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Daily union and American. [volume] (Nashville, Tenn.) 1865-1866, December 20, 1865, Image 1

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9
X J. JtJllA'A'lACiiTOJV te COTT
EDITORS A PKOPRIETORS.
Voluntary communications, contilnlnr Interest
Inr or important news, solicited from any quarter.
Kens, letters from tin Trioui counties of the
State especially desired.
All communications ihouM bo addressed to the
Editors of the Usiov asp Ahemc-is."
MBDICAL.
F. SEYMOUR, M. D.
(I.ato Brigade Surgeon, U.
.S.A.)
OCULIST AXI AUK 1ST,
Office 23 Cedar streetbetween Summer and Cherry,
NASIIVILLK.
Office for treatment of all Diseases of tho Eye
and Ear, operations for Squinting, Cataract, cct.
performed.
ItOX
706, I. O.
decC Juilstp.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS.
mssomjtiox.
'PJ1E firm heretofore cxislinr under tho name
1 firm and stylo of W. MATT UllOWK A-Co.,
is this day dissolved ly mutual consent Mr.
llrown retires from the business. Mr. Callcndcr,
in eonneetion with Pbineas Oarrett. will co
tinue the Kcnl Estate buiness nt the old stand
W. MatU llrown A' Co.. 'Sfo)WIf .
T1IOS. CALLENOEU.
T. OARRETT.
I. CALLiniKE.
CALLENDER & GARRETT,
(Successors to YV. Matt. Brow X Co J
41 Cherry Street,
WILL civo their prompt attention to the selling
and rmlinc of every description of Ileal Krftat c. -
dcol lw.
II1S1 RAIJT.T: 1511SII)ECES
Ituildiiiff TMis Tor Sale,,
A LSI),
NUMBKIl
A LAUOE
Of FA11MS.
lft. A fine UeMlenc, containing 12 rooms, in
rrr territory. AUo two vacant Lots adjoinine.
SI, That splendid Uesidenco of the late Jatnc
Johnson, on Broad Sftreet, between Summer and
llitrli rtrrrts, rontaininic 8 rooms, besides kvrvants
rooms and other out hoiifcs.
1. That splendid Hesidenrn of the Ute Hardin
P. Bo'tiek.eontatnint; nlMiiit 10 rooms, out bouses,
cle. !(kI iS;irinc and spring house with 8J
acres of Inn. I. immediately adjacent to thocity, on
th Chnrlotte Pike.
4th. 50 acres of eroimd of tho Barrow property,
on the Ctiarlotto Pike, .which will be divided to
suit purchasers.
fill.. A vrry Unto number of Lots in the City
ami the different Additions to N.vorillo. 25 Lots
in Eilircfivld and Brownsvillo.
filh. A very lnrre number of the BEST FAP.MS
in this and the adjoinine counties. Apply to
J. L. A H. V'- BUOWN.
dwt 1 in &'A UnioU street.
KELSON I MHRFEEE
KKAJ. .IJKTATK AHXTS,
Clicrry SI rt'Vt. iioar Iliiioii,
NASHVILLE, TENN.,
B 'A VI5 larno nimnml of Kcnl listalc lo sell in
ti'm uud tho udjiiiuiiii; Statu'.
T11HV BUY ANDSHLL
Gth", Coiihlyxiid Slnle Bonds on rouiiniwinn, as
Mill US Wiry ilossriplion of (Jovernineiit inclin
ing
TWO MAURY COUNTY FARMS
nrttfiffered iit vc'r'
In Williamson-
riiixoiiublo price. Also, one
A l'LACE ON THE CUMBERLAND RIVER,
of 'HQ acres, in Jackson county, Trim., for sale.
Ki'i.r.Ninn crrv pitoi'intrv
FOR SALE,
39
FUET on Church street, oppoito the Max
"A' ill House and MuS'iuin rcinide. at a reason-
able'prici. This is ventral, choico property, and
is moro tii an j, leel dee.
IVrf. improved, on Vino street, between
Chun'li and Union, very choice location, lint the
improvements nro moderate. The price is very
low.
02 IVrf, with largo brick dwelling, on Vino
idri'et. between Union anil tVilnr. being about tlio
most daiirable liHKition for residences in (lie city.
200 IVrf on MeGavnek street. West Nashville,
on which Is a neat Brick llwrllinc, fi or 7 rooms,
Xitehen, stable, etc;, nnd firt;rato cistern. Prire
only .P,WW. House and premises in good order.
IOO IVrf on Broad street. West Nahville, with
legnnt new Brick House, containing 10 or 12.
riKims, kitchen, stable, tw cistern, shrubbcrr, '
tc, rtec. at?l.V. Very desirable. If not sold
within ten days, this large nnd choice place M ill
! rented for the rciuaiuder of this and tho H hole
of next year.
tiO IVrf on Norih Market street, eonier of Ln"
rust, ou which l the well known Pleasant Smith
house. Price HUM.
BO IVrf on Snnieo streot, with large, elegant
and new Brick Dwelling, containing 16 room. 2
linth rooms, kitchen, oxtra slje, with gas, water,
and every modem improvement.
4.1 IVrf on Park street, with common im
provement, cry low. This property runs through
to Summer.
40 IVrf on College street, being the loner por
tion of tho,"lot now occupied Uy Department
llend'lnarters, belonging to Dr. Waters. Price,
JHJ per Toot.
A choice little lot on North College, just below
he Pubtlo Square, at a sacrifice.
SALOON AND RESTAURANT.
We offer for sale a p.iloon and Restaurant, now
doing n prolltnble lniine, in the very eentro of
trade, at a prieo perfectly satisfactory.
EDGEFIELD.
Wchave,.nerl1ifeetof gnmnd on the most
cliuicemHd dwiirable streets ia BilgrGebl, lor leasr
for live jetti-s fnm lt Jnnusry next, at prices
whish omlit to bctatisfnrtory to those desiring to
iutpr
Call O I
de-lm
NEKMrX .V 11 ITKI'ltia.
AI.DKET M. ItlLUX.
w. nuvri: Tiuiwrsov.
DILLIH & THOMPSllH,
HKAI, ESTATE AM)
COI.1.KC T I.G A E , T S.
PROMISING FAITHFUL AND PROMPT
I attention to all liusinexsentrusliHl Inmimr.
DILLIN A THOMPSON.
Offic
d
'4"" S0oml IClionaI 1Unk. CvllrcestreL
Of nAKKEI, tUAMIEUKIEN.
J Just rvcritnl.
medary .t nruKr,
S00 5Ar'f"-.ll.rC,KW,l,1W FEOIJR,
JJJ elegant article l Just received d for sale
by c .. . Mt,,AUY A BUUKE,
d i&iu,b,''ulc'rucrllroBj',Jilrl"''-
the bestiu themaiket,
.MEDARY A BURKE.
di3-a rorncr 1 nJ -M-'kct u-
we rrspoetfully lender our services to the Public
..tJenrral Agents for the Purebas an.! Sale ol"
Real Irftate; Uentinr ami U-asing r City or
lountry Pmperty: Cllection of N.i Aetounts
and ouchers; Investigation of Titles, etc, etc.
VOLUME XXXIII.
GROCERIES, LIQUORS &c.
XEW STORE.
PandolM & Eiva,
XO. 12 X0UTII CHEUItY STHEET.
DKALIKS IX
FANCY GUOCEUIES,
WINES. LIQUORS.
CIGARS. ETC.
jMOXQ THEIR STOCK MAY BE FOUND :
Java. Rio nnd Mocha CfTcc:
Crushed, Powdered, Coffee, Porti-Uico, and every
(Trade oturown rueari;
Teas, Candies, Starch;
Castile, Palm. Eraeivc and Laundry Soaps;
Almonds, Filberts, Currants, Prunes, llasins;
lluttcr. Oysters, Fancy and Almond Crackers;
I : a I i i . i Ik 4 : - f H .
Mixed, lilrkim, Chow-chow and Imperial Hot
Pickles;
Mushroom, Walnnt, India, and Sir Robert Feel
Catsuti :
Sultana, Royal, Table, Beef Steak, Royal Osborne,
Jolin Hull, fcoho, .Mogul ana ncrvey cauccs;
r.-t-nee 01 .rtnciiuvjcs ; r.K?eiivu ui curiu'js,
Huille. riniierial anil Durham Mustard:
Mushrooms ; Dutch Anchovies; Anchovy Paste;
Strasbourg Meat", fulled J.ongue. rolled 11am;
Fruit of every variety in cans and jars,
ix-Timu stock or
W i it c s and IS r :i n (I i e h
ALL OF WHICH A1U!
a r x it i x i: a x i i n i.o ute d.
MAY BE FOUND
Pcmnrtin and DutTOordoit Sherries;
Old Choice and HcscrveMadeiras ;
London Dock and Htinrundv Port:
Pcmnrtin, Blanuucfort and St, Julier. Mcdoe
Claret;
Haul Santcrnc, Nicstcincr, Hockheimcr nd Ca-
Dcmcrcier. (!old Medal and Hciilsick.Chamnacne;
Pinct Castillion. Utard. Dunuy.t Co's Brandies:
Irish, Scotch, Bourbon and Robertson County
sh. Scotch,
Whiskies;
Holland (!in:
Marxschino Alxintho; Vennoutho and all A-
rorted Luiuors;
Baker's and Holland Bitters;
GENUINE HAVANA 0I0AU8,
Choice brands, toccthcr with every variety of Do-
every vsJnct
lucslie CitarfCliewinc and Smokinr Tobacco of
all brands: together with all other articles usual
ly luunil in a
FIUST CLASS FANCY OUOCEItY STOUE.
It is tho intention of PANDOLFINI .t IUVA
to kcci on hand at all times a complete assort
ment of everything in their line, of the very best
quality to be purchased, which tticy are deter
mined to sell as low as any other establishment in
Ibis or any other city.
They respectfully ask an examination of their
stock, feeling assured that no One will go' away
uissatisiicti.!
l'AXDOLFIXI fc It IV A,
Fnney (irorrrs,
AMI IiEAI.ERS IX
WINES, LIQUOItS AND CIGAIIS,
'. 12 Xorlh Cherry Street,
dee Mm. NASHVILLE. TENN.
An. X I.AUflllt.l. O. W. II. butlkr. r. A. lltWI.V.
Formerly of Evans, Keith .t Co.
M'LAUGHLIN, BUTLER & CO.,
(Sue tssors to V. A. Irwin & Co.)
W If 1. K S A Is K It O C E It S
Commission Merchants,
Corner of Market and Clark streets,
NASHVILLE, TENN.
Wc have In store nnd forsalu a large stock ol
SUGARS. BROWN,
CRUSHED, AND POWDERED.
RIO COFFEE, FAMILY FLOUR.
SALT. MACKEREL, STAR CANDLES,
SOAP, TOBACCO. CHEESE. OYSTERS.
RAIS0NS, ASSORTED CANDY, LOBSTERS,
WIXWI AXIs I.MIUOIIS.
Bourbon Whisky.
Holland Gin,
lloliertsoii County do
Jamaica Hum,
f rrneli Jlrandy,
Apple do
Peach do
Cherry do
Baker's Bitters,
olierry inc.
Port do
Champagne do
Claret do
Catania do
And a complete assortment of othor Groceries.
Mclaughlin, butler .t co.
dec3 lm
I) ISA EE IIS IX
FIXE FAMILY UKOCERIES,
PURE WIXES,
UltANDIIvS,
c, etc., etc.
NO. 33 W1MT SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE,
Nit)tM tile. Trimrjts-rr.
riJ HAVE IN STORE AND FOR SALE
n large stock of
BUOWN SUGAR.
CUU 11 ED do
POWDERED, do
. RIO COFFEE.
FAMILY FLOUR.
SALT. "'" ' ,
MACKEREL ' ' " " '
STAR CANDLES,
SOAP. etc, etc. etc.
OYSTERS. COVE AND SPICED,
CHEESE. . ' ' U 1
SARDINIA.
PICKLES.
RAISONS.
ALMONDS.
FILBERTS. '' : -'
PECANS.
ASSORTED CANDY,
LOBSTERS, et
1VJ
etc.
Wines and Liquors.
Burbon Whisky,
Robertson County do.
French Brandy,
Apple Brandy,
Peaeh llrnr.ly,
Cherr)- Brandy,
Baker's Bitters, cte etc.
Holland Gin,
Jamaica Ruin. - .
Sherry Wine,
Port Wine,
Champagne Wine,
Claret Wine. . ,
Catawba Wine, etM etc.,
Willow-Ware; i
Superior Cigars :
SmoMiic Tobacco.:
Pickles;
French Mustard;
Caper Catsup:
Java Coffee, ete.-4
l'OSTER I1ROTIIEKN.
deot-tf
J. !HT. LU3LSDEX A. CO., 1
UASCrACTCEtSS Axn CEALSU
HIDES, OILS, LEATHER,
Findings & Currier's Tools,
so. e eouth market steket,
Dec, XASHTIX.XX, mi'"
-- ' ,ur ' - 1 1 J " ' ' - " ' "' ' ' " 11 "' ' 111 .'J111'1 11 , jtm,
DAIII UNION AND AMERICAN,
XV jTL XI XXjs,
, M "VJ
m T). c
SIGN" OF
PADLOCK
HrNJ) . "E RECEIVING
ianrc Dd iapla e u.ck ot &nglisn. ucr-
Which rjow-e selling at reasonable prices. Tho
stock cOTuists in part of
FINE IXL POCKET CUTLERY,
200 GROSS TABLE CUTLERY,
200DOZ.KNOB LOCKS, assorted.
CO do HAND AND RIPPING SAWS,
300 d. ASSORTED AUGERS.
25 do FOOT ADZE,
2000 lbs, HOOKS AND HINGES, assorted. i!2 t
48 inches.
1000 lbs. H DOIL CHAIN.
1000 " BLACKSMITH'S HAMMERS, all kinds;
.25 WRIGHT'S ANVILS.
100 CROSS-CUT SAWS, i to VA fct.
G03IILL SAWS, 6j4to 3 feet; , 'f '
AXES,
CHISELS.
FILES.
HATCHETS,
CHAINS
LOOKING GLASSES,
-CANDLESTICKS of all kinds.
BA7.0US,
SCISSOUS,
SHEARS,
TIN CUPS and PLATES,-
TEA and TABLE SPOONS.
COFFEE MILLS.
SHOE NAILS.
TACKS.
A very large stock of PLANES of every variety
Also,
I R K 31 1 17 31 ST V. EI. V E O TV S ,
Those wishing to purchase in our lino will do
well to giro us a call before buyinf. ,
SAJI. VANTJSEIt, A CO.
decllin. .
A. A. I1BRAHT.
T1IO. D. CBAIGIIKAD.
ARTHUR A. BREAST & CO.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS
I-IAllDWAIlEi
Si
AND CUTLERY,
NO. 29 PUBLIC SQUARE, NASHVILLE.
WE HAVE NOW. ON HANI), AND ARE
I f continually, receiving, a iare ana wen se
lected stock ol
irAKDWAIlEAXn:;tJETEERY,
in all its branches.
Wo invite Merchants and tho Trado generally
to our stock :
TABLE AND POCKET CUTLERY;
AXES AND HATCHETS;
CHAINES AND ROPES:
COTTON AND WOOL CARDS;
HORSE SHOES AND NAILS;
RIFLE AND BLASTING POWDER.
TANNER'S BELTING
AND TACKING;
FARMER'S AND MECHANICS TOOLS.
in evcrw Taricty, etc., ete.
Call and cxamino oar Stock. . We are prepared
to sell as cheap as any house west of the Allcghe-
nics.
A. A. RIIEAST A CO.
dec4 lm.
G. W. FALL & CO.,
IMPOKTERS,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS
HARDWARE AND CUTLERY
NO. 34 PUBLIC SQUARE,
NASHVILLE. TENNESSEE,
(Kirkuian .t Ellis' old stand.)
o would respectfully invite the attention of
SPORTSMEN to our stock of
Gr TJ NT ,
Which cannot bo equalled here. ' It comprises all
grades, from th .
PLAIA DOUBLE ITiARREL
TO THE
GELEBIIATED GUNS
OF
WESLEY RICIIAItn.S A GR EI
, itso a rrw
Rroacli Loadini; or Cnrrllj;c
SHOT GVXS.
AMUNITI0N
S PORTING
dee-lw
APPARATUS
jis. ji'Lironux. o. w. ii. nrrLxn. r. a. irwik.
Formerly of Ncvins, Keith A Oo.
McLaughlin, Butler & Co.,
'(Successors to F. A. Irwin 'A Co.,)
WHOLESALE
OltOCEItS
mt
Com mi s s i 6 n ; Merch ants,,
DEALtU IX
HKAXDIIX, WIXEA AX1) EIQrOlUi,
Corner Market and Clark ttJU. Nashville, Tenn.
T pay the highest narket prices for
DRIED FRUIT.
FEATHERS,
, . ' 'BEESWAX.
GINSENG.
i
And OHBtrj- Produce GescrallT.
, MtLATJGHLIN, BUTL1CB 00.
NASHVILLE, TEMESSEE, WEDNJESPAV, DECEMBER 20,
FAMILY GROCERIES &a
FAMILY GltOCEHY
NO. DEADEUICK STUEET,
(old stand of Adams and Eves.)
ROBERT EVES & CO.,
rTTT'WOUCD TtESPECTFULLY ANNOUNCE
V TO THEIR FRIENDS AND CUS.
tomers tnat iney nave openu a am ciass xamuy
Grocery Store at the old stand, so long occupied by
Ait. ma k V.vca. on Deiuleriek 'street. Tno Stock
has been selected with ca'e, and embraces a com
plete assortment of all the staplo and fancy arti
cles, together witi
OLD WINES .LIQUORS,
CIQARS, TOBACCO, ETC., ETC.
""IT700DEN WARE. 20 nests Wash Tubj, 20
doicn Wash Boards, 20 dozen i'ainted iluck.
cts. 10 dozen Siucrs. a large lot ol 11 rooms, etc., in
store.
WHISKY SO barrels pure Old
County Whisky for sale, by th
Robertson
c sauon or
barrel.
flOVE OYSTERS, Sardines. Pickles. Mustard,
Brandy iruits, liitsups, etc.
JCOTCH ALE. 20 dozen Bottles of J. Walker Sc
t.' rplolirntnl liottlcd Scotch Ale. Also a
largo lot of Young A- Co.'s Edinburg Ale, in bot
tles.
"UNDIES, Soda and Butter Crackers, Craok-
V ncll Biscuit, etc.
QUNDRIES-rNoils, Bed Cords, Rope, Wrapping
KJ Paper, Dcmljons, fcoaps, handles, etc.
r 10FFEE. SUGAR. TEAS, etc. We desire csne-
J cially to call attention to our stock of Cotlec,
Sucar. Teas. Also. White Fish. Pickled Hcrrinir.
ilour by tne barrel or sacK, lor lamuy use.
decl-lm. ROBT EVES & CO.
TERRASS BROTHERS
WHOLESALE GROCERS, COMMISSION AND
. FORWARDING .MERCHANTS,
Wo.
fOUTH MARKET 8TREET.
NASHVILLE TENNESSEE.
SUNDRIES.
1 fr boxes Rosin Soap;
casks Soda:
03 boxes Indigo (best:)
25 do Madden ' .
25 kegs and half barrels Golden Syrup :
10 barrels Blacking;
100 boxes Graiiand Ground' Popper; ;
25 do Spice;.
2 do Ginger;
200 ream Wrapping Paper;
20 cases Matches;
100 boxes Star Candles;
5 cases Sunny Side Tobacco;!
20 boxes Imperial Tea. For sale low by
TERRASS BROS.
dec! lm 35 South Market street.
QUGARS.-n50 IihdJ. common.
nrimc and choice
Kjl
jBrown Suear.
100 bbls. Crushed. Powdered and Granulated.
For sale by TERRASS BROS.
MOLASSES. 100 bbls. common nnd choice
Molasses. Forealoby TERRASS BROS.
I7L0UR. 200 bbls. extra to choice brands. For
sale low by
TERRASS BROS.
"WHISKY.-iM bbls
F.N.
.V Co.'s Robertson
county:
25 bbls extra fine do:
25bbls. Tennessee t hitc.
For sale low by
TERRASS BROS.
ARD. 25 bbls. Country Lard. For salo by
J TERRASS BROS.
COFFEE. 100 bags prime Coffee. For sale by
TERRASS BROS.
Icc3-lm.
G. W. BOWLAN'n, LAKDOS STOCKTON",
Vitut v m i t f tiei-nw ont'o i, v
Late of Nashville, Tcnn. Late of Nashville, Tcnn.
01V1ANI, SPERRY ifc CO.
WHOLESALE
IGROCERS AM) OENERAE
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
FOR TUB SALE Or
COTTON. TOBACCO AND TRODUCE GENER
ALLY.
B'-lParticulnr nttention civen to the nurchaso
of all kinds of Western Produce. U
No. WEST SECOND STREET.
deel lm-
CINCINNATI OHIO.
TREANOR & CO.,
WHOLESALE GltOCEIlS
And dealers in
Foreign & Domestic Liquors,
N0.S8 MARKET STREET.
decs
NASHVILLE. TENN.
SALE & LIVERY.
IX SERVICE AO A IX.
TJI?-VJVr.XJi
LiyBB,Y, :S ALE,
EXGHANQE STAB JJE
DEADEUICK STREET.
BETWEEN CHERRY
A XD SUMMER.
i
J. F. PENTECOST, Prripnlifer.
I A
fPUE UNDERSIGNED HAS JUST RETURN
J. cd from ihe North, with the best stock to be
had in the country. ItUUUlES AND CAR
RIAGES ALL NEIV, and horses superior lo any
In this t ity.
Mjr facilities for HOARDING nORSES BV
THE DAY, WEEK OU MONTH, are unequalled
in tht city. The'services cf an experienced Host
ler nave been secured, who will ffivo his exclusive
attention to Stock.
Constantly, on hand, a fine lot of HORSES
AND MULES for sale at tht LOWEST MARKET
HATES. ,
. Uavinx bad a lost cxperienc in tht bonnets, I
foci satisfied thaticaa fire satisfaction io all eases
; dert-la J. F. PENTECOST.
UNION & AMERICAN
) SPiniT OF THE RADICAL PBI-SS-
"We publislicd on yesterday an article from
the Xew York 2Yms, upon the subject of re
construction, and the right of the Southern
States to reprcscntatibn in Congress. The
following from the Chicago Times, the leading
radical journal of that eectipn, ifl a tone and
temper very different. Wc give it that our
readers may better understand the different
shades of opinion that are held at the pros
ent time toward the President's policy of re
construction within the Republican ranks
Reconstruction.
The appointment of a Joint Committee of
the two Houses of Uoncrcs3 on Keconstrue-
tion, and the reference to such committee of
the credentials of the members elect from
Tennessee, indicate that the American people
as represented in Congress, intend to exert
their proper influence over the whole subject
of reconstruction, iennessee has mora plaus
ible claims for immediate admission than any
otiier fetate. in tnc iiastern part ot the fetate
the majority of the white population were
loyal to the Union throughout the war. That
portion of the btate has elected members to
1 Congress who pcrsonallr would make worthy
nnrli'rpiiirrtnli rt rr nrnsentntivna. In thi di
vided condition of the State during the war its
white population rendered some support to
the Union, though a great aeal more to the
rebellion. The present effort at recon
struction was begun under thcGovcrnorship
ot Andrew Johnson, and Uo Presidents
desire that the Government of that State
shall be held to be already fully rccon
fetructcd. and that its representatives Miall
be admitted, is well known. Yet bv an em-
phatic vote, including all the Republicans
in the faenate, except Cowan, Dixon, and
Doolittle, and by the unanimous vote of the
Jicpubhcan majority in the House, with
only a dissenting squeak from Mr. Itav'
monu, Longrcss passeu tne lenncssec cre
dentials to the same committee which will
receive those from the other Statcs,Jhe
Joint Committee on lieconstruction. All
this is an emphatic contradiction of the
I'resiuent s statement in his messaee. that
it now only remains for the seceded States,.
i r i . i e. . i . ft 1 i i 1-
nient, to resume their places in tho Union,
while Congress will judge merely of the
regularity of their certificates of action.
Li ins attitude of Congress is sound. Itreiv
resents the loyal people of this country ex
actly. It will alford Congress time to ma
ture its own plan of reconstruction, and to
come forward in solid phalanx in favor of a
policy which shall represent the interests
of the whole people of the South, and of the
country, and not merely of the late rebels.
Something more than mere delav in the
business of reconstruction" is necessary on the
part of Congress. Their course will fail to
satisfy the country if it tends merely to stave
oil the issue. hat justice and statesman
ship demand, what the late elections demon
strate that the people demand, is not somuch
a postponement of reconstruction for its own
sake, as that subversion and overthrow of
the President's partial and one-sided mode of
rccuiisirueiiuii in ruierence 10 inu voting
basis, which restores rebels to power through
out tlie South and dooms a whole race to
peonage or bondage, until wiser councils or
a bloodv revolution shall wrest from their
oppressors their fair share of political rights.
Every Republican victory at the last election
is a verdict in favor of extending tho suf
frage in some form to some portions of the
four millions, who embrace a third of the
population and ninctecn-twentieths of the in
dustry, morality, loyalty and republicanism
of the Southern people.
In this matter President Johnson ' point
of departure was wrong, and every step he
has since taken has only made the wrong
more manliest ana glaring, lie assumes
that even in States wliere two-thirds of tho
citizens are colored, they are to have no
rights except those which the political mi
nority choose to confer upon them. This is
an undemocratic blunder and will convert
the South into another Jamaica, a scene of
slow torture for the black man and of con
tinued despotism and terror to the white.
It will condemn the South to hopeless pov
erty, crime, and violence. We do not ask
that any ignorant, depraved, pauper whether
black or white, shall vote. But wc do ask
that intelligent, moral, self-supporting men
of whatever color shall not be excluded by
law from anv avenue to influence or useful
ness to whicli their abilities and the votes of
their fellow-citizens would raise them. Wc
demand this in the name of the principles
of the Republican party and of the Declara
tion of Independence. c ask it as the
proper fruit of the war, the completion of
the work of emancipation. We ask it in
the name of the martyred Lincoln, as he ex
pressed his convictions in his letter to Gov.
Jlahn and to Gen. Wadsworth.
To do this it will be the duty of Congress,
if ned be, to join issue with any earthly
power that desires to make the issue, and try
the matter out as a question of power. But
the end will never be attained if Congress
merely dallies with and postpones the Presi
dent's plan. Do Congress need further light
upon the question ? Must more " black
codes " be passed, in all their hideous atroc
ity, more frecdmsn massacred, more rebels
elected to office at the South ? Must more
legislatures grant bounties to rebel troops
while refusing them to loyal soldiers? Must
more petitions be sent up for the lives of liv
ing traitors, more church prayers refused
even to the President who champions their
equality ? Must more honors be tender
ed to living rebel', or more monument
erected to dead ones? Must more ar
rogance be displayed by the haughty rebel
minority in South Carolina and Mississippi in
overriding the rights of the loyal majority
and disfranchising them utterly in the courts
and at the ballot box, except where the Presi
dential edict,- behind which glitters the
memory of a million of bayonets, compels
some reluctant compliance. with justice? If
Congress desire more of all this, let them
wait; but while they wait events will crowd
jast them, and the opportunity for justice
without revolution will be gone. Our thirty-seven
States will once more join hands
over the crater of our volcano and await its
next explosion.
If Congress is so profoundly pervaded by
anabsenceof independence, vigor and states
manship, as to write itself down as the mere
recorder of the precedences of the executive,
then it will allow reconstruction to proceed
on the basis, already tried and found want
ing. If not, and we believe it will not; it
will take a new point of departure, which
shall be in harmony with the genius of Re
publican institutions. It will do this In
maturing in its joint committee .on recon
struction, n general enabling act for those
districts of the South in which State govern
ments formerly existed, whercbv they shall
be constitutionally governed so long
as they rcmaiu in a territorial condi
tion, by a Governor lawfully appointed
by the President, and confirmed by
the Senate, and by a Territorial Legislature
elected by such portion of the population as
the enabling act shall permit to vote. The
majority of all the people of the South and
its entire loyal and anti-slavery population
favor this course to-day. Heretofore the
President has treated the question of recon
struction as a military one, over which he
alone, as .Commander-in-Chief of the Army
and Javy, had jurisdiction, and to which the
constitution anu laws ol the L nileil states
nnd the powers of Congress did not applv.
He has appointed Governors of States with
out asking their confirmation by the Senate,
nnd has substituted his Presidential procla
mation for the enabling acts by which Con
gress liad previously directed the formation
of State governments in territory wlicre none
existed. But let Congress adopt the sound
doctrine that State governments must be
constructed in the same manner as the State
governments of every State, since the orig- J
iiui uuiiciai, were consimcica, yK: py me
joint action of-Congrcss, as expressed in an
enabling act or an act cf admission, and sub
stantially the whole people of the territory
reeking a State government. When wc
adopt this doctrine we strike the hard pan of
constitutional law and precedent, and the
course is plain before us.
A few days since the telegraph announced
the election" of lion. Wm. A. Graham as a
Senator, tp JCongress .froni Korth Carolina,
for ihe long term. We arc now informed of
the election of John Poole, of Bertie county,
as" Senator for the short term. Mr. Poole,
we believe, haa all the time been a Union
man. He is a man of fair ability, and was
once the candidate of his party for Govern
or. Both the Senator dect were Whigs
in days of yore
TIic I'?iiln Troubles.
From the Baltimore Gazette.
The hopes- of Republican Ireland are
growing darker and darker every day. Fe
nianism has been so grievously' wounded in
the house of its friends, that its convales
cence will be slow at the best; whilst the
chances of its reeovcry.at all are so proble
matical that the life of the Brotherhood
seems to hang,ias it were, upon ,a gasamer
thread. Weliave already stated that the
Fenian Senate have deposed CFMahony from
the Presidency, and liave installed Vice
President Roberts in his place. Our read
ers also know that (JMahonyin turn, has
forbidden tho Senate the. use of his head
quarters; but what has passed since, then is
not so well known, and is quite, deserving of
being duly clironicled. The Senators, ten
in number, charge that O'Mahony and his
Secretary of the Treasury, Killian, were
leagned together " to bring about the ruin
" of the Fenian Brotherhood and the rob
"bery of a confiding people f that
O'Mahony as other Presidents have
done before htm has' disregarded the
Constitution which he had taken a sol
e mn oath to support ; that he lias refused
funds to the Secretary" of War General
Sweeny who was eager to measure swords
with the Sassenach, but found the Treasury
locked against him; that he", Mahonv, lias
nirea a patace tor ins Headquarters, at a rent
of twelve thousand dollars a yearj paying
tho rent for a year and a half eighteen
thousand dollars in advance, besides, de
iwsiting five thousand dollars as. a security
against damage to the building, and laying
out five thousand dollars more in rosewood
furriiturc and carpets to match, and in pror
vlding' sumntuoua sleeping rooms. &e &c:
and, finally, that although a million of
dollars has been paid into the Treasury iti
the aggregate, he was in the act of issuing
bonds for sixty-eight thousand dollars more
in an illegal and fraudulent 'manner. Foe
these reasons, and because he refused to plead
to the indictment, the Senate met and for
mally deposed him from, his high office.
Un the other hand, 1'rcsident O Mahonv
charges that O'Rourke the former Treas
urer of the Fenian Brotherhood one of the
malcontent Senators, who is foreman of the
press room in the olhce of the .New lork
lYibune, and one of the stockholders of the
Tribune Company, actually loaned to a noted
Republican journal of Xew York was it the
lYibunel two hundred and thirty thousand
dollars of the funds of the Irish JIapublic,
and also that the same Senator speculated in
gold, and thus lost, irretrievably, forty-seven
tiiousand dollars ot the money belonging to
the Fenians. O'Mahony further charges
thai another of the malcontent Senators
Patrick J. Meehau was sent to Ireland on
business of the Brotherhood ; that he carried
with him a draft far five hundred pounds
sterling, and also dispatches of importance.
That the draft in question and his letter
of instructions fell into the hands of the
British Government, in some mysterious
manner, and that Median cscaned in a vcrv
inexplicable sort of a way; and returned to
America unmolested. It is more than hin
ted also, that the immunity from arrest en
joyed by Median, arose from the fact that he
betrayed Ins associates, and that his disclo
sures led to the capture of Stephens and the
suppression of the Irish Fenian newspaper
organ, "The People." Lastly, O'Mahony
will arraign the ten mal-contcnt Senators
for collecting sixty-eight thousand dollars
from Irish men and women in the rural
districts, not a dollar of which, says the
Cabinet " O'Mahony" and his Secretary
has been deposited in the Treasury. It will
be claimed by the latter that the sixty-eight
thousand dollars of bonds nbout to be Is
sued, were designed to protect the interests
of the Brotherhood by using the money to
cover up this default.
All these charges and counter charges arc
to come up for adjustment before the Fenian
Congress, which O'Mahonev has sum
moned to assemble at New York on the
2d of January next. We believe that the
senators, against whom (J Mahoney, taking
time by the forelock, has already pre
ferred articles of impeachment, have also
called the Fenian Congress together to meet
at a somewhat later day. Iu the meantime,
both parties to the quarrel are preparing
vigorously for the struggle for supremacy
which is soon to take place. Both have is
sued addresses to the innumerable circles
throughout tho States, and both have already
received by telegraph quite a number of re
sponses and pledges of adhesion and support.
The Fenians of the Western district of New
York and of Xew England have announced
that they will stand by the Senate, whilst
those of the Department of Manhattan
JTcw York city and Brooklyn have rallied
almost to a man, to the support of O'Mahony.
The latter are eager for the fray. Their
ilclegates assembled in Convention, at New
York, on Saturday last, and in a long ad
dress to their brothers of North America,
emphatically repudiating "the sectional com
"bination of perfidious Irishmen," styling
themselves Fenian Senators, who are de
scribed as "traitors" of the deepest dye;
" T,irlnci3 t..- I i. .1 4l.n 1,!.-.!.
" position of Fenian Scnatorship to the most
"ignoble purposes."
As for John O'Mahony his name " stands
"like a star in the IlcavciiSj receiving new
" lustre from the clouds which obscure for
" an instant, but vanish before its power."
The traitors, "slimy and snake-like," have
poisoned it is alleged, "the holy stream of
"patriotism in its course towards liberty,"
and they are admonished, with the most in
tense, melodramatic fervor to " Beware ! "
The reputation of O'Mahony " is too well
" known," they add, iij be even dimly ob
"scurcd by thcwingsT of envenomed rancor
" or petty jealousy." The figures. are rather
mixed up in this part of the address, but
when men and especially Irishmeu speak
strongly, thev are not ant to be dioicn in thn
selection of their phrases, nor is it supposed
that the people of a 'country from which St.
I'atrick banished all the serpent tribe four
teen hundred years ago, should know wheth
er that species of reptile was gifted with en
venomed winp, or was without any wings
at all. But the most marvellous part of this
whole matter is, that although a million of
dollars has been paid into the treasury, it
was so short of funds when John Mitchcl
was sent recently tor Europe as an emissary
of the Brotherhood, he had to tarry several
days in New York before the necessary
means could be procured to enable him to
proceed on his voyage. We shall await,
with some curiosity, the explanation of thii
singular, but not altogether surprising state
of affairs.
The Cnttlc I'lnsruo IiicrofJiig'.
The advices by the City of Baltimore, in
dicate no abatement of the Rinderpest or
plague among cattle, which now theatens
such a curtailment of the ordinary supply
of animal foodr throughout Great Britain,
as must inevitablr affect provision market.
In the course of the past month the increase
of thediseasc hasbeenmost marked. During
that period the attacks have risen, from a
previous monthly average, from 14,000 to
upwards of 27,000, and the deaths, destruc
tion included, to upwards of 21,000. Be
tween the 4th and the 11th of November the
number of cases increased by fifty per cent.
In the ensuing week things were not quite
so bad, but there was a further increase still.
The London Times assumes that the death,
instead of 700 a week, are at least four times
that number, and if winter docs not brine a
change for the better, the loses may be 5,000
or b,000 a week before Christmas,
This is certainly a sad state of things, and
the worst of it is, that tiiiu far no adequate
remedy for it secrai to have been discovered.
The journals teem with suggestions and re
commendations with a view to checking the
disease, but practically they appear to
amount fo but little, the Rinderpest mean
while having mn it own way. '
The theory is still generally adhered to,
that this cattle disease was imported from
ihe continent, and that it can be checked by
keeping animals affected by it ajiart from
those, that are healthy1. If this; be sd, then it
is now, more than ever, a question with us
of the United States, whether we ought not
to exdude European cattle altogether from
our ports for the present.
The Guatcitv to Mns. Lixcqlx. The,
Washington correspondent of tlid Albany
(N. Y.) Argus says:
Fentioniny the Presidents Widov. It ia
proposed to give $100,000 to Mxs. Lincoln.
When Congress voted Mrs. Harruon $25,
000, the appropriation ras denounced in de
bate br licnton, Calhoun, Woodbury, and
othexJJeruocraU, but w passed in theScn?
tc br a vote of twcctyta ,nxUcn, and in
the llousc one hundred and' twenty-two t&
thirty-six. It ia to be hoped that the rir
enmstanecs nndcr which Mrs. Lincoln loX
Washington, will not be Lroaght- op in discussion.
1S65.
SOUTHER XETi S.
Escape op Mat LuxroN.The Memphis
Jsulleim. says: Mat Luxton ecaed from Irv
1115 Block yesterday morning and at this
writing had not been recaptured, despite the
efforts puf forth to that end. lie is 'under
sentence of death, for guerrilla operations
during the war. and it is only a day or two
since a petition for the remissipn of'his sen
tence signed by nearly two thousand citizens,
"wa.s lorwaruetl to aslnngtoa for tlio con
sideration of President Johnson. He hushed
by the guards at about four .o'clock, one of:
wnoui nrcu, out did not succeed in wounding
him. It was believed that Luxton'a case
would have met with favorable considers-
Jaon at the hands of the President, but it is
now thought that his chances of pardon are
sum.
Peksoxal The Hon. Landon C.IIdynes,
late Confederate Senator from this State, is
among the rt cent able accessions to the Mem
phis liar. Mr. Hayncs goes to Memphis
uiion a parole from the President of the
United States, protecting him against arrest
and anv interference with him in the prose
cution of his business;
Maj. Gen. GuptavtjS W-. Smith, who
resigned the position of Street Superinten
dent ot JNcw lork to come bouth, and who
resigned-his commission in the Confederate
army two years afterwards, has appeared in
New York as the agent of the National Ex
press company.
Sekioulv III. Wc regret to learn that
our esteemed friend and co-temporary, Col.
Benjamin F. Dill of the Memphis Apinxtl, is
not expected to survive the,' serious attack of
sickness, with which he lias been for some-
nine amicicu.
Pajdoxed. Doctor Morgan, also known
as Capt. Morgan, of Arkansas, who was sen
tenced to imprisonment lor life by a military
commission in Memphis, for organizing
panus ol guerrillas during tlie-war, lias been
pardoned, by the I'resident and is now en
route from Jefferson Citv, where he was con
fined, to his home. It will be remembered
that he was first sentenced to bo hanged, but
at the instance of some influential legal gen
tlemen, the sentence was commuted to im
prisonment during tho term of his natural
life. Ilis final pardon was obtained through
the ctlorts of his attorney, . II. 11. Hussell,
tusq., who recently returned trpm ashing-
ton.
flic Cleaveland Banner says that Col
James Parks, of Polk, was elected, at the
, election on the Cth instant, to represent the
counties of Meigs, McMinn and Polk, in the
present legislature, to nil tne vacancy oc
casioned bv the resignation of Mr. Conclaml
Just as it should have leen, for there is no
liettcr man in the district, and he will make
jusi sucn a representative as ute people neat
in the Legislature. We will vouoh for that.
Freed ii ex. About two hundred freed-
mcn says the Chattanooga Gazette, arrived
in thin city yesterday morning on the At
lanta train en route for Arkansas, where
they have made arrangements to g6 on cot
ton plantations. The crowd consists of
men, women and children. Thev hall from
the neighborhood of Atlanta.
Oimjanizixo. A meeting of the citizens
of Atlanta is called through the city papers,
for the purpose of organizing a regiment iu
order to clean the city of the scoundrels
whose business is murder and robbery.
Mii.lepoeville. Dec. 15. In the elec
tion to-day, Barnett was elected Secretary of
,iatc; isarnes as Comptroller Ueneral;
jjones, ireasurer, and J. W. Burke & Co.
iPrinters.
Gen. Bennett has issued an order forbid
ding the organization of colored militia in
Charleston, as having a tendency to bring on
a war ot races.
considerable excitement was created in
-in audience, in which were many Federal
olticcrs, at the theatre m savannah, recently.
utiring uie penormance ot tnc omnia
" Smiles and Tears." A song in which the
following words occurred was introduced in
the piece, and sung by Miss M. E. Gordon :
"I despise the North. Give me the sunny,
punny South." Tlio emphasis with which
the words were rendered, created loud ap
plause from the Southern and hisses from
the Northern spectators.
The Iluntsvillc .Mroatc says, Ave arc glad
ta'find that our people are alive to the im
portance of farming orations fir the next
year and are getting ready to engage in the
cultivation of cotton with energy. Small
farmers are meeting with most success
those who work their own lands, and only
hire help to a limited extent. This class,
who have land of their own, can make more
money fanning now than ever before and
will do so will make money rapidly by
persevering industry. Large land holders
find it more difficult f o farm now, because of
the uncertainty of securing reliable labor for
the whole year. They are willing and anx
ious to engage the freedmen at constant
wage, but they want to lie assured of having
the labor all the time. Tho pay is w?curi-
let the work be certain when paid for, and
the battle is won.
Gov. Humphrey, of Alabama, authorized
by the Legislature, )oa appointed five com
missioners to proceed to Washington to rep
resent to the President the present condition
of aflairH in the State, the bad effect tho ne
gro troops are having on the other ncrgocs
in the State, and to act, in conjunction with
our Congressional delegation, in endeavor
ing to have these troops removed.
W:lminotox, C Our city bids fair,
rays the Journal of that city, in a short time
to become one of the greatest commercial
places in the South, as will be seen by the
quantity of shipping now in port, anu the
continued arrival and departure of steamers
and sailing vessels of.au kinds. The facil
ities for the shipment of produce are now
greater than they have been nt any time
since the close of the war. Steamers con
tinue to arrive from Charleston, Savannah
and other Southern ports for the purpose of
procuring freights, and it has not, at any
time, been the case that they have departed
without a full cargo.
Get. A. P. Stewart. We desire to cor
rect an error into which wc, with others,
have been unintentionally drawn sayB the
New Orleans Picayune.
Gen. A. P. Stewart, late Ljcutcnant Gen
eral in the Confederate States army, was
elected a professor in the University of Mis
sissippi, but declined the honor intended
him.
A paragraph iu our paper this morning
also states that he was "surveying in Galla
tin last week." It has also been said that he
was to take charge of some edcuational in
stitution in Memphis. AH the statements
are incorrect.
General Stewart is a member of the com
mcrdal house of Stewart & Brother 47 Ca
romblct street, in this city, and it li his in
tention to devote himself exclusively to the
business of his house, and all statements to
the contrary are injurious to him, however
kindly intended by those who make them.
Oiuectionable BLTroys, The Mobile
Time says that Mr. Jos. W. Davis, was ar
rested in New Orleans, on Saturday lat, and
taken before the Provoctt Court foe wearing
a grey coat with bras buttons attached
thereto. These dangerous looking orna
ments' were then and tliere cutoff, in thcaw-r
ful presence of the court, and Mr. Davi won
permitted to go about his business. In about
half an hour he was rearrested by the same
zealous officer that had nailed him before,
and he had on the same .coat, bearing the
identical, or similar buttons. His case was
postponed.
Rev. Dn, Wit. X. Hxwkk, of the Episco
pal Church, died in Columbus Inst, Priday
night.
Col. Withers, of 3liwssippl, formerly
pen. Pcmbcrton'a Chief of. Artillery, re
orts his efforts to induce .Ronton capitalists
to embark in cotton growing and other
Southerrr sjicculatlonf Vfery sutxtspfttl.
Col. John Avery, one of the largest land
owner Li Virginia died, recently in Prince
George county, Yo- JIe ownciT pver nine
thousand acres in that county and Surrey
the adjoining one. He was, eighty-two year
old.
Amende. A short tirao since wc stated
that Daniel Helton, living in our county, had
twelve sons who" had acrved in "the Union
army; We now learn from. Mr. Helton that
he haa twentv-two tons, sixteen of whom
served in the federal army, one in the rebel
army, and live thai vrcretoo young to do any
fighting oa their own hook. We take pleas
ure in making the correction for the benefit
of the gallant aire'' of the "patriotic
sons." Who will contest tho field with old
Roane, and present inch an array of, gallant
ipirita from beneath, the same ' roof and the.
same household I All hail, old J.toanc,and
her gallant sons!
IST0. 14.
Tlio Operation of the Confiscntion Ijitt,
From the New York Times.
Many ieople of proiwrty in the Southern
States are excrcisctl about thcr loannM of
me connscation law and the effect upon con
fiscatcd property of a Presidential panloil
The Supremo Court at Washington ha bo-
fore it the case of Lcroy M. Wiley whidi
was tried before the t'nitcd States I)rtrict
Court in this dty, and excited some attention
in tho early part of tho year. Tho appeal is
to reverse, the decision" given hercy which
covered the "confiscation and forfeiture of
seventeen hundred and fiftv-six shares of the
capital stock of tho Great Western Railranrl
Company of 1S59, and of upward of So0.-
yw uu lvuiiuiu u uoiiua Ol uio same
corporation," and involved tho miestion.
uucs me i resiueni s paruon remit the sen
tence of forfeiture of rebel property and re
instate tnc rebel in all his nchU thereto?"
The decision of tho Supreme Court will be
looked lorwant to with groat interest by large
numbers of iersonH in the Southern States.
whose cases will be affected bv the result of
mis appeal.
A couple of instance in which the military
authorities have vcrv recently taken action
c " . i i- -
"iv" tuuii-cuiiuii lans mav muiuioneii m
this connection. The well known General
Pillow had two hundred mules taken from
his plantations in Arkaiv-, lie nnmrmv
and learning tliat many of thesewere still at
ct. Louis, andjbelieving, as lie savs, that the
"effect of his pardon was to entitle him to
the restoration of nil proierfv tchieh had net
been sold by decree of any courts under the
confiscation law," he made application to the
military commander of fhe division. Gener
al Shtrman, to restore to him the "mules.
General Sherman referred tho application to
me quartermaster, who inudo. an endorse
ment on it, that as General Pillow had leim
pardoned bv the President, ho was clcarl'v
cntitled to all property Liken from him
which had not been sold by deoreoof .ipnnrt
of competent jurisiliction". General Sher
man then referral the nnnliratiun to tho
Secretary of AV.ir. and - nsk-ml if Tin ulinnLl
. restore tlie mules. Secretary Stanton de
clined restoring them; and there tlio matter
now rests.
General Canby. couimatidin!r in Lonisi.in.i.
nas also just hail a case before him. in which
Mr. Luther Ronald-vai made application for
me restoration ot htty-one acres of land, wit li
the improvement, lying within the breast
works at Port Hudson. To the annlieation
he replies that " this property was captured
lrom the public cnemv at the expense of
much blood and treasure, and that tho title
IS now in tlio (inri.rnmi'iif nf tb I'nlf.il
btates as cajdured propcrt-v." I le adds :
"Ihave'lio idea that this title will lie re
lilUlllished. or the uronortv rrsfiirrd. ui Inntr
as the control of the .Mississippi riv6r is of
any value to the C luted btates. U liu legal
reclamation or the applicant it against the
late rebel government, and not air.iiiwt tin-
Government of tire United States." If he is.
in equity, entitled to' anv reliur. it m under
niu tuuaiuuuunai provision mat private
property shall net be taken for public use
without just romtiensation, or under the
1... ..,.....:,..,; 1 .i .
provisions of the third section of the act of
Mardi 12, 1S63. In either cue, the claim
must be supported by clear proof of title,
1 Ti. . .1 1 . p ... .
luyaiiy ai tne tiate ot uie original seizure,
and that no compensation was paid, or agrcctl
to bo paid, Uy the rebel Government."
There militarv decisions will undoubtedly
be appealed froni as soon as civil Jaw re-
vumes iU full swav. Tliere will be a vai
number of caseK itiVolved, and the general
result arrived at it of srreat imtiortanee to
the CQtmtry, as well an tt the jiartieri rnter-
esteii.
Lincoln aiitl JoIiiisoii lluw IlWlorv
i 1 1 1 Paint their Port nil Is.
From the .Memphis. Ilullctin.
There are those disposed, in view of the
exactions made by President Johnson, to
believe that Mr. Lincoln would have dealt
much more generously with the South. If
,we are not mistaken, Mr. Lincoln devised a
Scheme of "restoration," applied to Loui-d-hnaand
Arkansas. In July, 18(51, General
Ranks, under orders of President Lincoln,
issued a proclamation which contemplated
tlio organimtiori of State government under
revised constitutions and iron-clad oaths.
Negro suffrage waa coiupul.ory. The Stnto
was a non-entity. A null recession had de
htroved State vftalltv.
In Arkansas, theone-fenth basis of rcprc-
.fCntatioh Avas applied. The names of the
States were retained, if we recollect aright,
hud by this means alone, could their identity
bo recognized. The retention of lioundary
lines wa4 of no iignilicance, and trginia.
the mother of State, was ruthlessly dis
membered. inter' Davis concocted
scheme, paved by Congress, and we heard
that t'rcsidcnt Lincoln verbally approved it
The States were deemed dead ; rebellious
citizens, forever disfranchised, were pro
nounced unworthy of any ollicc; Represen
tation was based upon the one-tenth system,
infinitely worse' than the three-fifths basis
against which Andrew Johnson, with
marvelous prescience was wont to in
veigh in the halcyon days of unwashed
icnncsscc democracy. We remember read
ing in a Southern village, sooti thereafter
burned bv Sherman, a speech on this suli-
jeet, delivered jn, Congress by a man of
Such glowing iancy. that, in vulgar mrlancL.
he is known as Sun-et Cox. He urged that
this plan of restoration would, in Tennessee
permit seven thousand two hundred ani
sixtv-cigtit voters to rule a btate ol one
hundred and forty-live thousand three hun
dred and forty-eight voters. One tenth of
this number is 11. Ml. A m.aioritv of this
would be 7,268, nr.d these monopolizing offi
ces would hold the bt.ato in subjection'
Froni this destructive, cold'bloodcd wiutry
Davis plan, Brownlow's model government
derives its conception of duty to the jicople
bf Tennessee. Seven thousand Radietil-i
would thus enslave the State forever. Mr.
Lincoln was satisfied with this plan, though
he pocketed the Bill, with the declaration
that lie would, it pasKd, give it J'Jcecutive
aid."
It appears that I'resident Johnson ap-
E roves .neither the Hanks plan, applied to
ouisi.ana and Arkansas, witli the sanction
of Mr. Lincoln, nofthe Winter Davis mode
of eviscerating statehood. JoIinon holds
that State government! and Ixiundarv lines
arc no lesa indestructible than the Federal
Union. The Constitution contemplates the
possibility of individual criminality, but its
framere nevcrso defined treason, that States
could comjass it. Johnson, by a sweeping
amnesty, relieves citizens of disabilities, and
by his conduct of local and national govern
ments, makes Tennessee a wedge which so
dcaves the Union, compacted by Radicalism,
that all thcsA Stale may become cmlxxlitd
iu the great tree of Lilierty, beneath who-m
branches, counflcfs myriads and generation
df freemen, in perfect isecurity, Inay reiMc
forever. John.on 'ignores the one-tenth
mode of defining votcnt, utid deniex Federal
right of interference in thu question of Mif
frage, whether affecting whiten or Mucks,
He restores rights, HiHpendcd, to Slate,
Jrhoc entity and entirety were never suspen
d. Hu resorta not to military power, but by
ConvcntiuiM( cho;n by unawed, unrestricted
miflrage, reinvests them with all seemly
habiliment to make them welcome guest a't
an endlew "re-union." Hi-requires slavery
to lie abandoned finally and forever because,
lie would poxtponc, finally and foruvcr,
another such reign of mudm-wand deinoiiLuu
as that which slavery enabled Witiciani to
bring down nprttt our unhappy country.
Whatever .blotting inaV bo ascribed to ne
gro servitude, the woes it Jian innocently in
dicted on tlio country outwsigh tlicm all;
and wc may ifot complain that the President
render their recurrence impossible. Lin
coln once required anient to negro suffrage;
not Joha-on, who would only, have the Afri
can protcctel in all rights a a man. There
.but one: body of Ia-.giver on earth, thit
tide Dahomey, who would hare dmirtl
freemen Uie right to texrify, and that wan
found buried in stone and stupidity, at
Nashville. We had innocently supported,
though attendance at our white criminal
court might confuse somewhat. Ideas on this
subject, that the object at testimony wan to
elicit truth. What it hai tu dp with "negro
equality," iinlew it equalize blacks and
knaves, addicted to juridical liard-s wearing,
ke could never Imagine. If negroe wcr
tlie only ,liariatlie wnrJd, we wotdd .have
that, testimony rjcctcd and not ciher-.
fftzc.
The bill to prevent for the present tlmm
portation of foreign cattle, in order to gttani.
against the plague, ha panstd both Tfouse'
bt Congress, nnd nceiLionly the PresidontV
lignatuw.to liecpmo a Iawi This th, fiwt.
biU passjed this session.
Bat little lHexpectl totraiwpiro'W Coh''
grew uatil After the holiday; - ' . '
THE XASHVIXU: B.UIT VX19X,XX9
Omen Unloitnd'Amcric3tr Block, ernerCnnrea
anil Cherry streets, opposite th Post Olsa.)
Daily Ji, o
Weekly .. j co
Proportionate rates for Sorter periods,
gabscriptions invariably in adranee.
Sound IMillnvopliy.
From .tho Uiehuwnd Times, j
It I a reeeived maxim in kiiiio rc-fcr'aMn
schools of moral philosophy. Ih:t mankind ad"
mire most thoso. titniM In which they are mor
deficient. If this be founded in truth.it arenej
that of all human virtues courajreis ibn ms-i
rare. In the estimation of men this world over
this virtue takes tho palm from ehanly n th'
muUittiduofsins it cover. Its mrfnifcytatfr -ij t
ennuxh to Imieo tho ditrkvet crimes; tho want ef
it f.itally mars the eflVctof the mostdumtertitr 1
and ireneroas aet. It was fttrartlyadvauccl. n
oppnitiontopnbllo MeeutlOns, that tho eou -s-i
exhibited bv criminals at tho stake or on tho
scaffold tended to -anctify .their deeds in tho eyti
orthc people, and raised them to tho iltetv of
martyrs.. If tho hiahwayrnan and murderer
antmcd pluck, the ptoeewion from Stwjato
to Holbprn Hill wasdives ted of its umominy. and
assumed tho charaetenor n triumphal march. If
ho died 'came, hetoon'&hlftya i tk. .t. i"
of popular heroes, and- insured tho perpetuation
or his memory in romantic traditions and lecnj.
Y nether tue maxim bn trrnni-f-.l ... r.
deduced from t is, we believe, essentially tru
Courairo in the sens of the Koman 1 tr-fus tho
(Troupinc of those hishet friahtand tilraetcri.,t ,
of chivalrous manhoods "hravprv in nr..rl
dancers or diSkuUicn; resolution in nniwMtn,
them, aod. aboyo all, paticuco and iortitude
nndcrsnffenmr-ls certainly hut rarely m. : witlu
Resolution and bravery tho Southern people h.rrtj
manifested lulhnhiirhwfc development ( which
they are suscentiMe i thev nro nnr .iti.-i ...
tho exhibition of the crowning virtui'- patu-ii j
and fortitudes To mrtaiirtheir character th r
mustshowtliinselvptwicssl.iiotouly of n t
necat.ve. ratye n:irirrKeh-h if.i.iit.- .ul..T
complaint, to what U ituvit:iM, but of a nx'-a
Positive. nr netire Drineinlr (VhiM. ..i .
strcnstlu ii manifi-su iuir in emanuuitjtbHl
evennrssormmd-and temper whi.h ... '
turbedbythe .shwlssof niMbftune.oc wiich. If
stajawred or borne down by a sudden bt w. Ln.
the vital enetjry, thereon iterative brmyacsy ord
elastu-itv'tto riso again ami right itself.
people those most aeousuvned to thunk for them
selves those who best Understood and appric alcd
tlio lsallr moor !.it afraif., ..! '.1. ..,..
cherished them are men who have ncycr r
coverol from Ihe overwhelming confusion of enr
overthrow. Ther nr tik men tr,nni .
s(n in mute bewilderment. unabU in iit,
that the axiom ot tho tulh in whu-h they were
educated iHfr heneefhtih hn i!t-.wtnl.t .ihA.. .
These axioms were their irfn. without hieh
there can be Tor them n foundation Tor political
faith r iitstitu(Hirtal Koveriiinenr, no liberty
worth livinir for.
This over-mnsin. never-ortinc melancholy is
not consutMit with the spiritwc have e.imracndoL
Despair, while iris fimrri3rar,lr.wl hr I,,-, ,
aud resolution, ntt silinetisrfs 'cvjii aivts birtn.
to them eilll never elfeet ilaenfrn,,., int.v n-l-. .
animated and sustainetl by ftrtitula tho ncM'-fr
attributes of genuine uonrucc.
A Nbvr.r, "CoMrnntcff. Mr. JefK rsnn
Dayi, being a prim, clerical kind of man,
believe in theSeriidiiral inmnction oa tn
, short h:ur. During hi conliuement at a
certain jmblie watering place near Hamp
ton Roads, he has found it convenient to
cull ,in the aid of a barber. The first occa
Isionof sjiearing or Uimming dinted iL.
jtinguishitl altentioa from (i.n. Milc. win
'drrects the watering place afore-ald N .
'fcoonor hud Mr. Davin' loek-t fallen into tW
toniwrial towul, whun they were borne off
in a charger, like John the Baptist's hi-.L
'totJie cii-olv or (rencral Miles. WIu.I.ir
lany of tht' daughter of Hcroflias- Fo.'t n..l
ithwctreWew or not, the veraoioui Ndrthem
chronicle, from which we cull this incident,
refuses furthee information. At leu-;' ,
.however, Mr. DavIV hair, as Tuir v.iU d" t 1
jthe crowns of liiiijt 6r diatl men, i, ..
.again; and agaiii.thorcwaA an apj iicat,
iof the ahoaw. Gen. MiK Hut an crd rly
after the sacred ringleti, but lo! tf e rcl :.- -tory
Davis, antrdputing the attai 0 I
it with a pair of tong, and, whisking hi,
several head ornaments into the f.rc, tlio
firo puffed them up the chimney. Whcnr.t
it is rccocdetl that Gen. Miles waxed vrc'.h.
t We do trust, for the sake of decency, r.
aiot less fof the sake of so gallant a man s
Irii.ti Artlo. il,, tut rnn ;.. j r.i,..i...
- . . . inu vi f .i. itfuuiuiu
anything in Froissart or Bnrou Mimdiaucn,
If it lie true, Mr. Iavu will, by this tmr
iiext year, appear among the sons f,f r.itn
like unto a venerable Aholom. or in the
f-imi lit tnlo of thoa human bisons one occa
bionally beholds from, Texai or ML-ucuri.
jFrotn thu text of our Northern rcc rd. we
Eire led to presume that Gen. Miles dv. ire 1
he castaway hhir for relica. Since then i.i
io morp hair to 'bo hail, let Mr. David dv
Ware how he paros his finger nails.
I Again we express the hope that thN is all
K foul slander iqmti the comuiaiidant at
Fortress Motiroci Sfuiuld it so appear, at
liny time, we will lie mot happy to correct
the story and denosneu the man mid tht
journal thus scanilul'uing the public. Ju
yima l mitnlwMUil.
i:s. edition of ii kio.
J'rom tho Xew Orleans Star. I
About a nunrter nast 11 o'clock v sft nT.iv
forenoon, in one of the yards of the Pari, h
I'rNon, i negro, named Joe I'olydor, nliai
jjohn Mitchell, aliout SO youni of ngc. a
jiiuted, to some extent, by. a horrible tit-alb
(m the giillow, the comtniiwion of two of thr
tvnrst crimes that liuinan nature i.;c..ia!.lc
f rape and mnrder.
i In this insttuiee tho offencorj were aggmvat"
td by the victim bciutj. colored child on'y
even years of ago, named Eleanor GiIhoii,
jvhnm he cntlcctt to a place where he pcrpc
(rated the first foul wrong, nnd no doubt with
inch brutality, that, feutful rf discovery, lie
endeavored to prevent it by killing her and
hiding the body in tho wood. But such a
deed almost Invariably "will Out," anil after
jho finding of-the mutilated corpse, suspicion
rested upon him; he was arriwtiil, and sul
seipiently proof was found of his guilt, and
le was trieil and sentenced to be hung.
Religion, which, in every instance of
i ho kind that we remember, except one",
iiakos the criminal resigned, and give him
noral ,sw wdl a physical courage to mtxt
his most shocking and trying death, s::.
ained I'olyilor up to the last moment. Yet,
Iiongh hU demennor was calm anil evert
' hverful, liis mental disquiet mibt have been
terrible, for he was unable to sleeji during
lie three days and night preceding hu i t
ution.
! Early in tho morning ho expressed a tie--sire
to nddres the colorml men confined iu
the institution. At half-pnst V a. m., in a-
fordancc with hw wishes, the cdls of the
colorctl yanl vero thrown ojicn. Being then
informed tliattlioy awaited his coming hu
aroe from thu di-iir in which he was Hittin;-,
and with steady ntew, ajiprixiclicil the crowd,
when he addressed them in the fullow.it,
Wonls: Jy (Unred Friend;- Ncnrly all among
jou aru ntrniigern to mo and a great many
Hmonjjyou have. doubtless harbored feelings
Of eminily against me, and have cxprcn.xil
mlrwlves on hand as such, and now, at I
soon mutt drmrt tliU life, I hoj-0 If any otio
ijxl wight ngaintuie will fortcive iMcht- rr.I
ly iw I forgive my enemim. The crowd
Ijerc remarked, " Vou have no cncmif
ipnongst tis."
i 'Tis tnie my friendi, I soon must die. Yet
tliere is u consolation ill knowing I am pre
pared to go. Ye, my friends. I am per
fectly reconciled to go, for I plac my tniit
ih a better world. I trust my frlcids, yjti
4 ill all take warning by me, and bo prepared
ti nitct oor crenteHt cuuniy. ileath. TJkii
allow me to bid you a huj farewell.
1 tfToniA lirrrnn.
! Soon after II o'clock Ih; wasr escorted t
tliegalhmv. After being seated ho spoke a
ffcw wonl to thdiprMeiit, raying that Uv i
tlie will of God for him to die and that he
was tireimred. He thanked th- effi' i
the prison tm their krVwlneoH to hirnr n '
.t-kul a a kut mwst that an old ( 'jl.iv '
woman who won uwlur suuteuci? U r v- .
The dergyman t!tii reciu-tl p. a; - '
Sreauvely, tlie convict n-ieiitfI tin I ,
rayer, and in ft feV ntfimtmt afhTWir 's f'
trap fellr nnd the murderer sptd to t :
rf i lUenuil Judgment.
! ita 5fK DnvlH lo Treitlcit.
The Fortrft Monroe eorrespondt-nt of t
v. rr i.i
I " 1 started only in wriln the fact that J F
5)avf h a prfsoner Jiere, and that the fait
lay not be wholly forgotten by the public
lie is (.till In Carroll Hull, still in a large
Ijiit wdl and plainly furnished room , ttul
Ui the enjoyment uf a good fire anil- good a -fi-ndance;
still allowed alHindant rt.ij.
mnttcr: still iKrmittvl hU daily walk.j mi
tjie iratet ; and las but not least, i.ti.1
granted, as regards estting, a say the h '.1
mtwr- tlie ix.it the ranrfeet offiinU. t x 1 1
ecasional boils, whleh tnwiWc Ihdi w.: 4
ob-llke perten-y, thwmU liajipilr r.-t
ulte no plviitlfullv. hu haalth coiihii- i
nod. The mutliislical nreeMion of oik L: L-
itualed to iMHiueiw is evident in hw arrir;--ment
of hi paper and book, and tin. w c
istii'iinirnet m t!i snbjwt of drvstt rr.-l
dean linen Is still a uroailttent charactt'r
t-tici When he walk out he is alwi
Seatly gloveI, and hi jaunty oine bear h.vi
Untiling company HU strfngth of will 1
jjwaarkaldc. U haa sustained him, thtM far,
Quroqgh' 11 long, uml wliat, to one of his 3
five habit, resUew enrgier'l and grasj .k
ambition, must be 4 torturijie itiipri. nii,ti:T
With his will so Indomitable, tunl hU r
ourriM of thought and intellect, he can truul
Infinitely morv,"
" ... . . . . ...
1;
Commercial block, Giiro, w destroyed
' fire oa Sunday. Theliiternalional Hotel
s in ruins.

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