OCR Interpretation


Nashville union and dispatch. [volume] (Nashville, Tenn.) 1866-1868, April 23, 1867, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038521/1867-04-23/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Louisville "and Nashville
THE
RAI1E O A..
UNION AND DH!i
. ,
aUICK TIME TO
ST. LOUIH, .
CIIIOAGO.V -
Ay CINCINNATI,
AND THE EAST.
o Dully TlirotiffliTrnln,, Makliic
lrir( Connection at Loutarllle rr
;thc Enwt, Wtl nuil' North.
COMMENCING. JANUARY 27, 1867.
Trains will run as fellowi:
-
. - ' 5a. S.
No. 4.
Leave Nashville
.MX) AM
240 P M
3:35 PM
5:15 1 iu
WEST AKD NORTH
No. 1. No. 2. No. 3.
LeaveLouisvllleMr30'P M 9:30 PM CiJOA
Arrive Ind'nap'lls-iOO P M 4:16 A M I2i5P w
Arri VefChJcaroWJOiO "A M 'RIO P M 10:10 P M
M tit. Lout. :30A M 1:00 PM 1:45 AM
EAST.
AO, I.
No. 2.
Leave LQUttttlle
Arrive at Indianapolis
" (lacinnati
" " OTeveland
" Buffalo
" & PJlUburg
" " Baltimore
" " Washington
" " PKIladeFphia
" " New York
" " Rotten
lJO P M 9:30 P M
7:00 P M 4:15 A M
1VJSH P M 0:15 A M
0:15 A M 3.50 P M
IdS P M 10:40 P M
'10-jS A M 90 P M
12fJU A M 1:00 P M
12:40 A M Ii20 P M
7:00 A M 1-45 P M
fetO P M
JT-Steatncrs of U. S. Mail Line leave Louis
ville dally at 10 a.m. and 4 r. v.. arriving-in
Cincinnatijn tiraetotako early morning train
for the Hast." ,
Passenger ear attached- to freight train
Leavea-Franklin, Ky., at7$09 a, and Gallatin
at 9-30 a. W., arriving, in NasbvlU MltW a. m.
Leaven Nashville at 3:10 r. u arrive at Galla
tin GHJU r- Mandat Prankllnfipfl'rM.
alijert fink,
General Superintendent L. k N. R. R.
dee9
Nashville and Chattanooga
R A I Xj R O A D.
CHANGE OF TIME.
ftnily Tralim I.cnvo NiihIhIIIp
VnliltiKmi, New York, nml
Two
for
nil PolnfM ilnsi niil Noiilh. CIoc
CoiuirrlioiiH Mario nt Clintin
iiookii Mornlwc nnri Eve
nine: fr EnMorn niitl
Honlhern CI 1 1 ph.
OrrtcKor Oknkkai. SurrniXTRNDRx
NDKXT. )
ia Railroad,
...Ian. 27. 1807.)
NAHIIVIM.K A UllATTANOOQ
Nashville, Icnn
ON AND AFTER MTNDAY, JAN. 27,
IKB7, and until further notlco, Passenger
trains will run an followi :
Lcavo Nashville for Washington. New "ioric,
Atlanta, M aeon, Montgomery, Augu.to, Savan
Dah, New Orlcani raid Mobile at 5:00 a. w. and
fxOC r. u.. arriving in Chattanooga at 2:00 a. w.
and 3:60 r. .: both Trains inakinc close con-
Sectlons at Chattanooga with Host Tenncssco Si
oonria and Western A Atlantic Railroad
Trat&t. Returning;, leave Chattanooga at 7:40
a. x. and 7:40 v. u.. upon arrival of K. T. & (la.
and W. A A. Trains, arrivinc in Nashville at
4:30 A. M.and 4:30 r. M.
riospiiit ;inlnrc NIp-Iiic CnrM on nil
Night I'ttHMPiiifcr Trnlnt.
SiotLtiTviLi.E AccoMonTios Leaves Shcl
livrillo 20 a. m. acd 12:50 r. u., arriving in
Naxhvilio 11:10 a. m. and 4:30 r. m. Leaves
Nashville for Shclbyville 6:00 a- w. and 5:00 r. ..
trnvine in Shclbyville ifcOO a. m. and 9:05 i: x.
Nnnhvlllo nml NorlliwtNlcrn Hnllroml.
Parsenokr Traim Leaves Nashville 3:00
p. m.; arrives at Johnsonville9:00 v. m. Leaves
Jobnsonrllle 4:00 a. m.; arrived at Noshvlle
10:00 A. M.
W. V. NNr.S, Oen'l Sui.'t,
iT. .t C. and N. W. R.
J. W. BROWN, Uen'l PaM Aeent.
ianai-tf.
R
NASHVILLE fe DECATUR
RAILWAY
Great Central All Eail Eouto
TO THK
SOUTH ASP' SOUTinYEST.
Two nnllj'ThroiiRli lnnpii(rorTrnlnt,
iunkluKli'vct coimoctloiis utlccn
turtvitli SIcnipIilN nml Clmrlcs-'
(on Rnllrond, for nil Volntw
Nontli nml Kouthwent.
Tlirongli to Memplils Without Change
or Cars.
c
10M M UN CI NO JAN UARY 27, 1S67, TRAINS
Will run as lollowa:
TRAINS SOUTH.
TRAIN SO 1. TttAIN NO. 2.
Leave Nashville.'
Arrfvo I)ecatur.w.
" Huntsville
" Corinth
.. 7rff Ak V. "OSO P. V.
,. 3(00 r. M. 246a. M.
- 7:48 p. M. 7:43 A. w,
.. 83 r.xr. 85 a.m.
.11 P.M. 114 A.M.
" Grand Junction
Memphis SMi.ll
P. M.
TRAINS NORTH.
NO. 1. NO. Z
Loavc Mempbi 7:00 r. u. 7:20 A. M.
Leave Huntsville .- 384. v. ls p. u.
Leave Dtwatur - 0:45 a. m. 0:45 p.ii.
Arrive Nashville 2:40 p. M. 2:40 A. V.
Train No. 2l8outh eennects at Pocatur for
Huntsville: at Corinth with Mobile and Ohio
R. R. lar Selraa, Mebllo and intermediato
points. Oenueets at flrand Junction with Miss.
Central R. R. fir New Orleans and intermediate
points. ,
Train No. 1 South ennnoets at Decatur for
Huntsville, Memphis and intermediate nomts.
Train No.2 Nerth connects at Nashville with
Louisville and Nashville Railroad, for the East,
North and Northwest 5 and with N. A C. and N.
N. W. and IS. A K. Railroads, for all poiuU
on those Hues. ,,,..., ...
Train No. 2 South and No. 1 North run daily
Train No. 1 South and No. 2 North run dally
except Sunday.
.Splendid Sleeping CarH A I
nehcd lo all Night Trains.
VlnmbIn Afcommoilnllon Trnln
Dnlly, x'ppt NtiiiilnyN.
Leaves Columbia nt. fi:8S a. m.
Arrives at Nashville at 9:00 A, M.
Leaves Nashville at 4KX P. M.
Airhca at Columbia at 0:7 p. M.
The OlumWft Accommodation Train will run
on the above time permanently from year to
year, except that in summer the time of depart
ure from Nashville will be frOB v. v.. imte.l or
4 00 r. M.
For through Ttekets nml other inrorBiation.
Please apply at the office of the Nashville City
aVarlsfer Oeiaimny. Nertheasi earner of Summer
and Chureh street, and nt tho Uroad Street
Depot, Nttstiville, Tennessee.
j. it. vax y.m;
jan27 Ueneral Superintendent
AND OTHKR VALI'AIILK PROPKUTY
j.rV P.KIVATE
IN Pl'lUSPANCK OP DUCRK1W
OF THK
- Oh
.Iumstv Court. I otler at private sale lion.
ollicnfTer's residwiceon High street;
The Royd McNalrv House, on Summer street;
And otW viiluable property,
l'artiw dwMrim: to purcaasemill be fully ln
foriaetl h to tnTUMi, etc., uin application to mo
at the Court House. . .
MORTON H. HOWKLU
fvhlo Olerk and Master.
ARMISTEAD & WOODS,
WHnLKll.K AM SKTtll IlKALKBS IN
Staple and Fancy Groceries,
xo. aa sqvaiie,
sashvil lk.
TN rTORE AND FOR SALF.. A CO.MPLKTK,
A varil Wid fresh stock of tjlaple ad Fancy
Owerie. wabraasoR Oaased Prirtts, tnserT.
ItBpHed Liquors. Cigars, aud all ilescnrtiena
ot Proserin lor domeeUe use. nrWi 11 ,
O ito.vn.
l. liitil furttiar wwn ,rir
nt obtain IkkvM at the iMlow ftg ptww t-oai
tKHce. No. 1'uWie M'r'A'SV.f""?:
.1 lAlnlitA IkltlltlltIC: i.l. K. v""
Drug Str. Obcrry Krectt
Cotnpnnj'e Ottiee,
South OoUeffe Mntct. The ra
tes are as jenenr..
Two TieVeU fr FUleen Cents.
S.r.n for Filtv Cents.
Kourtsou TleUeis tor One Dollar.
When iMnHMcra pay in Mie ears, the Tare WMI
l.e ten oMita, and the are aipecUal to uwke
their own tSisige. Ooaduetan ,wfll have fifty
cmii and ot,e deMar ikaKea of tiakeW tor sale
Mti ike r jt fa
DAVID HIOIIKS. PrawdMt.
J. S. ROBINSON. Secretary.
npr6 3tti Hl,.J;T.l
U.UUU wiU py te
Th.aaiijissiswaiiinisni: w
AmvcatUJpwlingUrecD.ifMX) AiAl
" "JlxwfTllle. 1:00 b'm
VO XXXIII,
iCl u i 0 tt ami xifxttk
A . ,
TVr.STAY, APKII.S3.
Ijirsest Circulation in City and State.
THE LATEST FR0JI MEXICO.
The HleKvaT luerelnro Tlic Liberals
rnscoiiHCMl In the jrouiitnliis Tlio
IinperlnllslH Still ICeci nu Ojicii Hour
Sftcculnf lon as lo t lie Final Result
air. 8cvrnrl'! JJIcsicnser Highly.
Intcrrfltlng: IctnIN.
From the Matamoras Rancliero, of tho 14th insL
The report of GeneTai Escobedo touch
ing a spirited engagement between the
Liberals and Imperialists at Queretaro on
the 1st itiBt., reached Matamoras yesterday
morning, and was published in the official
organ of that place. It seta forth in Bub
stance that, at live o'clock on the morning
of April 1st, the Imperialists marched out
of Queretaro and attacked the Liberal
Iioaition on the hill of San Gregor;o. At
first the Liberals gave way before superior
numbers, but upon beingreinforced repulsed
tho Imperialists with heavy loss to both
parties. The Imperialists were commanded
by Miramon, Alendez and Castillo; the
Liberals by Escobedo, Trevino and forly
one other officers. The engagement lasted
an hour and a half, and doubtless was hotly
contested. The charge, according to Esco-
bedo'a account, was a dashing affair. This
" report-prove! 'that'tli ImperialintBjarc-ottJ
xue ouensive, ana not pem up lnvuereiaro,
much lew reduced to the Plazar as a thou
sand Liberal very liberal falsehoods
have all along led us to believe was the
case. It is generally believed here that the
Liberals have sustained a defeat, but ac
cording to Escobedo'H account it fell to the
lot of the Liberals to bury the dead, which
it had taken them a whole day to perform.
DEMmiPTION OF Tim FIEL1.
A broad, open country stretches away
from Queretaro in the direction of the capi
tal. Surrounding the open country are
volcanic peaks and mountains. Among
these mountains no force or body of men
can be manoeuvred. In these mountains
are the Liberals. They are there fortified
by nature, aud could no more be dislodged
than could rabbits be dislodged from a
chaparral jungle. Surrounding the city of
Queretaro are several peaks occupied by
the Imperialists. On them batteries are bo
planted as to rake all approaches to the
city. Five miles to the west of the city is
the hill La Campana, in the centre of the
valley. From this peak the Imperialists
fire upon the Liberals whenever they show
themselves in the open country. North
of the city is the hill of La Cruz, also occu
pied by the Imperialists. Besides these
are many other peaks or hills, surrounding
Queretaro, which the Imperialists took
possession of some time ago, and fortified
them before tho Liberals advanced upon
the place. One of these fortified hills, San
Gregorio, the Liberals captured on the
night of the 11th ult.
DESTITUTION OF THE LIBERA. I.S.
The Liberals are in a slate of great des
titution. Theroldicrs are without shoes or
other clothing; without food, except com ;
are disorderly, disorganized and demoral
ized to an extent probably never before
known in any array of similar size. De
sertion is daily and hourly taking place.
The highways arc being infested by them.
The advanced lines of the Liberals are in
the very edge of the mountains, in half
circle surrounding Queretaro on the north,
cast and west, at a distance from the city
proper of four or five miles. Instead of
tho Liberals having the city besieged, the
Imperialists have laid siage to the moun
tains. The mouth opening in the rich
valley to the south of Queretaro Is solely
In the possession: of the Imperialists; and
though the Liberals claim to have twice,
the force of their antagonists, they cannot
be induced to risk a pitched battle.
COSPITIOJl OF THE IMPEUIAMSTS.
Queretaro is abundantly supplied wilh
water from wells, springs and streams. The
road toward the capital is in possession of
hc Imperialists, and is unmolcstedly used
by them, over which lo transport supplies
and maintain communication with the rich
country to the south.
"Vhether the Imperial army is in a
starving condition or not, it is certain that
the Liberals are in just that condition. If
the garrison of Queretaro cannot be speedi
ly starved into a surrender, the Liberals
will be compelled to raise the siege. Hut
a siege it cannot be called, for the Liberals
have not and cannot molest the road to the
capital without risking an engagement in
the open country.
iin. shwaud's swift MrsaFjjQEn.
The steamer Blackbird, which took out
Mr. While, Mr. Seward's swift messenger,
to Juarez, asking him to treat Maximilian
and Ins followers according to the laws of
war, if they fell into hu hands, got out of
coal, and had (o put into Hrazos, She is to
take the messenger to Tampico, whence ho
is to find his way through to the seat of
war, as well as he can.
Special Correspondence of tho N. 0. Picayune.
Brownsville, April 14. Maximilian
is in a tight place, and as certain as the sun
rises and sets long enough, they will have
him in a tighter place. lie may, and very
likely will, gain several victories over the
outlaw, but the price ho will have to pay
to his victims will soon bankrupt him. The
country, for a dozen ortwentymiles around
him, is full of Liberal warriors, and move
where he may, like a serpent hemmed in by
fire, he is certain to get scotched, and final
ly killed, lie is in a very hornel'ii nest,
and though he may slaughter by thousands,
he will surely be stung to death.
Up to this time the Imperialists have
been victorious in nearly every rencontre,
but they weaken with victory, and tho
Liberals gain strength with every defeat.
"Death to foreigners" is now the Liberal
battle cry, and they certainly mean all they
nay. And whether it is in Queretaro or
any other part of Mexico whether it be
this year or the next, a war upon all
foreigners has been inaugurated, and can
not stop until not a foreigner is left in that
lovely country.
The Liberal losses up to tho present time
have been heavy, many times greater than
the lo of the Imperialists. No general
engagement has taken or will take place be
tween the beligerents, but the fighting at
and around Queretaro is almost constant.
On several occasions the Imperialists have
attempted to bring on battle, but the wily
ravages ?calter before the solid columns
and then close in behind them. It is a
desperate, devilish, savage warfare. Not a
prisoner has yet been taken by the Liberals,
according to their own account, but that
Imperialists have taken many is in proof.
To-night the mail will bo in from
Monterey and the further interior, but
utile there ia a great ringing of bells,
firing of guns and general illumination,
the iiEwe will not be favorable to the.
Liberals. This infallible custom on the
receipt of good news has not been invoked
lncc the commencement of the Queretaro
siege. To tw who understand these things
such remissness of duty speaks volumes.
But this is not the only evidence extant
that the Liberals have fared badly in their
Sierra campaign. The express extraordi
nario can come from Queretaro here in
fixty hours, and when the Liberals gain
even a partial victory, it will be sure to
come through "in time." and its arrival be
heralded by the noisy bells. No such ex
press has yet come through. The gigantic
forts at Monterey are being dismantled,
and all the heavy guns are going forward
to sHetain the Queretaro siege. All the
Northern Moxico conscripts and other vol
unteer pftldiers are being pushed forward to
.the baltlc ground. These things show that
.Maxitnilinit is not so nearly taken In an
we are persistently led to believe is the
etue.
OK WsWCOp-jWit The Liberals are reticent to a degree bor
rt Hrii pte furl doriDfopn timidity and oowardlec. On lhe
eder. atX. lw,"Har baud , the Imjierial exiles here arc
rrflnt aW bold. But, for the life of mo,
I cannot see what ground there is to hope
for the success of the Imperialists, where
the whole countryhopposed tothem, orto
any of tlievernmj'narly.jTlMbrupon
it only aSwquestion of timvheff 'Maxj
milianiaJubnlPbther. fereignerssifTMexicb
ishall either be killed or driven from the
country.
ONE DAY LATER.
From the N. 0. Picayune, 20. (Editorial.)
The Fate of Maximilian. Mr. Stew
ard's swift-footed messenger, Mr. White,
did npt go to Tampico, ibnt left Maiamoras
on the 15th for San Luis Potosi, via Mon
terey. He ought to be with Juarez on
Monday next, at the latest. Maximilian's
offer to capitulate at Queretaro appears to
have been made after the attempted sally
of the 1st inst. We are informed that this
offer was forwarded to Juarez at San Luis
Potosi,.and ought tp have, been therjbyie
4th or"5th. Answer wasprobably returned
to Queretaro immediately, and if? Maxi
milian's terms were agreed to, he was
doubtless several days since in the hands of
Juarez, iiiose terms were mai me uvea
and properly of the Imperialists should be
spared. If these terms were not agreed to,
it would be but natural for Maximilian to
hold out as long as he could. Whether he
could hold out till Mr. Seward's swift mes
senger reached the Liberal camp or not, is
donblful but probable, though it would be
close work. We think, therefore, that
Maximilian has the chances in his favor.
The most obnoxious native. Imperialists,
tMarqpez, etc., are safe, they having escaped
UM Hit? 401, aUU IUJ1CZV9 It, IU I tU(,t
themselves for that, we cannot think that
the Liberals would lie severe upon Maxi
milian and his other followers. It is even
intimated through the Liberal sources of
information that Juarez would give them a
safe conduct ont of the country.
There is still another chance which is
bad for Max., that he may fall into the
hands of the excited aud ferocious mob and
be assassinated before he is brought before
Juarez. It is known that the feelings of
the wholo people have been wrought up to
the highest pitch, especially against him,
"the Austrian," and even Juarez may not
be able to control them. We trust, how
ever, that they may be content with having
captured the descendant of Charles V. till
Mr. Seward's sVvift messenger comes up.
And get it may well be asked if his ar
rival will not be prejudicial to the capture.
The Mexicans are enemies of all foreigners
bitter againstall invaders, jealousof Ameri-,
cahs. It is very possible that the inter
ference of the United States will do more
harm than good in this matter, and it will
naturally wound the amour proprc of the
Mexicans to be told that they do not know
how to treat their prisoners, and that it was
necessary for the United States to interfere
in the name of civilized warfare and hu
manity. BR0WNL0W.
A Itniliml r.Hllmnte of tho Man
Test linony to IIN Counseling; 9Iur
!er Standing l'nrilon for any
Crime that lilt Tools may Com
mit Ilia Bid for Itenomlnnllon
Shocking: Disclosures from nig
Own Camp The Cyes or the North
lU'litfr Opened.
Cleveland, Tennesseo. Correspondence of tho
Springfield, Massachusetts Republican, Cth
What can the thinking Union men of
Tennessee expect in the way of civil peace
and prosperity with a man at the helm' of
State whose course has always been,. so
strongly marked by passion and violence ?
Has he ever shown a single quality of the
statesman? Is there any consistency in
his character or history ? When the war
broke out he was the ardent and bitter sup
porter of Southern "institutions." It re
quired protracted and patient remonstrance
to prevent his Wliig from espousing the
cause of the Confederacy. We can readily
excuse him for that, and every other weak
ness; but wo are merely calling attention
to his character. When he escaped from
the Rebel prison, and went North, he devo
ted his time to criticising the Federal gov
ernment and berating the AVar Department.
He is always con. Like his brother at
Washington, he is more than ready to bite
whatever barks at him. They both make
enemies where self-coutrol would secure
friends. But both are ready to call their
passion a virtue, and glory in their shame.
The two qualities of organization referred
to, which they have in common, are among
the main causes of the failure of their sev
eral administrations. For though Gover
nor Brownlow has been for the most part
successful in securing the adoption of his
plans aud placing his pels in positions, his
failure to wisely and impartially adminis
ter the laws has been as ignoble and signal
as that of Johnson to enforce his "policy."
Unless those high in authority under him
have lied and sealed it with an oath, Gov.
Brownlow has encouraged and counseled
assault, riot, mob-law and murder. Moro
than a year ago, I heard one of those
''prudent and experienced men," now
"placed in charge of that 'State guard,' "
swear that he had a standing pardon from
tho Governor, and lie would shoot whom
he pleased, and at a subsequent period,
also within my own observation, the same
man proffered to suit the action to the
word, and I have no doubt would have
done so promptly, had not bis demands,
made in violation of all law, been at once
complied with. These facts do not stand
alone in their class.
The Governor no doubt deserves credit
for some things. But when he so very
modestly offers himself a candidate for a
second election, it will not do for him to
attempt through his organs, and orders,
and proclamations, to make the people of
other States believe that all who humbly
deem him an unsuitable person for the high
trust are Rehelsandtraitorsand Johnsonites:
nor that they are not even Republicans, and
many of them as Radical, but less rash than
himself. But, then, the public know that
the people of this State, in convention as
sembled, have re-nominated him. Yes,
but the public don't know how that was
managed, and no wonder that the nomina
tion surprises the people of the State, while
it deceives those of others. Some light
may lc shed on the subject, 'Muring the
sweep of coming events, when retributive
justice shall overtake the lawless and vio
lent." Tho calm, wise, thinking, truly
patriotic and unselfish citizens of Tennes
see know full as well as does Gov. Brown
low, that his success in the coming cam
paign, in addition to the enforcement of
the franchise law, stands sorely in need of
all the colored vote, and the bullying in
timidation of the " loyal militia." Could
anything be more modest than the Gov
ernor's bid for the re-nomination ? See an
extract from his letter addressed to the con
vention. " I do not doubt the ability of the
loyal men of the State to retain its control
under the franchise law, provided the law
is enforced. I have no candidate to sug
gest, but deem the convention capable of
making its own selection. Nor do I speak
of the claims of myself or other gentlemen.
No man has any claims, to public trust ;
but the country having a right to the
services of her ablest and most reliable
citizens, such men will not feel at liberty to
decline important nominations, if bestowed
with encouraging unanimity. Even in my
feeble state of health, if I were nominated
by your convention, I would not feel at
liberlv to decline the nomination."
A. C.
i . i
General Joseth E. Johnston, late of
the Confederate array, is preparing a his
tory of his campaigns. Jefferson Davis
will, of course, bo handled vigorously, and
the work will embrace, in addition to a
record of battles and marches, a philo
sophical view of cotemporary evenLs, suf
ficient to give it the character of a history
rather than a narrative. General Lee is
also busy at a review of his compaigns,
which a N'ew'Ydrk.pnblUher is to take in
han, paying him)'itji reported, about ten
kper ceutiion.the salea? . ,
NASHYILLE, TENNESSEE, TUESDAY, APftEL 23, 1S67.
FROM TEXAS.
Mutiny Anioiii;Xe-ri Troops-Several
Killed An Exclllngr Day in
Camps.
From the San Antonio Herald, loth.
About noon yesterday our city was thrown
into great excitement "by the rumor that
the United States colored troops stationed
at San Tedro Springs had mutinied and
killed several of their officers, and also that
the war having been carried into Africa,
many of the negroes were killed. There
had been hurryingto and- fro among the
military stationed in the city, and they
were soon offal a double-quick. The ru
mors continued growing in number and
varying in details, until there was no way
of getting at the truth without going to the
seat of war, and we went. We found one
officer Lieut. Griffin, we understood the
name to be lying mortally wounded, his
head split open with a sabre; another
wounded in the hand; while the negro ser
geant who had struck the blow wilh the
sabre was lying dead on the spot where he
fell. From citizens living in the vicinity,
we learned that this sergeant had protested
before the officer of the day, Lieut. Griffin,
against the tying up by the thumbs of so'me
of his company, and that the' officer had or
dered him to his quarters, which order he
refused to obey, threatening to report to
Gen. Merrilt. Whether the officer then
t attempted to shoot or not, we could not
iearn, but immediately the sergeant arew
his sabre and cut. "Another officer then '
sliot the sergeant through the-head,while-the
latter officer was wounded in the hand
by still another soldier ; in the meantime,
the whole camp was alive, and numbers of
bullets went whistling through the air.
The dash and boldness of the senior officer
present" is said and believed to have done
much toward quieting down the mutiny,
which at one time indicated an indiscrim
inate massacre of the officers in camp.
Gen. Merritt was very energetic in exam
ining into the causes and ascertaining who
were tho instigators.
THE rXEI.IXG OF SOUTIIEItX 3IF..V
TOWARDS THE XEGRO.
From tho Mobilo Advertisor and Register.
" The Southern people desire to see a
fair trial of tho negro's capacity for self
government, and, most assuredly, every in
terest of the South urges her to desire also
a successful issue of the experiment. It is
difficult to overestimate the value of the
addition of four millions of industrious, in
telligent and upright citizens to the popu
lation of any country. If the freedmen
prove to deserve this praise, they will con
quer, eventually, ever prejudice against
them that is not founded upon a law of
God. They will elevate themselves, and
contribute "their full share to the general
prosperity, and they will settle a question
whieh has puzzled the world for forty cen
turies. "Let us help them in this work, as far a3
we fairly can, Bafely can."
The above remarks of the Richmond 2r
aminer express the sentiment of true South
ern men with regard lo the negro. It is a
sentiment which a Radical cannot compre
hend if he would, and which some of them
would not comprehend if they could.
THE IMPORTANCE OF A VOTE.
From tho Knoxville Commercial.
The importance of every man's voting in
a contest against the Radicals, is forcibly
illustrated by the result in Connecticut.
One Democratic candidate for the Senate
was defeated by four votes, and this gives
the Radicals one majority in that body, and
twelve more votes would have given the
Democrats a majority in both houses. We
hear, occasionally, of men in this section,
who are disposed not lo vote at all, because
they are disgusted with the situation ; but
we hope they will think and act differently
when tliey'refleet upon the value of every
vote, and that it is by votes alone, that the
situation can be peaceably changed for the
better. Remember Connecticut, and every
man to the polls !
Queen Isabella II. of Spain, is der
scribed as thirty-seven years old, of over
middling size, very fat, has light brown
hair, small round eyas, of a water-blue col
or, a short, turned-up nose, a finely-formed
mouth, a Bonrbonic double chin, colossal
bust and arms, an imposing figure, and
when smiling or in lively conversation,
makes a rather pleasing impression. With
all her corpulence, she is of a sickly consti
tution, and suffers frequently from a pain
ful eruption, especially on her arms, which
obstinately baflles all medical science. She
appoars to more advantage when sitting or
standing than when walking, her gait being
of that peculiar rolling manner which
characterized that of Louis XVI. She is
the daughter of Ferdinand VII., one of
the most reprobate princes, and of Chris
tine, sister of the late King Bomba, of
Naples.
County Court at Nashville.
Charles V. Dixon, by next friend, vs. John W.
Franklin et als.
AT THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE
County Court nt Nashville, on the 10th day
of April, 1807, on motion of complainant, by
counsel in the above cause, and it appearing to
the satisfaction of the Clerk that the said de
fendants, W. W. Smith and II. Smith, aro non
residents of the State of Tennessee, and there
fore the ordinary process of this Court cannot be
served upon them: it is therefore) ordered by the
Clerk that publication be made for four weeks
in succession in the .Nashville Union nnd Dis
patch, a newspaper published in the city of
Nashville, requiring tho said defendants to ap
pear at tho next term of the County Court, to bo
holden for the county of Davidson at tho Court
house thereof, in tho city of Nashville, on the
first Monday in June next, and answer said bill,
or tho Bauie "will be taken for confessed as to
them and set down forhearin? ex parte.
nprliMtw V. h. NICIiOL. Clerk.
County Courl at XusuvlIIc.
Franklin L. Darnell vs. Henry I!. Darnell ct als
AT THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE
County Court at Nashville, on tho 30th day
of March, 1807. on motion of complainant, by
counsel in tho above cause, and it appearing to
the satisfaction of the Clerk that the said de
fendants, Henry 15 , James, Ellen, Isadora, and
.Mary Eliza Darnell, nnd Richard Enox nnd
Donnison N. A. Enox, his wife, nre non-residents
of the State of Tennessee, and therefore tho ordi
nary process of this Court cannot be served upon
them : it Is therefore ordered by the Clerk that
publication be made for four weeks in succession
in the Nashville Union and Dispatch, a news
paper publishedin tho city of Nashville, requir
ing the said defendants to appear at the next
term of tho County Court, to be holden for the
county of Davidson at the Courthouse thereof,
in the city of Nashville, on the first Monday in
May next, and answer said bill, or tho same will
bo taken for confessed as to them and set down
for bearing ex parte,
nprll 4tw P. L.NICH0L. Clerk.
In Chancery at Nashville.
State of Tennesseo Clerk' Office. Chancery
Court at Nashville, JVrril tho lfith. 1SC7.
Felix fl. McKay, ct nl.. complainant, vs. A. C.
Carter etal.. defendants.
TT APPEARINO FROM AFFIDAVIT FILED
A in thia causo that the defendant, John U.
McFcrran, is a non-resident of the State of Ten
nessee i it is therefore ordered that he enter his
appearance herein on or before the third
Monday of the nert term of said Court, to be
held on the first Monday in May next, 1S67. and
plead, answer or doraur to complainanst' bill, or
the same will be taken for confessed at to bim
nnd set for hearing ex parte, and that a copy of
this order be pnblished for four successire
weeks in theNasbviile Union nnd Dispatch.
A copy Attest ; M.B.HOWELL.
Clerk and Master.
N. i Ed. Baxter, Sol'rs for eompl'ts. apr21 ttw
In Chancery at Nashville.
State of Tennesee CleTk's Office, Chancery
Court at Nashvill, April tho 1Mb, 1S67.
John W. Hughes, complainant, vs. A. B. Mont
gomery et als., defendants.
TT APPEARING FROM AFFIDAVIT FILED
x in this cause teat the defendant, Alexander
B. Montgomery, is n non-resident of the iState
of Tennessee: it is therefore ordered
that be enter bis appearance herein on or
before the third .Monday of tho next term of
said Court, to be held on the first Monday in
May next. 1S67. and plead, answer or demur to
complainant' bill, or the same will be taken for
confessed as to bim and Set for hearing ex parte,
and that a copy of this order be published for
four successive weeks ia the Nashville Union,
and Dispatch. r - ,
, A cory-Attwt: M.B. HOWELL,
- j Clerk aad Master.
aEas tJt Spurlock. SoPn ferjCompPt. aprSMtw
BY TELEGRAPH.
NOON DISPATCHES,
F.l'ROPEAX NEWS.
The (Jerman Opposition Triumphs
- over Blsmark France nnd Russia
Act In Concert, etc., etc.
New. York, ApriL 22. The Herald's
correspondence says the members of the
German opposition party are in legislative
triumph over Count Bismark, by the vota
rendering the government amenable to the
representative body on all matters relative
to federal taxation. The vote was verv
close, the Liberals carrying their amend
ment to the tax duty clause, in draft of the
.constitution, by a majority of Ihreo onlv.
but, the result argned badly for the fate of
the new normal military budget of Prussia
South. Germans naturalized as citizens of.
the United States, are in danger of being
held to military service on revisiting the
States which have entered into the now fa
rnous secret treaties with Prussia, Bavaria,
Wertembnrg and Baden.
The Herald's Constantinople correspon
dence says that Franca and Russia have
made a joint movement to recommend the
Porte government to cede Candia to
Greece, and that the approach towards a
unity of action in such a direction was re
garded as demonstrating that England is
likely to be left out of the consultation for
the arrangement of-the affairs of tho sick
man. - i
1 TheJTerald's Mnlinger, Ireland corres
pondence reiterates the assurance of the ap
proach of another Fenian rise far more ex
tensive than that of the 5th of March, for
the execution of which, he says a compre
hensive plan is being arranged in London,
Paris and Dublin.
Loan to the City of.Nt. I.oul-4.
St. Loris, April 22. The Mayor and
City Comptroller have arranged with the
national banks of the State of Missouri
for a temporary loan of six hundred thou
sand dollars, which will enable the city to
Jiay the interest on her bonds due in June,
Tuly and August, and also meet all other
obligations. This loan was rendered neces
sary by the change in the assessment law,
under which the city receives taxes in No
vember instead of June, as heretofore.
The State banks have all been made agents
of the city for the sale of bonds.
The Fenians serenaded General Pile
Saturday night, in complement of his ad
vocacy of tho resolutions of sympathy for
the struggling Irish, past at the late session
of Congress. The General responded in
an eloquent speech in favor of universal
freedom.
WASHINGTON.
Adjournment of the Senate Congress
nuil the President Agreeing.
WasiiinotoX, April 21. The Senate has
dwindled down to less than a quorum, and
adjourned sine die, without filling all the
vacancies, which, with two exceptions, are
in the West, thus leaving nine postoffices
without postmasters in Illinois, and one in
Pennsylvania the latter believed to be
Milton; and four or five vaeancies 'in of
fices of internal revenue in Indiana, Illi
nois and Wisconsin. No Consul at Ha
vana was confirmed. Under the tenue of
the office act, vacancies cannot be filled, as
they could be previous to the passage of
that law, by the President during the re
cess of Congress. It is said that Charles S.
Abel was confirmed as Collector of Inter
nal Revenue for the First District of Penn
sylvania after having once been rejected for
the same office; and Gov. Cummings
having been confirmed as Collector of In
ternal Revenue for the Fourth District of
that State, leaves the Governorship of
Colorado vacant.
The resolution of Senator Johnson ad
.vising and requesting the President to offer
to the contending parties in Mexico the
friendly mediation of the United States,
which was offered in open Senate yester
day, is precisely the same as the one sub
mitted in Executive session on the lGth,
and which had been confidentially printed.
The Chronicle to-day says when the Sen
ate adjourned last night, the impression
seemed to be almost universal that there
would be no quorum in either House on
the 3d of July next, as the feeling between
the Senators and Executive was so com
comparativcly cordial, and the intelligence
from the South promising submission to the
terms of reconstruction were so auspicious,
that very few doubted that the great meas
ures had anticipated and foreclosed all
chance of difficulty and dissension.
VIHOINIA.
Senator Wilson' Speech nt Orango
Courthouse Confiscation Mny Fol
low n It e fit sal to Reconstruct.
Richmond, April 21. Senator Wilson
spoke at Orange Courthouse yesterday.
He recounted the events which led to war,
and 'said that after its close the North had
no ill feeling for the South. The South
wa3 not submissive, and had the measures
now pending been adopted directly at the
end of the conflict the South wonld have
acknowledged that the government was
just and liberal; but when Mr. Johnson
assumed power he adopted a different poli
cy, which had brought on all this dissatis
faction. President Lincoln had prepared eight
conditions for the pardon of Rebels, all of
which met Mr. Wilson's approval. Mr.
Johnson prepared fourteen, which were six
too many. He (Wilson) had never favored
the $20,000 clause, for he wanted the South,
except a few prominent Rebels, to be at
liberty to go to work. The South had
complained of Congress violating the con
stitution, and yet upheld Mr. Johnson in
his violations of the constitution in restor
ing States.
The speaker waB oppo.led to a black man's
party, or a white man's party. Let all
who favor human bondage go together, and
all who favor freedom and progress go to
gether. If any Rebels had cast aside the
delusions, let them come up and joip the
Republican party.
Major J. II. Lee, State Senator from
Orange, replied to Mr. Wilson. He charged
tho introduction of slavery upon theNortb.
and said Mr. Lincoln did not at first intend
to liberate the slaves, and that the South
ern people were the blacks' best friends.
Mr. Wilson replied that in a year the
North would give negroes suffrage. He
said confiscation might follow if the recon
struction bill was not accepted.
mmjuuuiii.i iienasn sa mbb
St. Cecilia's Academy,
MOITNT VERNON.
Near Nashville,
CONPUCTKO BV SISTERS OP THg
OKDKK OF NT. DOJIIJf IC,
Under the patronage of the Right. Rer.
Bishop of Nashville.
rPHIS ACADEMY WAS FOUNDED IN 1500.
L for the purpose of enabling parents and
guardians in the South and Southwest to impart
to their daughters and wards a thorough and
solid education.
The Academy is about one mile from the eity
nnd is situated in one of the most beautiful and
healthy localities in its vicinity.
Tho Academic year consists of two Sessions
each, and terminating about the 20th of June.
Special attention is given to the different
branches usually taught in Academies.
For Teems, ktc apply to the Mother Sape
rier, Nashville, Tennessee.
jan!7-ly -
DISSOLUTION'.
qnE COPARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE
L existing under the name and style of Foster
Brothers is hereby dissolved by mutual consent.
All persoss owing Foster Brother can find
their office in rear of Guild & Smith's Law
Office, formerly occapied by Foster A MeEwen.
Messrs. ARMISTEAD A" WOODS have pur
chased the entire interest of the firm.
FOSTER BROTHERS.
Nashville, Febi nary. 1867.
In retiring from business, it affords us great'
pleasure to recommend Messrs. Anaistead t
Woods to all oar customers and the publio gen
erally, and hope they will continue their pa
tronage, so liberally extended to the old trm.
J - FOSTER BROTHERS.-
NMhTiUe, February, 1S67. arl5 tf
GET A GOOD FIT.
Have Your Shirts Made to Order
AT
III
I I . k- I
Hi ii, i . i I I I i r
II J
.11 J
"AfTrT
Paris
i
M)KE SHIRTS
riuriflFrr AND FINISH OFTHKSF. SHIRTS
J. wecloim to be Superior to any now offered
in thijniarket. In addition to our .Shirt De
partment;' we keep a superTjrsjortment of
Men's ;Rirni3umg
DRAWKKS.
UN'DF.RSHIRTS.
SOCKS,
SUSPF.NDKRS,
QL0VR3
SCARFS.
TIK3,
BOWS.
HANDKERCHIEFS,
HATS AXD APS,
And in fact every thing pertaini a gentle
man's toilet.
r. ii. TiioMrsoar,
(01d.No. 23) 41 Cherry slroet.
Jan20-tf .
THE SECOND
NATIONAL BANK,
OF NASHVILLE,
College Street, near Union,
Designated Depositary and Financial Agont
of the United States,
It ii prepared to transact a regular' Banking
busier, and furnish Kxchango oa
NEW VORK.
NEW ORLEANS.
LOUISVILLE. AND
CINCINNATI.
Government Securities, Gold and Silver.bought
andsoldon Commission.
JOHN LUMSDEN. President.
W. J. THOMAS. Cashier-
oct2t-ly.
jonx t. rooTE.
J. U. XASB.
FOOTE, NASH & CO.,
Nos. 17 and 19 West Columbia St,,
CINCINNATI,
DISTII.I.ERS
Of COLOGNE,;
HPIHITS,
Ar.conorj,
AND DOMKSTin
LIQUORS AND WINES.
DEALERS. tX OENOINR ,
ItOSlElTTSON COBSTY,
BOURBON, RYE AND SIOXONOAIII.A
WIIISKIE8.
Proprietors of the celebrated brand of Ora ge
Volley Whisky.3
maylB dly
lOOO A.OHBS
OF CHOICE
Middle Tennessee Land
"FOR SAM,
Within Seven Miles of NbmIivIIIo,
rilHE UNDERSIGNED OFFERS FOR SALE
i 1,000 Acres of the Tract of Land on which
ho resides. It is susceptible of convenient divi
sion, is exceedingly rich, and is especlnlly
net opted to OrnjtHefl. One-half of tho tract
is now in luxuriant grass, the balance in timber,
which, by tho aid of the Northwestern Railroad,
which pas.ies through it. could be sold in Nash
ville for more than tho whole land would cost.
If you desire one of tho best NtocK Forms
ever offered for sale in Davidson county, apply
at once. I am determined to sell.
I offer, also, a large number of Thorough.
hretl Stoclt several fine Stallions from four
to six years old, a few Marc?, and a number of
one and two year old Colts some of them in
fine condition to be trained the next season.
If the Stallions are not sold soon, they will be
farmed on favorable terms.
I also offer for sale a pair of niorongu.
breil Geldings, well matched- and broke to
Harness. W. SIAIUUttO.
December 6, 1SCG. tf
The Louisville Courier, Augusta Constitution
alist, Mobile Advertiser and Register, copy to
tho amount of S'JOand forward bills to this Office.
m T N A
LIFE INSURANCE CO.
Hartford, Connecticut,
AHUPtx, .Tniitiiu-y
iW$4,500,000
J Ml.
Inrnniflforyenr end ) fQ RQO CQF
Jrii. 1, 1S7, J
And :1oIIcIpm IhPiued, 14,1S9
Nashville Agencv: 36 College
W. I. TA I.BOTT, P. I. FECK,
General Agent. Resident Agent,
N. B. This Company has uniformly made 2C
Percent larger Annual Dividends than any other
ifelnsuranceCompaay represented in this Stale
sep2-tf
SUGAR, COFFEE
1000 hds fair to choice N. 0 Sugar;.
500 barrels New Orleaus Molasses ;
500 half bblB. New Orleans Molasses;
2000 bags fair to choice Bio Coffee;
150 Mats choice Java Coffee ;
25 Tierces Prime Carolina Rice ;
In, store and airiving, for sale by
NEWCOMB, BUCHANAN & Co.,
3J,Fonrt! Ntreet.
marl-am LOUISVILLE, KY
A. & .W. SANNIE,
NO. 21 BROAD STREET,
Between Market and College streets.
JTOI.1MALB BAKER.H ANI CON
rKirrinSEsm. Munh4nn r .11
kinds or OMdies, uraeuers. Uafces and Bread,
Dealers in all kinds ortruits, Nats. Raisins and
Sardines, Oysters. Uasned Fruits, Pickles, Toys,
Notions, etc, etc
The attention of the city and country mer
chant! respectfully solicited.
WM. KREGAN. Salesman.
A. fc- W. KA3TXXE. '
fb23 ly J-
NO. 127.
THE BEAXTIFUIa
S- SI.Hl'I.K, QUIET, DERABIiE. "
GREAT RANGE OF W.ORK.
,FOlJR DIFFERENT STITCHES..
( Reversible Feed. Self-Adjanitiig
' " Shuttle Tension.
TflE- LATEST IMPROVED AND BEST
J C0RDERV TUCKEB, IIKMMKK, FEL
LER AND BRAIDER.
(lalitlng Ctnnffr wilh Each Machine.
The only Machine that will Gather and Sew
on at the samo time by simply
lengthening the Stitch.
Every Machine Warranted.
Prices same as other GrJt-eliwi Machines, at
General Agency.
New No. 34 North Cherry st.
. Also, General Agency for the
Howet Sewing Machines,
OVblch forjmoiiufturinir. purposea-cannot bo
atimuvu
MACHINES OF 1 XtT, KINDS' REPAIRED
AAD WARRANTED IN ORDER.
All kinds of Family Sewing done to order
at the Florence and the Howe Agencies.
NO. Xi (old No. IT) CHERRY JSTREET.
CAMP aV E17LIOTT,
febli! GENERAL AGENTS.
ftew York nntl Bremen Steam
Ship Company.
a VIE FIRST-CLASS U. S. MAIL STEAM
. shin ATLANTIC, Cms. Hacikii. Master, will
leave Pier 45, N. It.. SATURDAY, April 6. at 8
o'clock a. m., for SOUTHAMPTON AND BRE
MEN, taking passengers to Southampton, Lon
don, Havro and. Bremen at the following rates,
payable in gold, or its equivalent in currency:
First cabin; $110; second cabin, S; steer
age. $35.
From Bremen. Southampton, Havre, to New
York; First. cabin, $U0; second cabin, $75;
steerage, $13.
Excursion tickets, out and home: First cabin,
8210: second cabin. $130: steerage, $70.
BALTIC. Capt. A. G. Jems, will follow April
20. Further departures from New York 1 May
4, Juno ls Jubo 15, June 2), July20.
For freight or passage apoly to
ISAACTAYLOR. President.
marl2 tf 40 Broadway. New York.
G. H, WESSEL & SONS,
Wholesale Bakers nml Confectioners,
No. 43 nnd 4.t Union Street, NimIi
vllle, T-nu.,
RESPECTFULLY INFORM THEIR
friends and patrons that they have reduced
the wholesale prices of Candy and Crackers to
the following:
Common Stick Candy, 20c. per lb. : Fine Fancy
Candies, 25c. and upwards; Butter Crackers, by
the barrel or box, 10c. per lb; Soda Crackers, by
the barrel or box. 10c. per lb.: Pio-Nic Crackers,
by the barrel, lOc. per lb.; Pilot Bread, by the
barrel, 8c. per lb.
We are also making a fine quality of Bread,
which our wagons aro rcody ,to deliver tu any
part of the city. General Dealers in Fine Im
ported Teas, Wines and Liquors. Scotch Ales
and London Porter. Also, Fruits, Nuts. Raisins,
Pickles, Oysters, Sardines, Catsups, Sauces,
Cheeso, t , etc.. which wo are ottering at greatly
reduced prices, and to which we invite the at
tention of the trade.
fob2l-3m G. II. WESSEI. SONS.
THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT,
Comer College and Union Streets.
EO THOMPSON WOULD INFORM IIIS
friends and thepuMlc that he hj Juat fltUt
np and opened an "flffcnnt Ileetaurant ovi, his
Saloon, hf re gentlemen will find t all timet not
only the lst the home market affords, bqt atto the
beat of ererytlilug from a distance listing pro
cured Die eorvices of a Hrt-rat cook, and from mv
long experience in hotel builness, I feel confidant of
roiog aiit 10 pieaiio customers.
Fri-sh Oysters recoired daily serred up In any
style Fresh Qame alwnys on linj.
novl-ly K. Q. THOMPSON, Proprietor.
It. H. GROOMES & CO.,
UNDERTAKERS FOR CITY ANDSl'R
rounding country Dealers in
METALLIC RL'RIAI. CASKS.
Office No. t- North Cherry hlarcct
Manufactory No. 115 South Mnrket St.
Orders left at either place will be promptly
filled. marl2fm
PETROLEUM?.
ritHE UNDERSIGNED ARE NOW PRE
X. pared to fill orders for
FirntOI.EU.U, CRUDE AND REFINED,
the product of Wells in Overton county. Tennes
see, at prices lower than the same can be ob
tained elsewhere. Every kiud of oil. Illumitating
and Lubricating, furnished at short notice. This
oil has already beeu largely used, and gives
universalsatisfaction.as shown by the numerous
testimonials received. The illuminating, oil is
KOX-ErLosiVE, and is to Suf higher than the
government fire test.
STONE Jc HEFLEBOWER, Agents.
marlVtf 67 orth Cherry st.
CHANCERY SALE
PHCENIX FOUNDRY
PROPERTY FOR SAIaE,
AT MOBILE, MAY 6, 1867.
170R DIVISION OF INTEREST AND SET
: tlement of the estate ."of Wm. Alderson, de
ceased, will bo sold all that property known as
I'JHE.VIX FOI7NDRV. formerly I. D.
SPEAR A CO.. and lately that of WM. ALDEK
SON A CO.. having a front on Royal street of
131 feet, on Theatre street 172 4-12 feet, and on
Water street 179 8-12 feet. Tegetbcr with ail the
MACHINERY, TOOLS, I'ATTER.VH
AND MATERIALS
of W. ALDERSON & CO,
Tbkms One-fourtb cash, and the remainder
at one and two years' credit, with intereitfrom
date of sale. Mcare.1 by mortgage of the pre
mises. aprlG lawtt
The NashvlHeUstoXASD Dispatch will please
publish conspicuously Once a week four weeks,
and send bill, with marked copy of paper con
taining the advertisement, to office of tho Ad
vertiser and Register for collection. MohiU
AdvtrlUrr and Jlejfiiltr.
Latest Telegrams.
fARREST OP I.DIUU ffllEF WATHUIAMBIHTE
Arrival of the Great Eastern
riMIE III Gil WATER ENABLED . THI3
JL large steamer tail foHhi.!rt witn the
largest and belt seleetej tok of
ZDIR2"" GOODS
and all articles generally kept in the DnrgooJs
line, for the well known establishment of O.
RICE CO.. and whieh will be sold at the very
lowest prices. ' , , . ,
We sell Prints from UJj to li cenU a yard.
Linen Towels at 15 ecnU . plce, and all other
goods in proportion-
We have also received a large lot of Ladies'
Cellars, which will be given to oar lady cuitem
ers, therefore call and Jtsare one bclere they a;e
WUI sell Boots. -Shoe and Hat V per cent
below cost, to elote them out.
mar27-to mayL G. KICK & CO.
iHMHrc Your Horn cm.
mHF. TENNESSEE MARINE ANDFIRE
1 INSURANCE COMPANY. safe and
reliable HOME OFFICE. Risks on country
dwellings solicited.- Losses promptly paid. '
A. W. BuTLER, .
aprS 3m p. Secretory. '
FOB 1807!
x roLiric!., sews, coniBKoiial
and Family journais.
The Central' Organ dCPulilic Sen
tinient ia Tennessee. . -
Subscription.'Pfice ReduGetl.
lilt: imfer Srru: keoim.e and -
j -' ioit the I'Eopi.k
Now is tho Time to Subscribe
'DY A CONSOLIDATION OP--THE -MSBU
VILLB UNlW'AND AMERICAN ariU-th
DISPATCH, and by the generous and united
support of the Uxtojf axd Dispatch by the
patrons of both tho former papers, tb Proprie
tors are enabled to present a Newspaper hitfcer
to unsurpassed in this city or State.
IN FULLNESS AND ACCURACY OF"
NEWS, our paper will compare favorably wilhr
the best in tho entire country: and in saying
thK we only repeat the expressions of raanyofl
onr patrons, who are most capable or judglngjTB
ucli matters. .
f -
- 1
f - , ,
In tho Political Interests' of
the People, .
The UNION AND DISPATCH, as heretn
fore. will take the Constitution and laws for Its
guide; and in the discussion of all the new and
intricate questions and issues arising out of the ,
extraordinary condition in which the country is
placed, it will adhere to the principles and
teachings of the founders and expositors of our
government and Institutions. It will endeavor
to guard with vigilance and defend with unwa
vering carnestnes and faith the rights and inte-
sts of all the States, and the essential prinei
las which constitute the basis of tho Republic.
We shall oppose all invasions of these, anil
uphold, to the utmost of our ability, the union
of tho States under them. Feeling that they
arq endangered by the revolutionary schemes of
tho Radical politicians who now hold the Legis
lative power of the Government, wo shall abate
thing of our past opposition to their rae
nir With these views, which are no less than
, niiound convictions, we cannot and will' nt .
hesitate to defend tho unfortunate South from. 1
the aspersions and impositions heaped upon It t
people, and urge that.! umiak and Riout shall .
be meted out to them. , ..'ff3.
Our Mumifuctiirlng nnd Io-
meHtlc InlcreslH.
p.
We shall constantly admonish the Southern. .
people to be self-reliant, and shall ds whattwo
may be able to induce the establishment
manufactories in our tnidt for our heme pi
duiU. To this end we will pay special attention
to the cost and statistics of manufacturing,
and exert ourselves to encourage the dlvnl(li
cation of Southern industries ami the develop
iicnt of Southern resources. 1
Our Financial and Commere3L
cial Column.
Every department of business has on imme-fJ.
diate interest in the markets ofthe country, nndi
in its financial fluctuations and condition. TEe'V
man who falls to keep himself properly aib"'
vised as to tho riio and fait of the markets, as
controlled by tho laws of demand and supply,
and the relativo conditicn of the currency. J
exposed to constant loss, and must necessarily1
fall behind his more intelligent and enterprising
neighbors. In order to make our paper valuably
as well as interesting, we shall continue tu
make this srmn. rxiTtTRg. Our Daily !
Market Reports, domestic and foreign, by tele- '
graph, and our City Reports, gotten up at heavy
expense, have challenged the commendation of . . ..
our best business men ; while ourcurrent Finan
cial Reports from all the leading mftney tentljpf'
of the country are fuller than have everTbtQ,.
published by any other jeumal in Tenneset
aft, i
- -r i f
' v ...
. Tim ftSw-
Upon tho Subject of Agrionljwejjg
And kindred topics, we shall abo gftfe 'anW
tensive variety of' valuable and intretfngatiti
tor Hie best adapted to the farming llasfe on
our State, whieh will, in a great latijpav
ply the place of a family agricultural papery
For the Family Circle, '
And for the speeial pleasure and profit of tta -.
young, each week wewlll give a general literary;
and religious miscellany. Nathlng shall fifed, v,
its way into our columns unfit for the peruOalf - -
the mothers and daughters or the taod.
eating the demoralizing sensationalism, of masy f
contemporary Journals, we shall eiehew that '
eharactenstrivlngtogivetheireadersubstaBtlal ,.rt .
matter, preferring' to bo useful rather ttmfi '' !
easational. ,'
Docisions 01 tno supreme"
Court.
Inviewo the neeenitie of the legal prefes--
slon, and the general publie interest aUaahtng ,,-.
to the many new question coming before oar -1
Judicial tribunals, we will publish all the J?-;'
portant decisions of the Supreme l&art, tfrta , ,
official lourees, whieh mny be relied upon, a -
entirely trustworthy.
REDUCTION OF RATES;
fa are gratified at being abta to stale tbat t(
tbt very Urge Increase In the number ef tmt
Dolly and Tn-Wekly subscriber enable o't - "'
reduce the price of subferiptien to these editkini. . 1
We Jo i" the wore eheerfully because the ne-
sltfes of the people. In the Impoverished etndl
tloo of our stricken section, require such' en-,'"fct
eeMlontai can be reasonably made In thelrlnJ
ttrests. From and after the 1st J anuary. there-
jero, ?ar m
TERM3 OP SUBSCRIPTION WILL BE
IN ADVANCE ' , s
DA1LT..
TRIVrTEEKLY -
WEEKLY -
-. 3 OO,
st
And for shorter periods at the same rates. '"
- We earnestly appeal to eur friends tis
extending oar circulation; and In thereby'In
easing our. means of usefulness; .AcopyiOftte j
per will be sent grataltoaslr to anyone Jj t
tea subscribers to' either of the editieos.

xml | txt