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Nashville union and American. [volume] (Nashville, Tenn.) 1853-1862, March 11, 1856, Image 2

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'Alexanders Indies JUd moves.
feb21
DAILY, 3; TRI-WEEKLY. tfr WEEKLY, $3.
OFFICE CORNER CHURCH AND CHKUKi STREETS
" G. C. TORUETT At CO,
SjH . XASTMAX, F.C. PPNHIKOTO'J. & 0. C. rOEBETT
TUESDAY MORNING, MARCH 11, 1850.
EXTRA HILLY SMITH.
Er-Gov. William Smith, of Virginia, came so
near being a know-nothing a year ago that he was
universally claimed as ona by tho party. Bat wo
sefl that he attended tho late Democratic State
Contention in Virginia at Riobmond. There v. aa
a good deal of excitement when be claimed his teat
as a delegate. Several member.! objected to his
teing recognized as Euch. A spicy debate occur
red. In reply to another dolegate, who had charjj
ed Got. Smith with "dodging" at the last electicn,
hn Raid:
I don't "dodge." Whenever a false charge is
made against me, .1 shall dispute it, ue it sam oy
Jew or Gentile, God or Devil I am to well known
tn rtn nr h an iranrei3ion in mv retrard. When
you get me into an organization, it ia hard to get
ine out 01 it. A repeat mat, mere uvouo one gretn
;hf in this country, and that between democracy
- r - j
and black republicanism. There is bat ono line of
rvni;w for me to nuraue. and that is nlain. I can
not do any thing ebe than eupport the nominee of
On this avowal, Gov. Smith was admitted to a
The Examiner thus describes the scene :
The proceedings of Friday were more important,
far more interesting, and very noveL A motion
was made tc exclude from the Convention Ex-Governor
William Smith, of Fauquier, who bad ap
-neared as a delegate from that county under f
lesolntion appointing any democrat of the county
who might be present in Richmond a delegate to
the Convention. The motion to exclude was sus
tained by its mover in a seiie3 of remarks which
eeemed to render it bat a measure of justice
te Mr Smith to be permitted to reply. We
will not sav it is probable, but it was at
least possible that, but for tLis considera
tion. tho Convention might have declined to
hear Mr Smith on the subject. The ground of
the motion to exclude was, ot course, tbat gentle
man's alleged identification with the know-noth-ine
party during the last spring canvass. The Cou
vention decided by a large vote to hear what ho
had to say azamst the motion, and in bis own ue
fence. He aceordingly addressed the body in a
speech of about half an hoar's length, amid frequent
interruption and many "cornering" interrogatories
from the audience. is speech was marked by
consummate address and astonishing powers of
self-control. The cool aiad intrepid precision witn
which he threaded the narrow passage between
Scylla and Charybdis has rarely, if ever before,
been equalled in the history of political navigation.
With allr be evinced mucb ot tbat caustic sarcasm
which has given him peculiar reputation as an
orator in Virginia. Throughout his address, he en
chained tho attention of the vast assembly, and, if
at times there were murmurs of dissatisfaction, he
was very often greeted with warm applause. It
recalled the scene of Luther before the Diet of
Worms. Upon his emphatic declaration that he
intended to support the nominees of the democrat
ic Convention at Cincinnati for President and Vice
President, the Convention, witn great unanimity
and amidst general and loud applause, determined
to admit him to a seat upsn trie lloor and to mem
bership among the democracy of Virgin.
The Philadelphia Aboktios. Tne Washington
Star of Thursday s&ys tho democratic andanti-know-nolhiag-
meters of Congress are much
pleased wih the Philadelphia nominations. Tbjpl
teSef is that, whi'e no candidate that could po$i
bly be nominated by the know-nothings can take
from their nominee, whoever he may be, a Bingle
daveholding State, the ticket formed at Philadel
phia will poll in the non-slaveholding States votes
enough to insure them (the democracy,) Mpne,
New Hampshire, New York, Connecticut, Pennsyl
vania, New Jersey, Ind a ia, Michigan, Iowa and
Illinois. They are calculating on the strength of
the organization (system) of the know-nothings,
as being an important element in keeping their
party together at the North.
The same paper thus serves up and presents the
k. n. nominee for the Vice Presidency. The accu
racy of the description of street-earner talk will be
universally recognized here :
"He resided in Washington for many years, and
is well remembered, especially on account of (Jen
eral Jackson's memorable saying, tbat. every body
had his pest; for his part, if it were not for Donel
son, he should have nothing in the world to trouble
him. The truth is, Donelson was his Monsieur Mai
apropos. Being a family connection of his wile, the
General was forced to tolerate him about him, and
to grin and bear with all the philosophy he could
muster, the 'scrapes and difficulties into which Don
elson was constantly getting him. Donelson's
most remarkable trait is an abiding want of com
mon sense, which has prevented him, notwithstand
ing the prestige of his relationship to the wife of
Jackson, from having the least political weight
where personally known.
He ratted from the democratic party because
President Pierce refused to take him and cert a i
members of his family for office, at his own valua
tion. For months before he turned up a known
nothing, the locofocos of Nashville were crocking
jokes about his lamentations over bis failure to get
what he asked of the Administration and the un
dignified and impotent personal abuse showered
by hia at the street-corners for the benefit of street
coreer audiences, on the President. His nomina
tion is worth to the know-nothing cause in Ten
nessee, at least a clear loss of some ,500 votes; for
the mental and political calibre of Major Andrew
Jackson Donelson, is well known throughout all
portions of that State."
MONROE COUNTY.
Madisomtille, March G.
Democracy i triumph ant in old Monroe again:
Sheriff J C. Vaughn (dem.) msj 227.
Circuit Court Clerk Joseph E. Houston (dem )
maj. 447.
County Court Clerk A. T. Hicks, maj. 477.
GIBSON CO0NTY.
, Below we give, from tho Trenton Standard,
the official vote of Gibson county. The success
ful candidates, we are informed, are democrats
and anti-know-nething whigs, who united against
the know-nothings:
Official Vo or Gibson Couhtt. The follow
ing is the official vote of Gibson county:
For Sheriff-Hesa 1507; Ramsey 1017.
For Clerk Varner 1227; Harris 1157.
For Trustee Goodman 12S8; Senterl226.
For Register MaLiurine 1232: R. F. Kins
1214. 8
County Elections. The following persons were
elected on Saturday last:
McMinn county John A. Gouldy, Sheriff; Jno.
F. Slover, Circuit Court Clerk: Wm George, Coun
ty Court Clerk; Benj. Wells, Trustee; Cornelius
Brown, Register.
Bradley county Kvhn re-elected Sheriff; John
H Payne re-elected Circuit Court Clerk ; John H.
Robinson re-elected County Court Clerk; Mr.
Potts elected Trustee; and Jo. Hicks, Register.
Meigs J. Zeigler, re-elected Sheriff, no opposi
tion ; J. A. Houser. County Court Clerk, re-elceted;
Wm. S. Arrants, Tiustce; Shaver, Register.
Monroe J. C. Vaughn, Sherff; Jo. Houston,
Circuit Court Clerk; T. A. Hicks, County Court
Clerk; Wm. Williams, Trustee; llalone, Reigister.
Polk Hancock is said to be elected Sheriff, and
Jas. Smith re elected Circuit Court Clerk by a ma
jority of C votes. Athens Post.
New York, March C The ieraSTiorresppp
dent telegraphs that despatches brougfct by ffce
America, were received by the State Department
yesterday. There is nothiDg decisive in them, ot
withstanding there are rumors that they are belli
gerent in tone.
An effort is being made by Southern Americans
, to start a new candidate for tho Presidency.
The i Tribune's correspondent says the Stephens
minority report on the Kansas cass is skillfully
fdrawn. It is in substance a demurer, insisting that
Congress has no right to look below the surface of
the Kansas Legislature but must regard the Ter
ritorial Laeislaiure as ligafully constituted, and its
acts as valid laws. Ihis being established, Whit
field is the legal delegate, no matter how many ille
r gal votes were polled, and Rseder caunot even con
test, as" he does not even pretend to have been vot
ed for at the election ordered by the Legislature.
This point is argued at great length in a memorial
by'Whitf e d, appended to and read as a pirt of Mr
Stephens's report.
WE commence opei.
will continue to receive Dj
it.airfhacMmn. Wa nvKtrMrwviriiii. . rh ia-fatw M
MtBw - r .-i.wm-huih-i mar
to call and see tnem, wuewer inoy wisn to purchase or.not
In the lot. opening this day is a complete assortment cf
B C McNAIRY ft CO.
Apply to
leoiv asi
WHAT AN OLD WHIG LEADER THINKS OF THE
NOMINATIONS.
and Gazelle
is wldelv known.es having been one cf the ablest,
most conservative, and dignified of all the old
leidiog whig journals. Printed at rnuaaeipuia,
the scene of the late know-nothing convention,
and a witness of the extraordinary occurrences
which have given that convention so unenviable a
notoriety, we have looked for tho comments of
that paper on the result of the meeting with much
interest. We have tbat opinion in the article
wbir-h wo cony below. The article itself is the
severest criticism wo have read, and it is evidently
i' 1 Zt J- .. - - -
03 canuiu as u ia scvciu:
From th J'tilaJelplia American and Quuile.
Me. Fillmore's Nomination. It has been from
no insensibility to its interest that we have deferred
any notice of the Presidential nomination, made
last Monday in this city As we are, to some ex
tent, represeatativeTof public opinion, wo have
paused until we could at least have a glimpse of
what in this respect tbat opinion is. Although
thero is certainly a kind feeling entertained to
wards Mr. Fillmore personally, his nomination, un
der the circumstances attending it, falls coldly and
unimpressively on the public mind. The conser
vative men ot this community atleast, with whom
we have so long acted, stand off in .distrust of the
new associations that encompasj Mr. Fillmore, and
which, if they do not veil him entirely, make him
an undefined and mysterious being. How was
the Convention by which he is presented as a can
didate organized? How were its members chosen?
What is the constituent body? Under what obli
gation, secret or avowed, do either the constitu
ents or the representatives aci? Was this body
the creation of secret lodges? Is it under the ob
ligation of oaths? Are those who belong to it
bound together by ties and duties on which the
law and the Constitution frown? Is Mr. Fillmore
the Millard Fillmore of 1848, an Ex-President
of the United States is he, can he be, a member
of a secret society, sworn to a religious test, and
to exclusiveness of the strictest kind?
To all these questions, and for all these doubts,
thero is but one answer, and in that answer there
is cold comfort. This is not a Whig nomination
it is not a Conservative nomination it is not an
American nomination, in the high and true senso of
that much abused name. It is a Know Nothing
nomination, with all its peculiarities; and at the
very moment at which it is made, it is proclaimed,
by authority, and as if in vindication from asper
sion, tiiat Mr. Fillmore was, and is, a member of a
Know Nothing lodge, in good standing, having
taken all three oaths; and tbat, but for tha, he
would not, and could not, have been nominated;
and, on tho ticket with him, js placed a gentleman
who was Mr. Fillmore's most violent assailant in
1850, and who, if our memory does not mislead
us, in 1844 was one of the loudest in denunciation
of Henry Clay and Theodore Frehnehuysen. Mr.
Frelinghuysin being supposed to be the especial
representative of tbose i"orm3 of religious belief
about which there is so much outcry now. "Our
opponents," wroto Mr. Fillmore to Mr. Clay, in
1844, "by pointing to tho native Americans and
to Mr. FrelinghuyEen, drove votes from U3, and
lost us ine day. a leader ot tnose opponents,
who thus cried down "the Native Americans and
Mr. Frehnghuysen," is now Mr. Fillmore's com
panion on this 6lranee ticket. Well may consider
ate men hold back, when by such processes, such
results are prouueea.
The public, thus puzzled as to the oritrin and re
sults of this strange Convention, have looked to
its record, and find little there to reconcile them to
its action. That scenes of disorder and confusion
will arise in all largo political bodies, every one
knows, and" no one wonders at But it is only
when, underneath the frothy snrface, there are at
work secret elements, and those elements of the
most acrid kind, tbat turmoil and disturbance be
come serious. Who can read the proceedings of
tuis convention witnout ieeiing tbat its vital and
only cohesive principle was some form of religious
intolerance; and Irom religious proscription and
sectarian jargon the true Americrn heart always
has and always will revolt. One hardly knows
what Eentiment predominates on looking at this
painful and grotesque record. We have read it
anew, and make our extracts from the revised re
port of the National Intelligencer, a paper certain
ly not addicted to unkind caricature, and which
seems to justify its very doubtful acquiescence in
Mr. Fillmore's nomination, by publishing the
strange u oi ngs ot tits new mends. Uur citations
are few, but significant:
"Mr. Small, of Pennsylvania, obtained leave to
say mat ce would accord witb the views of Gov,
Call for the sake of harmony, and would, if the lat
ter would abide by it, strike out all in his resolu
tions after the words 'Bible and Constitution.'
Applausa
"Gov. Call again stated his determination to re
tire. He had come to battle against the innova
tions of the foreign party in the United States,
anu ine lniiuencetoi tne rope ot itome. Uov.
Call now said, 'Farewell.' "
On the next day we read:
A recess was then taken. At the afternoon
I session there were several amusing scenes.
me itev. Air Jirownlow arose and proposed to
receive into the church, General Call, of Florida,
Percy Walker, of Ala., and all others who bad
neen going astray.
''Mr Brownlow, amid great applause, advanced
lowaru uen. oaii, and embraced nira, causing
deal of merriment.
"General Call said that he had given his hand to
bis brother, and he now gave his heart to the Con
vention," &c. tc.
Our last brief excerpts relate to those nearer
home, the representatives of Pennsylvania lodges.
and gentlemen who have slowly come to the con
clusion that the doctrine of reserve is no longer
pontic or comiortaoie.
Mr. I Haziehurst, of Philadelphia, said he was
Irom the district and the ward in which indepen
dence was declared in 177G. He appealed to the
South not to leave the American pvrty, but to re
main with it in its opposition to a foreign foe. He
urged compromise, and he cared for no platform
but Americanism and opposition to foreign foes.
Air. &. made a strong appeal tor 'Sam. 1 1
"Mr. J. Williamson, of Huntingdon, Pa., could
not be transubstantiated into a freesoil abolitionist
by St. Hilderbrand, or all tho rest of the saints in
the calendar. In his district they did not know an
abolitionist from a spavined horse. He counselled
union and harmony.
Now, it is from a convention thus deporting it
self, whose members, men of mature age and
cial position, clergymen and lawyers and nonde
scripts, hug each other in maudlin enthusiasm, and
make speeches about "Sam," and "St. Hildebrand,"
and "spavined horses," that this nomination comes;
and coming thus, it has no right to ask the support
oi uiga aim iair-minueu men or any party.
Surely we may be permitted to hesitate. As sure
ly is the painfnl distrust which on this subject fills
mo puuiiu mina jusnneu.
But the Whigs of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia
have peculiar motives for resolute reserve just now.
No where has the party which nominated Mr. Fill
more lelt more deplorable traces than hereabouts.
Neither locally nor, in tho nation has it been such,
we mean administratively, as to command conn
dence. Less than two years ago it sprang into
gigantic existence, and commanded som hing
kindred to admiration or fear. With a strong hand
and a grasp so bold that a stout and honest heart
seemed to nerve it, it took posssssion in ono
place or another of power and patronage.
Pennsylvania and Massachusetts and New York
all yielded. But the instant it conquered power,
it showed itself unfit or unable to administer it.
This was manifest to every oye, and there were
many, ourselves among the number, who looked
at the result with disappointment. The two renul-
siye elements of secrecy and sectarian proscription,
alien to the heart and intelligence of the American
people, only worked out their genuine fruits when
the eecret and sectarian party got into place. A
general sentiment of distrust pervaded every one's
mind, and the end was what we have said. Now,
is it to be wondered at that with these facts still
recent for two years is the limit conserva
tive men should regard with suspicion a nomina
tion about which they have not only not been
coBsulted, but from which they have been repelled?
To Euch conservative men who have not yet
spoken, we say, in all earnestness, reserve your
judgment. This nominatbn has no antecedents to
command acquiscence from Whigs or those who
act with Whigs. Lean of all, has it any claims on
Pennsylvanians. We have not forgotten the
scenes of last winter's legislation, and its impotent
intrigues, and remember well tl at the party whoe
Convention now nominates Mr. Fillmore was in
power and responsible, then: Philade'pbians, too
may well pause before they follow this New York
city lead, finding, as they do, among Mr. Fillmore's
prominent thanksgivers in tbii Convention, those
who have signalized themselves by bitter opposi
tion to our local interests. The time will soon
come when those who have heretofore professed
Whig principles, and who have, as yet, formed no
other connection, ought to determine on their
course and manfully proclaim it.
- J: G.-A a ROBERTSON.
ITOR RENT A Brick Office with 2 rooms, Cherryi
" . street, near the corner of Cherry and Church.
J. L. ft R W BROWN,
.Cherry gt mcr7 td
SMCCH,OF COL. TRAVLJ, .
Among thetnatters deferred because .of' tha re
cent presi on .our columns was tho excellent speech
of Col Tha via, in the House) on the nullification
of tho fugitive slave law in some of the northern
States. We print it to-day, with the letter ad
dressed to the author by some of his fellow-representatives:
r 52-
Rlfresen tati v Hall, -
JaLuary 18, 185C. J
Deab Sib: For reasons, unnecessary to men
tion, the undersigned members of the House of
Representatives, respectfully request you lo'writo
out for publication in the Union add American
the speech you made in this Hall, on the resolu
tion introduced by Mr. Civitt, on the subject of
the nullification of the fugitive slave law by cer
tain free States. Respectfully,
Dan. a Donelson,
John Ball,
B. F. Cloud, '
Lloyd Bcllin,
R, H. Wood,
J. B. Smith,
J. C. Oarlock:,. '
George Kennet.
CoL W. E. Travis.
SPEECH OF COL. W. E. TRAVIS,
In the Hemessee House of Representatives, on the
Nullification of the Fugitive Slave Law.
Mr. Speaker : The question under considera
tion is a grave and important one; a question,
sir, that involves, in my opinion, the stability, the
welfare, and the perpetuity of the Union ; and,
sir, 1 should not have ventured upon the discus
sion of so important a subject had it not been for
the very extraordinary manner and singular posi
tion taken by the gentlemen from Davidson, (Gov.
Drown) who has just addressed the House. I had
thought, sir, that thero would be no difference of
opinion upon this subject between parties in Ten
nessee. I had sincerely hoped, sir, that upon this
great question Tennessee would stand as one
man. But from the position taken by that gentle
man, dt-d other gentlemen on the opposite side of
the House, I am forced to the conclusion that
there is a wide difference of opinion existing
between the democratic party of Tennessee
and the present know-nothing party on thai
subject. Now, sir, what is proposed by the
resolution now under discussion ? Simply to say
to Massachusetts, and such other States as have
openly nullified the fugitive slave law as passed by
Congress in accordance with the Constitution,
that it is the sense of this General Assembly, that
the people of Tennessee ought not to trade, or
have, intercourse with such States, until they have
repealed such laws passed by their Legislatures,
nullifying the laws ot Congress.
Now. sir. this is a verv simnle proDosition. and
I cannot for the life of me see what the gentleman
can find in the resolution to have caused him to be
so much alarmed for the safety1 of the Union. Sir,
one might have supposed from his remarks that a
proposition had been made to dissolve the Union,
instead of the simple and plain resolution of disap
proval that's now before you. The gentleman has
taken great pains in a lengthy argument, and a
very eloquent one, to convince this Housa that he
loves the Union, and has descanted freely upon its
beauties and advantages; he has also told you, sir,
that he was a great lover of the Compromise Mea
sures of 1850, and that he was one of tho earliest
endorsers of those measures ; he also admits that
Massachusetts has passed a law nullifying the fugi
tive slave law, which is one of the Compromise
Measur??, and still he says that Tennessee must be
silent, olese her lips, sit tamely down and submit
to these outrages upon the Constitution and the
Union, tor Jear that we will hurt the tender sensi
bilities of tho abolitionist at the North. I do not
pretend to quote his exact words, but this is the
snbstance of his position. The gentleman has no
rebuke to offer to Massachusetts for openly and in
her soveioign capacity repudiating the Constitution
and Laws ot the (J-eueral Uovernment. and he can
stand by and look calmly on this scene and never
raise his voice of disapproval But if the gallant
and patriotic sons ot Tennessee attempt to warn
these abolition fanatics and remind them of their
duty, he is alarmed at dace for tho safety of the
Union, and goes off into a lengthy appeal to the
people oi Tennessee to cultivate lnendly and Tra
ternal feelings with our northern brethren. Why,
sir, if Tennessee only proposes to call back those
erronng and disobedient States, and remind them
of their duty to Ihe Federal Government, and the
covenant tbat they have entered into with the
other States, the gentleman is ready at once to
rebuke his own people for doing what 1 blieve to
be the duty of every Tennessean. Why is all
this sympathy for the North ? Why is all this for
bearance exercised by gentlemen for the fanatical
abolitionists I leave it for the people to judge.
Again, sir, I would ask you, what consistency is
there in the gentleman's professions of love and
devotion to the Compromise Measures, while he
can stand by and counsel us to be silent when the
fugitive slave law, which is one of these measure?,
nas, oy nis.own aamission, been openly and uis
gracefully repudiated, and that by one of the
sovereign States of this Union, and still he cries
"Peace 1 peace! I'm a friend to the Union and the
Compromise, but we must not wound the feelings
oi our nortnem nreturen.
Mr HnPftVpr- IVnnaQQan ta tma ff l. TTnlftn
I " ........WW ... fcv Ulb
ihe Compromise and the Constitution, and, sir," the
day has never dawned in her history that she was
afraid to tell her sister States," that "the Union, it
must be preserved." That sentiment, sir, was utter
ed by the immortal Jackson, in the dark days of
nullification, and Tennessee gallantly responded to
ner nero, ana, sir, irom mat day down to the pres
ent hour, it has been her watch-word in peace and
her rallying cry upon the bloody battle field. Sir,
I wish these resolutions to pass, that shemayhere-
Dy give assurance to tne President, whose duty
is to see that the law3 of Congress are faithfully
executea, inat sue win ever oe luund rallying un
der the stars and stripes of this glorious Un:n.
and at all times indignantly frowning upon any at
tempt, come from what quarter it may, to alienate
one portion oi it irom another. Sir, I wish to
place Tennessee in the true position. I wish her
to discountenance all attempts that may be made
to weaken the bonds of union that exist between
the several States, and I know of no other wav to
accomplish this, except by sending the voice of
warning wj our sister otaies when they are tound
straying from the path of duty, and to sav to them
that they need not expect the encouragement or
fraternal inteicourse of Tennesser, unt 1 they return
to the performance and acknowledgement of all
the binding covenants and obligations contained in
me uonstituiion ana iiaws ot the .Federal Union,
Sir, much has been said during this discussion
about agitators at the South and agitators at the
North. I wish to say that I am no fire eater, that
a am no agitator, mat i hate repudiation and nul
lification as I hate the bottomless-pit, I hate dis
unionism and abolitionism as I hate the very devil
himself. It has been said that these resolutions
were a fire-brand, and that wo were standing above
a magazine that was ready to explode at the
slightest touch; we have also, sir, been reminded of
the nre-eaters of the South, and the Southern Con
vention that assembled in Nashville, as though we
were to blame for all this agitation. Sir, there
has been a fire-brand thrown, but I am proud to
say, that Tennessee is not responsible for it, neithar
win sne do it mese resolutions should pass, and i
am more astonished, sir, to find gentlemen on this
uoor, so ready to hnd fault with their own people,
at the same time, so ready to excuss those that
are really guilty. The fire brand in this instance,
sir, comes from Massachusetts, and other States.
that have nullified and repudiated the spirit of
ino uonsumiion ana me very letter ot the law, and
in doing so, sir, have violated their oath of allegi-
uiw iu unnouemi uuvernraeni, irampieu upon
the rights of the other States, and with damning
fanaticism have raised the puny arm of rebellion
against this proud confederacy. Now, sir, who
. 1. T.1 1 1 r . i , l
has collected the combustible materials out of
which this magazine is formed that we have been
threatened with I Are gentlemen readv to sav
that Tennessee is guilty of lhi3 charge because tho
Southern Convention assembled at Nashville? I
hope not. Sir, for the honor of my State I deny
that that Convention ever violated or attempted to
violate the rights of any of the States of this Union.
Who men, sir, is responsible for this state of
things? I well tell gentlemen who it is. Ii is
the abolition fanatics and disunionists who live up
on mischief) who fester upon the body politic
and suck the life-blood of the confederacy like a
vampire, whose very breath is pestilence, and whose
presence breeds discord and anarchy. These, sir,
are the men that have worked all this mischief,
and shall we sit tamely down and be silent for
fear that they will grow worse? No, sir, this sil
ent policy has already given them strength and en
couragement, and will still continue to do so until
a different policy is adopted. Now, sir, it is per
fectly idle to talk about friendly and fraternal in
tercourse between different StatesDf this Union 83
long &3 some of them resort to the nullifying of
the laws of Congress, in order to affect an object
that they dare not attempt directly and openly. It
is perfectly idle to counsel Tennesseans to keep
silent under these circumstance. Such policy is
not in keeping with the genius of our people, and,
TlilTjlaiftllafa
NICHOLAS HOBSON,
JOHN B. McFERRIN,
ISAAC ;LH TON,
A. V. S. LIN DS LET.
Com'rg.
sir, I trust in God, tbat the day is far distant when
Tennessee wilLbe reduced "to the necessity of
adopting this silent and say nothing policy,. Let
her speak out like a iiee people and a sovereign
State.
Mr. Speaker : I have no fears of a dissolution of
this Union. I care not what politicians may say.
They may excite r the people and arouse the coun
try to a wild pitch of excitement, but whenever
the people of this great Republic see danger they
have never failed to step forward, still the troubled
waters as they did in 1852, by endorsing, almost
unanimously, the compromise measures of 1850.
This, sir, teaches .me that the great masses of the
peof le of this country are still virtuous and honor
able, and tbat they will always prove equal to the
emergency, however dangerous it may seem, and
therefore it is, that I wish to deal honestly and
fairly with cur northern brethren, and give them
timely waffling, and invite them to return to the
performance of'their duty as States, and they will
receive our friendship and brotherly kindness, but
not otherwise.
KIOT AT COLUMBIA (S. C.) COLLEGE.
The South Carolina papers contain details of the
recent terrible riot at Columbia College, on the
night of tho 17th ult. A parly of students who
had a grndge against the chief of police made a
murderous assault upon him. One of the students
had his skull split open. The chief was conveyed
by some of his friends t J the Guard House, upon
which an attack was Boon made by some 150 stu
dents, armed with knives, clubs and pistols. The
chief was again badly beaten and stabbed, and was
then thrown out of a second story window. The
alarm bell was rung, and citizens came together,
when another conflict ensued. Six military com
panies were ordered out, and were afterwards sta
tioned as guards around the Guard House and jail.
One of the students has since died, and others are
not expected to live. Bedell, the chief, is said al
so to be dead. The excitement was kept up till
the 21st; when the students were still threatening
revenge, and being very active in procuring arms
and amunition. The Governor went to the col
lege, and demanded their arms, threatening to fire
upon them. The students finally yielded, and quiet
was restored.
Another account says the scene presented was
such as Columbia never before saw. Two hundred
armed citizens, with guns loaded with ball cart
ridges, opposed to more than an hundred enraged
young men, with rifl33 in their hands. The order
was given to take aim, and a fire would have fol
lowed had not Col. Goodman and others thrown
themselves between the forces and called upon the
the citizens not to fire. By much persuasion the
students were induced to return to the college.
Some of the students were subsequently expelled.
Fodl Mckdeb. A man by the name of Wm.
Rowland, who kept a small store at Double Springs,
in this county, was murdered on Friday night last.
He was found in his store room on Saturday morn
ing, with his throat cat in such a manner as to lead
to the belief tbat it had been done with a hatchet
With the exception of a small bruise between the
eyes, no other marks of violence were found. We
learn that two of his neighbors were with him un
til about 9 o'clock on Friday night, at which time
they left him. When found he had his pantaloons
and socks on, and it is supposed that the assasin
called him from bis bed under a pretence of wbiah
ing to purchase something. The key of the door
was found in the murdered man's pocket. Robbery
was the motive, as the deceased's trunk ,had been
opened, and one hundred and twenty-five dollars
(the amount he was known to Jiave had) taken
out We learn, a negro boy, the property of 0.
P. Hall, was arrested on suspicious, and uuder
went an examination betoro the magistrates on
Monday, but no evidence was elicited to implicate
him, and he wa3 discharged from custody. We
trust every possible effort will be made to ferret
out the perpetrator ot this diabolical act, and bring
him topunishment Athens Post.
HIT. DOUGLAS,
Wholesale Dealer,
No. 54, Public Square,
NASHVILLE, TENN.
Spring: and Summer
STOCK.
1575 Pakacges Assorted Merchandise.
I HAVE received and would offer to the trade a large
and most desirable stock of new and beautiful Good.
The stock is composed of an extsnded variety ot Foreign
and Domestic Dry Goods; Boots, Shoes and Brogans; Hats,
Bonnets, Umbrellas, Parasols, Ac, ic
These Goods were purchased with the aid of larga ex
perience and ready money, and embrace a great cumber
of very cheaply bought articles, admirably suited to the
demand, Cc. ,
For reliable payment, I ihill reduce profits several per
cent, under the lormer custom of the House, because I
can afford to do 80.
Merchants who may desire to purchase Goods at close
prices, for prompt payment, can promote their interest by
makin selections from this unusually fine stock.
marh-Sm "U. DOUGLAS.
A. Ijarcombe,
Amforotypist
NO. 40, COLLEGE Street, Corner of .Union,
AMBR0TYPE3 the new Photographic Pictures on
Glass, made by Cutting's Patent Process, are now
. . . i 11- .1 " I ...t:.l nA ,xn- n.m If -
onerea 10 uie puunc t mo must ucamuu uu .....
mint lilcpneas in the world.
All sizes and styles Irom Breastpins to Caibinet Portraits.
UaguerreoiypeJ copied in Amoroiype.
nnmiw fmitstinn Pictures mt uo bv Daceurreotrpists,
are not Ambrotypes. One is jterUlaitlt, the other immirUl
Uenume Amoroiypes are maaetai vj, uumck"
and no where else in Nashville. marll im
T. G. BOBOI. O. C. ALLZX.
BURGE & ALLEN,
(Successors to T. 0. Surge it Co,)
Wholesale Grocers. Forwarding and Commission
MERCHANTS,
And Dealers in Brandies, Cigars, Tobacco, ic
CORNER OF COLLEGE AND SPRING STREETS,
Nashville; Tewr
WE are just in receipt of the following Groceries:
200 hbds ( rime to choice Sugar;
150 barrels rebelled Molasses;
100 K do do
20o Loaf, Crushed, and Powdered Sugar;
800 bags Rio CoQee;
25 bags Old Gov. Java CoQee;
SO bagsLaguyra do '
75 barrels Mackerel, Noe. 2 and 3;
50 i4 barrels do do do
75 boxes Scotch Herring;
8 Tierces Figs;
100 boxes Riiains, assorted ;
150 Painted Buckets;
25 Nests Tubs;
150 box Tobacco, assorted brands;
200,000 assorted brands of Cigars;
500 kegs ot Nails;
300 Demijohns;
500 gro. Matches;
25 bags S S Almonds;
25 bags Pepper;
20 bag! Spice;
3 casks Dutch Madder;
5 Ceroonsbest Indigo;
25 boxes fine Starch;
6 do bar Soap;
100 do Star Candles;
50 do Tallow Candles;
100 do Cheese assorted kinds;
LIQUORS.
00 barrels Pike and Wiltshire Whisky;
50 barrels Robertson county do
100 barrels Rye, Bourbon and Smith Reserve Whisky.
With a eeneral Stock of Brandies, Wines, Gin, Ac., to
gether with a supply of Longworths Native Catawba
iirandr and Sparkling Wine.
marll, SG. uunuc. a ai.ucii.
"T7UVE half Pipes superior Old French Brandy of the
l riniaeeoi lsll. uunvu auuc.
LONUWORTIl'S Native Catawba Grape Brandies
and Sparkling Wioe;
" Dry do
Fsrsaleby fmarllj BURGE a ALLEN.
FOR LOUISVILLE & CINCINATI.
THE tine pissenger s'eimerMAGNOLIA
Wm V Fuller Master, will leave
for the above and all intermediate ports;
THIS DAY, the 11th inst, at C o'clock p. m. For lreight
or passage apply on board or to
inarll A uamiuiu.i, .a genu
FOR LOUISVILLE, CINCINNATI AND
PITTSBURG.
THE lubstaunchsleanerJ B CARSON,
DF Brickie Master, will leave for the
above and all intermediate landings on,
THURSDAY next, tha 15th inst.. at 4 o'clock P. m. ilav.
ing superior accommodations, for freight or passage apply
on board or to marl I H U HARRISON, Agent.
FOR LOUISVILLE & CINCINNATI.
rpUE light draught steamer ECLIPSE, A
JL I' outhn Master, caving superior accom
modations, and intendinir to run as a rtcn-
Iarpacket throughout the ensuing season, will leare lor tne
above and all intermedial landings on WEDNESDAY
next, the J2thinst, at 10 o'clock p.m. For freighter
passage apply on board or to
mam u u tiAiwtiauxi, Agenu
VALUABLE MILLS FOR SALE.
WE are now offering for sale valuable Bawand Grist
Mills, with 8G0 acres of fine timbered Land, situ
ated on Caney Fork, below Sligo. Those wanting a bar
gain would do welltocallon us in "douiU guiet Ume"
mar9 1m .88, College st.
OAfin RAMBU and Arkansas Fishing Poles, Planet"
tQXjKjyj men can pick for themselves, for sale by
U, U. SCOYEb.
TAKEN UP by Owen Edwards, living in 9th Wfc.
District, Dickson county, Tennessee, a brown MBBk
H ULE, about 18 hands, high, 16 years of age andJ2u
blind, no other maris or brands perceivable. Ap
aised on the 16th dav or February, 1856, to $5.
.mar7-t. THOJ!LA&CLUORRI3, Rawrer. '
T. & W. EAKiN & CO.,
4 NO. 48 PUBLIC SQUARE,
NASHVILLE, TENN
WE HAYE JUST RECEIVED OUR
ENTIRE
EDRCHASB3 or
Spring Dry Goods
To which we again respectfully call the attention
of the Trade. mai9
Odd gellows Hall !
OLE BULL
Would most respectfully inform his friends and the citi
zens of Nashville, that he will positively give only
ONE GRAND
Oa TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 11, 1856.
For this occasion ha will be assisted by the fbUwing emi
nent Artists: The two favorite and talented young
Prima Donnas.
Bignorina ANNA SPINOLA,
Miss a ANNA VAIL.
LOUIS SCHBEIBEB,
The great Cornet s Piston Player, and
FRANZ ROTH,
. Distinguished Pianist and Composer.
PROGRAMME:
TXB.X I.
1. Solo Piano Forte "North Star." Fantasia,
F. ROTH.
2. Grand Aria "Qui la Voce," from Opera Pu-
ritani, .......
ANNA SPINOLA
8, Solo Cornet-a-Piston Selections from Bel
lini's Operas, with Variations, arranged
and performed by
LOUIS SCHREIBER.
4. Bong "We met by chance,"
Pacher.
Bellini,
Eueken.
S. Solo Violin Grand Cancerto, Allegro, )
Adagio, y
Rondo, J
Paganini.
ULK ISUlilj.
PAET II.
1. Ballad "There is a home like my own" -
(Tyrolean,) - - - ... - Ualibran.
ANNA SPINOLA.
2. Solo Corns t-a-Pislon Katy Darling, with
Variations, arranged and performed by
LOUIS SCII8EIBER.
S. Cavatina 'AMieiPreigb," cell Opera Otto
Mesi in due ore, .... - Don'uetlL
MISS VAIL.
4. Solo Violin The Mother's Prayer; - Ole BulL
OLE BULL.
5. Grand Due "Loateria di Andnjar," - Guiieppi LiUo
SIGNORINA SPINOLA AND MISS VALE.
6. Solo Violin ''Introduction and Carnival
of Venice," - Ole Bull.
OLE BULL.
igy Seats may be secured without extra charge TO
DA V at Mr West's Music Store.
t5r Tickets, ONE DOLLAR, to all parts of the Hall,
to be had at Music Stores, and at the Halt.
f3f Doors open at half past C. To commence at half
past 7. marl I if
THOMPSON & CO.,
NO. 21, PUBLIC SQUARE.
ARE! now prepared to offer to their customers and the
public generally, the largest, richest and best as
sorted Stocks or Spring and Summer
Dry Goods
ever offered before. Those wishing to buy would do well
to give us a call. We take great pleasure in showing our
Goods.
SILKS.
Our assortment is now complete, consisting in part of
Rich Flounced Silks, all qualities,
do Siripe do do
do Peaid do do
do Check do do
Plain Silks, all colors and qualities. Also, a lrgs lot of
Evening Bum. n eaaing ureases, in great variety, witn
all ine rarapnenaiia complete.
BAREGES AND MUSLINS.
The Ladies will find in our Stock of Bareges and Muslins
just the things they want.
Splendid flounced Bareges, all qualities
do ao urenamnes, do
do Figured Bereges, do
do do Grenadlnett, do
do Emb flounced Grenadine, Empress Eugenie;
Plain and figured Bereges all kinds.
KlOU FLOUNCED ORGANIC MUSLINS,
do French do do
Jaconet, do
Cheap Mualins in great variety from 12K cents per yard up
EMBROIDERIES AND LACES.
f We have uq unusual large assortment of Embroideries and
Laces.
Fine Embroidered Muslin Bodies, high neck
do do do do low do
do do do Cape,
do do do Skirts,
do do U'dkfs. This let ia just half price.
Rich Jaconet Collars and Sleeves, do do
do Swiss du do do do
do Linen Cambric;
Braiklast Collars and Sleeves;
Embroidered Swiss Collan, great job;
do Jaconet do
Ladies' retiring Rebes;
" Envelopes, triin'd.
CHILDREN'S ERBROIDERED BODIES;
do do Robes;
do White and Fancy dresses;
Jacanct and Swiss Edgings ana Insertings;
Nainsook and Mu'l do do "great job"
Linen Cambric, do do du
Jaconet and Swiss Flouncing;
Nainsook and MuIL do
Intants embroidered and Lace trim' J Caps
LACES.
Very rich and fine Point Lace Sett::
do do do Val. do do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do Houitcn, do
do Muslin Lace trim'd;
do Houiloie Capes;
do Point Lace;
do Val, do do
do do do Lore knot Cr.pei;
do
do ntuim iace mm d do
do do Val. Lace Berthes Sleeves to match
Splendid VaLLace Collars;
" Uoniton do
" Real Point Lace, do "Job"
" Maltese do do
" Muslin Lace trim'd do
VaL Lace Edging and Insertions;
Piatt do do do
English thread,do do
Guiprue Laee for Dress Trimmings,
SPRING MANTLES.
Embroidered Mu&lin Mantles;
do do Scarfs, Job;
Rich hand wrought Lace Mantles;
do Chantilla do do
do Emb. White Silk, do
do do Black do do
do do col'd do do
Plain Silt and Light Fabric Mantles, all kinds.
LINENS, LINENS, LINENS.
We bare natron hand several celebrated brands Irish
Linen of verv superior quality, which we are determined
to sell by the pieco or halt piece, at prices greatly under
the usual rates.
Also, S-4, 10-4, 12 4, Linen Sheetings, all qualitiej;
Pillow Linen, all widtks:
Riot Tab.e Damask, bythe yard;
do Damask Table Cloths, all sizes;
do do Napkins;
Doyles, all kind;
Turkey Red Table Covers; Napkins to match;
Bird-Eye Diaper, all qualities.
White Brilliante, all qualities,
Col'd do do
4 4 French Chintz.
English and American Prints in endless variety.
Periala, French Muslin, very desirable.
MENS AND BOYS LINEN. GOODS;
(Jas&imeres and Tweeds;
Marseilles Vesting.
Drap D'Te Summer Clotha and Fine French Cloths of all
ail Kinds,
CARPETS
In our assortment of Carpets will be found every thin?
desiraoie. na iniena uieepour sum op aanngme
entire season, receiving every thing new that comes out,
direct from Manufacturers bands, und intend to sell them
at such prices as will make them go off lirsly.
do Real Brussels do
do Tapestry do do
Extra Three Ply English Carpets;
American do
100 Ply Carpets all patterns and prices. Also, a large lot
of. Cheap Carpets,
t ine Mosaic Kugs; veire. tiugs; luuea nuga.
Parlor and Door MatU, all kinds.
CURTAINS.
RICH CRIMSON AND BROWN DAMASK,
do Green and Gold do
do Crimson and do do
do Bine do do do
with a variety of ether colors.
Alsoejlaree assortment of German Damask Cornice and
Trimmings to match.
Kicq Applique uice uuriains:
Tumboral do do
" Emb. Muslin do
Also, Lace and Muslin Curtain Goods, by the yard
marll b oj THOMPSON 4 CO.
S600 WANTED
VN MORTGAGE, or personal security, for which a lib-
7 eral interest win De paid, u application is made im
mediately at PICKETT'S Agency,
No. Broad at, srer Church Anderson's.
marll
FOR RENT.
A TWO STORY BRICK HOUSE on the Franklin
Pike with an acre of ground to rent for the balance
of tne year. Price $12 50 per month. Call at
marll PICKETT'S.
A BARGAIN ! READ Tills I
I WILL sell a first rate WOOL CARDING MACHINE,
all new, in good running order, with all the necesmry
buildings, and ample room for double the quantity of Ma
chinery now employed. Situated in Nolensville, and which
did over $600 worth of business last year. Lmgcrtditfor
gxdpaptr. Call at f marll PluKETT'a.
uiu kuu acuumr. lie signs nis name romiaaiej, "d"
is probably making his way to a free State. I will pay
a reward of ONE HUNDRED DOLLAtiS for his arrest
nYiTfliua
lan to iusura
and confinement in jail, so that I can get him; jry- :
deel5-dtriwAw.- W. G. UiaUT.tfhelbyville, Tenn.
I3T" Louisville Courier, copy two weeks, and send bill
tothisofScc,
...KO 49 PUBLIC SQUARE,
KASSVUiIZ, TESOT68SE.
ARE NOW RECEIVING THE
AND BY PAR THE MOST DESIRABLE STOCK OF
STAPLE AND FANCY
DRY G-OODS
EYER HERETOFORE BROUGHT TO THIS MARKET,
AND XO YVU1UU TUlil JiSVlTtt TUB ATTEN.
TIOJTOF
PURCHASERS.
marS, '53.
REMOVAL I
MASON BROTHERS, PabMers,
NEW YORK,
HAVE REMOVED fBOX NO. 23, PARK SOW,
TO THK1K STORK
Nos. 108 and 110,
DUANE STREET,
A FEW DOORS WEST OP NO. 803,
Broadway.
mar6
FRESH ARRIVALS.
Wesscl & Thompson.
1 K Ci BOXES PRIME ORANGES;
JLQV 20 do Lemons;
25 do French Brandy Cherries;
200-pkgs Raisins;
10,000 -tine Regalia Cigars.
WESSEL & THOMPSON,
Union street.
mart
McCULLOUGXI'S CANADA PROLIFIC
CORN.
I HAVE about 10 boshels of the above Corn, producing
from 4 to 8 stalks from one grain, and 2 ears to the
stalk; the Corn is good for stock of any kind, and excellent
for mta!' I will furnish enough for one acre for $4, half
acre 12, quarter tl. It should be planted at feet square,
with one grain to the hill, and for a sure stand to plant 2
grains to the hill.
Persona wishing; to procure, will address me at Rome,
Tennessee, sendirg the money tor the Cora and postage
I will make a deposit at B. S. Welter's, Nashville, Tenn.
marS-tf JAS. MeCULLOUGU.
SUPERIOR
TE A S
IN TQE ORIGINAL HALF CHE3T3,
IN BOXES, OF C AND 12 POUNDS.
AND IN METALLIC PKGS,OF, K,l, 24 4 POUNDS.
rOR SALE BT
JElNKINS & CO.,
(original inventors or thb mstallio tsa pact.)
Wholesale Dealers In Teas Only,
N. W. cor of Market & Ninth Sta ,
FHXLBD2LFHX -
rp Teas in Metallic Packs put up in Half Chests, con
taining a variety of both Black -and Green, to suit buyen.
Printed List of Prices, Terms, 4a, furnished by mail to
all who order them.
All Teas warranted to please, or no sale.
One and the same price and terms to all, and one only.
Half Chests ot Black contain about 85 pouads, and of
Green, about 50 pounds each.
marl tf
New Goods.
I AM now receiving my stock or SPRING AND
SUMMER GOODS, and would be pleased to show
them to mv customers and the public generally.
' SAM PMCUETT,
feb29-dlm bpo No. 54, College it
ALSO, just received SCOTTS Spring and Summer
Fashions.
A. O. JM. C.
THE MEMBERS OF THE ORDER
meet every Tuesday and Friday
evening at 7 o clock at
Their Hall.
for inspection and woik
By order of the M. E.
G. C.
TO LOVERS OF THE GRAPE.
mHE subscriber, a native of Franca and for the last six
I teen years a resident of Davidson csunty, and en
gaged in ine cuiuTauou oi iae grape, uer.uj (Circa uuwee
that he will attend the Nashville Market every Wednesday
and Saturday morning for five or six weeks, nod will offer
for sale vines cf different varieties, and of the best kinds,
and will afford all needful information to persons purchas
ing how to cultivate them
Persona living at a distance can procure vines at my
place, ten miles from Nashville, on theNolenaville pike.
JULIAN CAMUS,
mar7 lwd4tw Farm SI. J alien La Urappe.
GOOD REMEDIES ARE A PUBLIC GOOD.
THE GREEN MOUNTAIN OINTMENT was used bv
the Indians, when this country was first discovered,
and by tbtm was considered "the best gift of the Great
Spirit, to his red children." It is the best application for
ictlinimatory complaints, euch as Rheumatism, Erysipelas,
Tarious affections of the throat and glands, eruptions,
bruises, burns, sores of oil kinds, 4c Price per box, 25c.
Foraale by all Druggist, and b
mar7 Agent for the Gitefg Co.
DROOPING BUDS,
fTUIE beat remedy (or sick babies, and for all the dis
THE CHILDREN'S PANACEA,
nf thOra!enbercConiDaTV.
For fevers, teething, diarrhoea, rickets. colic, worms, 4c.,
4c, it is the best medicine ever known. In the Giselen
benr Almanac, tbat is given gratis, you will find a list of
numerous rny&iciaxis uinjuguoub umuu, nuu ud
dren, and it has been need once, no parent will consent to
be without it in tne nouse.
Price 50c per bottle.
Foraale by all Druggists, and by
ALEX. MACKENZIE,
mar7 17 Coll.'ge street.
SPRING FEVERS.
mHE GR-EFENBERG HEALTH BITTERS are pre-
JL pared from a number of the most purifying, invigor
ating ana ueHIIDK ruuu?, uiuap, ueiua auu viuca, ocivcicu
mostly Irom tee Jiaiena aieuicaoi America, ineyarei
nnnrnful tonic thev eive strength to IhesTSlem.and ena
Lie it ta throw off the constitutional tendency to disease.
They have all the beneficial effects of a true tonio, without
causngany unnjcm.
Price 25c per package.
For sale b v Drugjists throughout the State, and by
ALEX. MACKENZIE,
mar7 17 College street.
WTtW RTflPtT "PIJRWTSHING AND FANCY GOODS.
ittK invite all to examine ournew Stock of Furnishracr
VV and Fancy Goods. We have now a snporb lot of
shirts, Collars, lies, uravais, uaaaaercuieu, uiuiw,
Stocks, Halt Hose, Robes, Ac, 4c.
ALSO, a fresh tupply of Perfumery; and many new
stvles of Fancy Goods. All of which will be sold at a (air
rate- J. H. McGILL,
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Furnishing Store, corner
of the Sqnare and Uollege street. mar
Annn acres op land fur SALE.
THE above valuable Land lronis Irom 2K to 3 miles on
Tenneasee River. 4 miles below'Reynoldsbusg, a large
portion first class bottom Land a good los house. Also
Mill with two Saws: 800 acres under fence. Alaree
quantity of iron ore in the hill land.every variety of choice
timber. A great bargain can b e had ii immediate applica
tion is made to J. L. A K.W. BKOWa.
mar4 d2w 44$ Uherry it.
MACAULAY'S THIRD AND FOURTH VOL
UMES.
TTAGAN & BRC Market Street, have fust received
JTLA ACAULAY'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND
Third and Fourth Volumes.
ALSO. Songs and Ballads of the American revolution,
hv Frank Mnnre
UianCeS ana Ulimpses; ur, c uit l care owiw, iuciuuiu
Twenty Years Professional Life. By Harriet K. Hunt, 11. lJ.
. n i- i- e : i I 1 .. j :
me ifUSSian r.mpiru ; ius jheauurceo, viuvciuujou. u
Policy. By an American.
The Hunters' Feat; or Conversations around tha Camp
Fire. By Captain Uayne Beid. J ust received oy
feb2 HAUAa a tittu.
FOR RENT.
A N excellent dwelling House, witn an necessary oui
r houses, on tha corner ol Mummer ana aiaiDerrrour.
This House contains a oro gooa rooms, xc VV'I
U.11UUU,
mar6 tf No 63, Cherry it.
WANTED.
A N active Boy, 15 to 17 years of age, as an apprenuco
XX. to theraper uanging cosiness, jipmj iu. mo.
feb23
No. 23 Public Square.
FINE CITY PROPERTY FOR SALE.
nN SATURDAY, the 26th or Apni.n noi prenousiy
j: a . i tit ..ii t tha Conrt House to the
highest Didder my LARGE LOT lying in the angle of
hJX -r,A MrTmnrs street, and being the corner Lot of
k. ,.: on Kmul street. The said Lot fronts on
Brood street 74 feet, and on McLemore street 250 feet,
with a 15 foot alley in the tear. Terms, $500 equivalent
.k h.i,.i.nnn . credit ofeieht and twenty months
without interest. For particular., inquire at mr office,
No. 45, Cherry at. mar6 J. C. THOMPbQN.
H. WEBER,
Professor of Music,
140 SUMMER STREET,
(the old astlum for the bund.)
febl3-lm.
J70HL.Y,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
WILL havea Urge and lastitonaoie lot oi jooaj ai a is
..y.4 in rvvmer'a Huildin?. Cberrv street. where
i- I n malrn nn tr.nltamtn'm Clothes in the
neatest style, and at tha shoneit notice by the 10th or
nt.rrh feb26 If
FRESII ARRIVAL.
AM NOW OPENING THE FINEST
tntk: of nil stvles of CARRIAGES.
BAROUCHES and BUGGIES, that boa
eier been offered in this market.
P. P. PECK.
Nashville. Feb. 19. 1S56.
P. P. PECK
TTAS lust received some new style beaaiuui LuurtL
l1 uncir i OTavs tvr nnanr two horse, which be will
take great pleasure ia showing to all who wiU call on him.
man, oo.
wnenlurouzut u uie uurae, oruiictra uui-
J. Emerv ft
mares in foaL payable when the fact is ascer
tained. The season will open March the 1st, and close
Joly 1st, 1356.
Good pasturage at CO cenU per week, grain fed at 75
cents per week. JO MORRIS,
feblS dltr&wSt Agent
NEW PUBLICATiyte.
"A Charming and fcmeHag A lory" AJfcwue am ,
W..T, BERRY & CoTfcave J art received
A New Rsmiice by JiL'a Kaiaiigh
ESTCTLID
RACHEL GRAY;
A TALK. FOOSDSD OS FACT.
BY JULIA KAVANAGH.
OneVolame,12mo. Paper Ccrrers and Cloth.
Th TsmrYnn Intim.T. .11 ' it. 1 r. 1 .
"S praise 10 iae talent displayed by Jolia, Kavanvh i
, . laie. iae Awecsam, oneot thesaae ucudi
OI Critics. Kan W. hoMl iv. ..
1 J fewu.
a oriBicpcnossor raa sccusiiFuas.
Fromth4 London Olterttr.
."VJ? lurpaased herself :a tMa
preterit to her "Nathalie'' and -Madeline " ekv
diver and at-
mcuve u iney are.
From Vu London Pott.
"Rachel Gray" iaaweU written etory.fnll of life, passion
From tit London Sun,
Tha Attention Is riTeiM hr tha
genuine character brought fcmard.
From thtjjyndou. AtAtscrum.
Rjichel Grar U charming and toachiag ttorr, wrought
I rum uamoia tuu oiuipicsb oi mnwriau; 0m ia 11
m rrTinTn it ai1 tit itnvw Sa f wvmtA with w
skill. A yonn? seamstress, neither bean tifal nor clever 1
the heroine. There is neither love nor the ihadow of
lover in the whole book. tha. btroine beeins and eadsct
irmMinr nnTpr 1111. I n snmhro nnmAfv ifjttft
amongst which Rachel Ufa ia passed are mode beautiful
and almost saint lite, by tne gentle, single minded obe
dience witn w.ncn tneyare imnuea. no one can read u
. -i . r j r ,. m i ...
are vigorously sketched, and have a life like reality. Tt
brisk little French woman. Madame Rjaev brirhteaa it
and atrngglea, and aorroira, with his lave for bis peeviih.
sketch, is admirsole. we- Heartily recommend uxa star
. . 1 1 . ... . ... 1 ., - . 1
equally good.
W.T. B. &. Co. have alto oa sale
IVlna EliluxiM of IAm fatlMointr tmrhm in thi tarn f avlAor.
GRACE LEE. 1 voL, 12mo. cloth.
NATHALIE. A Tale. 1 voL.12mo.cbtk.
DAISY BURNS. A Tale.
MADELEINE. I vol. 12mo
WOMEN O? CHRISTIANITY, lfeno.
mar7
Al ACAULAY'S
uictodv nc cufii inn
THIRD AND FOURTH 70LU23i.
JUST RECEIVED BY
W. T. BERRY & CO.
JNapoicon at St. fieiama,
W. T. BESSY & CO. bare jost received
NAPOLEON AT ST. HELENA; or, Interesting Aney
ing ine r ive ana a tiau xears oi nis uapuviiy. mueciea
from the Memorials of Ias Casas, O'Mears, Meatbolaon,
AntemuacchL and others. By John C Abbott. With II
lustrations. 1 toL, 8to, cloth.
1 Ex tract front the Preface. 1
The genius ef Napoleon hi asionndjeg. All branches oi
tinman tnnwliwlir.) xmmmA iilikn familiar ?n him donntla
mind. His conversations at St. Helena, sejtiered through
the nnmerias and volnminoua memorials of thorawho
gleaned then, are replete with inteasest interest
There ia no uind which will not be invigorated bv famili
arity with those profound thoughts, expressed with o
raucu gww iu lccuug tou energy iu uicuou.
NAPOLEON MEMOIRS.
W T. BERRY ft CO. have also oa sale
LAS CASAS MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON, 2voIs,
ABBOTTS LIFa OF NAPOLEON. Svolt
NAPOLEON IN EXILE; Bv O'Meara.
flaruu.ua ai si. nr.i.r..iA. irom, ui ueuaia
ami Journals of Sir Hudson Lowe.
MEMOIRS OF NAPOLEON. Bj the Ducheaa D'Abraa.
tes. xvois. n itn rortraita.
HAZLITT'S LIFE OF NAPOLEON.
NAPOLEON'S MEMOIRS : Evenings with Prince Cara
baeeree. Second Consul, By Baron Laneon.
NAPOLEON'S EXPEDITION 10 RUSSIA. By Count.
deSegnr.
THE NAPOLEON DYNASTY. Bythe Berkley Men
With 20 Portrait.
NAPOLEON AND HIS MARSHALS. By Headier.
NAPOLEON'S OLD GUARD. By Headley.
NAPIER'S PENINSULAR WAR.
ALISON'S HISTORY OF EUROPE With aa AUaa
of the Plans of Rattles.
TUIER'S HISTORY OF THB FRENCH REVOLU
TION. 5roU , with Portraits. jan2S
NEW ARRIVALS.
X ARGE LOT OF FINE and low
i j priced rire screens:
Uold and VeWat Center Pieces;
Oak and Black Mamie Paper:
Several jetts of very handsome Parlor Borders, lMmice,Ac.
1 . 1 1 r t : . r. . : . i
W. W. FINN,
nLI!. c . ' i n . " t . .
no. -3, x uuiic square, wcsi Blue, corner xseauencK u.
mara
a sargaJnT
iuti 3A1.E- a naerynmsnea Kosewooa.aK .
JD 6 octave Piano Forte, A H Gates' make
hajt hnn hnt littlnin nu nnrlwil! halttM stall k I If
great aicrifice, if sold within two weeks. Tqm chonctt
wonld not be offered except that the oner ia closing np hu
business to leave the place. Apply at Vine street, two
J w f TJ J I n f i i V I? M (7 V L"
AUCTION KALE OF GROCERIES
W. H. Gordon & Co.
On WKUA&3UAX next; tne ixiu aiarca vre tv' .
fer at Public Sale, in our nsnal quantities: f
800 hbds Common to Choice La. Sugar;
100 bbls Plantation Molasses;
55 do Golden Syrup, (a choice article;
50 do Suear House Molasses;
50 New York Crashed Sagsr;
800 boxes Mannfact'd Tobacco, all grades;
100,000 Regalia and Principeo Cigars, (all extra;).
25 barrela Florida MalleU;
1,000 kegs Shoenberger Noils, all sizes;
200 dozen Painted Backets;
200 barrels Dean A Hale's Aurora Whisky:
200 do Moulded Tallow-Candles;
With various other articles.
TERMS OF SALE,
All anal under $209, Cash;
" " over $200 and under 12000,60 Ua vs
" over2000, 90 days, tor approved eadorstC.
aoies, payaois in ens oi uie cuy uonx.
mart W. H. GORDON ft CO.
Books and JStationtry.
HAG AN & BROTHER,
No.81. MlXZST XT.
DEALERS in School Books, Letter and Cap Papers.
With every variety of Stationery. Merchants and
others inpplied at low prices.
"1 TTHITE'S COUNTERFEIT KKTECOK for March
vr
published, and frt sale by.
HAGAN ft BRO.
mar'j
Market st.
TNK 500 dcx. 4 ox. bottles Ink, a good article, fer sale
J. lOT, UJ II ALf 1.1 a BllU.
QPELL1NG BUUKS.-500doz. Webster's Spelling
kj uooxs. just received oy.. mauact a aitu.
SPIRITUALISM SCIENTIFICALLY DE
MONSTRATED. By ProL Kobe Hare, M. D , Prof.
of Chemistry in the University of Pennsylvania. Oa
vol. 8 vo. cloth. Foraale by HAGAN ft BRO.
mar!) Market it.
FOR SALE.
ABEAUTIPUL residence Lotoo the corner at Church
street and Polk Arenas, fronting 50 fL on the former
and 170 on the avenue.
ALSO, a Dwelling with 6 rooms. No. 50, Summer st,
between Church and Broad street.
ALSO, Several beautiful bnilding Lots in Weit Nash
ville. , Apply to J. L. ft K. W. BROWN,
mart d2w 44 Cheery 3 1
LESLIE'S GAZETTE OF FASHIONS FOR
MARCH. Jost received by
mn vi .iiiti.v ikk. jar
JUST RECEIVED invoices of Sundries OJj and f
Ends." 4a. Given un in TRUST, which will be sold, k
lif&taUU JAWn. V ft. I AJUllale
in "JOB-LOTS" to close, at prices thata U nthfuvl
lory. B. P. SHIELDS, t
man Azcnt fur Trustees. I
TT'OR RENT. Within fire minutes walk of
JP tbs Square FOUR ROOMS and KITCHEN, or
leas, ror particulars apply to thli othce.
nara uiw.
NEGROES FOR SALE.
Y virtue of a Decree of the County Court of C f
Davidson countv. rendered at the March Term, X i
1856. I will offer for sole at the Court House in Neeh-tV S
vtlle, on SATURDAY, the 15m day or iiaren, an.gro
WOMAN aged S5 years, and her TWO CHILDREN, one
2 years of age, and the other an infant 4 weeks old.
Terms will be a credit of 4 months, notes with good n
dorsers.psTable in Bank required.
mara u ixix.a.iuajib
Clerk and Master.
NOTICE.
THE undersigned having qualified as Administrator on
Ihe Eshte of Martha B. Boyd, deceased, notiflea all
persons owing said Estate to call and pay the asms, and
oil those having claims against the same most praent
them within the time required by law.
WU. J. HULl),
mar5 d3t Adm'r.
N CONSEQUENE OF THE 11IGII PRI
CES OK SUGAR, oar wholesale prices hereafter shall
be, for common Candy,14 cents: and for common Kiss,
17tf cents S. GEO. GREIG.
LONGHURST, ft CO.,
mar5 dim J. 0. 4 U. ROBERTSO v. ,
fl. M. AKEROYD
ARCHITECT, &c,
PUBLIC SQUARE, OVER BERRY'S STOOR',
Nasbviixz. Tknxewiz.
TlLANS. Elevations. Keetbsa. and fall aized detail.
JL Drawings of every part of city and private resi
dences, with entire specifications, Ac, as made by tha
bestNew York sad English Architects.
ocu.0 iy.
Brothers Endless Chain Railroad Horse
.... . - r - .
Powers and Threshers. These Powers have toketrthe prize
in twelve States and are pronounced the best ever invent
ed. -They can be bad at Jas. A. McAllister's, Broadway
Nashville, or by address to me at Franklin.
feb7-2W ROBERT P. RICHADSON
... , .at ... - .i,.-5t4 "
i
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