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The Chattanooga news. [volume] (Chattanooga, Tenn.) 1891-1939, July 12, 1918, Home Edition, Image 1

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THE CHATTANOOGA NEWS
VOL XXX. NO. 328
HOME EDITION
CHATTANOtX.A, TENN., FRIDAY KVKMNCJ, JULY 12, 11)1 S
ODIOC. TUDCC CCIITC uwissrsd by Carriers
iwalre Uwu a wi.
ITALIANS CAPTURE AUSTRIAN BASE
HAIG'S MEN IN SUCCESSF UL RAIDS IN
FLANDERS; FRENCH TAKE VILLAGE
TAKE PRISONERS
INPATROLCLASH
120 Germans Fall Into British
Hands in Vicinity of Mer
ris, Flanders Front.
FRENCH CONTINUE GAINS
Capture Longpont, East of Vil-lers-Ootterets,
and Occupy
Javage Farm.
(Associated Press)
London, July 12. Further op
erations were carried out by Brit
ish troops last niffht, notably in
the Flanders area near Merris and
Meteren, the war office an
nounced today. Prisoners were
taken in a patrol encounter in the
Kemmel sector on this front.
Another British party raided
the German lines near Hamel.
south of the Somme. A patrol
clash in the neighborhood of Gnv
relle, northeast of Arras, also re
sulted in the taking of prisoners.
T iLaIh ....... t i in I li ,- viVin-
ity of Merris the British took 120
Prisoners-
Raids Near Montdidier.
(Asaoclated Press
Paris. July 12. The Villas of l.onr-
pont, on the Savlerrs river east of
Vlllers-Cotterets, has been captured
by the French, says the ofncisl stste
jnant from the war office today.
The French also continued their
jrrogress north of Chavigny farm snd
east of Faverolles. Javage farm, north
east of Faverolles also was occupied.
tn raids north o Montdidier and In
Champagne the French captured fif
teen prisoners. The official text reads:
"Our troops continued their progress
north of Chavlgny farm and east of
Faverolles. Last nlgjit our trocps oc
cupied the village of Longpont and the
Javage farm.
"Two raids, One north of Montdidier,
and the other In Champagne resulted
in the capture of fifteen prisoners.
"The German artillery was rather
active on the left bank of the Meuse
(Verdun region.)
CHANGE OF OFFICIALS
DOESNT AFFECT POLICY
Von Hertling Declares Wilson's
Utterances Force Germany
to Continue Struggle.
(International News Sen-ice.)
Copenhagen, July 12. "The change
of foreign secretaries will not change
the foreign or internal policies of the
German government," Chancellor Von
Hertling declared in a speech before
the ma'n committee of the relehstng,
said a dispatch from Berlin today. The
chancellor went on to say:
"The utterances of President Wilson
and foreign Secretary Balfour (of
England) force Germany to continue
the struggle.
"Foreigt Serdetary Von Hintze has
given a binding promise to follow
every pledge made by the chancellor.
"The change of foreign secretaries
was not caused by any real differ
ences, but by personal discussions of
matters that should not be made pub
lic. Germany's attitude on pence Is
unchanged. It will never change so
long as the policy of destruction marks
the speeches of our enenVTes.
"The closest union exjsts between
the political and military factions.
"We are ready to receive any sincere
peace proposals the enemey shall
make."
Chancellor Von Hertling's speech has
made It absolutely certain that Ad
miral Von Hintze has succeeded Dr.
Richard von Kuehlmann as foreign
secretary of Germany. The chancel
lor's reference to Von Hlntze's pledges
gave the first official confirmation of
Von Hlntze's appointment.
The statement reads: .
"In the successful minor enterprise
taken by us yesterday southwest of
Merris we captured more than 120
prisoners and ten machine guns.
"A raid attempted by the enemy yes
terday south of Bucquoy was repulsed.
We carried out a successful .'aid dur
ing the afternoon northeast of Merris.
"During the night Welsh troops
raided the German trenches In the vi
cinity of Tamel and captured sixteen
prisoners and n machine gun, in ad
dition to destroying many dufrouts anil
Inflicting disunities on the enemy. Sur
cessful raids were carried out by us
also near Meteren. Further prisoner
were taken by our troops 1n these en
gagements ar.d also In patrol nconn.
ters In the neighborhood of Gavrellc
and In the Kemnvi sector."
RUSSIAN RAH WAY MFN ON
STRIKF IN MANY TOWNS
(Associated Press.)
Paris, July 12. (Havns Agency.)
Russian railway men are on strike In
several districts, according to a Zurich
dispatch ouotlnr the Iclnrlg Neuste
Nnchrehten. The strike promises to
be general, the dispatch ssvs.
Trench Irtter carrier delivering the daily mail to the Americans
NEW EXCUSE WHY U-BOATS
DO NOT SINKJRANSPORTS
! Prefer to Attack Unarmed Ves-
sels, as Huns Think This
Better Part of Valor.
( In i frnntlon.il News Service.)
Amsterdam. July 1!. A brand-new
explanation why German submarines
are not sinking American transports
has Just been put out by the semi
official Wolff bureau of Germany.
According to this excuse. theU-honts
are confining themselves to attacking
neutral and allied shipping in the traf
fic lanes. The bureau adds:
"Submarines are not wasting pre
cious time trying to trap transports
which are well armed and are con
voyed by warships that are well able
to sae the greater part of the men
on the transports. To sink transports
would be an exploit, but It would not
further the principle for submarine
warfare."
DRIVE BEGUN TO OFFSET
ALLIED BOMBARDMENT
Germans Cry "Kamerad" After
but Taste of Aerial Attacks
on Rhine Towns.
(Associated Press.)
Geneva, July 12. Another campaign
has been undertaken along the Rhine
in order to prevent allied bombardment
of Rhine towns.
The landtng of the Dutch, of Baden,
has been asked to pass a resolution re
questing the government of the grand
duchess to exercise Its Influence with
the imperial authorities to come to an
agrecement with the belligerents to
abandon on both sides the aerial bom
bardment of towns outside the zone of
military operations. In a speech In the
landtag In favor of the proposition.
Deputy Narun declared that aerial at
tacks on localities behind the front
serve no military purpose and that
only Innocent women and children suf
fer. Hard Thrust at People.
In commenting on this new cam
paign, the Lausanne Gazette declares
that the Germans, since the beginning
of the war, have bombarded London
and Paris with Zeppelins and airplanes
many more than a hundred times,
while the allies, during the three years,
for various reasons, were unable to re
ply, but did not whine. Now the Ger
mans, It adds, after only a few months
of bombardment of their open towns,
are crying "kamerad."
ONE OF ASSASSINS OF
MIR6ACH ARRESTED
German Ambassador to Russia
Killed by Hand Grenade at
Moscow Last Saturday.
(International News Service.)
London, July 12. One of the two
assassins who murdered Gen. Count
Von Mirbach. the German ambassador
to Russia, at Moscow last Saturdny.
has been arrested, said an Exchange
telegraph dispatch i from Copenhagen
today, giving the Frankfurter Zei-
tung as authority for the statement.
Mirbach was killed Jvlth a haud
grenade In the German embassy at
Moscow. Two men. having passports
from a special committee, gained en
trance to the embassy upon the
eronnd that thev had business to con
duct with the German official.
DELIVERING THE MAIL IN THE
mm mm mm mrmai
. B mr jmumi I u
CHOLERA IN PETROGRAD
CLAIMS VICTIMS DAILY
(Associated Press.)
London, July 12. Owing to
the shortage of food, cholera
is on the Increase In Petro
grad and hundreds of persona
are dally falling victims to it,
says a Russian wireless dis
patch received today.
BRITISH DROP BOMBS
ON CONSTANTINOPLE
One Hundred and Twenty Pris
oners Captured in Opera
tions Around Merris.
(Associated Presa.)
London. July 12. Air force contin
gents with the British navy dropped
a half ton of bombs upon the city of
Constantinople on July 7. it was an
nounced by the admiralty today. All
English planes returned safely.
POSTPONEMENT ON BONE
DRY CLAUSE REACHED
(International News Service.)
Washington, July 12. An agreement
fnr nostnonement of a vote on war-
timo "bone dry" prohibition has virt
ually been reached with "dry" loaders
In the senate, and plans for a con
gressional recess appeared this after
noon to be taking definite shape.
FATHER'S CRIME PROMPTED
BY FEARFUL APPREHENSION
(International News Service.)
Alhany. N. Y. July 12. Fearing that
his 3 1-2-year-old child would be an
imbecile tor life, George Robinson,
shipping clerk of the Corona Type
writer works, at Groton, eight miles
from here, last night shot the child
through the heart and mouth, killing
It Instantly, then committed suicide by
shooting himself through the mouth.
Koblnson had brooded over the
child's condition for some time.
HEAVY TAX MAY DESTROY
MOTIVE POWER BUSINESS
(Internationsl News Service.)
Washington, July 12. A heavy tax
on advertising in the new revenue bill
s ill "destroy the motive power of
American business," the ways and
means committee was told today by
Jesse H. Neal, executive secretary of
the associated business papers organ
ization, representing postponed trade
papers. -
FEDERAL PRISONERS TO
MANUFACTURE SUPPLIES
(International News Service.)
Washington, July 12. Prisoners In
United States penitentiaries will be
compensated for the manufacture of
supplies for the use of the government,
according to the terms of an act signed
today by President Wilson.
The act provides for the equipment
of the I'nlted States penitentiary at
Atlanta, Ga., for the manufacture of
government supplies and for payment
to prisoners for their work.
FISHING STEAMER MAY
HAVE HIT FLOATING MINE
(International News Service.)
An Atlantic Port, July 12. A rumor
Is In circulation here today that an un
known flshlilg steamer was sunk yes
terday afternoon about ten miles off
the coast, probably from contact with
a floating mine. No information re
tarding the report could be secured
from officials here
TRENCHES
HL mt
mmmmmMm-,
in the trenches.
TURKEY REPLIES
TOU.SJDEMAND
For Explanation of Sacking of
Hospital Con't Ascer
tain Facts,
(Associated Press !
Washington, July 12 Turkey has In
formed the United States through the
Swedish foreign ottlce that so far the
true facts us td the reported seizure
of the American consulate and sacking
of an American hospital at Tabriz by
Turkish soldiers have not been ascer
tained, but that It Will be done at the
earliest possible moment.
The United States asked for an ex
planation of this Incident which if
regulad Ottoman troops were Involved
might mean a declaration of war. The
attack was reported June 19 by the
Spanish consul, who took charge of
the consulate when the American con
sul with a large party of Americans
and other foreigners left the Persian
city at the approach of the Turks,
Actual Difficulties.
Minister Morris at Stockholm re-
; ported today that the foreign office had
i informed him the Inoiilrv of the United
I states had not reached the Ottoman
govw.nm(,nt untjl Ju, B Tnen tne
matter was presented with a request
come In the form of the statement
. I. n . 1 , I ,,,,,, , II
It is assumed here that the Turkish
government actually is having great
difficulty In communicating with Its
forces In Tersla, and It will bo par
ticularly hard to obtai nthe fnets if the
Tarbriz outrage was committed by
Kurds or other Irregulars.
MOST "GODMOTHERED"
BOY IN ALL FRANCE
, ,
First Batch of Telephone Girls
Adopts French Orphan Boy
Five Years Old.
(International News Service.)
Taris, July 12. The first batch of
telephone girls that arrived In France
have adopted a war orphan a 5-year-
old boy. The girls are clubbing to-
gethcr to put up 500 francs yenrly to
educate him. All of the girls can
speak French and It Is safe to say that
this is the most
"godmothered" boy In
;dl France
WILL REDUCE CAR SERVICE
TO A STRICTLY WAR BASIS
(International News Service.)
Savannah. Ga., July 12. Beginning
next Monday, the Savannah Electric
company will reduce street car service
to a strictly war basis. Car schedules
will be reduced, one-man crews In
stalled and many other plans carried
out to conserve labor, power and equip
ment. FAIR, SAYS BILLY 'POSSUM
Fair, says Billy
'Possum. Now,
listen, gentle read
er; for you know
I'm wordly wise;
If you . can't be
good, be careful.
Truth will pene
trate dslsuise.
But the hint I want
to give you let
this sink well In
your dome who
Is gullty's not the
question Mani
soMtaoDY troi;
jfl T riorum
cure your nails at home. i
The Weather Fair tnnieht. and
Saturday fair and slightly warmer.
'j I 'Sf3
O
BRITAIN HAS i. MILLION
SOLDIERS NOW F QHTINQ
(Associated Press. )
ransi. July 12 Tlir ni llsli
fighting fOrOM In Franos now
aggregate two million tin n.
iiayn the Havas correspondent
on the rtrlllnh front. Thin
equal the number on the front
In 117.
GERMANS PLAN
NEW OFFENSIVE
Drive This Month Scheduled for
South of Ypres With Calais
as Objective.
DRIVE ON VIMY RIDGE
May Take Place Simultaneousrv
With That in Flanders Epi
demic of Spanish Fever.
(By Bert Ford, international News'
Service Staff Correspondent.) .
With the American Army on the
BrKish Front. Julv 10. -(Delayed.. )-
French prisoner? ofrar who escaped , fc. ... . ,
their German captor and made their '" 8Uthern Albania, on the western
way into the Belgian lines, say thai the wine ot the Balkan front, the Austro
Germans are planning an offensive ' Hungarian artillery has developed
south of Ypres. with Calais as Its ob- jrieat activity further eastward and
Jective, and that it may develop this ther la now mingled Infantry actions
month. and big gun durls over a zone of nearly
There Is also talk in the German 175 miles,
ranks of an effort north ot Albert, aim- I
ultaneously with the drive In Flanders. .
In an effort to turn Vlmy ridge an 1
Lorette heighta from the ares aouth ot
Arras. ,
There are reports of wholesale Ill
ness in the German army from the
Spanish grippe or the "Spanish fever,"
as the Germans call It.
Whrle divisions have had to be re
lieved becauae of the epidemic.
TRIPLE MYSTERY DEATH
STILL PUZZLES POLICE
Authorities Think Elder Krause
May Be Able to Throw Some
Light on the Case.
Waukesha. Wis., July 12. Local SniJ
Milwaukee authorities are today seek
ing Elder Krause, a farm hand and
probationer from South Milwaukee, In
the hopes of clearing up the triple
mystery death at the Wm. Mille farm
near here yesterday, where Hille,
Hulda Hille, his sister, and Ernest
Fentze were found dead, under unusual
circumstances.
Krause, who is missing, was em
ployed by Hille, breeder of blooded
horses, five of which were found shot
to death on the farm. A note given
to a neighbor. Mrs. Win. Dlngledein, a
receipt for $30, "for protection against
exposure," signed by the Bister, which
was found, are believed to be connected
with the ending of the three lives.
Pollde believe that Fntze, who is said
to have pretended he was a secret ,
i service agent, may have attempted to
SXtraet money from the aged man and
; woman, each of whom was past sixty, '
j on the ground of exposing them as i
being disloyal, as they were of German
extraction
Krause, too. Is said to have
i pog(!(j
as an official, and letters from
another sister of the Hllle'S, spoke of
some alleged misdeeds of h!s which
"L6 Si ihet"r b'1"1 torn up
the note he hnd Brnt her'
i
GOV. RYE CARRIES ON
CAMPAIGN IN SULLIVAN
(Special to The News.)
Bristol, July 12. Gov. Tom Rye, In
his senatorial candidacy, invaded Bui-
livan county yesterday and today. At
Kingsport last night he spoke to 1,500
people. He was introduced by Wm. r.
toner, a wealthy farmer.
The governor's speech was devoted
mainly to what has been accomplished
In the war activities in Tennessee.. He
was cordially received at Kingsport. i
He came to Bristol this morning, '
where he was received bv a number ol
frianda and was In conference
some of the party leaders.
with
.
MILITARISM WILL EVER
CLOSE DOOR FOR GERMANY
Paris, July 12. Germany has ex
cluded herself from the society of na
tions and will remain outside of It
as long as she is embarrassed by mil
itarism and the door will not be opened
until she has changed, says Andre Le
bey, who is writing a report on a
league of nations for the foreign af
fairs committee of the chamber of
deputies. In a statement to the Tetit
Parisien Deputy Lehey says:
"The allies have established at Ver
sailles an Interallied war council; why
should they not organize there an in
terallied committee to study the Idea
of a league of nations? This would
he a sort.of small -sized interallied
peace parliament to do for peace what
the war council seeks to do for war,
ine two actions are parallel and com
plementary. This first international
parliament would he the germ of a
league of nations. Why not seize on
the occasion of the anniversary of
July 14 to create it?"
ILLICIT DISTILLER TURNS
OUT TO BE GERMAN ALIEN
(International News Service.)
Atlanta, July 12. Arrested under a
charge of Illicit distilling, it developed
that A. F. Piekert is a German, born
near" Herlln: had never been natural
ized and had not registered as an alien
enemy. Piekert will be interned for
the duration of the war. He was a
well-to-do mn.ster nlnmber
INFANTRY AND BIG GUNS
ACTIVE IN 175-MILE ZONE
Austro-Hungarian Artillery Develops Intensity
On East Wing of Balkan Front Italians
Advance Nineteen Miles and Take
Important Base of Berat.
(International News Service)
London. July 12.- The Important Austro-Hungarian ba.e of
Berat, m southern Albania, has bei n captured by the Italians, said
Central News dispatch from Runic today, (, Berat is thirty miles
northeast of V.ilona.)
Pv the rapture of Berst ill dancer of a successful Austro-HlM
; f armn drive against Valona his been eliminated.
I The Italian lines are beine advanced thirty kilometers ("shout
j nineteen miles) in southern Albania and have been shortened more
than thirty miles.
The Italians took many Austro Hungarian1 prisoners in the fight
ing around Berat.
rw,.r,,,l c ...
tlntemutlunai News bsrvl i
Pins. .Inly i: While the Italians
and Frenrh have mnllniied to riH.inr.-.
CHILDREN FORCED
TO PROVIDE FOOD
(By Cyril Brown.)
(Copyright, 1918. by New York World.)
The Hague. Militarism has broken
the strike ot the Hamburg Bourse. The
commanding general ol the local army
corps promulgated ordinances threat
ening all exempted members with be
ing Immediately drawn Inlo the army
unless they resumed trading forth
with. The result was that the Ham
burg brokers voted for an immediate
resumption of business on the Bourse.
A curious instance of militarism Is
reported from Dresden. The military
autnoritles of the government of Sax
ony decreed that the aehool children
of that state will not get a summer
vacation beginning on July 15 unless
they "voluntarily gather at least
200.000 tons of leaves as "Krsats" hay
lor horses of the Add armies.
The military and civilian authorities
for weeks have been exerting pressure
on the school children to make hay
voluntarily, hut the results have been
disappointingly smnll, resulting in this
drastic, threat to the children unless
they gather the full amount of hay.
I nis muiiary measure. incitipruaiiy,
Is proof of the tremendous manpower
shortage during the harvrat season.
The relehstng debate on the army
budget disclosed other Interesting
phases of militarism. War Minister
Von Stein regretted Frequently tne
"far-renclilng promises made to the
relehstng. which afterward gave rise to
loua complaints wnen tney couin noi
be kept." The unkrpt promises hinted
at by Von Stein include the promise
to release the oldest tandsturm men
I'rom the service, and also the surviv
ing sons in families that had already
lost several.
Liberal Representative Mueller, from
Moiningen, charged thai deep resent
ment previiits In wide army circles
because of the tremendous number of
convictions of innocent soldiers who
have no appeal from the verdict in
the field. The army budget debates I
are read at the front with breathless
tension. Whoever reads the thousands
of letters reaching relchstaf members I
from the field knows how demoralising
Is the treatment accorded here to the
wishes of the field gray men."
He asked the war minister whether
I or not soldiers have the right of inter
course with their relehstng members,
I evoking the Ironic ejaculation from the
i body of the relchstag: "Youll wait a
i long time for an answer!"
1 Mueller disclosed that soldiers, writ
ing to relohstag members, again and
I again beg that their names be not dls-
; dosed. He cited the hitter resentment
prevailing among fighters at the front
I because the iron cross of the first class
had been distributed to all members
of the higher military bureaucracy anil
i even to the bureaucracy behind the
! front.
This has been fell like a blow Horn
S whip by the men at; the front," he
declared.
The war minister disclosed that
"prisoners returned from Russia nat
urally are duty hound at any time to
be employed In the army again." add
ing that written pledges again given
by German prisoners In Russia to Eng
lish and French officers were not bind
ing. Worth, a Catholic member, asserted
thnt "civilian clothing of men drawn
Into the army has been confiscated flt
absurdly low prices," and said "the
military must accustom themselves to
hear sharp speeches In the relehstng."
Socialist Stuecklen disclosed that
Gen. Von Vietinirhoff. commanding the
Second army corps In the district
around Stettin, had forbidden the cir
culation of the socialist organ Vor-
waerts in the hospitals and barracks
in his corps district. The speaker
added:
"The outrageous conduct of the Stet
tin commander shows we have mill
tary
absolutism.'
Liberal members have charged that
resentment wn.s caused among soldiers
on the battle fronts by reports of Ger
man war correspondents, particularly
by "exaggeration of enemv losses anil
the all too crude mlnlmlzlna: of our
own losses, also by running down en
emy soldiers."
EXTRAVAGANCE IN U. S.
CONSIDERED CRIMINAL
A Wahi.iston special stntrs that
taxes are contemplated on practically
) war om c in a ' ommuni
Ui dealing v. ith opera. ions in the Bal
kans says:
"South ot the Devoll cur troops, con
tinuing thilr successful advanrt, have
1 reached and occupied Kosnltz creat a
1 1 at. all the villages in the Tentorial
valley as far as Dobinev.
' The enemy's aitlllery Ik displaying
creat activity especially west of the
1 Vardsr river and north of Monastir.
1'itish aviators successfully bomb
I ed enemy depots In the Struma valley."
every nonessential of of life, in sug
gestions sent to th v tvn and means
committee ot the house by th war de
railment. The desicn oi these tuxes.
Which it Is proposed to Incorporate in
the new revenue hill, la to bring a halt
to the extravagance throughout the
l.'.iited States in practically every line
ol expenditure.
The suggest ions of the treasury de
railment were lor two groups of new
taxes aimed at the elimination of tx
psndltures for luxuries, and tu their
scope covering practically every non
saential. at the same time providtnf
that expenditures for the mose coatly
necessaries should likewise be penal
ized. There la proposed a tax of 20 per
cent, on automobiles, trailers and
track units, mctorej eles, bicycles and
upon automobile, motorcycle aud bi
cycle tins.
A 20 per cent, tax la suggested on
all musical instruments.
It Is suggested that the following
articles be taxed with the graduated
seal based upon the price yet to be
determined:
Men's Clothing Men's suitings sell
ing for more than 'M), hats for over $t,
shirts for ever J2, pajamas for ovtr
2, hosiery for over 35 cents a nsir.
shoes for over $5. gloves for over $'-'.
underwear for aver $3 and upon ail
neckwear and walking slicks.
Women's Clothing Suits selling for
over $10, coats for over $;io, skirts for
over $15, hats for over $10, shoes for
over $fi. lingerie over $5 per garment,
corsets $u, dross goods: Silk over $1.50
a square yard, cotton over .111 cents a
Hiuaro yard and wool over $2 a yard.
and upon all furs, boas and fans.
Children's Clothing Suits gelling
for over $15. cotton dresses for over
to. linen dresses for over $5, silk and
wool dresses over $8, hats over $3,
shoes over $4 and gloves over $2.
Under "house furnishings" it is sug
gested that the following nrtlcles be
luxed al rates yet to be determined:
Ail ornamental lamps and fixtures, all
table linen, cutlery and silverware.
"""'"' g's: mrnnurc in
sets tor wnicn more man ,i is pain
" each piece; on curtains at over $2
Per yard and on tapestry, rugs and
carpets at over $.1 a square yard.
On all purses, pocketbuoks and
handbags, brushes, combs and toilet
articles anil mirror at more than $2.
A tax of 10 per cent, upon gross col
lectlpns from all vending machines is
proposed.
The suggestion also includes a tax
of 10 pet cent, on all hotel bills
amounting to more than $2 a person
per diem and in addition It Is proposed
that tax on cabaret bills shall be made
to apply to the entire restaurant or
cafe bill (the present tax on cabaret
bills is 10 Jar cent.).
Under the second group of proposed
extravagance tax's, It Is provided,
that gasolene shall be taxed 10 cents
a gallon, the tax to be paid by the
wholesaler.
A tax of 10 per cent, on all leased
ears is proposed.
The following taxes on soft drinks
are suggested:
Those now paying 5 cents a gallon
to pay 20 cents; those now paying 10
cents to pay 30 cents. Those paying
10 cents a gallon to pay 40 cents:
those now paying 20 cents a gallon
to pay 80 cents. Mineral water now
sold at 1 cent A gallon to pay 16 cents
a gallon.
It is proposed to abolish the present,
tax on picture films and add to the
rate of admission and rentals.
Doubling of existing Internal reve
nue taxes on wines, liquors, beers and
upon cigars, cigarettes and other
gest.ed.
An automobile license tax on pas
senger automobiles graduated under
the following schedule is propsed: 33
horsepower less, $1; 21 to 30 horse
forms of manufactured tobacco is su-
power, $2f; 31 to 35 horsepower, $10.
and over 40 horar power, $80.
AUSTRIANS IN SERBIA
IN SERIOUS MUTINIES
(Associated Press.)
Corfu, July 12. A serious mutiny
among the Austrian troops In one of
the occupied districts of Serbia la an
nounced by the Serbian press bureau
here. The garrison at Kraguyevntz.
the former Serbian arsenal, broke Into
rebellion because of bad food, the
statement declares, and many of the
officers were killed.
The mutiny was suppressed after a
writable battle in which machine guna
and artillery were freely used.
J : , .

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