachment was dispersed on the
Serbian front. British aviators carried
out several bombardments in the neigh
borhood of Seres.” j
THE SPIRIT THAT PROMPTS MEN TO FIGHT
VAST PROFITEERING
ON COMMODITIES
BY COM
Inordinate Greed and Bare
faced Fraud Are Found
Among Producers of
Necessities
MEAT PACKERS SAID
TO BE FOREMOST IN
MAKING BLOOD MONEY

Outstanding Feature Is Evi
dence of Tendency to
Maintain High
Prices
By Associated I’rrss
Washington, June '29—Prof
iteering on a tremendous scale
in practically all the basic
commodities of life was re
ported to the Senate today by
the federal trade commission
as the result of an exhaustive
investigation.
“Inordinate greed and barefaced
fraud” na well as war pressure for
heavy production, the commission ex
ported as the causes.
Itenppraftsements of properties were
made by great concerns when it be
came evident that the government was
about to fix prices on a basis of re
turn and Investment, the report says,
and salaries, allowances and expenses
were in many instances padded to show
Increased costs of conducting business.
The outstanding feature of its inves
tigation, the commisison reported, was
the evidence of a tendency to increase
and maintain prices against the forces
of competition.
MEAT PACKERS LEAD
Of all the big profits disclosed by the
investigation, the report says, the prof
< Coat tailed oa Pag, Twol
FIGHT LONG-RANGE
BATTLE MEN ENEMY
In Spite of Fact They Were
Greatly Outnumbered
No Damage Was
Sustained
London, June 29.—Four British tor
pedo-boat destroyers fought a long
ranpe engagement with a German de
stroyer force off the Belgian coast on
Thursday evening. The action was
broken off before an> decisive results
were attained.
An official statement issued today by
the British admiralty recounting the
affair, says:
“On Thursday evening four of our
destroyers while patrolling off the Bel
gian coasts sighted eight enemy tor
pedo-boat destroyers, Our destroyers
proceeded on an easterly cous at full
sped, engaging the enemy at long
range.
“After the action had lasted a quar
ter of an hour, the enemy was joined
by three more torpedo-boat destroy
ers. whereupon our force fell back on
their Supports. The enemy did not
follow and the action was then broken
off. No damage was sustained by any
of our vessels.”
GER*yVN REPORT
I Berlin, June 29.—(Via Ix>ndon.)
The admiralty today announced that
German torpedo craft of the Fland*r3
I flotilla engaged British destroyer.- on
: the evening of June 27 off Ostend. The
clash took place while the Germans
were out on patrol. Hits, it is sta’ed,
were observed on two of the enemy de
stroyers. The British destroyer*, it
| is added, withdrew after an engage
ment of a half hour, steaming out of
sight at hrgh speed through an arti
ficial fog. The Germans sustained no
casualties nor damage to their craft.
Hungarian Premier Admits
Big Losses in Italian Defeat
liaeel Switzerland. June 29.—Admis
sion that about ;2,0h<) men in prison
ers were lost by the Austro-Hungarian
I force.} in their recent retreat on the
1 Pla've front was made by Dr. Alex
j antier W erKerle. the Hungarian Pie
mt*r, in a speech to the Chamber of
Deputies, according to a Dudapcst dis
patch today.
ARMY BEYOND 3
This Is Evident in Discus
sion of Big Appropriation
Bill, Which Has Just
Passed
MEASURES WILL NOW
GO TO CONFERENCE;
FINAL PASSAGE SOON
There Was No Roll Call or
Dissenting Vote as
When Supply Bill
Came Up
By Asvoelatrd Pre»»
Washington, June 2W.—In paanlnp:
the 912,000,000,000 army appropriation
bill today the Senate emphasized aenil
ment for enlarging; the army beyond
the 3,000,000 men provided in the
meaaure, but declined while awaiting;
the war department** new expnnaiuu
programme specifically to direct the
President to raiae an army of 5,000,000.
After a week’s debate and without
a ^oll call or dissenting voice, the
huge supply measure—a world’s rec
ord breaker—was sent to conference
between the two houses with a view to
its enactment next Monday, when the
appropriations are needed.
None of the appropriations for the
army's part in the war for the fiscal
year beginning July 1 was reduced by
the Senate. Instead It increased many
items, approved without change the
House clause clothing the President
with unlimited authority to increase
the army by further draft calls and
; added scores of important legislative
I riders.
A futile effort was made today by
Senators desirous of specifically order
ing an army increase. An amendment
by Senator McCumber of North Dakota,
proposing to ’direct'* the President t‘*
utinued on Page lAevcu)
Sanitary Units Compose Greater Part of Force
and Bulk of Combatants Will Be Sent From
the French Front, as Already Announced
MATERIAL INCREASE IN SIZE OF
PERSHING’S ARMY IS INDICATED
Five Divisions Which Have Been Brigaded for
Training With British Are Now Returned
Under Their Own Commanders for Battle
B,' AMorlated Pre*«
Washington, June 29.—Safe arrival in Italy of the first con
tingent of the military force which will represent the United
States, was announced today by General March, chief-of-staff.
Sent direct from this country, the troops landed yesterday to
supplement others ordered from Frence by General Pershing.
Sanitary units compose the greater part of the first arrivals, but “other
special units” also were included. General March reiterated the statement
that the bulk of the combatant American troops going to Italy will be sent
from the western front, their places being immediately taken by new regi
ments from the United States.
ITALIANS ARE EXTENDING ROYAL
WELCOME TO AMERICAN TROOPS
Rome. Friday. June 2S.—The entertaining of the American soldiers by the
civil and military authorities and the population at —— (deleted by censor)
continued throughout the day. Everywhere the Americans appear they are
the recipients of courtesy by which the Italians are attempting to express
their deep feelings of esteem and admiration for the fighting men of the
great republic. , ......
The Italians are doing all in their power to make the visitors feel at home,
escorting them about town to all places of interest., and the difficulties
of conversation in the two languages are smoothed over by friendly signs
and gesticulations. It is not an uncommon sight to see an American soldier,
his hrit decked with flowers, riding as a guest of a taxicab party of Italian
m(?n who are immensely proud of their role of hosts.
“\o definite plan for the In*
crease of this force from the
United Staten ban been reached,*
Secretary linker raid later In com
menting on the announcement. “It
should l»e emphasised that the
ahfpment of further Increments de
pends largely upon future devel
opments.*
Material Increase during the past
"week In the forces under General
Pershing was Indicated by the of
ficial announcement that five
American divisions, which had
been brigaded with the British for
training, have now been returned
to the American army.
\V bile the actions along the
American sectors during the past
week have been ehtirely' local lu
character, the chief of staff anld,
the results have shown that
American troops are more tham
holding their own, and fine exam
ples of individual valor have bee*
reported.
Viewing the military situation as
a whole General March was of the
opinion that the situation Is ex
tremely favorable to the allies. He
said the Austrian defeat was ex
tremely valuable both from a mili
tary and psychological sense.
General March had not received
official reports of the British and f4'
French successes on Friday, and
therefore withheld any comment.
He also refrained from announc
ing the total number of meg
shipped from American embarka
tion ports to dute. hut intimated
that a statement might be made
later in the coming week.
New Yorkers Are First
National Army Men to
Hold Sector of Line
The fi;st pational army division had
taken up a sector at the front, General
March also announced. It is the Sev
enty-seventh, raised in New York,
trained at Camp Upton and originally
commanded by MaJ. Gen. J. Franklin
Kell. It was taken across under Major
General Johnson.
Military or in ion, General March said,
found the Austrian 'attack faulty, be
< Continued on Page Fight)
ARE TURNED SACK
TO MINERS
Between 300 and 400 of
These 1700 Wanted to
Remain Under Fed
eral Control
Washington. June 20.—About 1700
short line railroads were turned back
to private management today by the
railroad administration a few hours be
fore Congress passed legislation in
tended to prevent the relinquishment
of many of them. Between BOO and 400
of the roads relinquished had sought
to remain under government manage
ment. About 400 short lines were re
tained as part of the national system.
Packers Deny They Are
Profiteers as Charged
by Trade Commission
Chicago, June 29.—Sharp re
torts were made tonight by repre
sentatives of Armour & Co., Mor
ris & Co. and Swift & Co., deni ing
charges of profiteering made in the
report of federal trade commission in
vestigators at Washington.
The packers’ statements declare th*
present is not the time for any one
branch of governmental activity to
strike at the packing industry, as it
is trying to supply the American urmy
j with meat. The statements, too, as
sorted that their profits were but a
fractional part of a cent per pound of
product and directed attention to the
prices of meat to the consumers and
the price paid for live stock to indi
cate whether the packers i have been
profiteering.
TODA Y ’S AGE-HERALD
SECTION A.
1— American troops arrive in France di
rect, states General March in week
ly review.
Allied attacks on western front to
gain vantage points are entirely suc
cessful.
Vast profiteering on commodities of
life charged by commission.
British destroyers tight long-range
battle.
Senate sentiment favors enlarging
army beyond 2,000,000.
3— Lauderdale farmers are planting to
feed nitrate plant employes.
4— Editorial comment.
City-aohooi pupils raise big sum for
ail war funds and purposes.
G~-Morgan citizens aroused.
5— America wants nothing of Mexico
but justice.
3— Underwood tells why he opposed ex
tending draft.
10— Sports.
11— Civilian military class composed of
200 leading men.
SECTION B.
1 — Lady Mary's letter.
2— 3-4—News of automobiles.
0— Amusements.
SECTION C.
1- 2-4—News of society,
."--Carpenter’s letter.
3— Georgia is unable to stir intareut in
campaigns.
6— 'Fashions.
7 Lazily Dalryinpie.
U—Markets.
SECTION V.
Comic supplement
SECTION fa.
Rotogravure.
A
SENATE WILL VOTE ON
WHEAT PRICE MONDAY
During Debate Reed of Missouri
Makes Bitter Attack on Food
Administrator Hoover
Washington, Jl ne 29.—After an unsuc
cessful effort by Senator Martin of Vir
ginia, democratic i».uJer, to hava the
Sena to abandon its proposal to increase
the government minimum guaranteed
wheat price to $.'.50, ten agreement was
reached tonight to take a vote’on the
question Monday,
Senators Gore of Oklahoma, Gronna
and McCumber of North Dakota, Borah
of Idaho f*nd others from wheat produc
ing states vigorously objected to Sena
tor Martin’s proposal. They urged the
Senate to stand by its price increase
until the snow flies, despite the pros
pect of a deadlock with the House caus
ing failure of the important agricultural
appropriation bill, to which the increase
provision is attached as a rider.
Dur.ng the debate Senator Reed of
Missouri made another vehement attack
upon Kood Administrator Hoover.
“The millers wore taken under the win*
of the food administration and were ab
solutely guaranteed against loss,” Sena
tor Reed said. “Their profits wore mul
tiplied threefold. Every time Mr. Hoover
regulated prices for the capitalists It#
has ululated them up.”

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