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The Birmingham age-herald. [volume] (Birmingham, Ala.) 1902-1950, November 22, 1918, Image 10

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038485/1918-11-22/ed-1/seq-10/

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[Talk to the Masses Through Age-Her ala Classified Columns—490o 11
THE AGE-HERALD
Alabama’s Greatest Newspaper.
Complete Associated Press
Dispatches Daily.
Exclusively Sunday
Classified Advertising
RATES
CASH IN ADVANCE
One time, per line .. 10
Three consecutive insertions,
per line .08
Seven consecutive ins* -tions,
per line.07
50u lines on contract to be used
i ■» 12 months, .06 per line
daily; .07 per lino Sunday
No classified advertising accepted
for less than .30.
Count six words to the line, 10 lines
to inch.
TELEPHONE SERVICE
Telephone your order and we will
accept your ad over the telephone,
charge it to you at the regular rate,
and send bill the following morning.
Call Main 4000 and ask for Want
Adv. Dept.
AUTOMOBILE stolen, five-1
passenger Kissel Kar, 1919 j
license No. 05272, engine!
No. 385900; equipped with;
three Goodyear and one
Kelly-Springfield tires; ex
tra Goodyear tire on rack;
$50 reward for information ■
leading to recovery of car.
, Phone 1587. Address 1921
Ave. D.
!>
fcTOLEN—1918 Ford touring car; Tennes
see license No. 26299; motor No. 2469126;
black cap on radiator; right front
casing cut near rim; radiator leaking;
one Eclipse spark plug; $25 for.recov
ery of car; $25 for apprehension of
thief. E. B. Besley, Chattanooga, Tenn.
jBTOLEN-—Wednesday afternoon on 2nd
ave., 6-passenger Ford, with 4 cases
Bradley & Metcalf Co. shoe samples;
handsome reward for recovery. R. rf.
Barclift. Phone West End 669 or Mor
j ris hotel. _
j &TRA YED—-From North Birmingham,
November 18, large blue cow; both ears
marked; horns point upward; about 7
years old; $10 reward for recovery. J.
A. Hughes* 2520 86th ave. Phone Main
s T234-W.
£25 REWARD for return of 5-passenger
Ford automobile; Tennessee license No.
32162; engine No. 2279916. Notify L. R.
Wade, care Adamson Motor Co., Main
7021.
1.JL0ST—A 32-degree Masonic ring at
Red Cross headquarters; “C. S. W. to
P. O. W.” inside. Leave at Red Cross
headquarters, Loveman, Joseph &
I Loeb’s. Reward._
(COST—Two red and whit© hound dogs,
names Trip and Troup. Reward to any
one that will call Dr. Fisher, Main 44,
or Dr. Moore, Main 8326, and tell where
they can be found.
LOST^-Old-fashioned gold breastpin, with
belt and buckle across face; return to
Miss Temple Roberts, 2nd floor Louis
Pizitz, and receive liberal reward.
ONE black heifer about 2 years old, came
to my place November 20; 79th and
Rugby ave. Owner can get same by
calling at my place._
LOST—Thursday afternoon at Fourth ave.
entrance to city hall, green and blue
covered shopping bag; reward for re
turn. Call Main 7772.
FOUND—Two "good investments; Liberty
Bonds and my $30 suits and overcoats.
'' Marc Linx, 1911 1st ave.
LOST—Ten dollars if you don't buy one
of my $30 suits or overcoats. Mara
Linx, 1911 1st ave.
FOL»JNl>—The uest and suits and
overcoats in Birmingham. Marc Linx,
‘ 1911 1st ave.
ANNOl NCEMENTS
SAVE COAL
By cleaning your furnaces, repairing
your grates, smoking chimneys, sweep
£ ing your chimneys; brick, tile and ce
4- ment work of all kinds; all work guar
anteed. Phone Main 8910.
V*TT7i fyf TV Second hand clothes,
iWHi X»U 1 shoes. 2116 2d Ave.
Phone 1581.
£ PLAY the piano for private dances.
Call Main 4943.
PERSONAL
• stWANTED—The present address of E.
M. Wheeler and G. C. Clowdus, road
contractors; last heard of located in
Birmingham district; wanted on im
portant business matters. A. A. Grif
fith. Cullman, Ala.
-'Sappiest woman In Georgia; I am fres
r from morphine after using 16 years;
writ* me for information; free to all
* sufferers. Mrs. Mary C, Mitchell, No.
*.« U E. Linden St.. Atlanta. Ga.
. 7_HELP WANTED—MALE
JVTANTED—Coal loaders,
P machine runners, mine la
~ bor and carpenters. Apply
,, [U. S. Employment Service
or Corona Coal Co., 1033
First National Bank.
iWANTED—Hotel
steward; machinist;
experienced expressman; laundry driv
er; contractors for hauling lumber; cyl
inder press feeder; repair man for fur
niture; experienced printers; colored
porters; 4 garage men; automobile elec
trician; colored office boy; stationary
fireman; 3 men cooks. Birmingham
Employment company, 308 21st. st., N.,
Ala. State Land bldg.
ANTED—Route boys;
good pay; will not interfere
With school. D. D. Monroe,
«o circulation dept., Age-Her
ald.
WANTED—Young man stenographer
ji
6
for position with large corporation;
work consists of only small amount
of stenographic work and assisting
with general office work; no book
keeping experience necessary; good
•alary and future to right man. Ad
dress H-43, care Age-Herald.
<; A permanent position can be secured for
you through the
: INTER-AMERICAN CO.
? We have helped others and we can help
cr you.
Commercial positions only.
1216 Jefferson Co. Bank Bldg.
.WANTED — Office boy,
,, with wheel; salary $8 per
* week. Apply circulation de
% partment, Age-Herald._
j WANTED—Middle age man, white or
^ colored, to live with couple four miles
a out from Birmingham, to look after
d place during day while we are at work.
Address L-87, Age-Herald.
WAITED— Male, white meter readers.
* Apply Auditing Dept., B. R„ L, & P.
j*p?Co.
5 BABB EH wanted; J26 guarantee. Grand
Hotel Barber Shop. Phone 437, Besse
mer, Ala.
■’ AN up-to-date barber wanted. J oh n
Ap ringer. Fairfield, Ala.
_help wanted—male; _ _
OPEN NOW
BARB HR SHOP NO. 3
102 N. 21st ST.
COBUNS & ROBBINS.
WALTER COLLINS, Mgr.
BARBERS WANTED._
WANTED—Men who can do three things:
First, buy Liberty Bonds; second, buy
more Liberty Bonds; third, buy one of
my $30 suits or overcoats. Marc Linx,
1911 1st ave. ___
WANTED—Young man for receiving
clerk; must write legible hand. Apply
in person to the manager, Cudatty
Packing Co., 2307 1st ave.
WANTED—Boy 10 to 18 years old to do
house work. Apply to 1106 N. 31st st.,
ready for work.
NEWS agents on railroad trains. Union
News Co., Terminal station.
JH KLP
\WA^^ED^^^oiC^htte^Arnerican widow
woman or poor orphan girl to cook and
keep house for widower; age 20 to 35
years; four children, baby 4 years old;
no washing; a good home for the right
woman; will pay $5 per week. W. D.
Suther, 313 First Ave., Pratt City, Ala.
CASHIERS; multigraph operator and
stenographer; shoe saleslady; experi
enced corsetier; girls for factory; skirt
maker; white waitresses; maids for
hotel; tray girl. Birmingham Employ
ment company, 308 21st st., N., Ala.
State Land bldg.
WANTED—Ambitious girl with high
school training to work in the mailing
department in payment for course. Ap
ply Massey Business College.
WANTED—Woman to cookHand do gen
eral housework. Apply 2833 Jefferson
ave., S.
FIRST-CLASS cook wanted; good wages.
Phone Main 2l0L
HELP WANTED—MALE AND
_FEMALE_
IF you are out of employment or want
to better your condition call to see
us; our methods are fair and terms
reasonable; it costs you nothing to
investigate our system. Birmingham
Employment Co., 308 21st st., N., op
posite courthouse.
WANTED—White and colored waitress
es; maids for hotel; colored porters;
laundry driver; other openings. Apply
Birmingham Employment company,
308 21st st., N., Ala. State Land bldg.
SITUATIONS^ WANTED—-MALE
MIDDLE-AGED man de
sires light, permanent
employment immediately.
G-43, Age-Herald.
EXPERIENCED salesman wants posi
tion with local firm; prefer selling
groceries; also would consider lines
regarding trade of this sort. B-58,
Age-Herald. _
SALESMAN wants position with local
firm; would prefer dry goods line;
formerly traveled entire south; can fur
nish A-l references. Address A-o8, j
Age-Herald.
WANTED—Position as stenographer; ex- :
perienced; call at once, McBride, Mor- i
ris hotel. _ j_ !
SITUATIONS WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED—Position as stenographer or !
secretary; have had three years experi- ,
ence in stenographic and clerical work; j
can use dictaphone; good references. |
0-57, Age-Herald. _ _I
WANTED—Position^ by” stenographer
with 6% years experience; can furnish
any references. Phone Main 5425-W.
AGENTS WANTED
COMPLETE history of the world war.
Large book; low price; big pront;
enormous sale; outfit only 25c; harvest
for hustlers. Southern Map Co., At
lanta, Ga.
^^SALESMEN^WANTEp^^^
ST^CK^SALESMEN^LocaL^enterprise;
good money for hustlers. Address C-57,
Age-IIerald.
_ FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
F^onTTATrE^agALDlJE
GRADING OUTFIT;
COMPLETE EQUIP
MENT; NOW ON WORK
ON PROFITABLE JOB;
CAN CONTINUE YEAR
OR MORE; GOOD THING
TO PARTY WITH CASH;
WILL SELL WHOLE OR
HALF INTEREST. AD
DRESS J-57, CARE AGE
HERALD.
FOR SALE
1 12”xl5” double drum mine hoist.
2 8”xl0” double drum mine hoists.
1 10"xl2” single drum mine hoist.
1 614”xl2” double drum hoist with boiler.
2 new double-drum hoists for motor
drive.
1 Berlin No. 114, 6-in.xl5-in. planer and
matcher.
MOTORS 4
3 phase 60-cycle, 220-volt Ifew motors;
sizes 1, 2, 3, 5, 714, 15 h. p.
Charles J. Geohegan
Machine Company
15 South 20th st. Birmingham, Ala.
FOR SALE—Steam tug, tOO horse power,
81 feet long, 16 feet beam. 5V4 feet draft;
fully equipped; recently completely
overhauled and passed by U. S. gov
ernment inspector; bargain. E. Ness
Co.. P. O. Box 602. Savannah. Ga.
BARGAIN for cash, one 40 h.p. boiler,
one 30 h. p. upright boiler with double
drum hoist attached. Phone Main 3bll,
or address L. W. Milner, 716 Brown
Marx bldg. _
IF you want an excellent library can
sell you one at a bargain. J. B. Cobbs,
care Federal Reserve bank.
FOR SALE—Suits and overcoats at *25
and *30, worth *10 more. Maro Linx,
1911 1st ave.
WANTffIJi—M'ECELLANEQUS
WE DYE GARMENTS
Also plumes any shade to match sample.
FURS AND PLUSHES our specialty;
out-of-town patrons solicited. Karp
French Dry Cleaning Co., 419 N. 19th
st. Main 9511.
W E buy second - hand
clothes and pay more. 2206
2d ave. Phone 7047.
SECOND hand boiler 80. 100 or 125 H. P.:
40 to GO H. P. engine; trimmer for 25,000
capacity mill; all must be in good condi
tion and a bargain for cash. Address
P-55, Age-Herald^_
WANTED—PINE, POPLAR. AND GUM
BOARDS; A LI. THICKNESSES. AD
DRESS P. O. BOX 668. SAVANNAH,
GA. _
wirpay_the_mgnest-pnces~ror_sacKs_an3
sell cheaper than anyone. Birmingham
Bag Co.. 830 N. 19th st. Main 5122 Bir
mingham. Ala.
I BUY gold crowns, platinum and teeth
on Monday and Wednesday. Dr. F. K.
Perkins. 60S First National Bank bldg
WE buy and sell household goods.
LOWREY FURNITURE CO.
Main 3115. 2023 3rd avo.
EXPERT, hat and garment cleaner's.
Gluck's. 1713 3d ave. Phone 2372.
HAIR CUTTING. 25c at lF29~4th~avi
^ BCJSINESS^^PPORTUNITIES ^
FOR SALE—Manufacturing plant
(new) in Birmingham district. Ad
dress Box 466. Anniston. Ala.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
A Safe 10 Per Cent
Investment
If a 10 per cent net business property
investment will interest you write owner
at once; safe investments of this char
acter are scarce and in demand. Ad
dress N-57, care Age-Herald.
ESTABUSHED manufacturer wants ca^
pable men to establish branch and man
age sales forces; “Kerodo.x,” the new,
inexpensive heat; no wood, no coal; $300
to $1500 necessary; you handle own
money; successful agencies established.
Somack, Inc., 416 N. Howard st., Balti
more, Md.
U1L I'KUPEKTIKS FOR SALE-Oil and
gas leases in Texas and Oklahoma and
stock for sale in new company. Ex
cellent opportunity for investor. Ad
dress C. E. King, 413-414 World Bldg.,
Tulsa. Okla.
WANTED—Standard drilling outfit com
plete; will either buy or contract the
drilling of well 3000 feet. Address Tus
caloosa Oil and Gas Co., Tuscaloosa,
Ala. P. O. Box 154.
FOR SAEhj—Hotel and boarding house, ;
furnished; 18 rooms; modern conveni
ences; 1 block from Union depot; 1 1
block from courthouse; a bargain if tak- I
en at once. Mrs. R. O. Bell, Aberdeen, j
Miss.
WANTED—Jo buy, stock in country j
banks; control preferred; capital not ex
ceeding $25,000. Address W. R. Taylor, ,
737 First National Bank bldg., Bir- j
mingham, Ala.
_auctio^ales__
FI JR NI TURE*^and^^li ou seh oitT^^oodta
bought, sold and exchanged; private
sales and auction; don’t sell or buy
unless you call to see us. We know
value and pay better prices; large lots
especially. Birmingham Auction and
Storage Co., 2008 3rd ave. Phone Main
9383.
ON December 4, 1918, L will sell at public
outcry 30 pork hogs, 12 head of good
cattle, two farm mules, 200 bushels
corn, all household goods and a lot of
other stuff; everybody is invited. W. D.
Lovelady, Lawley, Ala., R. 1.
_AUTOM O BILES_
FORD8~starT^easy'"7n^:oW
our new 1919 carburetors; 34 miles per
gallon; use cheapest gasoline or half
kerosene; increased power; styles for
any motor; very slow on high; attach it
yourself; big profits to agents; money
back guarantee; 30 days trial. Air
Friction Carburetor Co., 468 Madison,
Dayton, Ohio.
FOR SALE—1918 ‘’Six” Studebaker car; 1
will accept Liberty Bonds or smaller
car as part payment. See it at 510 23d
st., Ensley.
FOR SALE—Reading Standard motor
cycle, side car and top; practically
new; run less than 500 miles; $350; $125
cash, balance $25 per month. Claude
Lee, 821 3d Ave.
AUTO parts nickelplated like new. S.
M. Bernheim Electric Co., 2023 1st ave.
Main 6100.
AUTOMOBILES
FRESH, NEW FACTORY
“SECONDS” JUST RE
CEIVED-STOCK UP
While they laet; sudh tires are difficult
to buy, and will soon be unobtainable
until after the war ceases and manufac
turing; conditions become normal.
SIZE. PRICE. TREAD. TYPE.
30x3.310.00 nlain clincher
30x3%. 15.00 non-skid clincher
32x3%.17.00 plain St. Side
31x4.21.75 non-ekld clincher
31x4.21.00 plain clincher
32x4 .. 22.50 non-skid St. Side
33x 4 . 22.00 plain St. Side
33x4. 24.30 non-skid Q. D.
34x4 . 22.50 plain St. Side
34x4. 24.75 non-skid S.S.&Q.IJ.
36x4 . 30.00 plain St. Side
37x4%. 40.50 plain Q. D.
36x4%. 38.25 non-skid St. Side
37x5. 42.00 non-skid St. Side
TERMS: SPOT CASH. C. O. D. SHIP
MENTS, 10 PER CENT WITH ORDER.
Blacklock-Posner Tire Co.
HOME OF GOOD BARGAINS.
Phones Main 807-808.
431-42* South 20th Street.
Birmingham, Alb
SEE C. C. MACK FOR
THE BEST BUY IN
SECOND-HAND CARS.
1 ITupmobile roadster, model 52; in first-*
class condition, mechanically perfect;
this is a bargain.
FORD TRUCK.
1 Ford truck, 1917 model, mechanically
in perfect condition. •
1 5-passenger Kissel Kar, in first-cless
condition, new tires and practically new
car; well worth seeing.
1 National Twin Six, 7-passcnger car; a
wonder. See it means to J>uy it.
C. C. MACK.
2207 1ST AVE.
A FEW USED CARS
At a bargain. We would quote the prices
but we might embarrass our neighbors.
COME SEE THEM.
DE SHAZO MOTOR CO.,
404 S. 21st St. Main 1761.
FORD TRUCKS.
A number of used Ford trucks in splen
did condition; also Ford touring cars
and roadsters for sale.
CRUSE-CRAWFORD MANUFACTUR
ING COMPANY.
Ave. B and 22nd St. Main 2145.
Does Your Car Receive
the Right Attention?
If not, store your car with us, and when
you cgll each morning you'll find it
"spick and span."
E. N. YOUNG, MGR.,
PALACE GARAGE,
1700 Second Ave.
FOR SALE
1917 model, little Six Buick roadster,
with fine practically new cord tires;
two inner tubes and spot light; in first
class mechanical condition; $850 will
buy tl»is car; well worth $1250. Phone
Main 4123-J.
^PASSENGER FORD CAR
1917 model, in splendid mechanical con
dition; owner leaving city; a bargain
if you act quick; looks good. Call Ens
ley 414.
AUTOMOBILE
Five-passenger Grand Six. will sell cheap
or trade for real estate. Phone Besse
mer 138.
FORD TIRES ,
$6 and $7. double tread. Wyatt John
son. vulcanizer. 308 S. 20th at.
FOR SALE—Ford touring car, 1918 model;
Heintz-Spurgfield starter; Hassler shock
absorbers, ventilated windshield; can be
seen 1519 Allen street.
SPECIAL BARGAINS—Two 36x5 slightly
used tires, J. & D. straight sides, $15
each. Acme Rebuilt Tire Co., 215 S. 20th
st. Main 8136.
FOR SALE—Ford 1^17 model combined
truck and passenger car; good condi
tion. Kirkpatrick Sand & Cement Co.,
1 S. 24th st. Phone Main 1225.
OVERLAND—For sale. Overland SO. 1918
model; sacrifice to quick buyer. Phone
Main 7144-J.
1917 Little Buick 6 for sale, $850; in tip
top shape. Main 8217. 2300 1st ave.
ROOMS FOR RENT
NICELY furnished room, with good
board; steam heat. S22 and 821 S. 20tli st.
;_ ROOMS FOR RENT
HOTEL EDWARDS
3d ave. and 17th at., modern rooms, pri
vate baths, steam heat, running wa
ter, 75e lo $2 par day. Weekly rates.
Centrally located. E. T. Milligan,
proprietor.
CAPITOL PARK INN
Cor. 20th and 7th ave.; lavatory and
steam heat, $1 and up per day; $4 and
up per week. Private baths
ONE bright, cheerful room, with small
kitchen and gas stove, lights, hot water
and phone furnished for couple; no
children. Main 6125-J.
ONE room at rate of $1.25 per day,
for balance of month; steam heat;
hot water; private home; references.
Main 6884-J. _
NICELY lurnished front room, half
block from the Tutwiler. 2025 5th Ave.
Phone Main 6603.
EN fc>LE Y — Jiuo Ave. T7, roomers ana
boarders wanted; convenient to
^airfield.
FOR RENT—Nicely furnished front room,
close in, with all conveniences. 618 N.
23d st. Phone Main 6996.
ROOMS WANTED
WANTED—By bachelor, good size room,
unfurnished, in walking distance on
Nortside; light, heat, attention in
cluded; give price. Address K-57, Age
Herald.
BOARDERS WANTED_
TABLE boarders wanted; good table.
1913 Ave. D.
_HOUSES WANTED_
WANTED—To rent 5 or 6
room apartment, South
Highlands, or small house
east of 20th st., preferred.
Phone Room 503 Tutwiler.
- , RE W ESTATE..()A NS
On business, residence and farm prop
erly; rates, 6 ro 7 per cent; prompt
ser\ ice.
JEM ISON CO., 211 20th _S_t_
WE negotiate loans and sell real estate.
Can handle desirable farm loans. Mc
Connell, Anglin, White. 2023 3d ave.
WE negotiate mortgage loans at low
rates and buy mortgage paper. Leon
ard-Riley Co., 725 Woodward.
_REAL ESTATE FOR SALE _
NORTH HIGHLANDS
BARGAIN
Splendid 5-room cottage on full size j
lot; all improvements; near school i
and car; convenient to Acipco shops; :
a big bargain at $2250.
J. WILBUR COL?
MESSER REALTY (JO., INC.,
Scientific Realtors,
216 N. 21st st. Main 35
OVER THE MOUNTAIN
7-room bungalow and 4 acres of land,
all under hog wire fence; beautiful
view: house has water and sewerage j
connections: large bath room with lav- j
atory, toilet and porccdain tub; sink j
and hot water tank in kitchen; located !
on highway, 18 minutes run in Ford
from' town; price $300); easy terms.
LIDE LAND CO.
1914-15 Jeff. Co. Bank Bldg.
WESTEND
BARGAIN
6-room cottage on lot 50x190 feet; near
school. This is a pickup at $22.50;
terms can be arranged; possession
given in short time. Call
J. WILBUR COLE
MESSER REALTY CO., INC.,
Scientific Realtors,
216 N. 21st. st. Main 85
HOMFS FOR SALE
HOMES FOR SALE
HOMES FOR SALE
In every section of city. J. Murray
Norrnent. 2026 1st ave.
FOR SALE—Central Park bungalow; im
mediate possession; terms if desired.
Phone or see owner. 215 First National
Bank building. Main 834-Johnson.
IMPROVED and unimproved property
for sale; South Highlands. Owner,
T. O. Box 612.
REAL ESTATE FOR EXCHANGE
WILL EXCHANGE Anniston^business
property paying 10 per cent on price
asked for Birmingham real estate; our
location is on Noble street in same
block with postoffice; new 2-story
brick; call and tell us what you have.
Ingram Land Co., 312-14 Empire Bldg.,
Birmingham.
REA L ESTATE WANTED
I WILL pay *3 for any sur
veyed lot in Jefferson county, Ala
bama. For particulars address .C-5S,
care Age-Herald._
MORTGAGES and real estate bargains
bought. Bains Realty Co, 2127 2d
Ave.
___ MUSICAL __
WE BUY
Or exchange Victor and Columbia rec
ords.
MUSICAL EXCHANGE,
2027 Second Ave.
^ TEACHERS
TEACHERS leaving army or war work,
and all other available, can quickly
locate through us. Special enrollment.
Southern Teachers’ Agency. Chatta
nooga, Tenn.
THE ACME TEACHERS" AGENCY
needs teachers: splendid salaries. Hea
ley bldg., Atlanta, Ga.
ARM^AN^IMBERJ^NDS _
W^LI^^ay^lTiS^ir^acre^cash for any
Alabama land. V-54, Age-Herald.
CLASSIFIED BUSI
Firms listed below In this directory ar<
ham. Each of them want and apprec
AUTO TIRES
SPECIAL BARGAINS
Three 35r.5 Goodrich plain tread,
straight side; fully guaranteed; list
price $52.90, our price $47.61.
One 36x5, slightly used Goodrich
weather tread; straight side, $18.
One 36x5, slightly used Goodrich;
safety tread. Q. D. clincher; $15.
ACME REBUILT TIRE CO..
213 S. 20th St. Main 81S6.
" BINDERS
BIRMINGHAM PRINTING AND BIND
ERY CO.—1703H 3d ave. Main 6896.
BICYCLES
BICYCLES and motorcycles; best
makes. Bryant Bros., 114 19th st.,
Bessemer. Ala. Phone Bessemer 10.*.
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES AND
REPAIRS
WII.COX ELECTRIC CO.. 313 N. 19th
st. Phones 1169-422._
HEATfNG
HAHN-EOREMAN CO., heating. 1908
Ave B. Main 195.
" KODAKS
KODAK finishing by mail our spec
ialty. 1-ollar's Kodak Parlor. Lyric
B1 dg.. Birmingham. Ala.
' Laundries
EXCELSIOR STEAM LAUNDRY. 1707
2d ave. rhone Main 5312.
MOTOR" REWINDING
MIDDLEBROOKS EIJ3CTR1C CO., con
tracting. 413 N. 19th st. Main 223.
^ FARMLAND TIMBER LANDS ,
FOR SALE—70-acre farm, level, ^fer- i
tile land, part In virgin timber, run
ning water, good 8-room house and I
outbuildings, including also general
merchandise store; on pike road near
railroad station; 18 miles from Chat
tanooga. Tenn ; big bargain; reason
able terms; write or see owner. R.
C. Jones, Rock Springs, Ga.
iF you v ant to buy or sell farm land,
write Ingram Land Co., Birmingham.
LIVE ST&CK
DRIED BEET PULP
POSITIVELY THE BEST. FEED
obtainable: for
COWS AND RABBITS
THE MOST ECONOMICAL*MILK PRO
DUCER-ORDER EARLY, THE
SUPPLY IS LIMITED.
Mercantile Supply Co.
2229-31 SECOND AVE.
PHONES 562-563-564.
Needs of the Hour—
Now Due
Taxes.
m Insurance.
Coal.
Repairs on Home.
Sickness.
Financed Through the Mor
ris Plan—8 Per Cent—No
More.
_107 N. 21st Street_
Drs.
DOZIER
DOZIER
Specialists
Nervous. Blo.od. Skin. Pelvic ami
Chronic Disease*
Our Medical Institute was establish
ed in Birmingham over 25 years ago
and is one of the best equipped
medical institutions in Alabama. We
make no charge for consultation and
examination.
Office 2020Vz 1st Ave.
“SAMMY” BACKERS
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DEMANDS RIGHTS
FOR ARMENIANS
London, October 20.—The British gov
ernment is determined that the wrongs
suffered by the Armenians at the hands
of the Turks shall be righted and their
recurrence made impossible, writes Lord
Robert Cecil, the parliamentary under
secretary of state for foreign affairS, to
Viscount Bryce.
Four points mentioned by Lord Cecil
as the charter of the Armenians’ right to
liberation at the hands of the allies, are:
“The refusal of the Armenians as a
nation in the fall of 1914 to work for the
cause of Turkey and her allies, although
offers of autonomy were made If they
actively assisted Turkey in the war.
“Partly on account of this courageous
refusal, the Ottoman Armenians ■tVere
systematically murdered by the Turkish
government in 1915, two-thirds of the
population being exterminated by most
cold-blooded and Fiendish methods—700,
000 men, women and children being
killed.
“From the beginning of the war that
half of the Armenian nation under Rus
sian sovereignty organized volunteer
corps and bore the brunt of some of the
heaviest fighting in Caucasia under their
leader, Andranik.
“These same Armenian corps after the
Russian breakdown took over the Cau
casian front and for live months held up
the Turkish advance and thus rendered
important service to the British in Meso
potamia.”
RUSSIA IS FACING
TERRIBLE WINTER
London, September 26.—(Corresponden
of the Associated Press.)—Russia is fa
lng a winter of hunger and cold, au
mented this year because of the extrer
scarcity of fuel which prevails in s
parts of that country. The lack of cc
has been keenly felt ever since the lo
of the Donetz basin to the Germans ear
last sprtng. It affected the railroads ai
caused factories to be shut down.
The Czecho-Slovak operations in Sib
ria and in the Ural region have pr
vented any relief from that direction.
The stores of wood in Moscow ai
Petrograd, owing to the lack of transpc
tation facilities and other difficulties t
numerous to mention, are far from su
fielent to meet the demands of a loi
winter. A Moscow paper estimate
months ago that the supplies of wood
that city would hardly suffice to satis
the needs of public utilities this wint<
and that in consequence all private e
tcrprlses and homes could not hope
get even a limited quantity of it.
To one who has experienced the di
comforts of a cold Russian winter ev<
under better conditions, the situation
far from alluring. The chilly atmosphe
of an unheated apartment, darkness
the streets and homes, the quiet of a ci
undisturbed fcy the rumble of street ca
and motor vehicles, and, lastly, the u
comfortable feeling of an empty stoma'
—such are the prospects of the comil
winter in Russia.
NESS DIRECTORY
business concerns of Birmlne
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MACHINERY FOR SALE
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UNDERTAKERS'
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WATCH REPAIRING
WATCH repairing and jewelry i
ular prices. Meyer Goldner, 302
street.
Few Realize How Great
Is the Influence of Mrs.
Wilson in World Affairs
By HIGH W. ROBERTS
Washington, November 21.—(Special.) (
Margaret of Anjou, in respect to her hus
band, the king, was termed “the bet
ter man of the two.” Mrs. Woodrow Wil
son will, of course, never be so termed,
but, in after --years, it may be admitted
by the President that during the trying
years of his administration she was
his mainstay and his principal adviser.
And this prediction takes into consider
ation the redoubtable and astute Colo
nel House.
The general impression which will
later be established fact, that Mrs. Wil
son will accompany the President on
his trip to Paris, reminds that when
ever on extended visits out of Washing
ton the chief executive has been accom
panied by Mrs. Wilson. It is said to
be true that whenever confronted with
the necessity of taking some action or
vital importance the President, after
conferring with Colonel House, members
of his cabinet and members of Con
CURB IS LIFTED
Order Effective December 2
Allows Export of Raw
Cotton to the Allies
Washington, November 21.—Restrictions
on the exportation of raw cotton to
Great Britain, Italy, Belgium, Japan and
France, were removed today by the war
trades board, and the committee on cot
ton distribution. The order is effective
December 2.
Exportation restrictions on raw cotton
going to Spain, whereby the quantity ex
portable was limited and alioted among
the various shippers, also were with
drawn, effective November 22. After
that date applications will be considered
with a view to granting licenses freely.
Regulations which required that the
grade and staple be specified on appli
cation for export and that the applicant
disclose the existence of an actual sales
contract or freight allotment also were
withdrawn effective November 22. In
connection with cotton for export to
the allied nations, the special export
license will be issued to the proper cus
toms officials at the point of exit who
will be authorized to pass shipments in
accordance therewith.
Applications to export raw cotton to
other destinations will be considered ana
granted freely, the announcement said
and where agreements for shipments ex
ist international licenses will be granted,
in accordance with them.
FOREIGN DEBTS
TO UNITED STATES
By HOLLAND
New York, November 21.—(Special.)
The Secretary of the Treasury, William
G. McAdoo, holds, as a cashier of a bank
would hold, approximately $8,000,000,000,
presumably soon to be as much as $10,
000,000,000, in notes which our friends
across the sea have given to him in
evidence of their indebtedness to the
United States government. Many per
sons have wondered how the financing
of our credits of billions to our allies
has been transacted; that is to say, what
are the visible evidences of these ob
ligations? They are made evident to the
eye by the notes which foreign govern
ments have given to Mr. McAdoo, as
head of the treasury department, in rec
ognition of the obligations of these gov
ernments to the United States for credits
and loans.
It is not of common knowledge that
when ultimate settlement is made various
offsets against these foreign obligations
will be entered upon the open ledger
which is now the only form of book
keeping which contains the story of
these transactions. It is not possible or
permissible, perhaps, to make report of
the actual amount the United States
owes Great Britain for transporting
American soldiers to England and France.
The greater number of these soldiers
were ferried across the sea in English
ships convoyed by English vessels, and
many may be brought back in English
vessels. It is believed in the financial
district that our government obligated
itself to pay to Great Britain $65 for
every soldier transported to Europe in
an English vessel. How many were in
that way carried across the sea no one
but the government authorities at Wash
ington know. But presumably much the
greater part of 2,000,000 soldiers we sent
to France were taken in English ves
sels. That charge is now terminated,
for we are to transport no more soldiers
to Europe, although an additional charge
for the return of soldiers may be made
The aggregate, however, must amount to
a good many million dollars.
WE BOUGHT IN EUROPE
Then again, the United States has been
a heavy purchaser of supplies of various
kinds and certain munitions of war in
Great Britain and in France, and we
are to pay France for the use by our sol
diers of her railroads and motors. These
purchases will serve in some measure to
offset the debt which Great Britain and
France owe to us. Nevertheless the ag
gregate of our indebtedness to these
nations on account of transportation of
troops and the purchase of supplies must
be a very small sum in comparison with
the total obligations these nations have
incurred in the United States.
By and by when it is possible to close
the ledger and to strike a balance then
these obligations of ours incurred in
England, France and to some extent In
Italy, "will be charged up against the
obligations these nations owe to the
United States. In that way a true bal
ance will be reached.
FOREIGN BONDS COMING
When this is doue then it will be pos
sible to close the ledger, for these debts
will assume a new form. Great Britain,
France and Italy will take up the notes
which they have given to represent their
obligations to us by sending to us gov
ernment bonds. These bonds will bear
interest at an agreed rate so that in
exchange for the notes the treasury de
partment will have iu'its possession some
where near *10,000,000,000 in bonds issued
by England, France and Italy.
.Belgium wilt have no offset for the
loans that nation lias secured in the
United States. We have not been able
to buy anything in Belgium because
that nation has had nothing to sell to
us. Her national bonds, hovAv r, t !
be esteemed by Mr. McAdoo t;
country as excellent securit:
loans we have made to Belgii.
England lias notified our g
that hereafter shet will neet
credits from the United Stat
own account. She will, howe
asistance of this kind in urd<
cor those of our allies who hs
to England in part for suppor
gress, has always gone finally into con
sultation with his wife. It is also said
to be true that the President, on more
than one occasion, has been guided in
international policy by the discernment
and calm conclusions of Mrs. Wilson.
In all world affairs and matters of
state, Mrs. Wilson takes the keenest
interest, and other than the President
and his closest advisers, there is possibly
no better posted person in the world.
Mrs. »vilson has always attended the
joint sessions of Congress when the
President addressed such sessions, and
prior to the beginning and at the con
clusion of each address, the pair has
invariably exchanged glances of under
standing and sympathy.
It is indicated that the presidential
party to Paris will be replete wltn
women. In addition to Mrs. Wilson, the
understanding is that Mrs. Lansing will
accompany the Secretary of State, and
Mrs. Baker, the Secretary of War. Other
ladies may go along.
fore it is presumed that in due time
Secretary McAdoo may make another
credit to Great Britain, not because Great
Britain needs the money herself, for she
is now abundantly able to finance her
own necessities, but because she will need
assistance in financing some of the ob
ligations of those of our allies who turn
to her for aid.
It may be two or three years before
the great ledger in the treasury depart
ment which contains the record of our
loans and also the record of our obliga
tions to England, France and Italy will
be closed, after the balance has been
struck, and the European governments
which have borrowed here take up the
notes with national bonds. These bonds
will be looked upon as an investment
by the United States in the national and
unimpeachable securities issued by Eng
land, France and Italy. They will rep
resent by many hundred millions, even
by billions, a greater aggregate of ob
ligations than any in which the United
States or any other country has ever
heretofore made investment. They will
yield yearly interest which may amount
to as much as $500,000,000 and this in
terest, there is no doubt, will be prompt
ly paid. The bonds themselves may have
a long term, although that is something
to be determined when final settlement
is made.
Out of the taxes amounting to billions
and the loans amounting to other bil
lions, which the war has made it neces
sary for this government to impose and
to issue, are to be furnished the funds
with which these European obligations
will be met at first. Ultimately the
American people may absorb these na
tional bonds, which will be issued by
England, France and Italy, although the
best opinion at present seems to be that
it will be regarded as the better part
for the government itself to maintain
its investment in these bonds until the
time comes when they are paid. How
they can be paid is one of the important
questions of the future. And it may be
many years before that question is an
swered.
WHAT DOES SOLDIER
THINK ABOUT AS
HE ENTERS BATTLE?
With the American Armies in the
Field, October 15.—(Correspondence of
the Associated Press.)—When an
American soldier goes “over the top"
or when he receives a bullet or shrap
nel wound he thinks of his mother.
The French poilu thinks of his wife,
and the British Tommy of liis sweet
heart.
This fact is borne out by the offi
cers and doctors who have served in
all three of the allied armies. They
declare that when the American sol
dier is wounded t’lie first word on his
lips in almost every case is “Mother.”
Even after he is removed to the hos
pital he calls constantly for his
mother. His British ccilsin, however,
seems chiefly absorbed in his sweet
heart, and longs to see her “just once
again,” while his French compatriot
thinks only of his "femme bien
aimee.”
The correspondent of the Associated
Press at the American front asked a
number of soldiers what thought was
most on their minds w.ten mey first
left their trenches to attack the Go**
mans. In nine cases out of 10 the
answer was, “Of home and mother."
There were a few, however, who said
that as they entered the battle their
minds .were given over wholly to
prayer, although they had never be
fore been in the habit of praying.
Some of them kept before them words
of encouragement and counsel con
tained in letters from relatives.
One soldier on the morning of the
attack received a letter from his
mother quoting the Seviptural pltrp.se.
“Trust in the Lord and no enemy
shall prosper against thee." The so -
dier went through one of the bloodiest
battles of the war that day and came
out unscathed.
RUSSIAN PEASANTS
GLAD TO BE FREE OF
BOLSHEVIST RULE
With the American Forces in North
ern Russia, September 18.—(Corre
I spondence of the Associated Press.)
Russian peasants in this district are
glad to be freed from bolshevik rule.
“The bolsheviks promised us that wo.
! would have land and peace and
plenty,” one sturdy old man said to the
Associated Press correspondent," but
we soon learned what was their real
theory. It was just this:
“Tonight I go over and steal your
cow and tomorrow night you come
back and cut my throat and steal it
back.”
The peasants here are now settling
down to what they hope will be order
and tranquility after a long reign of
bolshevik terror.
All along the roads here one finds, in
the evenings, peasants walking back
to their houses with little bags o?
food, given them by the allies. Now
and then they are given a can of jam,
a luxury even for the rich in Russia
non.
In one village, whlfch the allies had
not yet had time to reach with tlieir
food supplies, the correspondent found
one peasant family eating swan, which
they described as exceedingly, tough.
“It was a sacred bird with us be
fore/' one of the peasants apologized,
“but wre have no meat and the bol
sheviks killed the fish in our lake with
bombs from their airplanes.”
The peasants are working willingly
under the kind treatment of British
and American Russian-speaking sol
diers. They were very glad to build
an aviation field, cutting down many
acres of thick timber, because they
were told the field would be theirs for
cultivation after the campaign.
The Santa Maria was one of the three
vessels with which Columbus set sail
for America from Palos. Spain, August
J, 1492. She was a good-sized boat. 9J
feeet long, carrying 66 seamen. She was
j decked all over and had four masts—two
vith square sails and two with lateen
sails. The other vessels were smaller,
snd without decks, and they were all
irovisioned for a year.

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