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Daily union and American. [volume] (Nashville, Tenn.) 1865-1866, December 22, 1865, Image 1

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DAILY UNION AND AMERICAN;
F. G. DUXXIXGTOK' & CO.,
EDITORS & TBOPRIETOIIS.
THE XASIIYITJLK
IULK IXYILT UXI0X ArfB
Office Union tad American Block, eeraer Church
and Cherry street;, opposite the PostOfice.)
TiEHj;
Weekly 3 CO
Proportionato rates for shartsr periods.
Subscriptions Invariably in adTance.
Voluntary communication!, contain! n r Inf rt
lot or important news, lollcitcd from any qnarter.
.news letter from the various counties of the
fctate especially desired.
AH communication! should bo addressed to the
Ar0LUME XXXIII.
NASHYILLE, TENNESSEE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1S65.
NO. 16.
Editors or tho Union xyty Avtmcxh."
1
MEDICAL.
F. SEYMOUR, II. I).,
(Late BricaJo Surceon, U. S. A.)
OCULIST AND AURIST,
Office 30 Cdlar 2trcct,bctwecn Summer and Cherry,
NASIIVIM.K.
Oflico for treatment of all Diseases of the Eyo
and Ear, operations for Squinting, Cataract, ccL,
1'crformod.
llOX 700, P. O.
dccG Sinlstp.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS.
D1SSOIAJTIOX.
'"PllE firm heretofore existing nnder tho name
I firm and stylo of V. MATT UROWN A Co.,
U this day dissolved by mutual consent. Mr.
lJrown retires from the business. Mr. Cullender,
in connection with Hiineas Oarrett. will co
tinue tho Real Eft ate business at the old stand
V. Matt. Urewn Co.. 9Mr
T110S. CALIiENDEit.
T. QlGtCTT.
T. CiLLXXDnt.
CALLENDER & GARRETT,
(Successors to V HiTT. I!i:owm A Co..)
TJenl Esttito jVfifOxis,
I Cherry Ntroat,
WITJj civo their prompt attention to the selling
and reulinc ofovery description of Real Ettate.
deet lw.
ll-i?IXt JLBIJB llliSI DEXGftS
liuildiui; Iolx for Sale,
il.SII,
A I.AKfll NUMRER 0V FARMS.
lid. A fine ilrsidrnce, eontslnlnr 12roojns. in
rtr territor'. Alo two vacant Ijott adjoining.
2d. That splendid Residence of the lato James
Johnson, on Ilroad Strect, between Summer and
llich street, eontaiiiiiic 8 rooms, besidos servants
rooms and other out houses.
3d. That splendid Residence of tho late Hardin
1. llotlrk, containing about 10 rooin, out house',
etc, (lood Soring and sprint house with R'A
acres of land, immediately adjacent to thccity, on
tho Charlotte 1'ike.
th. Ml acres of rrnnnd of the Harrow property,
on the Oharlolto Tike, which will be divided to
suit purchasers.
Mb. A very largo nnmbor of Lot' in the Jity
nml tho (lint-rout Addition' to Nnnville. Z Lots
in Kdgcficld and Rrownsrille.
fith. A very largo number of the REST FARMS
In this and tho adjoining counties. Apply to
J. .. A R. W. RROWN.
deet-lm M!j Uniou street.
NELSON MfKFREE
lCKAls ESTATE AfiEXTS,
!it Clicrrj- Nlrerl, nenr Union,
XASI1V1LI.E. TEX.V..
U AVlin larpjiiinoiintof Real Ejtato to sclliu
this and tho adjoining States.
nilSVRUYAXnSKIJ.
('ilrtGouidyjnidSlBlc llends m cnnitiilarinn. as
wclljrt every dueeihdloii of (loveiniiiciit Securi
ties TWO MAURV COUNT . R.MS
are offered ill Very rcnsonaldo prices. A!, nno
in WllliiiiiiMin
CUM ltliltl.AXI) RIVER,
hii county, Tentl., fur role.
ITT I'UOlM'.ltTY
)R SALE.
Q0 1'ItKTon Chilrch street. opprito tho Max-
well lloii'e and .Mas mie Temple, ntn rnvsnn
Hble'prieo. This is rent ml, choice property, ami
is more than M feet deep.
1.1 I'cet. Improved, on Vine strent, between
Cliureh nml Union, veiy choice location, but the
improvements uro moderate. Tlio pries is very
low.
02 I'oyt.with largo brick divellinit, on Vino
street, between Union and Cedar, boinit about the
must doeirablo looatin fur rojldeneivs in thccity.
200 rod on MHJavock street. West Na'hvillo,
on which is a neat Ilriek Dwelling, 8 or 7 rooms,
kitchen, stable, etc;, and first-rate ci'lern. l'rico
only Jl',tM. Ilom.0 ami prcmi'es in uowl order.
100 Toot on llroad street, West Na'hvillo, with
lermit new Rriek House, containing: 10 or 12
rooms, kltehen. table, tw cisterns, shrubbery.
tp etc:, at $1S.0M. Very desirable. Knot sold
within ten da vs. this largo and choice place will
b rented far the remainder of this and tho wholo
of next j ear.
HO IVd on North Market street, corner of .n
eti't, on which i the well known Tlcasant Smith
house, l'rico $H..VW.
BO I'ool on Spruce street, viith lane, cleeant
andnowRriiik ftwellint. contnininc 16 rooms,!
Imlh room', kitchen, estra sire, witli ca, water,
and every modem Improvement.
4.1 Veel on l'ark street, with common im
provements, very law. This property riiusthroush
to Summor.
40 1'ed on Olleiro street, bein? the lower por
tion of the lot now occupied bv llepartmcnt
llejid'inarlers, beloneiiiB to Dr. A aters. Trice.
j.VO per foot.
A choice little lot on North Collrse, Just below
lie l'ublic Square, ut a sacrifice.
SALOON AND RESTAURANT.
Wo offer fur le a Saloon and Restnuront, now
doinun profitable bH?nesi, in tho very centre of
trnJo, at a price perfectly satisfactory.
EDGlU'im.D.
We, have over 1JW feet of cronnd on the most
choice and desirable street in Edgefield, for leae
for tio years from 1st January next, at price
which oHtrht to bo tati'fnetory to thoro decirine to
Improve
Call m:i.m- xirui'iti:i
deoS-lm
1I.1ISRT M. MI.UK.
w. nctri Tiionrsox,
DILLEH & THOMPSON.
ItUAI. USTATi: AMI
C O Ii T, E C T IS (i X G E X T S.
"PROMISING FAITHFUL AND PROMPT
i aucmion 10 an tiuvinrMi cnirusici 10 onr care,
u..,ir..ii. i.H.l.. ...... : ... ii..i.i:A
as General Acents. fur the Purchase and Sale oi
Roil Estate: Rcutinr atnl Loa'inc: of City or
Country Property: voileetion or .Notes; Accounts
a"hd Vouchers; lnvestitation of Titles, etc., etc
1ULLIN A THOMPSON.
Office, over Second National Hank, College street
deet-tf
sZst) i list receh et.
MKDARY A BURKE.
Southeast corner Broad and Market sts.
dcclS St.
r.nn nackn m uviii:AT ri.rn.
OKjyj tlecaut article '" rcrtvxl ol for sale
Southeast c)nicr Jiivad and Market sts.
dccltr-St
Kftf) ItAItltr.I.S YOltlt Al'I'I.KS,
j j j mo ccsi in mcmarkii.
MKDARY X I1I RKE,
Southeast corner Broad and Market tts.
dcc!5-til
A l'l.ACB 0' ' J
of 100 i as, ft II
GROCERIES, LIQUORS &c,
A'EIV STORE.
PandolM & Riva,
NO. 12 NORTH CHERRY STREET.
PEiLEIg IX
FANCY GROCERIES,
WINES. LIQUORS,
CIGARS, ETC.
MONG TIISIR STOCK MAY II E FOUND :
Java. Rio and Mocha Coffeo ;
v,ruineii, rowdercd, Coflee, rortt-nleo, ana every
Teas, Csndii. Starch;
Castile, Palm. Erssiro and Laundry Soaps;
Almonds, Filberts, Currants, Prunes, Raiins;
jijiiicr, oysters, fancy ana Aimonu uracKers;
Pine Anolp. (.lritlfnr .ml Donieritiff (heM;
.Mixed, Uirkins, Chow-chow and Imporial Hot
Pickles;
Muthroom, Walnut, India, and Sir Robert Peel
Catnu n ;
Sultana, Royal, Table. Beefsteak. Royal Osborne,
John Bull, Sobo, Mogul and Ilervey Saucss;
Escnco of Anchovies; Es'ence of Shrimps;
iiaiiir, .imperial ana uurnam .nusiaru;
f i. . I, .,w. . . I..,, . U ! . . V. 11....
Ktra'bourg Meats, Polled Tonxue, Polled Ham;
i rum oj every variety in cans ana Jars,
m miiB atccc or
IV i n c nml It r n n d 1 c n
ALL OK WHICH ARB
OExumi: asi) in r.o iit ei,
MAY BB FOUND
Pemartin and PuffOordon Sherries:
Old Choice and RoservcMadeiras ;
iomluu JUoek ana Uurirunay 1 ort;
Pemartin, Rlanqucfort and St. Jullen Medos
Claret;
Haut Santenic, Nicsteiner, Hoekhelmer and Ca
tawba Wine':
Dcmcrcicr, Gold MdlalandllcidBick.ChamnaBnc:
n:... r.:u;.n ii....t ri t- iv. ltrnn.i;...
Irish. Scotch, Bourbon and Robortson County
Inskics;
Holland Gin;
Maraschino Ab'inthe; ermoath and all As
sorte.1 I.inliors:
Raker's and Holland Bitters;
GENUINE HAVANA CIGARS,
Choiro brand', toKothcr with over' variety ef I)o
mctie CiearsChewinit and Smokins Tobacco of
nil brands ; together with all othtr articles usual
ly found in a
FIRST CLASS FANCY GROCERY STORE.
It i the intention of PANDOLFINI .t RIVA
o keen on band at all time' a comolcto assort
ment of evervthins in their line, of tho very best
quality to be purchased, which they aro deter
mined to sell as low as any other establishment in
Ibis or any othcreity.
They respectfully ask an examination of their
stock, feeling assured that no ono will co away
dissatisfied
PAXDOLI'ISI it UIVA,
rnnej Grocers,
ixi) nr.ii.r.rts ix
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS,
No. 12 Xorlli Cherry Street,
dee Mm. NASHVILLE. TENN.
xn. m i.iuniiux. n. w. it. ncii.BR. 7. i. ikwi.t.
Formerly of Evans, Keith A Co.
M'LAUGHLIN, BUTLER & CO.,
(Suecssors to F. A. Irwin k Co.)
W IIO I. E S A 1 E ii It E 16 H
r ni l i
uuiiiiiiibbiuii m ei unaii itf
Corner of Market and Clark Htrects,
NASHVILLE. TENN.
Wc have in tdorenml forsalu a larj;u stock of
SUGARS. RROWN.
CRUSHED. AND POWDERED.
RIO COFFEE. FAMILY FLOUR,
SALT. MACKEREL. STAR CANDLES.
SOAP, TOBACCO. CHEESE. OYSTERS,
RAISONS. ASSORTED CANDY, LOBSTERS,
WIXKJI AXIS LKiiroitS.
Bourbon Whisky, Holland Gin.
Robertson County do Jnmaica Rum,
French Brandy, Sherry Wine,
Applo do Port do
Peach do Cliiimpazno do
Cherry do Claret do
Baker's Bitters, Catawba do
And a complete as'ortment of other Groceries.
Mclaughlin, butler a- co.
ileeS lin
nr.Ai.r.its ix
FIXE FAMIIsT filtOCEUIES,
11JKE WIXES,
UKAXDIES,
etc., etc., C('.,
NO. 5.1 WEST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE,
KnsliilUc, ToiiiieHee.
TV. HAVE IN STORE AND FOR SALE
a larco stock oi
BROWN SUGAR, .
CRU HED do
POWDERED, do
RIO COI'FHi;.
FAMILY FLOUR,
SALT.
MACKEREL,
STAR CANDLES,
SOAP. etc. etc.
etc
aYSTERS. COVE AND SPICED.
CHEESE.
SARDINES.
PICKLES.
RAISONS.
ALMONDS.
FILBERTS.
PECANS.
ASSORTUD CANDT.
LOBSTERS, ts
els.
Wines and Liquors.
Burlion Whiky.
Robertson County do.
French Brandy,
Apple Brandy,
Peach Brandy,
Cherry Brandy.
Baker's Bitters, etc.. els.
Holland Gin.
Jamaica Hum,
Sherry Wine,
Port Wine.
Champacnr WineJ
Claret Wine,
Catanba Wins, ets ete.
Willow-Ware;
Superior Cigars;
.Smukini: Tobaccos;
Pickles;
French Mustard;
Caper Catsup;
Java Coffee, eto.
rosTr.n imoTiiKKS.
dect-tf
J. I.V.1ISDEX A CO.,
vismrtrerts ixn ccxlers
HIDES, OILS, LEATHER,
Findings & Currier's Tools,
XO. 9 EOCTII MARKET STREET, -Pc.4
"i-VSllVIMX, VXSSft
HARDWARE.
ii.a Bi vr a n e .
SAM. YANLEER, CO.,
NO. U COLLEGE STREET.
(Two Doors below Public Square.)
SIGN OF THE BIG PADLOCK
1TAVE ON HAND AND ARE RECEIVING
JLJL a large and complete stock or hnglisb, (jcr
man, and American HARDWARE,
Which wa are sellinr at reasonable priocs. Tht
stock consists in part T
FINE IXL POCKET CUTLERY.
200 GROSS TABLE CUTLERY,
200 DOZ. KNOB LOCKS, assorted.
10 do HAND AND RIPPING SAWS.
500 d ASSORTED AUGERS,
25 do FOOT ADZE,
2000 lbs. HOOKS AND HINGES, assorted. 12 to
4S inches,
1000 lbs. II D0IL CHAIN.
1000 " BLACKSMITH'S HAMMERS, all kinds;
Si WRIGHT'S ANVILS.
100 CROSS-CUT SAWS. VA to VA fcU
60 MILL SAWS, to S fset;
AXES.
CHISELS.
FILES,
HATCHETS,
v CHAINS,
LOOKING GLASSES.
CANDLESTICKS of all kinds,
RAZORS,
ECISSORS,
SHEARS.
TIN CUPS and PLATES.
TEA and TABLE SPOONS.
COFFEE MILLS,
SHOE NAILS.
TACKS.
A very Iarsa slssk of PLANES if every variety
Also.
IRK3tIlIJI UTEEI, PI.OWH.
Those wishing to purchase in our line will do
well to give us a eall before buying.
bam: VAXi.rint, co.
deel lm.
1. 1. nnsuT.
Tim. D. CRUGIIKin.
AKTHUR A. BREAST & CO.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS
IX
PI All!) WARE
AND CUTLERY,
NO. Si PUBLIC SQUARE. NASHVILLE.
o c
-llfE IfAVE NOW ON HAND, AND AUK
continually receiving, alartrand well so
lecteil stock of
IIAItmVAIti: as;cuti.eut,
In all its branches.
Wo invito Merchants and tho Trado ccncrallr
to ourstort:
TABLE AXI) 1'OCKET CUTLERY;
AXFJI AND HATCHETS;
CHAINE3 AND ROPES i
COTTON AND WOOL CARDS;
HORSE SHOES AND NAILS;
RIFLE AND BLASTING POWDER.
TANNER'S BELTING
AND PACKING;
FARMER'S AND MECHANICS TOOLS.
in evcrw variety, etc., cts.
Call and examine our Stock. We are prepared
to sell as cheap as any housowest of tho Allcsho
nics. A. A. nitKAST A CO.
deel lm.
G-. W. FALL & CO.,
I 31 P O 11 T E K S,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS
HARDWARE AXI CUTLERY
NO. il PUBLIC SQUARE.
NASHVILLE. TENNESSEE.
(Kirkmnn A Ellin did stand.)
Wo would respectfully invito the attention ol
SPORTSMEN to our stock of
G- UN S,
Which cannot he equalled here. It sompriscs all
Kradc!, from tha
PIsAIX DOUBLE IJARREI,
TO TnE
CELEBRATED GUNS
ov
ATi.si.r.T mcnAitiiN a ) tn
ja.80 a raw
HreacIi.TiOmUnj; or CartrldRc
RITOT C3UXS.
AMUNITION
RPORTIXO APPARATUS
dect It
JiS. MLlBailLl.T. 0. W. B. frTt.f.R. T. 1. tRWlS.
Formerly of Ncvins, Keith A Co.
McLaughlin, Bugler & Co.,
(Stcccssors to F. A. Irwin A Co..)
WHOLESALE OJtOCEltS
Commission Merchants,
DI1L1B3 IX
rtnAxniiis, wixnt ajtd i.iirons.
Comer Market and Clark sts.. Nashville, Tenn.
Wo pay the hishest market prices for
DRIED FRUIT,
' FEATHERS,
BEESWAX,
GINSENG.
And Cou it try" l'rwl u cT Cencralty.
McLlUGHLIK, BUTLEK & CO.
FAMILY GROCERIES &c
FAMILY GR0CE-EY,
NO. S DEADERICIC STREET.
(old stand of Adams and Eves.)
ROBERT EYES & CO.,
"ATT-WOULD RESPECTFULLY ANNOUNCE
V TO THEIR FRIENDS AND CUS.
toiners. that they havo opend a first class Fam
Urocery Store at inooiusianu, soionnocruiiieu us
Adams A Eves, on Doadorick street. Tno Stock
nas been sclocicu wnn care, anu cmuracus a com
pleto assortment of all the atapla and fancy arti
clcs. together wit!r
OLD WINES, .LIQUORS,
CIGARS, TOBACCO. ETC.. ETC.
TTfOODEN WARE. 20 nests Wash Tubs, 20
1 doien Wash Boards, doien Paintod Buck
ets, 10 dozen bitters, a larco lot or urooins, etc., in
store.
"WHISKY 30 barrels pure Old Robertson
I County Whisky for sale, by tha gallon or
barrel.
0
10VE OYSTERS, Sardines, Pickle, Mustard,
iirandy fruits, tatsupj, etc.
SCOTCH ALE. 20 dozen Bottles of J. Walker &
Co.'s celebrated bottled Scotch Ale. Also a
larso lot of Youne A Co.'s Edinburg Ale, in bot
tles. 0
AN DIES, Soda and Butter Crackers. Craok
ncll Biscuit, etc.
SUNDRIES Nails, Bed Cords, Rope, Wrapping
Paper, Demijons, Soaps, Candles, ete.
( 10FFEE. SUGAR, TEAS, etc.-We desire cspe
J cially to call attention to our stock of Cottce,
Suear, Teas. Also, Whito Fish, Pickled Herring,
Flour by the barrel or sack, for family use.
docl-lm. ROBT EVES A CO.
TERRASS BROTHERS
WHOLESALE GROCERS, COMMISSION AND
FORWARDING MERCTIANT3,
II: - KOUTH MARKET STREET.
NASUVILLn TENNESSEE.
SUNDRIES.
1 nnt'oes Resin Soap;
1UU 50 casks Soda;
fOj boxes Indieo (bent;)
25 do Madder:
25 kegs and half barrels Galden Syrap :
10 barrels 11 lacking
1U0 boxes Grain,and Ground l'vppcr;
25 do Spice;.
25 do Ginger;
200 reams Wrapping Paper;
20 cases Matches;
100 boxes Star Candle;
5 cases Sunny Side Tobacco;!
20 hoxes Imperial Tea. For sale low by
TERRASS BROS,
dec! lm S5 South Market street.
SUGARS. 50 hhds. common, primo and choice
Brown Sugar.
100 buls. (Jrusncu, rowucroa ana uranuiaica.
For sale by TERRASS BROS.
M
OLASSES. 100 nbls. common and choice
Molasses. For (ale by '115KUA&S IJllus.
LOUR. 200 bbls. extra to ehoico brand'. For
sale low by
TERRASS BROS.
rHISKY.50 bbls. F. N. A Co.'s Robertson
I Y county;
i)ois extra nne uci;
25bbls. Tennessee White.
For salo low by TERRASS BROS.
I" ARD. 25 bbls. Country Lard. For salo by
j TERRASS BROS.
COFFEE. 100 bags prime Coflce. I or sale by
TERRASS BROS.
decS-lm.
G. VC. ROWLAND, LAN DON STOCITOX,
JllllX N. HPKRRT. IlKNRY Sl'KRRT.
Lato of Nashville, Tenn. Lato of Nashville, Term.
ROWTiAXDSPERItY A CO.
WHOLESALE
JHOCi:iLS AND GKXKKAI.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
ron Tim sjiL op
COTTON. TOBACCO AND PRODUCE GENER
ALLY.
3-Particular attention given to the rurchaso
of all kinds of Western Produce.
No. it WEST SECOND STREET,
deot-lm CINCINNATI OHIO.
TREA-NOR & CO.,
WHOLESALE GROCERS
And dealers In
Foreign & Domestic Liquors,
NO. M MARKET STREET,
dcet NASHVILLE. TENN.
SALE & LIVERY.
IX SERVICE A G A I X.
UP-ViVD-XJI?
LIT E It Y. SALE,
EXCHANGE STABLE
DEADERICK STREET.
IiETWEES'CHERRY AXD SUMMER.
J. V. PEXTECOST, rroprietor.
rpiIE UNDERSIGNED HAS JUST RETURN
A ed from the North, with tho best stock to bo
had in the country. BUGGIES AND CAR
RIAGES ALL NEW, and horses superior to any
in this city.
My far'litios for BOARDING HORSES RY
THE DAY. WEEK OR MONTH, are unequalled
in tno city, ine services or an expcncnccu nosi
ler nave been seearod, who will give his exclusive
attention to stock. .a .
CoD?tntlr, on hand. Wine lot of nORSES
AND MULES for sale at the LOWEST MARKET
RATES. . .
Having had a long experience in the business, I
foel satisfied that I can gtvo satisfaction in all cases
Ueei-lm J. F. PENTECOST.
TMION&AMEEIOAIT
THE FLTCKE PAUl'EKISJI OF THE
SOUTH.
From tho Richmond Enquirer.
It was a bitter jest when a distincuwhed
French statesman said, a few years ago, that
the United States were only fUIfiling their
duty of exhibiting coloial dimensions in all
material interests when they contracted a
national debt also, that surpassed all others
on earth. The good people of the South
wiirsoon have to add another feature of Eu
ropean civilization to those they have been
filowly but surely acquiring one by one a
regular Proletariat. The pauperism that
prevails in alt the older btates of Europe is,
at once, an evidence of their unsoundness
from decrepitude or bad government, and a
sore that exhausts their resources and im
pedes their healthy action, has hitherto
been an unknown evil to our far scattered
population and teeming soil. It will be so
no longer, and Fourth of July orators will
be deprived of one of their tavonte boasts,
while legislators will have to bend all the
energies of their minds upon a subject that
has so far battled the ingenuity of statesmen
and economists of every land.
Our former elaves will, with the exception
of a small proportion, become paupers. This
is a misfortune as great for us as it can possi
bly be for them, and we need no gratuitous
advice on the part ot our itadical brethren
at the North to be told that self-protection
requires us to make every effort towards re
lieving the sufferings and improving the con
dition of the frecdmen. Ihe honor of the
South demands that wc should not allow
them to perish in our midst. However casv
our consciences might feel on that subject,
the catastrophe having been brought about
by others, who have left tho consequences to
us, the world at large would hold us respon
sible for the calamity, and history would not
in silence pass over the apparent barbarity.
We arc, most assuredly, not obliged to as
sume all the effects of this sudden and violent
liberation of a whole race. But, by God's
Providence, this race is placed in our midst,
the frecdmen live side by side with us, there
is no possible way, within the reach of hu
man ingenuity, to remove them in a body to
a distant country, and all that is left us is to
bow to the inscrutable decree, which ap
points us unwilling guardians of helpless
millions. There is no avoiding the solemn
duty. It is irksome; it is unsought for: nay,
it is unjustj but it is one of tho;c sad and
solemn duties which the strong man looks in
the face and bravely takes upon himself to
fulfill, with God's aid; so well as lie can. Suc
cess is sure to bring its blessing: failure in
volves no disgrace, but leaves, at least, the
grateful sense of having done all that could
be demanded.
AVe must feed, clotho and educate these
helpless beings, and the sooner wc resolve to
assume the obligation and. provide for its
honest fulfillment, the easier it will be for us
all. Those among them who can render
service, well trained house servants and able
bodied field hands, will amply repay the of
fer ot a home and a lair compensation. I he
mere relief from the moral responsibility for
the physical welfare of our servants, which
weighed so heavily on conscientious masters
and faithful matrons in Virginia homes,
will be a signal bencht, for which wc can
well afford to pay a small tax. Many wo
men will be useful in households and on
farms, and children of a certain age can
easily bo apprenticed to learn handicrafts or
to be trained for domestic service. But
there will remain over a large number of
freedmen, whom the excess or the want of
age, infirm health and utter incapacity for
any but the coarsest work, will render un
able to find shelter or respectable connec
tions, liiesc will constitute our paupers.
and it is our duty to sec to it that they do
not become criminal as well as poor. Al
ready the public safety of every kind of
property has been seriously impaired ; al
ready our highways and byways swarm with
homeless, thriftless vagabonds, and in every
town and village vast numbers of wretched
beings are crowded together, living in forced
idleness and wanton disregard of law and
decency.
There are two measures especially, which
arc imperatively called for, even before any
other efforts can be made to regulato the
status of these new members of our society,
and to provide for their duties as well as for
their rights. e must have a poor tax,
every community, county, corporation or
rural district being taxed, and, we tear, being
for a time at least heavily taxed, to provide
for these paupers and to prevent the burden
from overwhelming individuals with no
benefit to the commonwealth. The burden
may be hard lo bear, but it will be true
economy in the end to pay these taxes, for
they will provide most judiciously, bv well
chosen ofiicers, for the support of all the
needy, prevent the annoyance and wear and
tear "of feelings connected with systematic
becearrv. and "give the ncccssarv control
over all who arc not regularly employed and
under domestic restraint, lo complete tins
control, however, a rural police, consisting
of active, energetic and yet discreet jmcn,
will have to be established in every district,
whose duty, prescribed by law, it will be to
patrol tho whole country, to watch over pub
lic security of persons and and property, and
especially to regulate the movements of the
vagrants. Volunteer associations of the
kind, which have already been organized in
various districts, have shown the great use
fulness of such a system of well directed
surveillance. To make this police efficient,
however, it must consist of regularly en
listed and well paid men, for thcro is no re
liance to bo placed upon voluntary service,
however zealous in their action and disin
terested in their motive.
With two such safeguards providing for
the necessities, as well as for the good beha
vior of the large floating population which
has so suddenly been called upon to learn
unprepared, the obedience due to public laws
and the prudence required for self-preservation,
wc may safely tako time to mature,
through our'able Legislature, such lawsas
this new class of inhabitants and their anom
alous condition may require. Wc may for
the present, content ourselves with making
them inoffensive; we must ere long, sec to it
that they become not only harmless, but use
ful; that they can pa'v taxes like all others
who enjoy the protection of the laws and the
benefits of organized society, and that they
contribute, not merely in names, but by the
actual fruit of their labor, to tlio aggregate
wealth of the country.
Itutlcr mill Grunt.
from tho Memphis Argus.
Gen. Butler has announced his intention
to answer that portion of Gen. Grant's re
port relating to his campaign. So the
Licutcnant-Gcncral had better drop his ba
ton, pack liis trunk, and join Maximilian.
If tho late commander at Bermuda Hun
dreds had announced his intention to resort
to pistols and coffee, m vindication of his
representation, there would have been no
necessity lor alarm, jus career as a iignter
lias not been remarkably brilliant, as Gen
eral Grant broadly intimates. He will not
shine in history with Napoleon, or Gresar,
or Grant, Sherman, or Lee, as a military
hero ; but ho is not the least formidable an
tagonist with the quill. Though no fighter,
he is a writer, and can as nearly torture
words into proving that black is white as
any one. True as arc Grant's charges, But
ler will make out a case of some sort thai
will look plausible, and find a large number
of gourd-heads to believe it. Butler is noisy
and smart, a noisy man is never at a loss for
men to sneeze when he takes snuff. There
is a large class in this country never happy
savo when dancing attendance on fussy poli
ticians redolent of brass and money. As
Gen. Butler has a large share of both, he
will not lack backers in abundance.
Butler is playing a dcsicratc gamo for
the Presidency, and evidently regards pul
ling Grant down a sure method of pushing
himself up. If he can persuade a consider
able portion of tho .Radicals that General
al Grant has treated him badly, a valuable
point will have been gained ; for he will
rally around his standard the entire Itadi
cal Lost, who arc even now displeased at the
Lieutenant General's political non-committalism.
So wc may have a cnisado from
Gen. Butler, whose vigor and "strategy "
will cause many in the North to wonder
why the same agencies were not employed
in his military campaigns.
The Indiana Senate has defeated the bill
so amending the State Constitution as to
strike out tho 13th article, prohibiting ne
groes from entering the State
A writer in Blackwood says: "When
people want to speak of a native of Holland,
they call him an Amsterdam Dutchman ;
but when they speak of the German race
generally, they leave out the Amstcr."
Trenlmcut of the Kcitli.
From the New York World.
The Democratic party have always main
tained that the mere exertion of military
force indispensable as that became would
never suffice to restore the Union. Certain
it is, in the light of events, that war has not
sufficed to restore the Union ; and the main
question of debate, eight months after its
close, U, whether restoration is yet practi
cable. Could there be a more 'conclusive
demonstration that war alone could not
accomplish the purpose for which the late
war was undertaken ? The mere mili
tary success of the war is not and never
was the point in question. Thai has been
complete and overwhelming; but to pros
trate resistance was not the ultimate object
of the war, only a means. Is that object
attained? If so, why is Congress about to
organize with a thin! of the States excluded
from their representation ? Why docs our
rrmy, in time of peace, number two hun
dred thousand men, scattered through the
South keeping watch and ward? Why is
the whole country 1-ending eagerly toward
Washington, listening for what the President
is about to say on the great topic of restora
tion N ny is every Heart among us filled
with misgiving ? men on one side fearing
that the President will favor the restoration
of unsubdued and incorrigible enemies; and
on the other, that his healing and concilia
tory policy will be baffled by a recalcitrant
Congress ?
The Union, as yet, is not restored ; prac
tically the whole country admits that the
Democratic party were right in maintaining
that war alone could never restore it. Wc
have paid this appalling price for goods
vhich, when sent to our door, wc reject as if
reeling wuii uiu uimcs oi a pcsi-liouse.
What have wc got to show for our enor
mous expenditure? A Union restored and
confidence re-established? 2sol The Union
remains to be restored by statesmanship ami
moderation, which, as the Democratic party
always contended, might have prevented its
dissolution. What, then, have we got, as
yet, as the fruit of our mighty efforts? Count
the grave', and see! Beckon up the crip
ples, and behold! Go into the markets; ak
tho prices of food, fuel, laimcnt and learn !
Consider our debt of three thousand millions,
add to it twice as much more for production
arrested and projicrty destroyed, and tell us
what this enormous sacrifice was for. What
have we got to show for it?
If wo are to believe the statement'' of the
Republicans, we havo got an Ireland, a Po
land ! We have merely extended our do
minion over a people not fit to be admitted
into our councils. Wc aro guaranteeing re
publican government (that is what they call
it !) by excluding States from representation.
So far from having restored the Union, the
"Union party" (Union party !) contend that
the restoration of the L'nionis the very worst
thing that could happen, as yd.
Against this doctrine tho Democratic
party, trusting that they have Provident
Johnson with them, protest. They believe
there has been no moment since the out
break of the late bloody and fratricidal war
when the restoration of tHe LTnion was not
desirable. After the firing on Sumter, war,
was indeed inevitable ; but we have been
compelled to use the maximum of force be
cause we exerted the minimum of statesman
ship. The war was so managed as to keep the
South united and resolute so long as they
had any resources, making the acquisition
as expensive, and the country when reac
quired as worthless, as any conceivable me
thod could have made them. That, however,
is past, and cannot be helped. But is there
any necessity for conlinuinn the snirit of the
old method, and making the government of
the country wc have reacquired as nnropub
lican and expensive, and the restoration of
the Union as late and long-deferred, as bv
any kind of management is possible?
hen Preidcnt Johnson came into office.
he adopted for the restoration of the Union,
the kind of means which the democratic
party have always contended were indispen
sable. He manifested great kindness of spirit
toward the South ; ho defended their assail
ed rights ; he stood as a bulwark between the
Southern States and the tide of radical fana
ticism and vengeance. The effect was won-
lerful ! It was liko the fabled contest be
tween the wind and sun to get oil' the trav
eller's cloak. While the storm was making
its trial, tlie man hugged his garment all the
closer in proportion to its violence. But
when the sun's turn came, and the sun pour
ed down his meridian efi'ulgcnce on the pil
grim, assailing him with genial warmth, he
he put off the cloak of his own accord. Thus
it was with the South, when President John
son treated them with generous magnanimi
ty, lo the astonishment ot everybody, they
became as ready to return to the Union as
they had been eager to quit it. The radi
cals growled, and revived their old policy.
The storm rcassailcd the traveller, and sun
and wind were struggling together for the
mastery. If the radicals prevail, he will
bethink him again of his cloak ; or to speak
without figure, if the South is treated as the
radicals demand, the old hostility will be
revived, and pacification is as far off as ever.
If the Kadieals arc to be believed, the war
is not only a failure in respect to the restora
tion of the Union, hut even in respect to
what thev mot glory in the abolition of
slavery. The Union, they say, cannot yet
be restored, because slavery is, as yet, abol
ished only in name, not in fact. They con
tend that, until the freedman has the elec
tive franchise, he is as much a slave as ever;
that reunion is not to be thought of until the
negro is a voter. But no Itadical can lc
crazy enough to deny that the measure in
question tends, above any other that could
be thought of, to dissatisfy and exasperate
the white population of the South. What
ever else may be said of it, it is not a mea
sure of conciliation. To insist upon it is the
most certain means to embitter and alienate
the white population of the South, and ob
struct the restoration of the Union. Among
all the eccentricities of politics, the ah-mrd-"
est ever witnersed is a so-called " Union
party" whose watchword is. that the Union
shall not be restored.
o iT Opinion.
A correspondent of a Northern paper
savs :
" It is difficult to convey, bv words, an
adequate idea of the intensity of the rage
with which the Republican party of the
Northwcr't regard the recent course of Presi
dent Johnson, and the policy he has adopt
ed. During a recent visit to Chicago and
Wisconsin,! had an opportunity of seeing
the manifestation of this feeling in various
aspects, not from the press alone, but from '
the pulpit aiul in social life. The revulsion
of feeling which has taken place in Wis
consin and Northern Illinois, during the
past four months, is perfectly wonderful.
At the time that Mr. Johnson "succeeded to
the Prcsidcv, I heard grave elders, and
deacons and ministers there declare that they
could sec the hand of God in the removal of
Mr. Lincoln, because they feared he would
have been too lenient toward the South, and
that God had raised up Mr. Johnson to be
the Joshua in the place of the gentle Moses
who had departed.
Mr. Johnson's little finger -was to be
thicker than Mr. Lincoln's loins so far as
harsh measures towards the South were con
cerned. How changed arc the notes of these
same ministers and deacons now ! Two
weeks ago I heard one of these political
teachers, in his Sunday morning speech lo
his corgregation in the temple of God, com
pare the President to the wicked kings of
Israel who cause the ancient people of God
to wander after strange gods, and to give
point to his discourse, he read that chapter
of the Old Testament which denounces curses
upon tho Israelites because they had not
rooted out anu utterly aesiroyea inc innam
tants of the land which they had conquered;
and tho application of his discourse was
that now that God had delivered the inhabi
tants of the land which wc had conquered
into our hands, that if wc ditPJnot extermi
nate them, wc ought at lcajt never to admit
them to a participation in the rights of citi
zenship, until they consent to admit the ne
groes to a full participation in tho same
rights. And he warned his hearers that the
judgments of God would be visited upon us
if we do not cut down the groves and break
all the images in all the land that wo liad
conquered ; that is, if wo dirl not soot out
and abolish all the old established customs
and forms of worship at the South, and sub
stitute, instead, the Episcopal and Catho
lic and Baptist and Methodist Churches of
the North. Three or four months ago he
said, strong efforts had been made to root
out the false teachings of the Sooth, and to
supply the Southern Churches with godly
men from New England and from the Chicago
Theological Seminary. But in an evil
hour President Johnson had ordered that
good work to be gtopjied, and the. Southern
Churches were agam in the hands of the
Southern people.
Well Sahl.
From the Richmond Time.
We are very much obliged to those gen
tlemen who have como South to set the mo
rals of our negro txipulation right, and teach
them the advantage of matrimony and chas
tity. Ilicyliavcan up-hill, arduous wcr&
before them but doubtless it is a labor of
love, and they ask not either gold or silver
lor their reward. e, in our humiilc way.
and according to our light, for many years
last, havo endeavored to christianize and
civilize them, and vainly imagined, until wc
were taught better, that wc were doing our
duty to tins legacy that had been forced
upon us in spite of all resistance, and had
somewhat improved them in contrast with
their forefathers on the Guinea coast, or
their cotcmporaneous relatives at the court
of the King of Dahomey. But it seems wc
were mistaken, and a host of strong-minded
women and weak-minded men have, at the
risk of their health, and leaving luxurious
homes, emigrated to this missionary, impo
verished land to set things straight. But,
while we are didy thankful and " very hum
ble," it is not very pleasant for us to read in
the Northern journals, of the Kadical per
suasion, letters from these amiable mission
aries, describing our fellow-citizens as un
mitigated heathens, and painting the hand
some residences which, in our gratitude, wc
have furnished them, as little better than
hog pens. The very love feasts at our Afri
can churchci they make fun of, mil call
them barbarous. Now, this is not agreeable
not pleasant. It may be sport to them,
but it is death to our feelings. And wo feel
very much like tho sinner, who paid his
qua'rtcr to see " Death on the Pale Horse,"
and afterwards remarked that it might be a
very delightful picture for Christians, but ho
did not like it.
Wc wonder that our friends do not recol
lect the old saying that "Charity begins at
home" and with that, the fact of the hun
dreds of homeless wanderers in the Northern
cities the thousands of "unfortunates" who,
in wretchedness of soul and body, roam their
streets at night and show their painted, hag
gard faces each morning to, the police magis
trate the sin and shame that blaze forth in
their own land and blacken the palaces on
Fifth Avenue and Madison Square, or deso
late some quiet New England homo among
tho hills of the Housatonic or by the banks
of the Mcrrimac crime that would para
lyze the pen of a Parisian Feuilletonist, and
which carries us back to the Dark Ages. We
might tell these missionaries of aca-e of in
eest among good, pious, respectable and weal
thy people in the city of New York where
one of the parties had built a Sunday School
and the other taught in it where a husband
is charged with procuring an abortion on his
wife and then forming a liasion with the
abortionist and where the wife of a Bishop
is an miiKirtant witness for the plamtitl, and
the Rev. Dr. Tyng's chief fugleman, appears
on the side of the defence, as confessor for
the adulterer. But wc shut our eyes in hor
ror from tho scene of noor humanity's frail
ties and abominations, with sad anil not ex
ultant lecling.
There are other similar cases now filling
the columns of some of our Northcn ex
changes, which though not fit " to adorn a
moral, yet might point a talep but wc
forbear, lest wc shock our readers. Wc have
no inclination to draw invidious and boast
ful comparisons, for virtue, like beauty and
bravery, is not peculiar to any people or any
clime. The following quotation, from that
able, conservative paper, the Cincinnati En
quirer, may remind the missionaries of some
things they sceni to have forgotten that
while they are, after their own fashion, ele
vating the African to a level with the Cau
casian of the South, they may be neglecting
their own whites at home. The Enquirer re
marks :
" While we havo been fixinc tho domestic rela
tions of the South our own have fallen into dis
order. If any of our suh'crihers are inclined to
tho perilous amusement of reading tho reports of
tho great Eastern divorce cases, woheg them to
read, also, in tho same connection, tho reports of
our philanthropic niisiion.iric touching tho suc
cess they have had in inducing tho frecdmen and
women to enter into tlie holy state, or matrimony.
Hero it is that our nohlc chnritios appear in their
mot tlorid apcct. There is nothinglikothc mar
riage ceremony to cicyate and rclinc tnc colorou
persons.
Iiry Hones A I'rnctlcnl Kiihjeei.
From the Richmond Times.
Wc do not profess to have that genius
which "can impart eloquence to dry bones,"
(as was once said ,f the present learned Pro
fessor of Anatomy at the University of Vir
ginia,) but we have something to say about
them for the bencht ot our country readers,
who are so liberally patronizing our semi-
weeklv paper. i e do not allude to the
bones of buried valor, now mouldering in
the hchl3 and forests or irginia ; sacred be
their repose ! and let none speak or write of
them save in charity and honor. But wo re
fer to the bones of that countless multitude
of horses and cattle which followed man in
his war-path with dumb submission, and in
mute and uncomplaining resignation, yield
up their lives on every road, by-path nml
field of the South. Go where you will on
any of our roads which traverso the area of
active hostilities, or which were selected as
the routes for the march of armies, and tho
traveller will think that he is entering that
valley of dry bones spoken of by Ezckicl, the
propfict. In a distance of ten miles, in an
adjacent county, on a road passed over by
the wagon tram of General Grant's army
and the cavalry of General Sheridan, can be
counted, even at this late day, the bleaching
skeletons of more than one hundred horses.
Their skulls were very generally resorted
to, during the pxst summer, by wrens .and
tomtits, for the purposes of incubation ; and
by wasps, hornets and humble-bees, who
seemed to regard them as very eligible
quarters, and, no doubt, considered them as
very saio ami convenient repositories lor
their nests. A little off from the road, where
the slaughter-pens of the trooi)3 were located,
are the myriad bones of butchered cattle,
whitening the ground for acres around. The
description which we have given is true, and
applicable to all of the war-fields and mili
tary roads of the South.
There is wealth and usclulncss m tins
great harvest of bones, and it should be gath
ered. Collected, ground up and reduced to
dust and powder, there is more value in a ton
of these bones for agricultural purjioses, than
in a ton of Peruvian guano. Jion&t aro
nearly wholly composed of the Phosphate of
Lime, an clement indcspcnsible to every
productive Foil, and which, from its scarcity
.as a natural product, our lands arc unfortu
nately, very deficient in. And yet all soiU
must"iosscM it, and no crops can be made in
its entire absence. But this is not. the only
valuable feature of the bones. Phosphate of
lime is the chemical results of the union of
phosphoric acid and lime; and phosphoric,
acid is coiniK)cd of certain projKirtions of
, X I I
phophorus anu oxygen. ow, piiospnoms
is comparatively rare in nature, and is never
found as a simple, uncombincd substance.
As an ingredient of bones, it is more abun
dant in this form than elsewhere in Nature,
and all our supplies are obtained from this
source. It is very valuable in the arts for,
liesidcs its value in the manufacture of luci-
fer matches, there are many other usps to
which it is applied. The supplies of it are
limited, and it commands enormous prices;
being generally hold by the ounce. As it
combusts spontaneously in the air, it has to be
kept in water.
The value of the bone crop will now be
appreciated, in view of what we have snid.
Wc hojc our farmers will not neglect their
interests in this matter. Our own opinion
is, that any man who starts vigorously and
Ixildlv into the bone business, will get rich.
While upon this subject of bones, we will
add a few words about manure, which we
liope will be of interest and service to our
agricultural friends. The value and ini
lortance of this agent entitle it to the dig
nity of a science, as tho extent and variety of
its sources, should justly rank it among the
arts.
The science of manures is but little under
stood or appreciated among us. With small
free labor farms, and the consequent neces
sity fo rich lands more attention will here-
. - .. . ., r- . I . 1
after be paid to manures in wie-aouin, man
heretofore. We are vastly behind the io
plc of Eurotw, and of the North, in the econ
omy and administration of manures to our
exliausted soils. In Europe nothing is al
lowed to be lost, that can enrich land. Not
an ounce of hman excrement or urine is
permitted to cscaic, and .the manure of
horses is even carefully collected from the
highways.
Jn a recent number of The Grunlry Gen
tleman, a capital agricultural patr, full of
interesting matter, is a very useful and sug
gestive article on manure, which jioinU out
the method of its creation and accumula
vTpl
farmers studied more the science of tho ma
nures, and understood the art.
tion. Every acre of wood land, every ditch,
decaying log and wood pile is compelled to
rt Ua tribute to the soil. ould that our
THE CI.OS1XCJ St'EXl
BV T. B. READ.
(The following is pronounced by tho HWmWtr
Jleview to be unquestionably tho finest American
poem ever written.
Within the sober realms of leafless tree.
The russet year inhaled the dreamy air :
Like some tanuod reaper in hii hour f ease.
When all tho fields aro lying brown and bare.
The cray b.irns looking from their hasy hills.
u er me uun waters Triiientns m too vale.
Sent down tho air a creetinsr to the mills.
On tho dull thunder of alternate Hails.
All siehts wcro mellowed, and all .Aand.sublued.
Tho hills seemed 'further and the stream saiw
low.
As in n.droam tho distant woodman hewed
His winter los. with many a muQlcd blow.
The embattled forests, cro whilo armed with cold.
Their banners orient with every martial hue.
2ow stood like some sad. beaten ho?t ofohl.
Withdrawn afar in Tirao's remotest blue.
On sombre winej tho vulture tried his (Hsht j
The dove scarce heard his sichine mate's com
plaint; Anil, like a starslow itrowntiuc in the light.
The villaco church vano seemed too l:tle and
faint.
Tho sentinel cock upon tho hilMde erew
Crow thrieo and all was stiller than l.ofure;
Silent, until somo replying warder blew
His alien horn, and then wus heard no moro.
Where erst the jay within the elm's tall crest,
.Made itarrulom trouble round her uiitledrod
yonns:
And where the oriolo hunir her swny inir nest,
Ry every licht wind like a centre srrung ;
Where sane tho noisy martins of the ene.
The busy swallows circling ever nenr
Forbediinr. as tho rustic mind helieri.
An early.harvest and a plenteous year;
Whcro every bird that waked tho vernal feast.
Shook the sweet slumder from its wings at
mom :
To warm the reaper of tho rosy Inst :
All now jvas sunless, empty aad fotl&m.
Alone, from out tlie stubble, piped the nuail :
And croaked the crow through all tho dreary
gloom;
Alone, the pleasant, drumminr in the vale.
Made echo in tha distant cottage loom.
Thero was no bud. no bloom upon the bowers :
The spiders moved their thin shrouds by night.
The thitlc-dwn, the only shost of flowers.
Sailed slowly by passed noiIessly out ofsitht.
Amid all this in this most dreary air.
-And where tho woodbine shrwl upon the porch
Its crimson leaves, as if the year stood there.
Firing the floor witljits inverted toreh.
Amid all this the centre of the scene.
The while-haired matron, with monotonous
tread.
Plied the swift wheel, and wifli her joyless mein.
Sat like a file, mid watched the tlyinc thread.
She had known sorrow he had walked with her.
Oft supped, and broke with her the ashen crust;
And in tho dead leaves still she heard the stir
Of his thick mantle trailing in theduot.
While yet her check was bright w!th summer
Her country snmmnncd and she save her nil ;
And twice war bowed to her his satdo puiin.
u tuv liiusnuiu iu iuh Ulm llie Willi.
He-cavo the sword, but not the hand that drew
Ami struck for liberty the djinij blow ;
Jnr hun.wlm, to his sire ami country true.
Fell mid the ranks of the invading toe.
liontr. but not loud, the drooping wheal went on,
lake the low murmur ofa hive ut noon :
Long, but not loud, the memory of theono
llreathed throned her liin n Kid awl tremulous
tone.
At lat the thread was mapped her head was
bowed.
Life dropped tho distaff through her hands
serene.
And loving neighbors smoothed her careful
shroud,
Whilu death and winter closed the autumn
scene.
AUIIICUITUKAjL,
Influences) ofSnlt upon Ihc Grmvtli or
Allium!.
Large Men of Vermont, Ohio ami Kentucky
I'hysical Degeneration of the Women of
America.
From the Country tlentlcman.
The Massachusetts Hoard of Agriculture
held a two daws' meeting laid winter at
Greenfield, for thediacussion of matters con
nected with the subject of agriculture, and
for the deliver- of lectures.
Durinir the discussions l'rofewor Aira.-siz
said that locality should be tnken into ac
count in the selection of breeds of cattle. lie
had noticed that the cattle were small in
alpine and granite districts, and large in
limestone and marlisu sections, p.vcry pom
in Jura contained lime water, and the cuttle
there drank in bones and growth. He never
took care of a cow, and didn't know how to
feed one; but as a physiologist, if he wanted
size, he should mix crushed lime or chalk
in their feed, and thus give them something
to build upon, &c.
liiesc statements open an interestine; held
for some general remarks and comments rc
latiiiK not only to the jrrowth and wcll-Iioinir
of animals, but men.
Influence of mil vmn the Grotrlh of Ani
mals. There arc no doubt many thousands
of acres of the freestone lands of New Eng
land that have been in grass almost from
time immemorial, that have been so tar c.x-h.m-ded
of the little lime they once con
tained as to leave an inadequate supply for
the building up of the frames of the animals
reared upon them. This deficiency of Iione
lorming material may some time manliest
itself only in the dwarfed appearance of the
animals, without any evident signs of dis
ease; in some instances, however the defi
ciency is so great that young animals become
weak in "their frames, and manifest a great
desiro for bones, which they will chew for
hours. Ihese cases require an immediate
remedy, and ground bones are often fid
with beneficial effects, and 1 as I'rofessor
Agassiz stUTKcsts, the mixing of crushed limo
or chalk with their food may answer the
same imrnntc. nut winlc these lands liavc
parted with their lime by long continued
cropping, it is not probable that tncy are
equally wanting in the other ingredients cs
tontial to the building up of the muscle as
well as the bone of the animals reared
upon them? This being the fact, then, and in
order to render the cure permanent and the
farming profitable, the remedy should be ap
plied to the laud, not only in the application
of lime, but of such other cnrichingmatcrials
as will improve the crops generally. Nature
never intended that animals should be fed
on crushed bones or lime to furnish the
material to build up their frames, but the
supply should come from nature's laboratory
in the well fed crot of crass anil irniin. The
alpine and cranite districts alluded to no
doubt arc not only deficient in lime, but the
essentials generally ofa good sou ; hence the
cattle reared in these districts will nocatsnrily
be small. The Devon and the smaller breeds
of cattle are adapted to the soil and climate
of New England, while the Durham, or short
liom, hnds a paradise in the luxuriant hold
of Kentucky. Tho impression has provnil
cd that the celebrated blue grass of Kentucky
was a variety iicculinr to tnat particular
locality, when, in fact, it is simply the com
mon June blue grass jiretenti) of our
door yards. It is owing to the remarkable
depth and richness of the soil of some six or
eight of the central counties of Kentucky,
in which this grass grows in the greatest ier
fection. that raves the name to that section
of the State .is the "Uluo (iratts IJegion."
The geological character of this section of
Kentucky is very remarkable and interest
ing. Tho soil is two or three feet deep, reel
ing upon a foundation of hwiiirerous lime
stone. Its average depth below thesarmee
is about six feet. It abounds in organic re
mains, and by the constant action of time is
undergoing a rather rapid disintegration,
thus bcin;: a source of inexhaustible fertility
to the soil. Perhaps in no country in the
world can a moro pcrfeet and lasting soil be
found. It contains not only an abundant
supply of lime, hut all the oilier elements
essential to the most produetivesoil. I have
said that the limestone of this section of
Kentucky lies at an average depth of six or
eight feet liclow the surface, Iwt there is
hardly n. farm on which it does not crop out
in a number of places, trencrally on'tlic face
of the Southern slopes. This done li(KjipJ
thin strati, anu ltirnuuitu a very cheap anu
easily wrought material for any amount 6f
fence required.
JJr. ltobcrt J'ctcr, ol Jexinxton, connected
with the late geological survey of the .Stat,
who has analysed several hundrad siiecimerM
of soils, minerals, waters, grain, Ac, fur
nishes some very interesting facts for the
fanners. Among thoc numerous analyst
two panicles of Indian com were submitted
to chemical tests. One sample was grown
upon the Koret land in one of tIje"xorw.t
counties in the State; and tha othcrTras th
product of the rich bloc crass land of Pay
ette county, near Lexington. Tlie object of
ii.e aii;inii asw ui'ii-rniiiiu uiu inherence
in the nuitritirc quality of the two samples,
and alro to ascertain how much more largely
the corn grown upon the strong limeetonc
land of Fayette would iMtrtake of the mia
eral or inorganic constituents of the soil,
than that which was produced on the :joor
land. The result proved that the corn
grown ujon the Fayette land was richer by
a very considcrgblo pcrccntago in it fatten-
ing and nourishing, qualities than tho
sample- grown on the poor land, while
the analysis of the ash. showed an
equally largo percentage of the5 mineral fngre-
dients'in favor of the same, among which
were particularly named, potash, soda, lime,
magnesia, phosphoric acid, &e., S:c; This
proves a very important fact one, for my
own ivart, Ira not prepared to anticipate.
I lind previously supjiosed that tRc grain
grown upon any soil, however poor, would
be as rich in its organic and mineral consti
tutents as that grown upon the richest soils,
believing tho difference would be alone in
quantity, and not in quality. Such net be
ing the case, it prove to the farmer the
greater necessity of maintaining his land in
the best possible condition. In connection
with this subject, Dr. Peter, in speaking of
the character and quality of the soil of thi
section of the State, formed by the disinte
gration of the soft lavers of the bluo lime
stone of the lower Silurian epoch, remarks:
' I lwve often had occasion to admire the
luxuriant growth of the vegetables, and tho
rapid and twrfect development of tho ani
nmls raised upon it. Compared with these
of tha jxiorcr soil of some of the other geo
logical formations, the horsw, initios, hog,
cattle, and even men, and the cats and dogs,
seem to bo of Iarjter growth, and present a
much more thrifty and well-fed appear
ance." So far as it relates to domestic animals all
that Dr. Peters says is probably true. These
arc governed by instinct or the unerring
laws of nature while man is endowed with
resion, which too often fitib to govern his
appetites or pnons, and hence hi physi
cal condition is impaired by violation of
these laws.
Lirgs Men of Wetiern 1 erase, Ohia ami
Kenhieiy. Dr. O. AW Holrac tho distin
guished poet and author, also endorses the
lifriestdP' theory. Ho soys: "In Kentucky,
Ohio and 'Western Vermont, men grew to
largo sixe because of tho limestone fiiram
tion under tho soil."
The character of the early Fettlers of
these countries, and tho habits of life which
it hey were necessarily coHitielled to adept,
had much more to ik with their physical
development than the limestone that un
derlies those States.
Kentucky was first settled by men from
Virginia, the hardiest among tho inhabitants
of that old commonwealth men who pe
seised unusual resolution and strength of
bodily constitution. They traveled seven or
eight hundred miles, without roads, through
an unbroken wilderness, inhabited only by
wild beasts and savage Indian. Men of
such a stamp, arriving in a new and per
fectly wild country, were compelled to adopt
the most simple ami most natural habits
of life, living in .veil ventilated cabins,
and wliose daily bill of Hire wiw corn broad
and tho wild meat of the country, and with
an abundance of labor in the opon air. These
simple habits of life, practised Jiy such a
hardy stock, could not fail to givo to their
iitlspriiiK great siie ami the most perfrct
physical development. Tluw for two gene
rations the men of Kentucky surpataeil in
size anil physical endurance thoee ef any
other" State. But at this time bt a few of
these large men are to be seen a mere rem
nant of a former generation remain.
The standard of siio now in Kentucky, I
believe, will fall below that of Ohio, a much
older State. Tho change in the labor and
habits (if life among the jieoplo of Kentucky,
auiee its early settlement, lifts been very
groat. Tho rapid increase of slavery and its
attendant evils, and the adoption of easy awl
luxurious habits of life, shave changed the
whole physical aspect of the people.
In a report of the statistics of Ohio, fur
nished by tho commissioner, Mr. Mansfield,
some interesting facta are given, but tlie pres
ent length of this article will only admit of
a brief extract : J he average iieigut ot uie
men in the interior of Ohio is live feet ten
and a half iuehes, five inches aliove tlmt of
the Belgians, two and a halfinchcs above that
of the English recruits, ami one and a lialf
inches above that of the Scotch Highlanders.
Of the two hundred ami thirty-nine indivi
duals taken promiscuously formoaeuroment.
fifty-nine, (one-fourth,) were six feet and
upwards, ton being above six feet two inches.
The great size of the Vernionter niny safely,
I think, be attributed to the character of the
countiy nnd clinmt, w!iidh aru fuvnmhld to
industry and simple habits of living.
Physical Degmernlitm of II Wen in America.
But while well developed men may be
found in certain portion of the country, it
is a fact sustained by actual meastirotMuls
that the women of America aro inferior in
in size and physical health to European
women and there are too paluftble evidence
of a continued decline in this respect. TheMi
evidence are more manifest in the older
States, and in the large cities. The qmstiou
mnv be aiked, why are American women so
delicate? It may be answered that they live
too much in doors ; many of them take too
little exercise, while others are compelled to
take too much exercise in confined and III
vcntilntcd amrtmentii. Tho English women
aro much moro hardy than those of
America. Physical exercise form an
important part of the education of glrla in
England, while in America it is almost en
tirely neglected. In England all clnwe of
society tako exerciso in the open air ; even
the nobility pay great attention to this
requisite tohealtli. Without healthy women
wo cannot havo strong hardy men. Take
the statistics of the large cities, say Boston,
Now York and Philadelphia, and compare
the births from native tmrents with tho-Hj of
foreign origin, and we shall find a very Inro
per centage in favor of the foreign, and again,
compare tho number of deaths among tho
children, the native with the foreign, and a
large per centage will be found with the
American children. The greatest good at
the country demands a reform in the haMts
and physical education of the young, ami
particularly among the females. TlieqHes
tion is, how is it to be brought about ?
A "Wasiiixotox Mbdai. I't'noiiAKi
rno:.t tub "Indian. Major General John
B. Sanborn, when in St. Loui a few days
ago, showed im quite a relic of antiquity,
winch he procured from an Indian chief, at
the council at the month of the Little Ar
kansas, and for which lie gave a horse worth
$HJ3. It was a silver mtslal about tlx
inches long and four inelies wide, of an oval,
shape; on one side were the words in a cir
cle, " (1. Washington, President, to Young
King," with two figures, one with an Indian
Kith his tomahawk thrown on the ground,
and in his hand a pije, handing It to the
other figure, intended to represent a white
prince, with a crown 'hi hi head; at the
iKittom was the date 1780. On the otherwdc
was a representation of a shield and eagle ;
In one claw nu a bunch of arrows, in the
the other a twig; over the hewl of the eagle
were twelve stars ami the wordd " United
States of America,'' Iwt no motto. Bvery
thing about the medal nhowed it aiteient
origin ; the letters were old-feshionul, and
the representation of the eagle was unnattt
ml ami awkward, stick a a boy would now
draw none of the life-like expression that
the eagle has on the coin now evidently
the work of other days, when etMrraving was
not in its present degree of perfection ; but
seveiity-cix years make quite an improve
ment in the utecltanieal art.
ViiK Oilornl Tetmemnm, apaperpttlittehed
by tlie negroe in Nahvillt ways :
" U'e MHt sect that eveiy mUtHMmHtttmT,
wHetttr licrman, irub, ot wklcvr aMHiMWy
has tar trt laims opon the Ooverasaeftt UMn we,
whn are sutive Ut lit manor Wo.' "
That is a nut for our foretgn-bra dtfswns
to crack. The (.iorttl Ttnnemmn ean add
that ' its claims upon the Government" are
duly acknowledged at AVachingies, and the
authorities) .ire doing more for its eater than
for any white men of any nativity, foreign or
American. Practically, this U in the main
essentially more a government for tb o
tection of negroes than that of Jamaica or
King Dahomey. Eight or ten millions whites
are directly oppressed in the South and
thirty million indirectly in the North, for no
other purpose titan to take care ef the lirter
estl of the negro. AH Congressional legis
lation is aimed at that. The white man k
ill variably districted awl the negro trusted.
Jllis eeler" is received as conclusive evidene
of his ileserviiig protection awl security. If
he i anxious for a negro government, hehns
it here. True, he thWt "it in the national
councils but he rule tketa. The (Ximctd
Tnmeiftui can not only boast of its cWms,
but Jheir acknowledgment. He is under a
negro government. Ismimiti CbertV.
Mn. Piausn of New York, has jm pre
!ented to the work! twoutaeter inec -t art,
iin the. lltsWgmpiwil portraite yf the' -
ebrated tottUtem (Jesters!, ume w
son.
Mn General 15, B. Lee he W h faun
lof oighthniidwlaemsnasw NarwstoB, W
Dr. Drcwry, of JtkhoKd, 3i,WW.
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