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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, November 09, 1918, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Alabama Libraries, Tuscaloosa, AL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038485/1918-11-09/ed-1/seq-11/

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EFEECTJ STOCKS
Leaders Lost 1 to 5 Points,
But Were Able to Make
a Come-back Later
In Session.
New York, November 8—The stock
market continued at the outset of to
day’s more moderate operations to re
flect the disturbing influences created by
yesterday’s armistice hoax. Leaders lost 1
to 5 points, but soon recovered, in nu
merous instances being succeeded by ma
terial gains over the previous day's high
est quotations.
Wall street is almost unanimously of
the opinion that the war is ended, but
manifests considerable confusion of sen
timent in proceeding to adjust its affairs
to peace conditions. War stocks were
Alternately heavy and strong, ending in
the main at materials on announcement
of the placing of additional orders for
various railway equipment.
Kails held their own, being the first
Issues to rebound from the heavy open
ing. Further accumulation of low-grade
shares was again the strong feature of
that division.
Restricted money conditions did not
prevent a renewal of activity, presumably
by pools, in oils, motors and tobaccos,
and in the later dealings Baldwin and
American Locomotive, American Car and
various specialties made substantial re
aponse to speculative buying.
United States Steel was consistently
irregular in its less active movement Be
tween the low of 101% and high of 103*4.
closing at a net gain of a small fraction.
The demand for metals seemed to be
founded on tangible ground, but gains
in that quarter were reduced by the
general realizing of the last hour.
Domestic as well as foreign bonds for
feited in varying degree their gains of
the previous day, Liberty issues, how
ever, displaying firmness. Total sales
(par value; aggregated $12,275,000. Uid
United States bonds were unchanged oil
call.
New Orleans, November 8.—Yesterday's
peace news is not officially confirmed
yet, but London says general opinion is
that Germany must accept. Liverpool
strongly accepted peace anticipation, be
ing about tiO points lower than due on
prospects of larger importations and
straddle operations. Norfolk advises that
British consuls were instructed to cut
Insurance rates for British bottoms 50
per cent owing to increased safety ot
shippi ng.
The following important news came
from Washington and Atlanta: "The
fixing of prices of raw cotton is unnec
essary and impracticable. President Wil
son wilt be told by »we cotton investiga
ting committee on t lie war industries
board, was announced by Dr. Thomas
W. Page, chairman of the committee.”
Atlanta: "Resolutions calling for the
abolishment of the war inquiry board
immediately on cessation of armistiee
row pending and calling on farmers and
dealers to hold their cotton for 55 cents
a pound, were adopted at a meeting here
today by the cotton states advisory
board.”
Weather conditions and ootlook are
bullish. Cold weather, with tempera
tures -10 and below into Georgia, con
tinues over the Atlantic states, while
rains covered the western half of the
belt with temperature to 24 in Oklahoma
and northwest Texas. Indications are
for unsettled, rainy weather in -he belt,
with a cold wave over Sunday. Follow
ing comment from New York after the
close.
The ginning figures of 7,793,515 bales
were in line with general expectation and
had little effect. Liverpool cables were
lower, due to war risks and selling by
Wall street and the south, which brought
a lower level of prices, but on the in
fluence of buying for New Orleans and
foreign accounts, a recovery of 70 points
occurred. The market, however, failed to
show any real snap and passed off as
soon as this buying subsided. News as to
the outcome of the armistice is restrict
ing business, but the general impression
prevails that this question has been dis
counted by the present level of priecs.
Sales on all rallies still look the best
to us.
Stock List
Sales. High Low. Close
61%
48
86
67%
41
94%
61%
46%
84
65%
40%
91%
61%
46%
85%
66%
40%
92%
Amer. Beet S. 400
Amer. Can. ... 7700
Amer. C. & F... 3100
Amer. Loco. ... 6200
American Linseed 300
Amer. S. & R.. . 22700
Amer. Sugar ... 1500 113% 112% 113
Amer. T. & T... 1900 108 . 107% 107%
Amer. Tobacco.
Anaconda Copper 111 73 71%
Atchison . 2200 98 97
Atlantic C. Line.
Atl. G. & W. I.. 2000 111 % 110
Baldwin Loco. 323 82% 75
Balto. & Ohio.
Beth. Steel "B" 28500 62% 61
Canadian Pactflc 1700 l7l% 170
Central Leather 2400 62% 60%
Cbesa. & Ohio .. 5300
C„ M. & St. P... 3400
Chi., R. I. & P. 11900
Chino Copper- 200
Col. Fuel & I... 400
Corn Products 6300
Crucible Steel .. 3100
Cuba Cane S... 11600
Erie . 15800
General Electric 200 156% 156
Gen. Motors... 5100 136% 132
61%
52 %
31%
43%
40%
48
56%
33%
20%
60%
51%
30%
42%
40
47%
54%
32
19%
189
72%
97%
106
111
81%
59
61%
170
62
61%
51%
31%
43%
40
47%
56
33%
20%
156%
133
3t. Nor. pfd
Gt. Nor. O. C...
Gulf States S..
Illinois Central..
Insplr. Copper.,
tnt. Mer. M.
7300 103
2300 32%
200 65
1100 105
3000 55%
2200 30
100% 102%
31
65
104
54%
29%
32%
65
104
55%
29%
do pfd . 11900 121% 120% 121
35%
40%
35
39%
2500
. 6800
16500
. 6700
28%
44%
31%
83%
38%
176
28
42%
30%
82
85
40%
119
40%
172
28
43%
31
82%
49%
49
85
93
80%
10%
23%
38
110% 110%
99% 1101
46% 48%
49%
49
25
91%
79 -
10
23%
36%
49%
49
25
91%
79
10
23%
37%
Inter. Paper .... 700
Kenne. Copper 10600
Louis. & Nash.
Maxwell Motors 4000 41
Mex. Petrol... 19800 179
Miami Copper
Midvale Steel
Mo. Pacific...
M Y. Central
'lor. & Western.. 400 111
Northern Pacific 5800 102%
Dhio Cities Gas 3900 47%
Pennsylvania . •. 2900
Pittsburg Coal • • 100
Say Con. Cop.— 2000
heading . 13600
Sep. Iron & S.. . 3400
Seaboard Air L... 100
do pfd i. 300
Sinclair O. <fe R. 5900
lloss-Sheffield
Steel & Iron.. 100
louthern Pacific 71100 109% 107%
Southern Ry... 12100 34 33%
do pfd. 12100 72% 71%
itude. Corp... 30200 72% 69%
renn. Copper.... 300 16% J6%
rexas Co. 3600 195% 192
rob. Products.. 10600 137% 135% 136
."nited Cigar S.. . 4900 104% 102% 103
Inited Fruit- 100 147 147 147
y. S. I. A. 2000 99% 98% 98%
J. S. Rubber... 6100 74% 72% 72%,
y. S. Steel- 78000 103% 101% 102%;
do pfd . 200 113% 112% 111%
Jtah Copper-... 1800 91 90 91.
7a.-Caro. Chem. 200 60% 59% 59%
Vabash pfd “A” 2900 41 40%
Vest. Union_ 1500 92% 92%
Vest. Electric .. 2300 45%. 45
Vlilys-Over.. .. 26000 27% 26%
52
52
70 ’
16 4
194
Total
hares.
40%
92%
45
27
sales for tha day, 869,000
FOOD BOARD PRIC
For Saturday, November 0, 101S.
Retailer Consumer
pays pays
SUGAR— per cwt. per lb.
Granulated . ..$ 9.2899.64 10.28<v
Retailer's profit on sugar must not ex
ceed lc per pound.
FLOUR— Per bbl. 24-lb. sack
Plain .tf*.00ei2.fi0 $1.53@ L73
Self-Rising .Yl.40912.65 1.57(^1.72
Retail profit on flour not to exceed $1.20
per barrel in original mill packages.
Per. lb.
15918c
Per. lb.
35QM3
3tKao5c
22V2<&2oc
30933c
40©42o
..3446936c
38937c
40945c
oO@674i,c
55966c
6697SC
35942c
35937%C j
MEATS—
Beef (side) .
Sirloin steak ...
Round steak ...
Rib roast .
Stew .
PORK
Loins.
Chops .
HAM—(Cured).
Regular (whole)
Skinned (sliced) .
BACON—(Breakfast)
Strips (sliced) . 44M>951c
Fancy (sliced . 5846967 c
BACON—(Bellies)
Smoked . 32935%c
D. S. (white meat).. 2S@32c
LARD SUBSTITUTES—
Tierce . 23@25c
Drums .234*9254fcc
Tubs .231/4©25^c
PURE LARD—
Tierce . 28929c*
Drums .2S%9-9420
Tubs .28449294* e
CORNMEAL— Per cwt.
Alabama (bulk) . $4.10^/4.30
Foreign (bulk) . $4.1594.30
GRITS—
In bulk . $4.3094.53
Packages . $2.8593.00
BUTTER- Per lb.
Creamery (fresh) — 6196244c
Storage . 53954c
Maximum profit on butter allowed to
retailer 5c to 6c over actual cost
26&dUc j
26Vi@30V&c !
2«%93UUc '
81984c
31149 34 ^ac
31449 34%C
Per lb.
595ViaC
59-544c
596c
14915c
Per lb.
5S9<Hc
PRODUCE
Sweet [email protected]
Irish potatoes (white) $2.5093.00
Cabbage (cwt.) . $2.5093.00
Cheese (Amer. col.).. 37(@38c
Onions (sacked .$2.4092.75
Rutabagas .$$.0092-50
Eggs (storage) .
PEANUTS—
Alabama (field run)..
OLEOMARGARINE—
High-grade .
ROLLED OATS
20-oz. (18s) .
20-oz. (368) .
RICE- -(Bulk).
Honduras .
Blue Rose .
BEANS—(Dried)
Lima (recleaned) .
Pink (Cal.) .
Navy .
PEAS-Dried blk. eye.
California ...
BREAD
Loaf (12 oz.) .
Loaf (16 oz.)
42948c
Per lb.
109 lie
Per lb.
3%94c
3Vk94c
3449 444c
44946c
SV2@4Vfec
49906 c
Per lb.
159I7V2C
3093544c
Per case.
$1.9592.00
3.S594.00
36@ 4244c
Per pkg.
12ViCbc
1244916c
$10.15911.50
$9.5599.60
Per lb.
. 1491544c
. 1091144c
11915c
i24i>*&-“>c
1291244c
Per lb.
17920c
1244915c
1244919c
79944c 991244io j
7c
8c
8@9c
9910a
J. E. KEITH, Chairman.
Main 3826.
Bonds
U. S. 2s, registered . 98
J. S. 2s, coupon . 98
U. S. 3s, registered . 83
LL S. 3s, coupon . S3
J. S. 4s, registered.106%
J. S. 4s, coupon.. 106 44
Illinois Central ref. 4s . 86 44
Louisville & Nashville un 4s. 86%
it. Louis & San Fran. adj. 6s .... 76
Seaboard Air Line adj. 5s . 60
southern Bell Telephone 5s. 93 4s
southern Railway 5s. 98%
Southern Railway gen. 4s ...... 72
J. S. Steel 5s . 100
Coffee Market
New York, November 8.—Except for .
some foreign interest in late months, the
iquidation of old contracts in the coffee
futures market was believed to have been
Jietty nearly completed by the close to
ilght. According to the instructions o£ *
lie food administration the entire inter- (
^st must be closed out before the end of ,
business tomorrow, and it is expected j
foreign orders will appear around the
ing in the morning. Meanwhile, fur
her advances have been reported in the
Sr&silian markets, presumably reflecting i
he improving peace outlook, and the of- 1
icial cables received today showed gains 1
ompared with the last quotations of 12o
eis at Rio and 600 reis in Santos. Under 1
hese circumstances the local spot mar- *
'et was firm, but quotations were nom- 1
nal on the basis of 1074c for Rio 7s and
5y2c for Santos 4s. Nothing definite has f
et been learned as to plans for a pos- ‘
ible reopening of the exchange for gen
ral business, but there were rumors to- -
lay that such action might be taken by *
he first of next month. 1
Sugar Market c
New York, November 8.—After the
ccent dullness, the local market for
aw sugar was considerably more ac
ive today with the committee report*
ng purchases of 369,650 bags of Cubas
ur November shipment. Prices were
nchanged at 7.2Sc for centrifugal to
he refiner.
The local market for refined sugar
ras unchanged on the basis of 9 cents
or fine granulated. The demand,
fhile a little more active, is some
hat disappointing, with refiners well
ble to take care of all orders.
Live Stock
Chicago, November 8.—Hogs: Ile
eipts, 30,000; late trade very dull,
tostly 10c to 15c lower than yester
ay’s early trade; poor clearance j
lade. Butchers. $17 85@ 18.25; light,
17.35® Cg. 18.10; packing, [email protected],
igs, good to choice, $1 1.7 6@ 15.35
Cattle; Receipts, uuUO. good native
teem, strong; westerns steady; others
ommon steers and canners, lower,
alves strong to 35c higher; good feed
rs steady; common kind weak. Beet
iltle, prime, $15.40® 13.75; medium,
9.35@ lo.lO; butcher stotjjts, cows and
eifers, $5.75® 14.UU; canffers and cut
srs, $4.75@5.<5; Stockers and feeders,
lioice, [email protected]; medium, $7.0o@
75, veal calves, choice, $16.00® 16.75;
estern range beef steers, 513.75®
7.50; cows and heifers, J8.0t)@ 12.25.
Sheep: Killing lambs closed weak
t 36c to 50c decline, feeding lambs
botil steady; lambs, prime, $15.3o@
5.50; medium, [email protected]; culls,
1.00® 12.50; ewes, prime, [email protected];
ledium, 88.00®9.25.
Kansas City, November 8.—Hogs,
eieipts, 12,000; steady: heavy. 81700
>18.00; packers and butchers, 817.35®
I. 00; lights, 817.00® 17.90; pigs, 81400
16.50.
Cattle: Receipts, 2000; steady; prime
■d steers. $17.50® 19.2£; dressed beef
eers, 812.00® 18.00; southern steeis,
>[email protected]; cows, 85.00®10.50; heifers,
>[email protected], Stockers end feeders, 86.00
14.00; bulls, |[email protected]; calves, $7.00
13.00.
Sheep; Receipts, 2500; steady. Lambs
II. [email protected]; yearlings, $10.00® 11.50,
ethers, [email protected]; ewes, |[email protected].
St. Louts, November 8.—Hogs; Re
ilpts, 9900; higher;- light, $17.70®
1.20; pigs. $14.75® 16.50: mixed and
ltchers, [email protected]; good heavy,
[email protected]; bulk. $17.70® 16.35.
tie; Receipts, 8900; steady: na
| ’ eef steers. $11.50® 18.25; yearling
and heifers, $9.50® 15.50; cows.
12.50; stockers and feeders, $8.50
Jt* fair to prime southern beef
$10.00® 18.00; beef cows and
[email protected]; native calves.
25.
Receipts, 1700; steady; lambs
75; sires, $11.00® 12.00; can
‘ r lhoppers, $7.00® 9.00.
, Naval Stores
' - ■ November 8.—Turpentine,
2 sales. 137; receipts, 38;
ickv ’ • "t.
; sales, 349; receipts, 203;
E. $14.50; y, $14.55; G,
C75; I, $14.go® 14.85; K,
M, $15.40® 15.45: 51,
*00; WW, $16.26 *
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BU
CO
IN PIT TRADERS
Grain Was Nervous, With
Corn Fluctuating, While
Oats and Provisions
Were in Sympathy.
Chicago, November 8.—Nervousness and
irregularity today characterized the con
market. while traders watched for ar
expected official announcement froir
Washington that hostilities had ceased
The market closed unsettled, ii7sc net
lower to 5c advance, the latter for No
vember, with December at Jl.19Vdl.20,
and January $1.21^^1.21^. Oats finished
off to "sc up and provisions carying
from 90c decline to $1 advance.
Bears in. corn clearly had the advan
tage most of the time, owing to the
general anticipation of an armistice with
Germany would be signed with the least
possible delay. Especially during the
first half of (he session urgent orders
almost without exception were to sell,
and buying support displayed a notice
able lack of vigor. Bulletins telling of
the. spread of revolution in Germany, and
about chances of a suspension of the
draft in the United .States, acted as an
evident handicap on the bulls, but were
partly offset later by gossip that the
shipping board would make every effort
now to rush food and other supplies to
Europe. The November crop report from
Washington proved to be substantially
identical with advance estimates here.
Oats showed more firmness than corn
as a result of improved shipping de
mand.
Provisions swayed with corn.
Chicago Futures
Future quotations were as follows:
Corn— Open. High Low. Close.
Dec._L20% 1.22 1.18% 1.19%
fail. 1.20'/.. 1.23 1.19% 1.21%
Oats—
Dec. TO 70% 69% 70%
fan. 70 70% 69% 70 "
Pork—
Vov. 37. SO
(an. 4-MO 43.60 43.60
Lard—
Vov. 26.70 26.60 26.60
>an.26.50 26.77 26.40 26.40
Ribs—
<ov. 23.60
Ian.23.65 24.12 23.65 23.75
Cash Grain
Chicago, November S.—Corn. No. 2
yellow, $137; No. 3 yellow, $1.30© 1.31,
So. 4 yellow, [email protected].
Oats. No. 3 white, 70@71%c; stand
U’d, 71 % ® 72 %c.
Rye, No. 2, $1.62; barley, S0c@$1.01;
:imothy, $7.90® 10.00; clover, nominal;
>ork, nominal; lard, $26.60®26.65; ribs,
124.00® 25.00.
St. Louis. November 8.—Corn, steady;
Vo. 5, $1.32: No. 4 white, $1.30.
Oats, steady; No. 2, 69c; No. 3 white,
Kansas City, Mo.. November 8 —Corn,
To. 2 mixed, $1.52®1.54; No. 2 white, $1.52®
.54; No. 2 yellow. $1.54®!.56. Oats, No. 2.
Vhite, 70%@71c; No. 2 mixed. 6S©68'jc.
Rice Market.
New Orleans. November 8.—Rough rice,
‘ales, 825 sacks Honduras, 5®7.25c; 300
Tarolina. 6.50®7.40c; Japan, 187 sacks at
■S0@7c; 403 Louisiana pearl, $7.25; receipts,
197; millers, 34S7. Clean sales: 2837 pock
its Honduras, 5%@Sc; Blue Rose, 2804
lockets, 5%!§7%Cj; receipts, 2901.
Produce Market
New York. November 8.—Butter,
trong; receipts. 9S39 tubs: creamery,
ligher than extras, 61%®62c; extras,
2 score, 61c; firsts, 57%@60%e.
Eggs, strong; receipts 6016 cases;
resh gathered extras, 69®70c; fresh
lathered regular packed extra firsts,
6®6Sc; do. firsts, 61®65c.
Cheese, firm; receipts, 572 boxes;
tate. whole milk flats, fresh specials,
2%@33e: do. average run, 32c.
Poultry, alive, easy; chickens, 28®
9c: fowls, 28®32c; old roosters. 22c;
urktys, 32@38c; dressed irregular and
nchanged. >
Chicago, November 8.—Butter un
hanged.
Eggs, receipts, 4619 cases: firsts.
7% © 58c; ordinary firsts, 54%®56c:
t mark, cases Included, 54®56c.
Potatoes, receipts, 60 cars, un
hanged.
Poultry, alive lower; fowls, 20®24c:
prings. 22 %c; turkeys, 31c.
St. Louis, November 8.—Poultrv,
ens. 24c; springs. 21 %c; turkeys, 30c;
ueks, 23c; geese, ]9e.
Butter, creamery, 59c.
Ep.gs, 52e.
Kansas City, Mo.. November 8.—Butter
id poultrv unchanged. Eggs, firsts, Sic;
iconds, 47c.
Money Market
New York. November 8.—Mercantile pa
ir. 6 per cent. Sterling, 60-day bills. $4.73;
■mmercial 69-day bills on banks, $4 72%;
■mmerctal 60-day bills. $4.72%; demand,
. *5%; cables, $4.76%. Time loans, strong;
days, 90 days and six months, 6 per
nt bid. Cali money, strong; ruling rate,
per cents Bank acceptance. 4% per cent
-ancs: Demand. 5.45; cables. 5.44 Guild
s: Demand, 41%; cables. 42. Lire: De
and, R.o6; cables, 6.35. Rubles: Demand.
16: cables, 14. nominal. Mexican dollars,
%e. Government bonds firm; railroad
nds Irregular.
Metal Market
Vew York, November 8,—Metal ex
ange quotes lead unchanged; spot, 8.05c,
elter, quiet; East St. Louis spot of
rs, 8.60c.
Bradstreet’s Review
Sew York, November 8.—Bradatreet s 1
morrow will say: :
rrade continues to taper off, rumors (
peace, effects of influensa. the elec- .
>n holida> and light buying resulting ;
sm "arm weather, having repressed
erations and at the same time there
a strongly defined tendency to mark ;
ne while trying to sketch out the prob- <
ie breadth of readjustments to follow I
e peace now apparently In sight. i
n fact, the roseate outlook in Europe,
th premature reports of Germany hav
5 accepted terms submitted by the al
d powers, have already taken' firm in I
e unsettlement of grain and cotton J
ices, in cancellations of some orders, J
the holding up of plint extensions* 3
d in higher prices for securities. Econ- J
lizing and the absence of young men
>m the lists of buyers also have made
- some increase in supplies of mer
andise, and in view or the inevitable I
feat of Germany, irrespective of what i
at country may do in quibbling over <
•ms. the general disposition is to shy i
•ay from placing orders when the po- ;
ltials suggest lower prices, at least,
til readjustments have been worked
t. (
Veekly bank clearings, $8,250,026,000.
Tobacco leaves treated with the X
y are thereby cleared of the de- <
•active beetle.
The camphor resources of Japan and 1
irmosa are taxed to the utmost to -
pply the present demand for this <
mmodity. <
I
I
That Guiltiest Feeling
By BRIGGS
Missive, am e/asy putt _of
Two FEET ON Tn £ ElfiHTeeNiw
gftt£N For a wi\jmini6 of
The match 0Y ome oP.
ITi A Tie AMI) NJ E C c S5 iTATfS
PLaY>n<3 an Extra houc
wftt
£'Ya
-%
V. 7
s
mimed it
0h CHAfcLiF
vuhat - t+a '
HOUYD Yoo
HAPPFa-i Tfe^
X>0 THAT 1
* HamK we Got
a CHAo/ce Y£T- he
•gi_cuJ >t - \ tele
You we LEAD A .
Cti ARMED fto /
uipi today /
well for
Tmoh LOi/e
op M l * g~ !!
Sat Yam’s a
GLAWT at Mii
EkPRS.S3i.Cuv/
iT'S A >5CREAM
There Was a Readjustment
of Conditions Caused by
False Peace Reports
the Day Before.
New York, November 8.—Reaction from
the intense excitement created by circu
lation of false peace reports yesterday
was reflected in the nervous and irreg
ular ruling of today’s cotton market.
There was considerable activity early
w hen commitments undertaken yesterday
afternoon were being readjusted, but later
business was quiet with prices sagging
off while the trade waited for further
armistice developments. After selling at
28.35c at the start, January rallied to
2D.li>o but 'eased off to 28.30c in the late
trading and closed at 2S.3$c with the
general list closing steady at a net de
cline of 30 to 60 points.
The market opened steady at unchanged
prices to a decline of 00 points under li
quidation and in sympathy with weak
Liverpool cables. There was a good deal
of buying on the small ginning figures
and bullish spot advices, however, which
quickly caused rallies and by the middle
of the morning December had sold up
from 29.00c to 29.82c, and March from 28.00c
to 28.70c. This made net advances of 30
to 37 points on the more active months,
but the demand seemed to come chiefly
from shorts, and as soon as covering
subsided, the market turned easier un
der scattering liquidation. Trading was
quiet later, but prices worked lower in
the absence of support with most posi
tions reaching the lowest levels of the
day, March selling at 27.83c, of 57 points
net lower. The close was steadied by cov
ering but within a few points of the
lowest. The census report showed only
7,793,615 bales ginned to November 1, and
Indicated the smallest ginning between
October 18 and November 1 on record.
Local bears explained this on the ground
that ginning 1 ad been restricted by un
favorable weather, the epidemic and con
gestion at compresses or oil mills, but
the figures seamed to strengthen the
smaller estimates of the yield.
The decline in Liverpool was considered
partly due to the easier ruling of marine
war* risks.
New York Futures
High. .Low. Close.
December . 29.82 29.00 29.07
raquary . 29 15 28 30 2S 38
March . 28.70 27.83 27.90
day . 28.30 27.50 27.53*
July . 28.00 27.20 27.25
New Orleans Cotton
New Orleans, November 8.—The cotton
narket was in the position of waiting on
he outcome of the armistice conference
oday and values suffered somewhat from
iquidation of long cotton, taken on yes- |
erday when prices were bulging as the ,
esult of the false rumor that the Oer- :
nans had signed the terms laid down
>y the allies. This liquidation was mosT
rronounced In the afternoon and the mar
cet closed for the day at a net loss of
5 to 44 points.
In the early trading fluctuations were
lervous and the trade was very much
Lt sea over the situation. Before the
ession was very old, prices were 43 to
2 points off. considerable short telling
leveloping as the result of the belief that
t the signing of the armistice was de
ayed a reaction from yesterday's buying
nd display of bullish sentiment over the
opposed ending of the war was due.
Jood support wan offered at the decline
nd the market recovered and went 20 to
5 points over yesterday's final prices
the view gradually grew that the
reek might end with the matter of the
trmlstice still undecided, selling increased
rspecially from longs, and during the
rreater part of the afternoon prices were
it a net decline of about 30 points.
New Orleans Futures
High. Low. Close
>ecember . 29.00 27.99 28.35
anuary. 28.50 27.65 27.75
larch . 28.10 27.30 27.34
lay . 27.85 27.00 27 15
uly . 27.38 27.23 26.95
Spot Cotton
New Orleans, November 8.—Spot cot
on quiet and unchanged. Sales on
he spot. 339, to arrive 450. Low mid
lling, 26.63c: middling. 30.38c; good
Diddling, 31.38c. Receipts, 4903; stock,
24*236.
New York. November 8.—Spot cotton
:uiet; middling, 30.85c.
Liverpool Cotton
Liverpool. November S.—Cotton spot
iuiet: prices lower; good middling.
3.42d; middling, 22.79d: low middling,
1.74d; good ordinary. 20.21d; ordinary,
9.69d. Sales 2000 bales, including 1705
American. Receipts, 73,000 bales, in
luding 65.800 American. Futures
losed irregular and unsettled. No
Fixing Goods Prices.
Washington. November S.—The
cotton price fixing committee of the
war industries board, met to<U$
w ith representatives of the cotton
textile industry to compile a new
schedule of prices for cotton goods.
The present fixed price for cotton
cloths holds until November 16.
vember. 20.63d; December. 19.90d; Jan
uary, 19.1$d; February, 18.50d; March,
I7.56d.
Liverpool Cotton
Liverpool, November 8.~Weekly statis
tics: Total forwarded to mills, 50,00W
baies; American, 39.000; stock, 221.000;
American, 109,000. Imports, 91,000; Amer
ican, 74.000. Exports, none.
Port Cotton
New Orleans; Middling, 30.3Sc; receipts,
4903; sales, 789; stock, 324,226.
Galveston; Middling, 31.00c; receipts,
7004; sales, 4000; stock, 296,659.
Mobile: Middling, 28.75c; receipts,
166, sales, 66; stock, 22,060.
Savannah: Middling, 29.50c; receipts,
2339; sales. 121; stock, 2$,586.
Charleston: Middling, 29.50c receipts,
1000; stock, 58,008.
Wilmington; Receipts, 373; stock, 43,
566.
Texas City; Receipts, 3102; stock, 12,
629
Norfolk: Middling, 28.50c; receipts,
1529; exports 11,561; sales, 270; stock, 82,
095
Baltimore: Receipts. S5; stock, 10,711.
Boston: Middling, 31.60; stock, 11,873.
Philadelphia: Middling, 31.10; stock, 13,
690
New York: Middling, 30.85c; stock,
126,149.
Minor ports: Receipts, 14,568; exports,
12.511; stock, 24,197.
Total today: Receipts, 35,971; exports,
24,072; stock, 1,300,119.
Total for week: Receipts, 146,711; ex
ports, 66,997.
Total for season: Receipts, 1,704,239; ex
ports 1,064,405.
Interior Movement
Houston: Middling, 30.85c: receipts*
18305; shipments 4452; sales, 1452; stock,
297,180.
Memphis: Middling, 30.50c; receipts,
8458; shipments, 4921; sales, i50»>; stock, 1
251,931.
Augusta: Middling, 29.13c; receipts,
2917: shipments, 2387; sales, 918; stock,
136,416
St. Louis: Middling, 30,50c: receipts,
3373; shipments, 2366; stock, 17,773.
Little Rock: Middling. 30.00c; receipts,
1257. shipments, 1646; sales, 1646, stock,
28,317.
Total today: Receipts, 24,310; shipments,
15,775; stock, 731,551.
Dry Goods
New York. November 3.—Cotton goods
markets for civilian lines today were
quiet. Bids were received by the gov
ernment for large quantities of cotton
goods and wool goods for war purposes.
Fending action on price fixing in cotton
goods and yarns, buvers are holding off.
Ginning Figures
Washington, November 8.—-Cotton
ginned prior to November 1, the cen
sus bureau announced today, amounted
to 7.793,615 bales, including 120,343
round bales, and 15,780 hales of Sea
Tsland
Oinnings to that date last year were
7,185,178 bales, including 132,907 round
bales and 57.560 bales of Sea Island.
Ginnings by states:
Alabama, 555.041; Arizona. 0565: Ar
kansas, 537,605; California. 18.404.
Florida, 16,111: Georgia,' 1,475,09ft; Lou
isiana. 359,644; Mississippi. 688.471:
Misscuri. 25,094 North Carolina, 414.
748; Oklahoma, 398,901; South Carolina,
966,040! Tennessee. 152,1 44: Texas, 2,
166,495; Virginia, 6307; all other states,
1835.
Sea Island ginnings by states:
Florida. 6290; Georgia, 7860; South
Carolina, 1630.
Weekly Cotton Review
New York, November 8.—The selling
movement which was in progress at
the end of last month continued until
January contracts sold at 26 cents last
Saturday morning. At this level the
decline was checked by covering and
there were sharp rallies during the
earlier part of the past week on re
ports that southern spot holders were
refusing to follow the decline in fu
tures. January contracts sold back to
29.50c. or Stfcc per pound above the
recent low level, but later In the week
fluctuations were extremely nervous
and irregular owing io conflicting ru
mors as to peace developments.
One of the factors considered respon
sible for early week advances was a
denial from the committee on cotton
distribution at Washington that large
governrr.aet contracts for cotton goods !
were b*«Mt :s'dolled, but the infiu- J
ence wag SulJ jfe the stronger tech- .
niea! pe», ,en ally the break of ove* 1
10 cents - vtOunV from the high rec- 1
ords or '■v '•fefe’t/ and the relative
firmpes if -o ' o,rn spot markets
Copyright, 1918 , by The Tribune Association, (New York Tribune)
All Merchants Are Ready This '
_Morning For a Good Business:
By J. C. MOSES
It was a good day for all merchants
yesterday, both wholesalers and re
tailers getting ready for today’s big
turnovers. The downtown stands were
well assorted with fresh and crisp veg
etables, while meat displays were of
the best.
Feedstuff remains practically un
changed, with some lines hard to get.
Quotations were as follows:
Poultry
Fryers—2 pounds and under, 40c.
Gulneas~50c each..
Roosters—20c.
Turkeys—Live, 3i> c lb.
Ducks—‘JOc lb.
Geese—12%c lb.
Hens—34c Jb.
Hggs—Wholesale, 62®5oC.
Eggs—Retail, 61<@62c.
Fish
Spanish Mackerel—22V4C.
Pompano—36c.
Salt Water Trout—2<X0Z2c.
Mixed Fish—12c.
Red Snapper—Headless and drawn, 20
me.
Gray Snapper—Headless and drawn,
4c.
Mullet—I0<gpllc.
White Trout—12c.
Chesapeake Bay Oysters—Extra select,
2.00 gallon.
Meal and Feedstuff
Hen Feed—$4.00 per 100-lb. sack.
Mixed Horse and Cattle Feed—$70.
C. S. Meal, 7 Per Cent-$58.
Peanut ..teals—$63.
Kiddo Feed Meal—$46.50.
Velvet Bean Meal—$46.
Old Style Hulls- $31.
Lin Hess Hulls—$21.
Corn—$2.00.
Corn Chops—$3.86.
No. 2 White Oats—$1 per bu.
Choice Tea-Green Alfalfa—$48 per ton.
Southern Alfalfa—$46.
No. 1 Timothy—$43.
Clover and Timothy—$42.
Shucks—$15.
No. 1 Johnson Grass—$30.
Rye Straw—$22.
Fruits and Produce
Oranges—California, $10.603111.
Lemons—$11.
Bananas—5M?c lb.
Live Stock
(Union Stock Yards.)
Feed Steers'
Good to Choice—10<®12c.
Medium to Good—S^9c
Common to Medium^7@8c.
Grass cattle, according to weight, quaL
y and flesh:
Steers—8(010c.
Fat Cows—8<09c.
By JOHN C. HOSES
he belief is that while a bearish view
C peace as a market factor has pre
liled in certain Wall street and local
>urces spot holders as a rule think
lat peace will mean higher prices
id the market is supposed to have
sen fluctuating between these two
ilnions.
Some trade buying has been reported
liing the week, but support from
iat source has not been much in evi
;nce, and domestic mills are believed
i be holding off for the next sched
e of goods prices. The talk recent
has been that no change would be
ade in the maximum values already
force, but there is enough uncer
inty in that respect to cause more
less hesitation.
Private crop estimates issued dur
g the week have ranged from 11,10©,
0 to 11,750.000 hales In excluding
iters, or well under the official end
ptember indication of 11,818,000
lies Small ginning: returns to Nu
mber 1, were attributed partly to the
idemlc and congestion at mills or
mpresees, but probably served to
rengthen the smaller estimates of
e yield.
Lazy Man
•om the Detroit Free Press.
Representative Harry Helm of Ken- !
cky told in a war tax argument a ,
ory about a lazy man. ;
‘I once asked this man.” said Mr
elm, "how, since he couldn’t read, he •
anaged to put in the time day after
,y without doing a stroke of work. -
‘The lazy mai» yawned, took a chow
tobacco and answered: ;
• Wall, Congressman Helm, sometimes '
sets an’ thinks, an' then ag’in I jest 1
ts.’
^REYNOLDS & JULIAN
BROKERS |:
Member* N. O. Cotton Exchange
Chicago Board of Trade
Correspondent* H. & B. Beer, New j '
Orleans, La., Clement Curtis & Co., j
Chicago, J. S. Bache & Co.,
New York
L. D. Phone 889 j1
303-4-5*6 Empire Bldg. j
Birmingham, Ala.
Medium Cows—7@8c.
Cutters—u®6Vsc.
Canners—5%@5%c.
Heavy Bulla—7®,Sc.
Light Bulls—6®7c.
Oxen—5<&7c.
Fat Yearlings—7®8c.
Hides and Tallow
No. 1 Green Salt Hides—17$ iSc.
No. 2 Green Salt Hides—I6@l7c.
Half Cured Hides—Kgpilc less.
No. 1 Green Hides—14@15c.
No. 2 Green Hides—13®14c
No. 1 Dry Flint Hides—27®2Sc.
No. 2 Dry Flint Hides—26® 27e.
No. 1 Dry Salt Hides—24(§2uc.
No. 2 Dry Salt Hides—23®24c.
Goat Skins—80©90e.
Damaged Hides—Half price.
Sheep Skino Wool—$1.23@L50.
Lamb S^ins—7oe@$1.00.
Horse Hides—$l(g)1.50.
Ginseng, Wild—$7@S.
Colt Skins—25®60c.
Shearing Skins—25@75c.
Goat Skins—r75@85o.
Hog Skins—25® 50c.
Beeswax—33 ® 35c.
Tallow—12® 14c.
Washed Wool—75 @ 80c.
Clear Unwashed Wool—55® bOc.
Burry Grease Wool—35®37c.
Cotton
Good middling . 29%
Strict middling . 20H
Middling . 2S94
Strict low middling .. 28
Pig Iron 0
(Under Government Basis.)
Coke Iron Nr. l .$33 00
S. li. Stewart^ Co.
401-2 Woodward Bldg.
Grain handled in loin lOOO l»u»licl* and
upward. AImo fractional lot* of atocls*
Ferauual Attention to All Urdera
Private \V irea W. 1. l'UKLTSi
Phoue Main 5417 Manager
W. E. Campbell
Cotton
Stocks, grain, provisions and cotton
seed oil. Correspondents Shepard A
Gluck. New Orleans; E. W. Wagner &
Co , New York and Chicago. Continu
ous quotations; private wires to all
exchanges. T
616 and 617 Woodward Hid*.,
Telephone Main 6141
Hubbard Bros. & Co.
Cotton Merchants, Hanover Square. If,
Y, Members Now York Cotton Ex
change. New Orleans Cotton Exchange,
New York Produce Exchange. Associat
ed Members Liverpool Cotton Associa
tion. Orders solicited for the purchase
and sale of Cotton and Cotton Seed Oil
for future delivery. Special attention
and liberal terms given for consign
ments of spot cotton for delivery. Cor
respondence invited.
Railroad Schedule
Corrected November it, 101S
Arrival and doparture of passenger
trains. Birmingham: The following
schedule figures published as informa
tion. are not guaranteed. *«-t
BIRMINGHAM TERMINAL STATION
Southern Railway System
(Southern Hall wily Co.)
fj<>. Arrive from i No. Depart to
19 U s HBtor 7:35 p [ 24 Jax-N.Y. 4:35 n
5:20 a j 12 Atlanta 12:45 a
11:58 p 40 Atlanta 5'30a
11:25 a 30 44 's'naton 9.00 a
i.'lop 11 Or'nvflle 7:00a
10:[Oa 19.Selma 540a
5:35 p 27 Selma 6:00 p
12:2^ it 15 Columbus 4:10 p
LI Atlanta
19 Atlanta
16 Co’bun
L2 Gr'ville
18 Selma
20 Selma
!3 Jax-N.Y.
Southern Railway System
(A. (1,
No. Arrive from
1 Cin-W’t’nl1:25 p
New O.
3 Cin
4 New O.
5 Ch'n’oga
11 Ch’n’oga
6 Merid’n
2 Merid’n
45 a
11:15a
1 >
1:10 p
10.00 p
11:10 a
11:40 p
s. II. H.i
n,°:t _ Depart to
IN.O.-aSp’t 1140 p
2 Cin. WTn 8:00 a
3 New O. 11:25 a
J Cin. 8:05 p
5 Meridian 4:10 n
22 Ch'n’oga 5:00a
0 Ch'n’oga 4:00 p
11 Meridian 5.50 *
Frisco Lines
No.
106 K. City'D‘?tf3t0tS
104 K. City 11:00 p
926 Amory* 4 00 d
922 Memphis 7:00 a
■Jo. Arrive from
105 K. City 3:50 p
103 K. City 5:35 p
125 Amory* 10:10 a
121 Memphis 6:10 p
Central of Ga. Ry.
Jo. Arrive from No. Depart tr
: Macon 10:25 p , 2 Macon 7:00 a
'Jax-sav. 11:50 a 10 Jax-Sav 4 *5 n
: M’cn-Col. 12:15 p I 4 Col.-M’c’n 3:50 p
Seaboard Air I.ine Ry.
Jo. Arrive from i No. Depart to
6 N. Y. 10:10 p 6 N. Y. 6:30a
IN. Y 1:40 p | UN. Y. 2 30 p
1 P’mont 11 -10 a I 20 P’dmont 5:20 p
UllnoiH Central Ry.
Jo Arrive.from No. Depart to
I Chicago 4:10 p 110 Chicago 12:15 p
.OCISY1LLE A \ASHYIU,E STATION
L. A N. H. R.
Jo. Arrive from i No. Depart to
1 Cin.
2 New O.
3 Cin.
4 New O.
5 Decatur
7 Cin.
0 Mon'g'ry
5 Decatur*
2 Mon'g'y*
9:21 a !
12 :15 p
3:45 p I
8:53 p ■
7:30 p |
3: 50 a
7:20 j< !
9.40 a
11:00a i
1 New O.
2 Cin.
5 New O.
4 Cin.
6 Decatur
8 Cin.
9 Mu'.t u'rv
14 Dacatur*
11 Mon'g'ry*
Birmingham Mineral
9:31 a
12:30 p
4 00 p
9:03 p
7:20 a
11:45 p
6:00 a
5 20 p
4:20 p
Jo. Arrive from
35 Praco* 4:55 p
48 T'loosa 1115 a
42 Blocton 7:35 p
45 An'ston 10:40 a
47 An'ston 6:50 p
02 T'loosa
No.
Depart to
36 Praco* 9:25 »
41 Blocton 6:30 a
49 T'loosa 2:55 p
44 An'ston 2:50 p
46 An'ston 8:40 p
5:30 p | 101 T'loosa 7:00 a
A.. B. A A.
Io. Arrive from | No. Depart to
3 M'ch'ter 11:30 a [ 32 M’Ch'ter 6:00 a
1 M’eh’ter 10:55 p 24 M'ctt'tar 4:15 p
•Daily except Sunday.

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