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Nashville union and American. [volume] (Nashville, Tenn.) 1853-1862, November 01, 1856, Image 2

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DAILY, $3; TSI-WEEKLY, t5; WEEKLY, $3.
OFFICE COBBER CHUECHA5T) UKtREY STRKETS.
" G. C. TORDETT & CO.
K.O. EASTMAN, F-C. DUHNIITaTOK, ft Q.C. TOSSXTX
DEMOCRATIC TICKET
FOB PRESIDENT:
JAMES BUCHANAN,
OF PEHHSTLVAItlA.
POE YICE-PRB81DHNT:
JOHN C. BKECKfNKIDGE,
OF KENTCOKX.,
DBRXOOBATZO &&BOTOBAX. txckbt,
FOR THB STATE AT LAEQB:'
WILLIAM H. POLK, of Macet.
ISHAM G. HARRIS, of Shelbt,
DISTRICT ELECTOSB.
Ko. 1. 8AMUEL POWELL, or HawkiM.
" 2. JAMES W. McHENBY, of Overton.
8. D. M. KEY, of Hamilton.
" 4. E. L. GAEDENHIBE, of White,
"5. E. A. KEEBLE, of Butherford.
" 6. JAME3 H. THOMAS, of Maury.
" 7. THOMAS J. BROWN, of Giles.
" 8. G. G. POINDEXTER, or Montgomery:
" 9. J. D. O. ATKINS, of Henry.
"10. D. M. CUBED!, of Bhelbr.
SATURDAY MORNING, NOV. 1, 1850.
EVERY CITIZEN SHOULD VOTE
A country is well governed not only
in proportion to the intelligence of those
who control, but tho number who partic
ipate in its government. It is through
the ballot box that every citizen exercises
his influence upon the legislation, and,
consequently, the destinies of the repub
lic. The first indication of the decay of
a love for liberty is manifested by indif
ference to voting. That country will be
the freest, the best governed, and longest
lived where every citizen exercises the
right of franchise, and regards it as a du
ty to vote. It is not merely aright, to be
exercised or not at the option of the in
dividual, but a solemn duty imposed on
him by his love for his country, and the
advancement of his race. Let no man
neglect it; the gravest responsibilities are
frequently incurred by a carelessness
about what appears to be a trivial duty.
We call on every voter to go to the polls,
whether he be democrat or know-nothing,
and to do his duty to himself and his
country. We particularly call upon eve
ry democrat to vote; no plea of business,
or money-making, or indolence, will ex
cuse his absence. "Eternal vigilance is
the price of liberty."
Let every naturalized citizen who is
entitled to voto take his naturalization
papers with him, and be ready to exhibit
them to the judges when called on to do
so. ,,
In the city, let every thing be done de
cently and in order. Let democrats re
member that the good name of the city
is in tho keeping of its orderly citizens,
and any temporary political triumph is
dearly purchased, if obtained at the ex
pense of law and order.
Watch!
The know-nothings of this county,
having no hope of the election of Fill
more and despairing of success in the
State, have fallen back on Davidson
county, and want to give an increased
majority here, as some little consolation
in the terrible overthrow which they
know awaits them. The list of judges
of election, appointed by the Judge of
the County Court, gives a majority
against the democrats in every district of
the county, and in some districts, as we
are informed, not a single democrat is ap
pointed ! This never happened before,
in times of the highest political excite
ment. We are willing to hope that the
County Judge was imposed upon by oth
ers, and that he would not knowingly
commit eo great an act of injustice.
Still, it is a fact, and democrats have to
meet the injustice by extra vigilance.
The ballot-box of the county is in the
exclusive possession of our adversaries.
That they intend to commit frauds, their
baseless humbug about "black carpet
bags" is conclusive proof. It is the "stop
thief" cry of those who are waiting to
rob democrats of their votes. Let every
ballot-box in the-county be watched, and
every legal democratic vote which is re
jected be recorded; for,if necessary, there
is a way to correct frauds by purging the
polls after the election.
DCr" Democrats, see to it, that every
democratic vote is polled. Should any
of your neighbors, especially in the city,
absent themselves through any fear of
personal violence, on the part of know
nothing bullies, go to them at their houses
and urge them to go to the polls.
CT'The democrats on the day of elec
tion should avoid all personal controver
sies or discussions with their adversaries:
Keep entirely aloof from all who mani
fest a disposition to create disturbance.
Vote and urge your friends to do like
wise, but do not suffer yourselves to be
drawn into a quarrel upon any pretext
whatever.
DCr'Every democrat should hold it to
be his imperative duty to devote next
Tuesday to the performance of his duties
pertaining to the election. Be early at
the place of voting. Vote yourself, and
then urge the friends of Buchanan to do
likewise. If all do their duty, the State
is sure for Buck and Breck by an over
whelming majority.
YOUNG MAN I JBE CARBUI. HOYOU
u CAST 3CO OR FIRST VOTEjflf
Young matihoipare-you" going to-cast yonr
first vote ? How, begin your p olitical life ? Will
yon commence a record' that will haunt you the
rest of your 3ays? Will you vote with a party
that has but one idea, ar d that a falso one ? Will
you identify .yourself witha sectional I. party, jthat.
cannot last but a 6in?le year bed thrn be blown
oat like a candle ? , Where willyou'be next year ?
Look to this, young man. There is no event of
your life of more' importance than this. ; Begin
right. That is every thing to you.
Look at ths history of the democratic party,
and of the factions which have from time to time
opposed it:
In 1789 the opposition to the democracy were
in favor of a " strong government" so strong B3
to almost amount to a constitutional monarchy.
In 1798 they were in favor of the "alien and
Bedition laws" and high-minded measures of John
Adams's administration, which destroyed the free
dom of the press and put almost unlimited power
in the hands of the President. They were also
opposed to immigration, and extended the natu
ralization laws to fourteen years.
In 1803 they were opposed to the purchase of
Louisiana, which embraced the whole Southwest
ern country and gave ns the command of the mouth
of the iLasissippi, declaring that the land was not
worth a dollar, but was a mere barren waste.
From 1790 to 1816 they denounced the efforts
tho French were making to become a free people,
and sympathized with England and the continent
al despots, who were laboring to restore the royal
house of Bourbon against the wishes of the French
people. Napolion and Thomas Jefferson were
the great objects of their hate during that period.
In 1812 they opposed the declaration of war
against Great Britain, preferring to allow that
nation to impress and carry off our seamen upon
the high seas and to commit the most outrageous
spoliations upon our commerce.
In 1814 they got up the traitorous Hartford
Convention, the object of which was either to force
the General Government into a disgraceful peace
or else to form, a separate confederacy of the New
England Stales. Among the resolutions passed
by the Hartford Convention, was one that none
bat American born citizens ought to be eligible to
office, and also that no more slave States should
be admitted into the Union. Here was promul
gated the germs of those principles that disticgaish
the opposition in our day.
During the war the leading opponents of the
democratic party took the side of Great Britain,
and deemed it unbecoming a .moral and Christian
people to rejoice over the victories of the Ameri
can arms.
In 1820 they.iheaded by Burns Kino, were at
the bottom of the Missouri agitation about slavery,
which threatened the overthrow of the Government
It was through their acts, according to the testi
mony of Thomas JJeffekson, that the North was
first arrayed against the South in the Halls of Con
gross, upon the negro question, which, it was sup
posed, had been settled by the Constitution.
In 1828 they oppossd the election of Akddkw
Jackson as President, because he was a " military
chieftain," and declared that, rather than have euch
a President, it would be preferable to have " war,
pestilence and famine."
In 1832 the opposition to the democracy allied
itself with the rotten, corrupt United States Bank,
which had become dangerous by its vast moneyed
power, to the liberties of the people. They said
the country could never get 8long withouta United
States Bank, and would be ruined if the monster,
under the control of Nicholas Biddle, was crush
ed. When the Bank insulted and bade defiance
to the President and representatives of the people
in Congress, tbe leading opponents of the democ
racy staunchly justified it. They were in favor of
a vast system of internal improvements being
undertaken by the.Government, which would hare
increased the expenditures hundreds of millions of
dollars made the administration at Washington
all powerful sapped the foundations of public
morality and virtue rolled up a great national
debt, and entirely destroyed the republican sim
plicity of our institutions.
In 1837 they were against the policy of tho
Government keeping its money in national coin
under its own control, and declared that it never
could succeed.
In 1828, in several of the States,"' they got up a
crusade against. the Freemasons, and professed a
holy horror of all secret societies, even these that
were not connected with politics, and tried to put
them down by law.
In 1830, forgetting their assertion that military
Presidents were so dangerous, they nominated ooo
an experiment which they repeated in 1840, 1843,
and 1852 ; in the two latter instances going to the
regular army after them, and choosing men who
had no experience as civilians.
In 1840 they elected a President by the "hard
cider" excitement, and, in so doing, 'opened the
floodgates of drunkenness and intemperance
throughout the land.
In 1842, under pretence of " protecting Ameri
can industry' they passed a high tariff, the effect
of which was to make the whole country pay trib
ute to and be taxed for the benefit of a few hun
dred manufactories in New England and Pennsyl
vania. In 1844 theyopposed the annexation of Texas
to the Union.
In 1816 they opposed the Mexican war, and took
the side of the enemy during the whole contest,
with a few honorable exceptions. When peace
was made they declared that our territorial acqui
sitions, including California, New Mexico, and
Utah, were not worth a dollar" an evidence of
short sightednes3 almost unparalleled in history.
In 1850 they very generally refused to follow
their leaders, Clay and Webster, who favored a
peaceful and fair adjustment of the slavery ques
tion, to keep open which menaced the integrity of
the Union.
In 1854 they opposed the Nebraska bill, which
carried out the principles of the adjustment oi 1 50,
and repealed the odious and unconstitutional Mis
souri restriction upon popular sovereignty.
In 1854 they also organized themselves into a
secret political society, Bnd made war upon the
fundamental principles of civil and religious liber
ty. The ends of that organization were narrow,
aristocratical and bigoted, while its manner of pro
cedure was as hateful and anti-American as could
possibly be conceived. Through its instrumental
'iy they endeavored to destroy liberty of con
science, practically unite Church and State, and
divide our people into warring section3 apd nation
alities. At p eaent they are busily ennaged in organiz
ing parties upon a sectional basis to array the
North against the South, the free States against
the slave the necessary result of which is, if
consummated, to break up the Union. During
this period they have changed their names many
times, it having become odious ; but their princi
ples have remained substantially the eame, vnd
identified them before the peopl. Not one of their
measures ever succeeded or wsa approved by actual
results. Their system of a "National Bank,"
"Protective Tariff," assumptiim of State debts, no
extension of territory, alliance with England, hos
tility to European republicanism, proscription of
men on account of their birth or religion, and
abolition agitation by the General Government,
has all been condemned.
All of our important national laws have been
passed by the democratic party, and so wise and
judicious have they been that it has governed the
country, with brief intervals of opposition misrule,
since the Constitution was adopted in 1789. Its
opponents havener been srrptt sighted andluufor
tunate, and history shows thim up in the moit
unenviable colorsTh'eir leading principles have
JensUust.qropdar.injtitutions, and great ad
miration f.r the British monarchy, after which
they would copy.
WHAT STATES WILL GO FOR BUCHANAN" ! '
A few days will determinft this .question. We
intend, however, to venture an opinion, which we
want our readers to remember, that they may see,
after the election, how far, iif at all, we were mis
taken.
In tbe first place we shall give Mr. Buchanan
every Southern State, without enumerating them
Maryland is the only one we consider at all doubt'
ful, and the only State in the Union that Mr. Fill
more stands the least chance of carrying. We
believe, however, that it will go for Mr. Buchanan
These States cast electoral votes, in all. 120
NORTHERN STATE3 CERTAIN FOR BUCHANAN.
Pennsylvania,
New Jersey,
Illinois,
Indiana,
California,
Total, 182
Of the States that are doubtful, but in which we
think Mr. Buchanan stands the best chance, we
enumerate
Connecticut, 6
New Hampshire, 5
Wisconsin, 5
Michigan, 6
Rhode Island, 4
New York, 35
Total,
61
13
8
6
4
23
for rBEMOHr:1"
Massachusetts,
Maine,
Vermont,
Iowa,
Ohio,
Total, 53
For Fillmore, NONE!
The whole number of votes is, 290
Necessary to a choice, 149
It will be seen that we give Mr. Buchanan every
State in tho Union but eleven, and think that ho
stands the best chance for six of those. A few
days will determine the accuracy of our calcula
tion.
WORK I WORK It
The canvass is nearly at a close. The day for
inminent has naaaed the hour for action has ar-
a r
rived. Oar speakers and editors, in all portions
nf thn StotR. have done their whole dutv in this
contest. Night and day they have labored in the
good cause. Having done all that tney can, tneir
last appeal is to their friends throughout the State
to do their duty on the day of the election.
Everv man has a duty to perform that duty
is
to hi3 country in return for tho blessings it con
fers.
There are none so humble that they cannot do
Romsthintr on the dav of election. lalK wun
your neighbors and urge them to vote right. Bun
throueh vour minds all who have voted, ana nnng
to the Dolls all that have not. See that those who
urn detained bv sickness, or otherwise, have con
veyances, or such other heip as will enable them
tn mmn out. Watch tho polls that none may do
permitted to vote except lho3e who are legally
entitled. Watch for spurious tickets goten up to
swindle the honest voter. Ask for nothing but
whnt is rieht. submit to nothing that is wrong
A great deal depends on the right kind of action
on the dav of the election. There is no doubt
but the popular heart is with the Democracy but
thn nonnlar will is frenuentlv deleited oy tne su
perior organization and energy of the opposing
party.
TVt it not bo bo this time. Know-nothingism
bv its secret onnliances, i3 thoroughly organized.
Thev aro striinsling with all the desperation of a
-i.r r in lifa mTiTq unou the result. As
jot ijr wui-wj r o- i
a nartv. it hai shown itself to bo thoroughly un
scrupulou? aad prepared to resort to any men is
to secure thd ascendency, it oa nooves us, uu re
fore, as its opponents, to labor, unceasingly, fr.im
this time until the close of the polls. If tho Dmi
ocrats and old line Whig3 friendly to tbe election
of Buchanan and Breckenndge aiiopt mis cour a,
there can be no coabt as to the result.
K. N. DEMONSTRATION.
It is wisa on the part of our know-nothing
friendo to get up a demonstration beore the election,
After it, th ey will have occasion only for mourn
ing. Thev have not carried a State in the Union
since the nomination of Fillmore, and we do not
believe they have the slightest chance to carry ono
on Tuesday next. It is wise, therefore, to have
thpir show in advance.
Lookinff at the late results, we think the show
to-day rray be regarded by democrats as a funeral
rather than a jubilee. Sim is dead; ana ttc act
of burial, if performed to-day, would only be done
three days in advance of tbe time appointed by
the nuhlic. The nrocession to-day should conwiu
an effigy of Sam, with the well-known lines, on
an infant who died young
'Since I am bo early done for,
I wonder what I was begun for."
ggf" A friend from Williamson gives U3 a most
encouraging account of a democratic barbecue and
sneakintr at Smith's Spriuffs in that county, on
Wednesday last. The crowd was large and the
enthusiasm strong and earnest.
The number of good speeches made are seldom
equalled on such occasions. Oar district elector,
G. G. Poihdexmb, Esq., was present and addres
sed the audience in a epeech that, we are inform
ed, delighted his listeners. Mr. Poinoextsr is one
of ths ablest young speakers in tbe State and has
won golden opinions with the democracy where
ever he has been. Wo regret exceedingly that an
accident, some weeks since, disabled him from
canvassing this entire district, as ha had purposed
to do.
L. D. Mtees, Esq., of the county of Maury, an
old line whig, who will give his first democratic
vote on Tuesday, wa3 present by invitation, and
spoke to the crowd with telling effect. Our infor
mant, who has heard many of the speeches of this
canvass, compliments Mr. Mykbs with having
made the best to which he has listened. Our per
sonal knowledge of Mr. Mtees at the bar patisfied
us that he would be able and interesting on the
stump. We only regret that he was not induced
to make a list of appointments in various counties
of the State.
W. T. Thompson, of Maury, and R. W. MoGavoce
of pur city, spoke upon the occasion with much
success. Both of these gentlemen have made a
number of speeches in this canvass that have re
flected much credit on themselves and been of
signal service to the cause. We expect a good
account from Williamson on Tuesday.
SQf The New Albany Tribune (know-nothing
gives the vote of Indiana all official, except four
counties as follows:
For Willard, 119,423
For Morton, 111,489
Majority for Willard, 7,935
The official vote of these four will probably make
it eight thousand.
EgrCoL Samuel R. Rucker was tried in the
Circuit Court at Woodbury, last week; for killing
Dr. W. A. Smith. The jury, we learn, fixed his
term of confinement in the Penitentiary at twelve
years. Ho took an appeal to the Supreme Court,
"FROM MAINE TO G BORGIA?"
No better evidence coud begiven1 of ths ta
tionaht7 of the Democratic party than that we,
here in Tetraes3ee,can and do adopt as our own, the
statement of tho Eastern Times, published in Maine,
respecting the difference between the Democracy'
and their Northern'opponents, touching the admis
sion "61 XanHas, Here it h: . -
We wish' the, issue in regard to the admission of
Kansas to be distinctly unoerstcod. ine repuou
cin party would have the people believe that the
democratic nartv aro in favor of making Kansas a
sUvn Stf p Thn frnn difference betweenUhe po
sition of the two parties on this question is tbist
Ihe Democratic party North and South, vriU admit
ner jrte or nave, jusi at u wuir "j
may decide Every one agrees to this principle.
southern men. among whom we nonce nun. it m.
8. Preston, in bia eoeech. which we publish to
day, all agree to admit her as a free State, if the
mBioritv so vote.
But the republican party ajs, if yoa wish to
come in a frte State, well and good; we welcome
you to our armt; but if cn the other hand, you
wish to come in as a slave State, you must stay
out of the Union. No matter what the mcjority
of her peoDle desire in recard to her domestic in
stitutiona, they say to them, we know better than
you what is for your good, and you must do as
we wish. They would impose upon thoaa when
coming into the union a conaiuon wmcu is incom
patible with the dignity of a sovereign State, a
condition which has never yet been imposed upon
any previous State; a condition which, however
much power they havo over her wnen a territory,
the Constitution gives no power to impose when
about to becomo a state.
AH that is required by the. Constitution is that
tbe government or tbe state to be admitted should
be of a republican form. They prate about re
storing the government to the principles ot vvasa-
rogton and Jetterson. lhey never enunciated the
principle of no more slave territory. They both
admitted into the Union states with slavery, and
they did so because the people of tho3a States so
desired to be admitted, itey both let: their soi
emn warning against sectional paities, but we see
one now formed and claiming their sanction. We
should want no better arguments in support of
our coune, than the words ot the early 'residents
UON. F. P. STANTON.
Thu gentleman delivered a speech at Brooklyn,
New York, on Tuesday evening, of last week.
The New York Daily Neivs says that
"The Hon. F. P. Stanton of Tennessee, enchain
ed the attention of ttis vast audience for two hours,
by one of the moat able, forcible and eloquent
speeches that has been delivered la tbe Stato du
ring the Presidential campaign.
"He showed up the holljw pretences of the
black 'republicans in their true light. Ho showed
by conclusive evidence, that these "sbriekers fjr
freedom," through their representatives in Con
gress, were the hrst to oppose the practical opera
tion of the 'Missouri Compromise;" and that they
had steadily and firmly adhered to this line of pol
icy from tbe date or toe passage ot this Uompro
mise in 1820 up to the very day on which it was
proposed by Stephen A. Douglas to repeal this
measure so obnoxious to their political tastes
It was then, and not till then, they discovered
that the much reviled 'Missouri Compromise' was
b measure of peace and mercy, and was regarded
by both sections of the Confederacy as a finility
upon the slavery qae3tion.
We regret that the press of other miltera com
pel us to defer the publication of these masterly
epeech es until another day. For the present, we
content ourselves with a mere passing notico of
them.
THE PROSPECT IN NE7 YORK.
Extract from a private letter written by a very
intelligent gentleman from Washington to his friend
there, dated the22d insL, at Albany, N.;Y.:
" I called at the Argus office, and havo got such
information as tbey had. They think there is a
fair chance for carrying Mr. Buchanan in this State.
I have seen many of the politicians, and the best
spirit prevail i. My present impress'on is that
the democratic electoral ticket will prevail. The
democratic party is fully aroused, and they arc
doing thiegs in their old style. Tne local tickets
are, in general, well got up, and nil appear to be
awake. Yesterday Henry Ward Baecher ad
dressed a Fremont ma$3 meeting at Fort Edward.
Beecher's eupport of tho ticket will not help the
black republicans Everybody is disgusted with
his turning the pulpi: into the stump.
"The strong appearance that the campaign will
end auspiciously for the democracy has a strong
influence on the timid and the wavering. Enough
appears now to satisfy the most incredulous of tbe
election of Mr. Buchanan, I saw a canvass while
in Albany, made by sagacious politicians, which
gave Freincnt but six States, leaving two or three
doubtful and giving ill? re-it to Buchanan.'
THE ELECTION OF A PRESI OEST AND VICE PRES
IDENT. The following is a summary of the laws and
constitutional nquiiomentj in the election ot a
President and Vija President:
1. Electors elected on the first Tuesday after tho
first Monday in November.
2. Elcqtorg itit--i on iLa first Wednesday in De
re'nbi r iial c t-i " tir vo ej. They then sign three
certifi t-?, -end ii uie-i'v'Uger with one opy to the
PieaiUVutoi' tho innate bt Washington before the
first WeJues-.lay iu January, another by mail to
the same perssD, auJ the third deliver to the Uni
ted States Dutri. i Judge where electors me it.
3 Each Stato provides by law for filling Bny
vacancy in the board of electors occasioned by ab
sence, death, or resignation. Such of the electcrs
as are present are generally authorized to fill any
vacancy.
4. The (iovernor gives notice to electors of
their election beflra the first Wednesday in De
cember. 5. On the second Wednesday in February Con
gress shall bo in session and open the returns.
The President ot tne senate sum, in tbe presence
of the House of Representatives, open the certifi
cates of returns, and count the votes. The per
son having the greatest number of vote3 for Presi
dent, if sach number be a majority of the whole
number of electors, shall be the President.
6. If no person has a mtiority ns above the
choica is to be made from the three highest return
ed. The members of tho House, by States, form
themselves iu electoral committees, and the major-
tv determine which is to be tbe choice ot tbe state,
each State having only one vote.
7. If neither ot tbe candidates get a majority of
the States before the 4th ot March, then tho Vice
President shall act as President.
8. If the people do not elect through the elec
tors a Vice Presiding then the Senate ot the Uni
ted States shall make the election from the two
h'geest candidates returned to them by the elec
tors' GEORGS LAW.
Bennethaj at length dismissed his pet, Live-
Oak George, ai a hopele33 humbug. Of him he
says.
"We have been guilty of a great burglary with
regard to George Liw. We have broken down
the fences of the political menagerie to set him on
his pins before the people. We thought he had
tbe stuti in pim to mate a telling, vigorous man in
the present exiaency of the republic. We para
ded him in all sorts of shapes turned him this
way and that doctored himiponestyje, physick
ed him in another gave him views and idea3, end
maxims and apothegms, and occasionally a bit of
poelry; but with all we could do, assisted by ex
Senator Weslcott, Sila3 M. Stillwell, Charles Ed
wards Lester, and other worthies, Ueorge Law
turned out to be a great humbug, and as a politi
cian only fit tobclaughedat. His ridiculous opera
tions in hi3 conventions and meetings, during tho
past few month?, have only iojured the cauje of
the opposition to the democracy, and materially
damaged the prospects of the candidate he endea
vored to ass st. Like a big bull in a china siop, ho
smashes everything with which he comes, iu con.
tact We really now hope that he will now go
back to private life, acd become aiespectable, God
fearing cit'zjn. Wo rather think that he willtu.
cecd better in religion than in politic3. One half
thomonev he has thrown away oa political harp
ies, had it haen in building churche3and establish
ing nuneries, would haye given him, with the
Pnno. ' character for benevolence, munificence,
sanctiiy, and devotion, which Would last him all
the cays ot his Hie ana open ior mm a spieuuiu
prospect hereafter."
OnN WILLIAM 3. WW- pATDUESr. E. g. MAYr;
Join Williams & po.
COMMIS310N MERCHANTS AND CQTT0N
FACTORS,
NEW ORLEANS, LA,
T3 B. MAYES, formerly of Columbia, Tenn., baa Ufcoa
an oGee on Broad Street, adjoining tlia Depot or the
estee and Alabama Railroad, Nashville, and is prepar
raake liberal cash advances on conslncnmentj to Jobn
"Williams & Co. p foct3l -3m
-lSW.Sf
OOXMUNWATWX.
fit - Tf
AKKAKSAS BOTTOM LANDS PLANK ROAD MEil
PHIS AND ST. LOOTS RAILROAD.
The State of Arxuuas li dHttae4 te-I ona o f tho flnt
Stateslntfca Union. Her Internal manrcos aro great, and
when developed, asther aoon will bo. she will comnare
favorably with, any other slater States. In tho xieat Talley of
us uuusiippi.
J am aaUsfled, fro rathe best Information, aa wolLasobser'
vatlon, that the north-eastern parUoa of the State, taken all
together, Is decidedly the best portion of tho State embrac
ing we eonnuesorcrlttenden, PolnaetU Greene and MIuli
sIppL These eonnuea Jte moUy la the MIssUsIddI bottom
Greene and MlMlalpptJotniThrMbsanri Use; Mississippi
tuuiur joins mo wnoio wiaiaotuitl neck ofMlssonrt run
Jslng down betwetn the Mississippi river and Arkansas.
, risk nothing in saying that these lands, In point 'of beaolT.
iicnness ana lertmry or toll, are unsurpassed In the whole
world. These lands make a territory of about forty miles
square, It is an a Umbered coantry, though the timber
generally of younj;groth? and not hard to get clear of In
opening plantations. . .
I bellere It to be tbe healthiest country 1 nave erer seen,
This I think Is mainly owlngjto.Jhe absence of any local
cause for sickness, and the extrainBnary good water to be
found In OTery portion of the country. In point of conve
nience It Is unsurpassed, as there is no portion of the country
bat it within ten miles of steamboat navigation. There is
road, thirty feet wide, now cut out from the Mississippi river,
passing the lower end of Big Lake to the high lands west of
St. Francis river. Dr. Fowlkes Is now In New York, making
arrangements to hare this road graded and planked as soon
as It can be done. Tbe Railroad from Memphis to St. Louis
by way of the Iron Mountain Is expected to be commenced
soon, and there Is no donbt as to its being completed at no
distant day, as It Is In the hands of men of energy, enterprise
and capital, who will push it forward to speedy completion.
The roots is entirely practicable, as all or nearly all of the
road runs through an entire leiel country. The road can
be made perfectly straight, and very soon the Iron-horse will
be snorting over it at the rate of sixty miles per hour. There
Is no road that can be built cheaper, and when It connects
with the great Central Illinois road at St. Louis, and with the
great Central Mobile and Charleston roads at Memphis, It
will be the longest and best road In the world; It Is to be the
great thoroughfare between the north and south, and will be
a means of binding Buchanan, Fillmore, Fremont, and their
friends In one common brotherhood, and thus be a great
means of presorting tho ConsUtution and the Union. Now.
this road wlU run through the whole longih of the country of
which I have been speaking. Some have doubted the prac
tlcabUity of buildings Railroads through the bottom of tbe
Mississippi In consequence of the overflows, but these fears
bare all vanished since the great-rise last spring the lerles
all stood and protected the country from any Inundation, In
spiring more confidence in the country than anything that
has happened. Theleyies will all soon bo completed, there
b) making It the most desirable coantry in the United States,
I will here take occasion to say that, though I own a large
amount of land In that country, and expect to make it my fu
ture home, I have no land to sell.
Dr. Fowlkes lis a very large land bolder there and wishes
to sell, and will 'give enUre eatisbetlon as to tho validity of
bis titles. He is offering his lands at the very low price of
flro dollars per aero, which is but a part of their real Tslae:
and I would here take occasion to say to all that intend pro
curing land in that country, that there Is not a moment to Ec
lost, as land Is going up; and when those roads, of which
havo spoken, gct.under way, land will sell there from thirty
to fifty dollars per acre.
Many may think this visionary, but I tell you It ts true, for
that is destined soon t be a very great country . In point of
land, waterand health It is certainly unsurpassed, and there
are thousands that could infinitely better their condition, get
themselves rich farms, and procure lands for their children
by making purchases In Arkansas.
In conclusion, I would say to my friend), and all others
who Intend morlngtoa new country, that now is four time;
delays breed dangers; go at onco, seethe country for your
selves; examine, without prrjudlce, Mliilsilppi county, and
If you are not well pleased you will be the first I have beard
of out of hundreds. There Is enough there to please the most
fasUdtous. It will take but little time or money to go aDd
see It; and I am fully persuaded that you can do mora there
for yourselves and children (if you go now) in ten years, than
you could horo In a life time. I write more for your benefit
than my own. We wantactualsetllers men of worth men
who are Industrious, and will help build op and derelope the
groat resources of tbe country. Lary drones ars advised to
stay array. A.B.ROZELL,
Mt. Viaw, Octobers?, 18j6.
2jTho papers of Nashville and Memphis, secular and re
ligious, will please copy.
Lanier, Phillips fc Co.,
WHOLESALE GKOCE1CS,
Commission merchants
AND
DEALERS I.V FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
LIQUORS,
NO. 39 MARKET STREET, NASHVILLE,
TENNESSEE.
Nov. 1 tf.
SJashville Theatre
SATURDAY KVESINC, OVEJIBER 1, 133C,
Will be presented the admirable Drama of the
OR I' II AN OF GENEVA.
Pas de Dzcx.
.MlSStS. PiRTlNUTO AMD FlIHS,
To conclude with the Drama of the
MILLER'S MAID.
PRICES OV ADMISSION Dress Circle and Par.
nnetteTJe: Uncer Circle SOc: Colored Box 50c: Colored
Uallery 25c; Private Boies, (exclusive right) 10; Single
Seats, to fl.
jgf" Doors open at 7 o'clock, P. II.; curtain rises pro.
ciselv at IU. P. M.
Sf Box OSes open from 9 to 12 o'clock, A. M., and
from 8 to 4, P. M., wnen Beats can be procured from
E. C. HDNTlEY. Treasurer.
ALL THE PREMIUMS AGAIN AWARD
ED TO
Watcrficld
Walker !
AGREEABLE with their usual custom Waterfield &
Walker airaln sweDt the board of all the Premiums
offered at the late Fairs for the fipest specimens In the Hat
Department. It snoutu se oorne in mina luawor mo very
moderate price of five dollars ono of these elegant Hits can
i . i ii n' i u n ti r ii . n" 1 1 i"i.'L
09 prOCUfUU. UUVl iAlljiitl.i.u ut i auut.i
NEW DESIGNS OF SOFT II ATS.
THB largest and most select assortment of Soft Fur Hats
will be found at Waterfield & Walker's they hare all
the new colors or tne season.
novl WATEUFIUI fi WAL.KEK.
LADIES' KIDE1NG IIATS.
npiIE Ladies will find at Waterfield dc walker's some
A handsone stvles of Rldlnr Hats of the richest texture
and most appropriate designs. Also, a full assortment of
raney tiats ana uaps ior cnuaren.
FUKS I FUKS I FUHS t
TJTTE have receive a part of our Winter stock of Furs,
v v ana will sen mem si very moderate pnera.
WATERFIELD & WALKER.
City Hat and Fur Store,
novl 26 Pnblic Square.
COPARTNERSHIP NOTICE.
rpHE psrtnershlp heretofore existing under the style of
X. LAMER & PHILLIPS, in mo wuoiesale Urocery and
Commission business, ceased this day, by limitation.
The business from and after this date will be continued
and conducted under the firm name of LAMER, PHILLIPS
& CO. All persons Indebted to tbe late firm are requested
to make early settlement, and those having claims against
the same will please present mem ior adjustment.
L. H. LANIER,
Nov. I, 1S5G. WM. PHILLIPS.
C. Mincfc&xi,
DKTJGfUST AND APOTIIACARY,
LINCOLN HALL, NO. 134 CHERRY STREET, SOUTH.
HAS just received a large and carefully selected
Stock of Genuine Drucs. Chemicals. Perfumery.
Spices, Ac, which he will sell at the lowest prices for
cash, or to ounctual dealers on the usual time. Hav
ing obtained the services of a legally qualified Druggist he
hopes, with strict attention to business, to merit the patron
age of the public. Physicians' Prescriptions carefully com
pounded at an hours oitne aayor nignt
UL. QUININE, Sul. Morphene, received and for sale by
nov, 1
U. VU.XJlli..
"tARB. SODA One cisfc received and foraile by
KJ nov l
E. C. SIINCHIX.
HAIR PREPARATIONS. A large variety received cod
for sale by E. C. M1XCH?N.
TJOCKET KNIVES. A fine assortment received and lor
L aae by (,norJ
B. C. MINCH1N.
ONUFF- One barrel of superior Maccabay Snulf receive!
yj ana rorsaie oy
k. c. vinmis.
BRUSHES, COMBS, &c A
and for sale by
large assortment receive?
K. O. M1SCHIN.
TEAS. A quantity of " Curlou's Young Hyson" and
Extra Oolong Teas of superior quality received and for
ale by E. C. MISCH1N.
A FINR assortment or surgical instruments received and
-ta.
. for sale by
novl 2w
E, C. 1IINCHIN.
FOR SJHTllLANU ArjfU PAD UC A II.
mHEllifht drantht steamer HARTS VILLE.
X Rokt. Grubss, Mastor, will leave as above
on M03DAI ov. 3,ai iu o-ciocx, a. m. ror
passage or freight apply op Doara or to
novl-d2t P. F. HARDCASTLE.
Mrs. Julia Jones,
X) CaPECfUM.Y informs tbe citizens ofNash
livhle that ihs is pow prepared to give les-
sobs on tbe Piano-forte and Mnglnz, Terms! I f? f fl
made known on application atb,rr llsldepce, IJIahttreot,
between spring anu uroaq. '
One Hundred Pantaloon
Makers Wanted?
AT NO. 71 if EAST SIDE PUBLIC SOUARE, NASH
VILLE, 'Lisa.' ' K.'H. BROCKWAY fc oo.
bcti-djm. ' '
W. KUSBU I. swvj.. u.
o. x. CAW CO,
ULsacajsj, sii a s
WHOLESALE ffBOCZSS AND COMfilSSIOS
StEHCHAKTS;
No, 50 Buoadwat, Nashviuj, Tcssijsre:.
&
NEW. PUBLICATIONS.
Medical Text Books !
JOHN YOItK Je CO. have received all the
Text Books used In the Nashville Medical School :
Wilson's Anatomy; Fownes' Chemistry;
Erlchsun'a Snrrerv: Cazeux Obstetrics:
United States Dispensatory ; Kirk & Paget'a Physiology;
in0 Pjlth"" A Bale EOT J
Taylor's Medical Jurisprudence ; Wilson's Dissector;
and a great variety of miscellaneous Medical Bocks, not con
tained In the abovo catalogue. (novl.
JOHN YORK CO. have Jrtst received
The Prince of the House of David :
The Captive Youth or iuda ;
Confidential Letters of Napoleon and Josephine ;
Linda, or tbe Young Pilot, by Mrs. Hentx ;
Robert Graham, by Mrs. Hentx;
Never too Late to Mend, by Reade ;
The Old Regime, by Tocquerllle ;
English Traits, by Sydney Smith;
LamerUne's celebrated Characters, complete.
Draper's Physiology, niustratad. For sale by
novl JOHN YORK. 4 CO.
MRUICAL BOOKS.
JOHNYORK & CO hare on hand a complete stock of Text
Books used In "the Nashville Medical School, which they
offer at tbe publisher's prices. (novl
JOIIN YORK & CO.
Have just received Memotra of Hugh L. White;
Life of James Buchanan;
Memoira of His Times, by Ilenry Cockburne;
Appleton'g Cyclopedia of Biography;
Lippincott'a Gazetteer of tbe World;
Perry's Expedition to Japan and China Seat ; aad
Ramsey'a History of Tennessee. novl
SCHOOL ROOKS.
JoesYobc A C3.,have just received a complete assort
ment of Classical Common School Books, which tbjy offer
for sale cheap, novl
GOLD PENS. !
JOHN YORK A CO, have just received a new supply
of the best Gold Pens in this market. novl
I1LANK DOOKS.
Ledgers, Journals, Day Books. Cash Books, Record
Books, Minute Books, io, for sale bv
novl JOHN YORK & CO.
PUTNAM'S MONTHLY for November ;
Household Words " "
The Schoolfellow "
novl
Jnst received bv
JOHN YORK & CO.
Boots! Sfioes ! Trunks!
LADIES' SHOES.
LADIES' fine French Lasting Heeled Gaiters;
" " ' " Thick Sole do, tint and pl'n;
" f " Congress do;
' " Kid Boo'ees, with and without heels;
" Kid, Fr. Me. and Goat tVelt Bootees ;
" lndii Robber (leather sole) Clogs.anew art'e;
14 Kid Slippers, of every description ;
Velvet and Lasting Slippers ;
A variety of Ladies' Toilet and Fancy Slippers :
Misses' Thick Sale Kid and French Mo. Shanghai or Kos
suth Bootees; with a general assortment of Misses' and
Children's Kld,French Morocco,Coat and Calf W elt Bootees.
GENTLEMEN'S GOODS.
Gentlemen's fine calf Vaterproof Boots :
" " Double Sole do :
" " Dress Boots ;
" " " Congress 'Gaiters, double and
single Solo;
" " Water-pf. Shoes aad Oxford Ties;
A large stock of Men's, Boy's and Youth's heavy Calf and
Kip Work, of goad malerl.il and Workmanship.
NEGRO SHOES.
A large and varied asortment of Negro Bropins. for men
and boys, Negro Bxts,&c Planters ate respectfully Invited
to call and examine before purchasing.
TRUNKS, VALISES, Ac.
Alargs lot of fine Solo Leather Trunks, for Gentlemen
" Ladies ;
Ladles' Extra Size Dress Trunks ;
Also, a lot of cbeaD Leather Tranks:
Fine Sole Leather Valines, Carpet Uazr-ie.. all nf which
are onerea low lorcasu. juu.t ka.-uaul,
oc 131 No. 4-2 College street.
NOTICE.
OEALED PROPOSALS will be received at the Recorder's
O Office, Inthe city of Nashville, until tbe 13th of Aovem-
ber, 1856, to furnish two thousand cons or Wood, suitable
for making iteim. Said Wood to be well seasoned, four
feet long, and to be approved by the Engineer at the Water
Works of the city. The same to be delivered at tbe Wood
Yard at the Water Words, corded and measured all to be
dellvtrsd during the present Municipal year, ending tbe SClh
September, ISS6
wai. ii. liuit.i,
ocui ta
Ch'n. Waterworks Committee.
DISSOLUTION.
THE copartnership heretofore existing between IUm &
Woxk is dissolved, by mutual consent. AH debts due
by the Arm will be paid by Work, and all the debts due to
the Arm will be paid to blm
tcui jv
E. B. WORK.
NOTICE TO POLICY UOLDEltS.
ATE. E. D. FARN3WORTH has been dnly elected Marine
11 L and Fir 3 Inspector for the Insuance Offices and Agen
cies of this city, and as such inspeetorU authorised to ex
amine any rise taxen ny euner oi tne umres.
JOSEPH VAULX, Pres't.
ALLA. I-AL.L,t-resTt.
SAM. SEAY, Prest.
oct3I tf JOS. NASH, Agent.
F1RK WORKS.
QKY ROCKETS, assorted, Roman Candles, Flourpot,
kj uengoia, lorpeuoi, o;c, ior sale at
oct3) J. C. & C. ROBERTSON.
SAKUINKS.
rflft BOXES Sardines, Gllloux's brand;
0JJ 25 da Raisins, assorted, fresh;
'-cnlc Prumes ;
in bblsNuts, assorted;
000 boxes extra Eagle Princlpo Cigars ;
uj extra prime Aiaccaroni. f orsateby
OCI30
J. C. & C. ROBERTSON.
Mew Books.
HOW WE LIVE.
DRAPER'S rilVSIOLOGY. Incomparably the best Work
on tne subject, embracing tne great and important discove
ries recently made throuehoutthe World.
HUMAN PHYSlOLOGYv-Statiul and Dynamical ; or the
uonuuions anu course or tne ure or .Man. By John millam
Draper, M. V. LL. I)., Profesjorof Chemistry and Pbjk!.-ey
In the University of New York. Illustrated by nearly 300
line Wood-cuts trom Photographs. C30 pages, 8vo., Muslin.
Keeelvedandforsalsat HAGAN's
oct39 Market street.
BECKWOURTH'S LIFE AND ADVENTURES, Tho
Life and Adventures ef James P. Beckwourth, Mountaineer,
Scout, and Pioneer, and Chief of the Crow Nation of Indians.
written from ins own dictation, by 1 . V. uonner. with Il
lustrations. 12mo. Muslin.
His Life has been a scene of bold enterprises, of ar
dancers, of hairbreadth escapes, to which It would be diffi
cult, if not impossible, toned aparrallei. Puritan Rtctrier.
The volume seems to be rigidly truthful, and Is one of the
best Illustrations of frontier and ultra-frontier life In our
literature. Chmtain Advocate and Journal.
For sale at HaGAN'S, Market street.
WILSON'S WESTERN AFRICA. Western Africa : Its
History. Condition, and Prospects. Br Rev. J. Lelchton
Wilson. Eighteen Year a Missionary in Africa, and now one
of tbe Secretaries of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Mis
sion, ttiin numerous engravings. I'.'mo., siusiin.
Mr. ilson's book on ' Western Africa" contains tbe most
complete and circumstantial report thai has vet appeared of
tne present conaiuon of mis pari or tne tvoria. Lowiex
Literary Q&zttte.
tot sate at
HAGAN'S, Market St.
A HICII INTELLECTUAL ItEPASX FOlI
A the Admirers of Shakespeare Tbe Original Text of
enaxespeare nesiorea -u.iwi lypograpnicai errors ana
Omissions Corrected by tbe Manucrtpt Emendations, con
tianed in the Recently-Discovered Folio of 1032.
Tbe complete Works of William Shakespeare, comprislnir
his Plays and Poems : with a History of tbe Staze. a Life o
tbe Poet, and an Introduction to each Play: by J. Payne
Collier, Esq.. F. S. A. To which are added. Glossarld and
Exnlanatory Notes, and Notes to the Emendations, showicz
the Headings or all other editions, by John i-. Jewetu em
bellished with a Splendid Portrait, and forty new original
uesiens. tor sale at iiaua.vs.
octSU Martetstreet.
CIT1' AND COUNTRY RESIDENCES FOR
SALF.
A BRICK DWELLING with live rooms. Kitchen and
X3l Servant rooms, die. on McLemore street, between
Church and Broad, exempt from taxation for noarly 30 years.
ALSO, a neat Frame Cottage and 3! acres of ground, three
miles irom tne city on me aoiensvuie rise.
ALhU.a name uweiiiniand acres or iana; ana a
mairnlncont Residence Site It; miles from the city, on tbe
Gallatin Pike. Bargains will bo given. Apply to
J. L. & H. W. BKOW.S,
oct29 d2w 42) Cherry street.
joiyeaii's premium aim goods.
TUST received a supply ofGoodvear's Patent Gum Coats.
O Cloaks, and Legglnzs, proof against all kinds of weatbtsr,
the bent goods or tne Kind ever mane, rorsaieov
OCIZJ J . 11. A1CU1L.1..
ItUC'KSKIIJ SHIRTS AND DRAWERS.
T ECEIVED this day a small lot of best quality of Bnck-
Xl skin Shlrtsana litawers.anaaiewoi a cneaper siyie.
OCtSU J. IU
WHITE AND Ol'EKA KID GLOVES.
TUST received n handsoma lot of White and Light
tl Uolored Jvtd uiovea.
oct2i ' J. 11. AICMILU
TRUNKS AND YALISES.
TU3T received a supply sf best Sole Leather Trnnki
rl and Valices and a large lot cf cheap styles, all for
sale by focl23j J. U. McQILL.
TpvRESSlNG ROUES. Afew Robes, well wadded,
XJ received and lor sale by J. u. McuiLu.
TTNDERU EAR. Wo have now a supurb assort-
j ment of seasonable underwear. It consists of :
bbaker flannel, Miaker Knit,
Segovia, Lamb's Wool,
Red Saxony, Arnarian,
Merino, Ca&hmere,
Lined Silk, Canton Flannel,
Twilhd Cotton. Ac. all of which we aro aellmir at
fair rales.- Ipat291 J. li. McQILL.
riMtAYKLLINU SHAWLS AND lUUKFERS.
A. A handsome lot of hjivy Traveludi Shawls and Muf
Ida ICCCIICU BUU ,U Snip UJ IX. 411UI1JU-
I - i j i T i. t ii'ir-r.r. T
MI! UTS AM) COLLARS Just received another
invoice oi beat style oi shirts and Collars, at varioos
price a. ocl2j)J J. ll.MCUILL-
AOLOlt ED S II HITS. A small lot of colored Shirts ,
J hoe style, end a good supply of cheap ones.
nctrJ J. ii. aicuiuii.
NECK Tl ES Afi D STOCK. Just received every
variety of Cravals, Ties, and Stocks
CttZ1) J. II. S1CU1LU
Ladies' and Gentlemen's
ynrninhincStore. comer of Square and College street
$5 Reward,
STOLEN or Slayd from the subscriber, on me im mst
a SORREL HORSE, with a bald face, white legs, and
one glass cje.no other marks remembered.
ALSO, at the saras time and place a Dark Ray or Brown
iiir.A. vmte on one nina loci, ino wuio iok.iu v. -
dollars v, ill be given for "he return of horses.
a 113 lw o. near the Brewery.
O
UR present prices Yof CduKlon Canole fcper iz'
GEORGE UKB1U,, ,
LONGIIUUST & CO-
oct2S- tf
J. a. & C. ROBEKTSON
LAND WAItRAOTSI LAND WAR RANTS I
XITE will pay the highest market price, in pasn or Mer
VY chiUdise; for Land Warrants
BrtAaaruui', tiiniiB K
No.71 Eaitaide PublieSqnsre,
Cct27-trr. aaiaviiie, ienn.
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
Important KTew Books,
A FULL AND PERFECT- CjTCLO-
P.SDIA OP GEOGRAPHY, Illustrated with many hun
dred Wood-cuts, and containing aB recent discoveries, b
Ingbrought down to tbe present time. 4 vols, 4 to cloth.
WEBSTER'S ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF
DOMESTIC ECONOMY; comprising such subjects as
are most Immediately connected, with House-Keeping,
&c. l vol. 8 vo doth.
CYCLOPAEDIA OF AMERICAN LIT-
ERATURE ; embracing Personal and Critical Notices of
Authors, and Selections from, their Writings, from the
earliest Period to the Present Dr.y. 3 voJ.8 ro. cloth.
THE IMPERIAL LEXICON OF THE
KNGLISH LANGUAGE ; exhibiting the Pronunciation,
Etymology and Explanation of Every Word usually em
ployed In Science, Literature, and Art. 9 vol. 8 vo.
A FULL AND PERFECT CYCLO-
PJEDIA OF NATURAL HISTORY. Illustrated wlta
many hundred Wood-cuts, and giving every attainable
Information In matters connected with the Science, brought
drown to the present Urn. 4 vols. 4 to cloth.
BRANDE'S DICTIONARY OF
SCIENCE, LITERATURE AND ART; vomprislng tho
History, Description and Scientine Principles of ErerT
Branch of Human Knowledge, with the Derivation and
and Definition of all the Terms In general nse. 2 vol. 8vo
cloth.
NATIONAL CYCLOPAEDIA OF USE
FUL KNOWLEDGE, By Charles Knight. 11 voL ele
gantly bound In 6, half Russia.
RICHARDSON'S DICTIONARY OF
THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Containing Explanation
with Etymology, and Illustrated by Quotations from the
Best Authorities. The Quotations are arranged chronolo.
glcally from the earllestPerlod to the beginning of tbe Pre
sent Century. A new English edition, In 2 vols, 4 to do
SMITH'S DICTIONARY OF GREEK
AND ROMAN BIOGRAPHY AND MYTHOLOGY. 3 vols.
8 vo. half calf.
SMITH'S DICTIONARY OF GREEK
AND ROMAN GE0GRAPHY.2 vols. 8 vo. cloth. (Flnt
volime now ready.)
URE'S DICTIONARY OF ARTS, Man
ufactures AND MINES. Containing a clear exposi
tion of their Principles and Practice. 2 vols. 8 vo doth.
McCULLOCH'S DICTIONARY OF
COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION. 2 vols. 8 vo. doth.
RICH'S ILLUSTRATED COMPANION
TO THE LATAN DICTIONARY ANU GREEK LEXICON,
forming a Glossary or all tbe Words representee Visible.
Objects connected with the Arts, Manufactures, andEvery
day Life of the Greeks and Romans. 1 vols. 8 vo. cloth.
HOUE'S EVERY-DAY BOOK; OR,
TRE GUIDE TO THE YEAR t Relating the Popular
Amusemenu.Sports, Ceremonies, Manners, Cos tons, and.
Events, incident to the Three Hundred and Sixty flvo Days
in Past and Present Times ; being a series of Five Thou
sand Anecdotes and Facts. 3 vols. 8 vo, half calf;
LA FEVER'S ARCHITECTURAL IN
ST0C1OR, containing a History of Architecture from the
Earliest Age to the Present Time, containing 2i0 Engrav
ings or Temples, Palaces, Cathedrals, and Monuments.
Also, THE GREEK AND EARLY ROMAN CLASSIC
ORDERS, their Principles and Beauties, Ac. 1 vol. 4 to,
half Morroco,
THE FORUM
OR FORTY YEARS
FULL PRACTICE AT THE PHILADELPHIA BAR. By
David Paul Brown . 2 vots. 8 vo. cloth.
THE RISE OF THE DUTCH REPUB-
LIC. A History. By John Lath r op Motley. 2 vols. 8 vo.
doth.
FOR SALE BY
W. T. Berry & Co.,
Nashville.
OcL3I.
I85C. UNION LINE OF 1857.
NASHVILLE & NEW ORLEANS PACKETS.
JAMES JOHNSON Carr. Jsssc Jomsoie.
HUMBOLDT. " W. Sinoso.
SCOTLAND K. t,. Duxcxm.
NASHV1LLE.......... ....... Teos. Bkluhtdik
THE above steamers will run regularly In tbe New Or.
leans and Nashville trade. One of them being la each
port everyday durine the boallnr uiun. Ihvu r.i. ...
ii uwneu in .asnviue.
and built especially for this trade.
Capt- B. DuSeld will act as their Agent In New Orleans, and
win aiujoaio any nusmesa connected with thn Una
I re-
spectrally solicit the patrotageof the Mercantile and Travel
Hag community, well sallsOed that the Officers and Agents
will spare no exertions to desire their favors.
A. HAMILTON.
Agent, Nashville.
B. DUKIELD,
octiS tf r. Agent.New Orleans.
JIKMl'UIS AND NAM1V1LLE PACKET.
'iic uaa pauengersieamer AICUJvIA, Capt.
X Jiazs -Millie, will run in the above tradn i
sais season, leavlnr Nashville evenr AIONriAVj
at 4 o'clock. P.M.. and Memnhla everr THI.'ttsTTTv
HSDAYal4
P.M. Passeczers mav relvnn thn ahn.n i,ti..i.....i.
place on the day an J at the same time advertised.
rc- " r. A. HAMILTON, Agent.
REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER
LINE FOR ST. LOUIS.
SALL1E WEST. Crr.J. N.Coa.rrr.
cLLA... ...... ...... n T . u r
rv-.nlci i , if, . .. . . v.i.fc.
' innu win uc we regular pacxeia oe-
i.dbu ot. uiuh anu nasnvtue inis season, j
aau "i.i cuumBiicfj ueir uina i m m p.i ! .tr
alter the flrst rise In Cumberland River. They wUl maka
their trips as regularly aa the business will allow. Ono
leaving eacn port about every five days.
"- 11 r. A. UAJllL,TO.V,Agenl.
REGULAR WEEKLY CINCINNATI AND
NASHVILLE PACKETS.
THE new llsrht dranpfct itA.mnr
iuu. nrkB, was. r CLLza, Master, i
being expressly built lor this trad.. J
with all the modern Improvements, with the liettt draosht
snbstauncb and new steamer SAMUEL P. IIIBBEKD,
GRACE, Master, will rn as rrgular Packets daring the
ensuing season between the above Darts una of ths bn.t.
being In port every week. These brats being In command
of old and expertencrd commandants, and with superior
iicii.wo. iur passengers ana irrignu, solicits a snare or pub
lic patronage. For passage or freight apply on board, or to
II. H. HARBISON. Agent,
"tgg in front street.
TO WHOLESALE DEALERS.
D. W. RUSSEIjiL,
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT
FOR THE SOLICITATION OP ORUERS FOR
PITTSBURG. CINCINATTI LOUISVILLE
MANUFACTURED ARTICLES.
OFFICE NO. 50 BROAD. VAT, NASHVILLE
THE followlog Is a portion of the articles I propose taking
orders for: Rectified. Bourbon. Reserve. Mononmh.tii
and Rye Whiskies: Brandy, Wine, Gin, Rum. Ale and Por.
Ur, Loo-worth's Sparkling and Dry Catawba Wines, 8tar
and Tallow Candles, German and Palm Soap, Lard and Lin
seed Oil, While Lea J, Iron, Nails, Stoves, Castings and Hull,
ware. Wood and Wtlljw ware, L'hee.e, Vinegar, Glaj and
Glasswure, Hardware, such as Shovels, spades, (lost, Axes,
Picks, Mattocks, Cordage, Wrapping: Taper, Matches, cVo.
Orders handed me will save troable of nrderinror exnen-
ses of traveling to purchase, as I am authorized to take or
derson the same terms and prices as voa cnuld nnrehn If
you was at the factor! s in person All orders handed ran
will be Immediately sJnttotlio factory and shipped prompt
on openingof navigation. Hoping to share a good portion
of your liberality and Undoes, 1 remain, jours very respect
'""Ts ucua II V. . KLSSKLL.
Merchant Tailoring.
I WO OLD respectfully Inform tbe Gentlemen of Nash--vllle
and vicinity that I have opened at So. 34 Union
street, with a carefully selected stock ot Cloths, Caaslmere i.
veilings, etc.. direct irom new orx,suen as will suit tho
taste of the greatest tnnriistvr, and having engaged Ihe
services of Mr. W.C. Allen, competent Cutter and practi
cal Tailor, I am confldent that I have la tnls and other at-
ranzemenu every uciilty for giving comple satisfaction.
Terms moderate. Exhibition no charra.
WM. H. PERY,
OC123 w 34 Union street.
IVeffrocs for Sale.
BY virtue ot a decree of the County Court of Davidson
county, rendered in the case of John II. Callender.and
others r parts, I will offer tor sale on the Publio Square Iu
Nuhvllle.aod In or near the old Court Yard, on SATUR
DAY, December Clli. S56. tbe following negroes to-wil;
Judith, agedSOvears; Thomas, aged 13 years; Anderson,
aged S3 years; William, aged 4 years: Mary azed S. Jndita
a;ed a months. Terms cash. F. R. CHEATHAM,
OCU2J air uierk aed Master.
Eating Saloon !
. . i-Ti. i . ijiini?iMitDiWTinnif -v
so' nis riowiioe baioon, ana is now ready to accommodate
the public In all the delicacies of the season. On hand s
splepdld quality of Oysters. Come one I come al 1 1
OCUI U J.
Front street, few doors from the Square
fOK KENT.
THE Store-House on the South-east corner of the Square
and Front street, for tue balance of this year. The fix
tures will be sold cheap to any one taking the boas.. Ap
ply lo BE.1J. t. SIHELJJS,
ocrai u 4i ruuua square.
Will. W KNOX,
BULL HANGEH,
AND X0'
KEY FITTER,, v
Corner of Broad and Cherry streets Kaahville. Tean.
jan8'5fi tf
PERKINS & CO.,
iri.- j
GENERAL VOMMISSWN MERCHANTS.
.deesVly NEW ORLEANS.
W. X. HtKIHS. .
WAGON AND UORStS TEAM FOR MALE.
ANEW WAUON, good harness, and wall trained
Hones, for sale on good terms, on time it required by
the purchaser. For particulars call on B. Pitt, ot Edge.
field. eeUO-tf

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