OCR Interpretation


The Chattanooga news. [volume] (Chattanooga, Tenn.) 1891-1939, June 28, 1919, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038531/1919-06-28/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

THE CHATTANOOGA NEWS: CHATTANOOGA. TENN., SATURDAY. JUNE 28. 1019,
100XIHG FOR DR.
H'CALLIE'S RETURN
TO MISSION KIDOE PEES.
BYTERIAN.
Work of Himself and Family
at Mokpo, Korea, to Be
Detailed in Talks.
A membership contest between the
Tray tand purple dlvtHtons is In prog
res at the Missionary Rld(te Preshy
nrtan. The church U looking; forward
ta the return next week of Rev.
Doufflaa McCallle and family from
Mokpo, Korea. Mr. McCallle and hie
wire are both missionaries of the
Southern Presbyterian church. While
here they will make numerous talks,
telling of the work among: the Koreans.
B. Y. P. U. Convention,
. Echoes of the state B. Y. P. IT.
convention recently held at Knoxville
will be riven Sunday evening- by the
twelve delegates who went from the
Ptrst Baptist union. At o'clock the
young ladlvs of the church have
planned to serve light refreshments
end all of the young: folks or tne
church and congregation are Invited.
Among1 those who will take part on
the program and the topics assigned
them are the following: "Welcome
nnd Reception." Joe Olllesple; "A
Worthy Program." W. W. Her: -Our
Trip." Llewellyn Chapman: "Mrs.
Crawley's Talk," Miss Jessie Wright:
Our New B. Y. P. U. Secretary. Mr.
Preston," Miss Evelyn McMahan;
"Knoxville." John Parnell; "A
Glimpse at the Knoxville First Union
on Sunday Night," Miss Haiel Brum.
mett: "The Lunch and Entertain
ment," Miss Mildred Stephenson;
"Our Play. Given by Chattanooga
roung- People." Miss Maude Barnes;
"Stewardship Talk by L. P. Leavell."
Miss Ethel Stephenson; "Juniors."
Mrs. S. P. Courtney: "Next Meeting,
P. U Johnston! talk, F. M. Dearing,
state president.
Rev. Churles Haven Myers, who Is
now In the west Rev. Harnett will
have an interesting discussion or
some of the lesuons growing out of
tne war and how to meet the prob
lems tn the future. Dr. Harnett Is
a forceful and Interesting speaker, ,
Northside Presbyterian.
At 11 a.m. there will be a special
sermon by Rev, H. N. Qulsenberry.
who will preach for the pastor at this
hour. Mr. Qulsenberry is a minister
of great ability, making a splendid
record in the late war service, and
should be heard Sunday by a large
audience.
Mountain Creak Baptist.
Rev. D. F. Mulkey. of the North
side, will hold services Sunday aft
ernoon at 8 o'clock.'
Hiohland Park Christian.
Services Sunday morning will open
at 10 o'clock. The Bible school will
use half the allotted time, which will
he forty-five minutes, and the last
forty-five will be devoted to worship.
The services will conclude at 11:S0.
Third Presbyterian.,
rr. Steele's subject at the. mora
ine service will be "Will Wars
Cease T" The contest In the Sunday
school between the reds and the
blues, based, on the number present,
will be continued. . : T
Patten Chapet.
K. H. Hoover, minister of Central
Church of Christ, begins a mission
meeting at Patten Chapel, near
Lookout lake, Sunday evening at 8
o'clock. This Is Mr. Hoover's, fourth
annual .meeting at this point.
Alton Park Bsptist.
Sunday evening at o'clock the
church will be formally . dedicated.
All helpers and the publio generally
Invited to attend- ...
First Christian.
On Friday, from 12 to 1 o'clock,
a great union patriotic service, par
ticipated in by all the Christian
churches. Disoiples) of the city, will
be held in this church. An inspiring
program of music and short addresses
will be presented. Medals to re
turned soldiers will be distributed.
All members of Christian churches,
friends and families of soldiers are
invited.
Pilgrim Congregational.
- Dr. Fred P. Barnett, of Fort Ogle
thorpe, will occupy the pulpit at the
Pilgrim Congregational church, K. of
P. hall, Walnut street, Sunday at the
11 o'clock service, taking the place of
Play at First Baptist.
"The Church That Went to Col-'
lege," a play arranged to carry out
the ideas of Christian education day
throughout the Southern Baptist con
vention, will be given by the First
Baptist Sunday school Sunday morn
ing at 1:10 o'clock. The program pre
sents the many phases of education
and especially brings out the many
reasons why young men and young
ladles should obtain a college edu
cation. The program begins with "a young
man who has been reading of the re
cent meeting of the Southern Bap
tlst convention in Atlanta." by Wil
liam Dayton. H. F. Howell, acting
superintendent, desires to have a bet
ter school and asks how he can in
terest more people as teachers and
officers, as well as enlist a larger
number of people in his school. MIrs
Evelyn McMahan takes the part of
the lady school teacher who Is very
anxious to get boys and girls to go
to college. Miss Katherlne Courtney
represents Miss Smith, who speaks
her mind on such subjects and raises
objections to everything in general.
Deacon Positive, who usually has his
way, Is represented by O. K. Grent.
Miss Harriett Hood, takes the part
of Mary Jones, an earnest young
woman with missionary inclinations.
Then P. ti. Johnston as Prof. Howell,
a Baptist educator, comes In and
presents the cause of education. In
turn answering many questions about
college, and finally converts all of
the school to his viewpoint Llewel
lyn Chapman Is the deacon g son and
Miss Mary Pearce his sister. Polk
Pmartt is Sam, a hard-working, am
bitious boy, and the girl chums are
represented by Misses Addle May
Barnes and Hazel Brummett
Here Are Latest Tracts Proposed
Avondale Baftist.
Rev. C. E. Sprague, the founder,
now pastor of the leading Baptist
church In Cleveland, will occupy the
pulpit at the evening service,
English Lutheran.
In the absence of the pastor. Rev.
Charles A. Phillips. Chaplain Rob
erts, of the post hospital, Fort Ogle
thorpe, will fill the pulpit of the
English Lutheran church at the 11
o'clock service Sunday. There will
be no service at night ' . , '
Central Baptist.
Dr. PIckard Is back from Knox
ville, and plans to bring two great
messaged next Sunday, The choir
(Miss Lallle Beall Keese, Miss Daisy
Wolf, Ernest Rolston and Richard
Park) will render a selection from
Donizetti's "Lucia dl Lammermoor,"
and there will be other special mu
slo at both services.
RECORDS COMPLETE
Washington. June 2S-(Speclal.)
Mortality records for Tennessee coun
ties dating beck to 1850 are in the pos
session of the census bureau at Wash
ington, and can be had by the state
for the asklna. The records, which
give the information for each county
separately, with the name of the de
ceased and the date and place of death.
furnish a rich field for those interested
In genealogy. The county records were
offered to all states of the Union a few
years ago, dating Back oeiore tne uivu
war period, . ana Tennessee was one
of the four states-which responded thet
the statlseios were not wanted by the
state authorities. Steps are being taken
to bring the matter to the attention of
John Trotwood Moore, state librarian,
and it Is believed that Mr. Moore will
take appropriate steps to receive and
proaerve these records.
f e 4
wmm i .
I 1 ml izT L
' I k . .. . 1 J P
, 1T?s . .... I
ui I i a
I SIT o 4
I i-ucn
i i II i Ah
. I m ev.uia Ak ,;
W
0 tT air &
V I f'llff ' ' ' "
A$T WINTW T oV" '
Above are pictured the two latest sites proposed for the new memorial
auditorium. In the upper half of the layout la a plat of site No. 5. located at
the northwest corner of West Sixth and Broad srteets. In the lower half is
a plat of the Market Square or No. 4 site.
Site No. 5, it will be seen. Is on the same block with site No. 3, which is
at the southwest corner of West Fifth and Broad streets. Site No. 4 runs
from the south edge of the Y. M. C. A. building to the north, edge of the
Volunteer State Life building. . . '
CALENDAR OF CITY AND SUBURBAN
CHURCHES
All morning church services, except otherwise stated, at 11 o'clock.
Sunday evening services, as a rule, at 8 o'clock in city and 7:30 o'clock
In suburbs. Sunday school services commence at 9:30 a.m. In city and
9:45 in suburbs. Nearly all religious societies meet on Sunday eve.
. nings one hour before regular church services.
Sunday Ni
Armageddon
" Is it past or future?
! Is it a great war, or is it a place of a battle?
Was the world war Armageddon, or is there
to he another, world war?
What says the Bible? (Rev. 16:16)
avenue
McTeer.
AT THE CANVAS AUDITORIUM
Opposite the Court House
. SUNDAY NIGHT
MtlHUDISI EPISCOPAL
AVONDALE Corner Miller
and Ocoee street; Rev. W. L.
h. M. Burns, 8. 8. Supt.
ST. JAMES Corner Bead and Ross
vllte avenues; Rev. Walter B. Smith. A.
L. Smith. S. S. Supt.
ST. MARK'S Cofher Forrest and
Mississippi avenues, North, Chattanoo
ga; Rev. J. J. Kobinette. W. S. Beck,
S. S. Supt.
HIGHLAND PARK Corner Orchard
Knob and Bailey avenues; Rev. M. P.
Murphy, pastor. E. B. Catlln. S. S.
Subjects: Morning, "Orleving the
Spirit;" evening, "The God of Abra
ham." FIRST Corner McCallle and Georgia
avenues; Rev. W. F. Smith, D. D. C.
N. Wood worth, 8. S. Supt.
MANKliR MEMORIAL East Chatta
nooga; Rev. Claude Vance Bellamy.
Dr. G. B. Harrison, S. S. Supt.
RIDGEDALE Rev. George S. Bales.
Carl R. Atliern. S. S. SupC
Suhlects: Morning (10:45), "Riches
and. What Should Be the True Attitude
of a Christian Toward Them;" evenliiR,
"Our Battles-, and How to i'lKlit
Them."
ALEXANDER SIMPSON, JR., ME
MORIAL Corner McFarland avenue
and Maple street; E. E. CavalerL L. A.
Urown, S. S. Supt.
ALTON PARK Charles B. Tarwater.
J, A. Stewart, S. S. Supt.
Subjects: Morning, "New Members'
Day" and reception of members;
evening. '.'Shining for God."
EAST LAKE Rev, R. C. Jones. J. R.
Horton. S. S. Supt.
Hear This Great Lecture-Subject by
i EVANGELIST WOLFE
NAZARENE
GOSPEL TABERNACLE Corner
William and Sixteenth streets: W. M.
Tfdwell. W. H. McCihee. S. S. Supt.
UNION
RED BANK Sunday school at 10 a.m.
L. B. Jones, S. S. Supt.
Dr. K. O. Gardner will preach at It
a.m. on "The Benefits of Christianity."
The World's Crisis, or the History of Na
tions. What this titanic upheaval of the na
tions means to the student of the Bible will be
told in an interesting way.
The Book of Revelation Now Being
Explained Hear It
Note the Program for Next Week:
Sunday Night "Armageddon: What Will
Become of the Turk?"
Monday Night "The Seven Lest Plagues:
A Famine Before the World."
Tuesday Night "How to Be Good When You
Do 'Not Feel Like It."
Wednesday Night "How to Pray to Obtain
Answers."
Thursday Night "The Return of Jesus."
Friday Night "Why I Became an Adven-
tist."
Sunday Night-
METHODIST EPrsCOPAL, SOUTH
j CENTENARY Corner East Eighth
j and A streets; Rev. E. E. Wiley. La
! vens Thomas, S. S. Supt.
I Morning: service by Rev. S. A. Neh
! lett. Evening service on courthouse
lawn.
I WHITESIDE STREET Rev. R. K.
i Triplett Charles Wallace. S. S. Supt.
! Subjects: Morning, "Seelns the Un
: seen;" evening. "The Best Way."
KING MEMORIAL H. B. Vaught. J.
A. Burns, S. S. Supt.
j RIDGEDALE Rev. R. E. Earley.
George C. Mason, S. S. Supt.
TRINITY Corner McCnHle and Park
I avenues; Rev. J. C. Patty. W. E. Brock,
j 8. S. Supt.
Both sermons by pastor,
j HIGHLAND PARIS Corner Beeeli
street and Union avenue; Rev. N. M.
; Watson, D. D. J. F. Holbert, S. S.
i Supt.
I Subjects: Morning (10:45), "The
How and the Where of Christian Edu
I cation:" evening, "He Can Who Says
! M FERRIN'S CHAPEL Rev. W. F.
Dully. Sunday School 10 a. m.
HfXSON Rev. Charles A. Pangle.
C. V. Hlxson. Jr., S. S. Supt.
ST. ELMO J. L. Mulllns. Flank
i Farmer, S. S. Supt.
j NORTH CHATTANOOGA Rev. a S.
Cutron.
! WISDOM MEMORIAL W. F. Dalley.
j Sunday school. 10 a. m.
li)AST LAKE Eaut Lake car line
i and Thirty-Ninth street Chas. K.
loncs. J. R. Horton, S. S. Supt. Sun
i day School at 8:45 a. m.
i DODSON AVENUE Rev. E. R.
Roach. J. W. Brown, S. S. Supt.
-"The Other Side of Death."
Everyone Welcome Seats Free
A Pleasant Place to Spend the Evening
I CHURCH OF CHRIST
i CENTRAL Masonic Temple build-
i ing, coiner Seventh and Cherry streets.
10 H. Hoover. A. C. Pinckley. S. S.
Supt. binle school at 9:45 a.m.
; Morning subject, "How Relievers
Are Kewarded."
COWART STREET Twenty-second
and Cowart streets. 1. A. Jacobs, S. S.
Supt. Bible school at 9:45 a.m.
Preaching at both hours by Price
Uillingsl"y.
ST. ELMO St. Elmo avenue ami
Furiy-eiKhtli street; Roy Simpson, S. S.
Sunt. Rible school at lft a.m.
Preaching both hours by J. Paul
HhiiIIii.
ItOssVILLE Rossvllle boulevard and
.rt v-.tirhl h Mtrcf.1 Oem ut W Kri-
' monds. S. S. Sunt. Bible school at 10
a.m. j - .
Sarvlces at II a.m.
RIDGEDALE 123 North Dodds ave
nue. Jesse Beall, S. ' S. Supt. Bible
school at 10 a.m.
Church services at 11 a.m. by R. R,
Brooks.
EAST CHATTANOOGA Corner ot
AuDlirg street and Chamberlain ave
nue. Z. C. Rowden, 8. S. Supt. Bible
school at 10 a.m.
Preaching at morning hour.
NORTH CHATTANOOGA At end
Walnut street bridge. Bible school at
10 a.m.. E. A. Lowery, Supta
Preaching at 11 a.m. by Prof. S. H,
Profntt.
ROMAN CATHOLIC
SS. PETER AND PAUL'S 212-214
East Eighth street; Rev. F. T. Sullivan.
LUTHERAN
ENGLISH Corner McCallle and Cen
tral avenues; Rev. Charles A. Phillips,
pastor. Sunday school, 10 a.m. Morn
ing service by Chaplain Roberts. No
night service.
IMMANUEL'S Opposite Southern
Express at Terminal station. Rev. Otto
Graebner. Sunday school at 9:15 a.m.
English morning service at 10:30
o'clock. German evening service at 8
o'clock. .
CONGREGATIONAL
PILGRIM Knights of Pythias hall;
Rev. Charles Haven Myers. H. A.
Symes, S. S. Supt.
Morning; subject, "Some Lessons
From the Great War," by Dr. Fred P.
Barnett.
UNION East Lake; Avenue N near
Thirty-second street; Rev. John Willis.
Sunday school, 9:46 a.m.; A. T. Barr,
Supt. Ensign class for men at 10 a.m.
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., the midweek
meeting at the Highland Park church.
Saturday, 9:30 a.m., Sunday school and
preaching to follow. All services, save
the Wednesday night one, at the K. P.
hall, on Walnut street.
LATTER-DAY SAINTS
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
Knights of Pythias hall, 208Va Main
street, and 711 Falrvlew avenue, at 8
p.m. Sunday school at 10 a.m.. and
preaching at 11 a.m.. at mission head
quarters, 711 Fairview avenue.
UNITARIAN-ALL-SOULS'
Houston street, near
McCallie avenue; Rev. W. M. Taylor.
Class In Christian ethics at 10 a.m., by
Prof. C. Everett Conant,
EPISCOPAL
St. Paul's Seventh and Pine streets;
Rev. W. J. Louring Clark. Celebration
of holy communion, 7:30 a.m.; Sunday
school and Bib'e classes. 9:30 a.m.;
celebration of holy communion (first
Sunday), 11 a.m.; morning prayer and
sermon at 11 o'clock; evening prayer
and sermon by rector at 7:30 o'clock.
CHRIST CHURCH Douglas street
and McCallle avenue; William C Rob
ertson. M. A.
Sunday school and Bible class at 9:20
a.m.: high mass. 10:30 a.m.: evensong,
p.m. Mass dally at 7 a.m. except
Monday and Thursday, when it is at
8 a.m. Benediction on Wednesday at
8 p.m.
Second Sunday after Trlnltv.
ST. JOSEPH'S MISSION 901 White
side street: Father Evans, priest In
charge. Masses. 6:30 and 10:30. Sun
day Bchool at 9. Eveningsong at 8
o'clock.
GRACE MEMORIAL Corner Hick
ory street and Klrby avenue; Rev. Ed
raon Reynolds Jones. Sunday school at
9:45 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
at 11 o'clock. ComniunKSn, 7:30 p.m.
UNITED BRETHREN
Corner Duncan and Buckley; Rev. A.
O. W-lght R. F. McClure. S. S. Supt
Subjects: Morning, "The Life More
Ahundant;" evening, "The Last Har
vest." CHRISTIAN
FIRST Corner Georgia avenue and
Seventh street; Rev. Claude E. Hill.
Andrew Smith. S. S. Supt. Bible school,
9:30 a.m. Communion service and ser
mon, 10:45 a.m.
Morning subject, "The Fear of
God:" evening service on courthouse
lawn.
HIGHLAND PARK Corner Bailey
avenue and Beech street: Rev. wmi u
h,.i. N. f. Carr. H. S. Supt.
Preaching at 10 a.m., concluding at
11:10 Subject 01 sermon, Tin run
n-.ua Af Time."
t'.ART LAKE Bible school at 10 am.
Otis Uverton, 8.. 6. Hupt, Communion
at 11 a.m.
BAPTIST-
CENTRAL McCallle and Palmetto,
Rev. W. L, . PIckard. D. A. I-aiidresn,
8. S. Supt Bible scnool at :30 a.m.
Subjects: Morning, "Christ's Test!,
mony to a Man;" evening, "Christian,
itu- anil Our .Country."
AVONDALE Kev. W. R, Hamlo. J.
A. Penny, 8. S. Sunt.
Herman by Rev. C. B. Sprague.
OAK GROVE TABERNACLE Rev.
E. J. Baldwin. H. E. Thurston, 8. S.
fiUDt.
ALTON PARK Kev. 8. N. Hamlo.
E. B. Veasey, 8. It. Supt.
Sermon at 11 a.m and dedication at
I P.m.
FIRST Corner Georgia avenue and
Oak: Rev. Harold Malnr. Charles F.
Hood. S. 8. faupt. Time, 11 a.m. and
I p.m.
Cf..rnlnv mhM "What Uintllti R.
lleve Regarding Church Membership.'
RIDGEDALE Corner Twelfth and
Peachtree streets. Rev. F. E. Hauser.
J. S. Lnmb. S. S. Sunt.
FIRST Nona Chattanooga; Kev. u.
E. Blalock. R. S. Taylor, S. 8. Supt.
B. Y. P. U., 6:45 p.m. Evening service
at 7:45. ,
e.'.st lakjs corner Tmrty-iourtn
and Avenue L; Rev. W. E. Davles.
WOODLAND park uev. George
W. Mcuiure. ,
ST. ELMO Rev. Oscar D. Fleming
Car) C. Ling. Supt Bible school.
HIGHLAND 1 AUK He v. VV. 8.
Keese. Bible school, 11:30 a.m. J. R.
Humphreys, S. 8. Supt. '
subjects: Morning, . "Baptist and
Christian Education;" evening, "Full
ness of the Bible."
CHAMBERLAIN AVENUE East
Chattanooga; Rev. G. T. King. D. K
Whitaker. 8. S. Supt.
TABERNACLE Corner Long and
Twenty-nrst streets. Rev. J. B. Phil
Hps. John E. Ling, 8. 8. Supt. Bible
school at 9 '80 a.m. ,
EAST CHATTANOOGA Rev. J. N.
Bull. W. J. Carey. 8. -8. BupL 1 '
TYNER Key. A. T. Hayes. Geo. C.
Etenhens. 8. S. Supt. Evening at 7:30
O C10CK.
CHURCH OF CHRIST (Scientist) - '
FIRST 811-813 James building, sun-
day school, 9:30 a.m. Services Sunday,
11 a.m.; Wednesday. 8 p.m. Free read
ing room, same address, open dally ex
cept Sunday from 10 a.m. to S p.m.
aunject tor tesson-sermon. Chris
tian Science."
SECOND 313 McCallle avenue. Read
ing rooms, tenth floor James building.
Open every day from 10 a.m. to p.m.
Services Sunday. 11 a. m., and Wednes
day, 8 p. m.
Subject for .. lesson-sermon. "Chris
tian Science."
PRESBYTERIAN
NORTHSIDE Mississippi avenue:
Rev. Oscar E. Gardner.
Morning sermon by Rev. H. N. Qul
senberry. Evening subject by pastor,
stop, platen and Look." . . .
FIRST Corner McCallle avenue and
Douglas street: Rev. J. W. Bachman.
James F. Finlay, S. 8. BupL
Morning subject. "Good Reioicina-."
Evening service on courthouse lawn,
SECOND West Seventh and Pine
streets; Rev. E. A. Elmore, D. D. C. V.
Brown, s.- s. supt.
FIRST CUMBERLAND Corner i Oak
and Lindsay streets; Rev, R. A. McCul
loh. Fred K. Shelton, 8. 6. Supt. -
Subjects: Mornlne. "The Breadth of
Faith:" evening. "What Does Lovaltv
to Our Church and Country Call For?"
MISSION RIDGE Rev. E. S. Lheu-
reux. Dr. J. Park McCallle. 8. 8. Supt.
Services, 10 a.m.: Sunday school, 11
a.m.
Morning subject. - Tell Them How
Great Things the. Lord Has Done for
Thee."
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN Rev. Battle
McLeater. John A. Chambllss. S. B.
Supt. : ,
Morning subject, "The Awakening."
THIRD AND PARK PLACE Corner
Oak and Baldwin streets; L D. Steele.
rt. s. roner, a. s. supt.
Subject of morning sermon. "Will
Wars Cease?"
CENTRAL Corner Hickory street
and Bailey avenue; Rev. T. 8. McCallie.
K. F. Hudson, s. 8. Supt.
EAST CHATTANOOGA Rev. R. W.
courthouse lawn, "Backbone." 1
GLORY RESTORED
TO VERSAILLES
Second Peace Signed to His
toric Hall of Mirrors Gives
Back Lost Prestige.
BISMARCK WORK UNDONE
UNIVERSALIST " r
DR. SHINN MEMORIAL Corner
Main and Hickory streets; Rev. George
A. Gay.
OLIVER CASES TO
BE HEARD MONDAY
Several Cases of Excessive
Charges for Coal in Viola
tion of Fuel Laws.
Knoxville. June 28. (Special.)
Charges of fraud and sabotage against
William J. Oliver and others will be
heard In federal court here Tuesday,
July 29. The defendants in the sabot
age charge, which ie an outgrowth of
charges of making bad shells for the
United States government, are William
J. Oliver, William J. Oliver Manufac
turing company, John M. Walker, J. K.
Campbell, J. S. Waterman, Thomas P.
Roberts, John Dean and Charles Woods.
The sabotage charge Is made against
William J. Oliver. William J. Oliver
Manufacturing company, J, 8. Water
man,- J. Ed Campbell and Thomas P.
Roberts. All emphatically deny any
guilt in connection and atate that they
connoentiy expect to prove their inno
cence. J. A Zlegler, who has given
evidence to the government, is alto, a
defendant in the 'alleged sabotage
charge, but his case is to be heard sep
arately.
Among other cases to be heard are
several coal cases, In which operators
and dealers are alleged to have made
excessive charges for coal. In violation
of the Lever food and fuel act: also
cases of highly technical violation of
other laws, including the narcotic act.
There are several cases in which Inter
nal revenue violations, such as illicit
distilling, retailing without license and
transporting liquor into dry territory
are charged.
Some ot the charges made are said
to be of a highly technical-nature and
do not Involve a serious offense or re
flection upon the integrity of the defendants.
Mr. Oliver is now at Hot Snrings.
Ark., where he went for his health. He
has been suffering from injuries sus
tained when struck by an auto truck
several months ago, and his case has
been postponed several times. His
skull was fractured. ....
Owing to his ill health Mr. Oliver has
been unable to devote much time to his
duties, and announcement has just
been made that his brother. R. B. Oli
ver, has been elected president of the
William J. Oliver Manufacturing com
pany. R. B. Oliver la- a man of
broad experience in general construc
tion and contracting lines. He now has
large, contracts for road construction
purposes In a number of the southern
states, but this work hereafter will be
looked after by Mr. Ralph E. Oliver, as
all the time of the former will be oc
cupied In the management of the plant;
WANT BENTON M'MILLIN
Would Keep Former -Tenneasean In
Peru.
Lima. Peru. June 27. The American
society of Peru has Initiated a move
ment to have Benton McMlllin, of Ten
nessee, the American minister, retained
here as ambassador. Minister McMillin
recently was nominated by President
Wilson to be minister to Guatemala.
The society, composed of Americans
throughout the Peruvian republic, at
meeting yesterday unanimously au
thorised its board of managers to send
President Wilson this cablegram:
American Society of Peru sincerely
regrets possible loss of Benton McMil
lin a8 American minister and wishes to
Inform the president of the United
States that McMlllin's appointment? as
mbasaador here would be most grati
fying to members of this society."
A number of Peruvian newspapers
have indorsed the suggestion.
Opposition Developed.
Washington. June 28. Opposition to
the transfer of Minister McMillin from
Peru to Guatemala already has devel-
ped in the senate foreign relations
committee and delayed confirmation of
the change. Senators from Tennessee
are said to feel Guatemala Is a less im
portant post than Peru and they, with
others, wanted time to inquire into the
reasons for the change.
Thousands of - Parisians Line
Avenues to Catch Glimpse'
of Delegates. , .
Vsrssill.s, June 28. (A. P.) ;
The signature of "the Second
pesc of Vsrsailles" in the long
Hall of Mirrors in the chateau
. of France's great monarch, Louis
XIV, today restores to Vsrsailles
fes old place as the stags' of ''all
the glorias of Francs," dimmed '
irr mors rscsnt days by memoriea
" of mobv axessses during, tha ,
Franch' revolution, tha military -downfall
of Francs in 1870 and
tha proclamation of ths German f
empire in tha same hall. Repre
sentatives of ths nations of the s
world gathered thsrs to sign and
seal the instrument undoing tha
work of eonqusst of - Bismarck
and Von Moltks and inaugurat- :
ing ths. away of ths lesgue of
nations in place of tha ill-sd-
justed ' European balance or
power.-
The ceremony was set for S o'clock
In tha afternoon, but hours before
that time an uninterrupted stream of
automobiles began moving up tne
cannon-lined hill of Champs' Elysees,
past the Arch ,of Triumph and out
thrniiarh the shadv Hols de uouiogne
and Park of St. Cloud, carrying pleni
potentiaries, officials and guests to
the ceremonv. - They reached Ver
sailles over a thoroughfare kept clear
by pickets, dragoons and mounted
gendarmes and were cheered an route
by throngs gathered in the flag
decked -suburban-towns of Boulogne,
St. Cloud and Sevresvllle for a pass
ing glimpse of the world's celebrities
ot tha conference. , , ;
Ranks of Frenoh 8oldisrs. , -
Tn tha meantime. thousands upon
thousands of Parisians were packing
and sDecial trains upon the
three railroads and interurban lines
leading; to Versailles, and contending
with the residents of Versailles for
places in the great Place d'Armes
before the" chateau., or in Chateau
park, where the playing; of the famed
fountains or Versailles wouio mant
the end of the ceremony. They could
hope for only a brief glimpse of the
delegates, but they wished to be able
to say later that they had partici
pated in the event. --
Tha Avenue de Paris. the . broad
boulevard leading direct to the- cha
teau's court of honor, was reserved
for the automobiles of delegates and
secretaries. For half a mile before
they entered- the chateau grounds,
the motors rolled along between
ranks of French ..soldiers of today,
succeeded within. the- grille or ths
court of honor by rows of statues of
old-time military, heroes of- France,
from Admiral Du Quesolin and cnev
alier Bayard, "without fear and with
out reproach," to Prince De Conde
and Viscount De Turenne. , v
A comoanv of republican guards in
brilliant full dress uniforms, drawn
up at the end of the couct as a guard
of honor, presented arms, as the lead
ing plenipotentiaries passed. On en
tering the building by the portal
through which the Paris mob burst
in the early days of the Frencn "revo
lution, the delegates mounted by - the
marble or queen's stairway to the
suite of "queen's apartments" and
the Hall of Peace, through which they
gained access to the Hall of Mirrors.
Ushered in Formally.
To reach the peace table the pleni
potentiaries passed through a space
reserved for some- 400 privileged
guests, who were instructed to be in
their seats well in advance of the
entry of the delegates? -It had been
arranged that the delegations, instead
of straggling in without order, as
they did when the original terms of
peace were communicated to the
Germans, should make their entrance
by groups, each one being formally
announced by ushers from the French
foreign office. ,
No Honors for Teutons.
This formality was not prescribed for
the Germans, who were given a separate
route of entry, coming into the chateau
through the park and gaining the mar
ble stairway through the ground floor.
Thus there was" no occasion for the
guard of honor to render them military
honors which were reserved for the al
lied representatives. Ulsmounted guards
with drawn sabres, who lined the mar
ble stair case and the queen's apart
ments when the allied delegates passed,
remained In their places, however, for
the entry of ths Germans. Ths setting
of the Hall of Mirrors, a long narrow
gallery of t feet from end to end,
with high arched ceiling adorned with
allegorical and historical paintings oy
Uebrun, and bright with the light re
fleeted from the mirrors which match
the almost uninterrupted array of win
dows forming ths opposite side of the
apartment, gave a tone of Impressive
state which would otherwise hays been
rather lacking in the 'assemblage qf
delegates who were clad as for ordinary
gatherings in frock coats nd cutaways.
Seventy. Two Chairs Around Table.
Seventy-two chairs for the plenipo
tentiaries were drawn up around three
sides of the table, which formed an
open rectangle fully eighty feet in
length on Its longer side. A chair for
M. Clemenceau, president of the peace
conference, was placed In the center
of the long tame lacing m wmuuwo,
with those for President Wilson and
Premier Lloyd George on the right and
left hand respectively. The allied dele
gations were arranged In the same
order as when the terms were presented
to the Germans, but the German dele
gates, this time. Instead of facing their
accusers, were assigned seats at - the
side Of the table nearest the entrance
which they could take after all the
pthers were seated. - .-. -
This arrangement would permit them
to leave after the signature of the
treaty before the allied delegations, not
waiting for the semi-state procession of
allied delegates through the long suites
of the chateau apartments to the ter
race, from which to witness for a time
the playing of the Versailles .fountains
before returning to Paris. i .
Enlisted Men Cheered.'
A few minutes before t o'clock ths
fifteen enlisted men from the Ameri
can, British and French armies entered
the hall amid decorous cheers.
UNIQUE PROGRAM AT v
CENTRAL Y. M. C A.
MONDAY EVENING, JUNE
. 30, AT 8 O'CLOCK.
Royal Holland Bell; Singers
Here in Remarkable
, . . Performance.
The members of the T. M. C. A.
and their friends' are cordially in
vited to attend a very unique musi
cal program at the Central T. M. C.
A, Monday evening,. June 10, at
o'clock, which will be given by the
royal Holland bell - ringers, which
consists of six people fatherymother;
three sons and a daughter.' This re
markable, family has .been t in this
country only two years, tourh.g the
country. They have played In all o(,
the cantonments of the central de
partment of the national war work
council of the Y. IS. C. A., also at
the government war exhibit at Chi
cago. . Their . Instruments are very
unique and never before used, in this
country. . Songs are rendered.' in the
Dutch and English languages , and
they will appear in the native ' cos
tumes of the common- people of. Hoi-
land. - They come to Chattanooga
very highly recommended and no one
should miss this opportunity to hear
them. .- . '
Children Ory
FOR FLETCHER'S - W
CASTOR IA
iPartha Washington College
Sixty years' distinctive leadership in education of young women.
Thoroughness of instruction, Christian culture and refinement,
healthfulness of olimate, a pleasant home-life In a eultured community
of interesting historical associations. . .. ."
' Full collegiate, literary and science oourses leading to. Baohelor of
Arts degree. Fifteen units required for entrance.
- Schools of Musio, Art, Expression, Home Economlos offer courses
laadina t eartificatas and dirjlomss.
Buildings five modern, brick, connecting, steam-heated, el(
lighted. Modern gymnasium. : . . .
. Next session opens. Sept. 11, 1919.
Rates are moderate. Address V
CHARLES C. WEAVER, President, Abingdon, Virginia.
Emory and Henry College
(Established 1839) ; ;
emory, Virginia. -
1 Located en the Norfolk '& Western, twenty-five miles east of Bris
tol, Vs. Noted. for beauty and healthfulness. New and modern dormi
tories. Faoulty of University-trained teachers. Courses of instruction
up-to-date and thorough. Literary Sooieties famous for excellence of
work. 8ociety halls unsurpassed In the south. - Fifteen units required
for admission into the Freshman class. -' Rates very reasonable. Write
for catalog and book of views. . Next session opens Sept. 18, 1919.
For information, address CHARLES C. WEAVER, President, Em
. cry, Vs.'. ' , , . , . , , , ... .
Christianity
j.
and Our Country
Will Be the Subject of
DR. PICKARD'S FOURTH OF JULY SERMON
. . Tomorrow Evening; at 8: IS O'clock
CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH, McCallie and Palmetto
Morning Topic
Christ's Testimony to a Man
SPECIAL MUSIC BY THE CHOIR-Mba Lallie Beall
Keese, Miss Daisy Wolf, Mr. Ernest Rolston, Mr. Rich
ard Park; Miss Ruth Wood, organist. -,- .
Morning Anthem "Sweet the Moments, from Doni
zetti's "Lucia."
Evening Anthem "Eternal Light of Light" (Brack
ett). '
Public Invited to All Services
Including the Bible School, at 9:30 O'clock.
GEORGIA MILITARY
t)
X
TM7. J
a iii ' n
H
ACADEMY
COLLEGE PARK (Near Atlanta), GA.
I One of America's
Most Splendidly
Equipped Prep Schools
Reserve Officers' Training Corps Under War
. Department. A Majoi1 and a Captain, assisted by x
Two Reserve Lieutenants and a Sergeant
' Detailed by Secretary of War
Operated by. about- seventy-five leading citizens
of Atlanta and Southern States to afford our
boys and young men educational advantages
equal to any in the United States. .
MomAii'al Holl wsfino- SKf) (MM) nnd dprtmated
to the hundreds of brave men G. M. A. sent to the
colors in the recent world war, now completed.
Graduates Receive Full Military Credit and
Benefits on Entering Senior Units.
" r i' .
FIVE COURSES OFFERED
(1) Classical-Preparing for regular college entrance; (2 Engineering Fitting for schools of
Technology; (3) Commercial-Preparing for business life; (4) Special -Fitting cadets for West
Point and U. S. Naval Academy; (6) Motor Transportation.
v SPECIAL ADVANTAGES
1. Large Faculty of Experienced Educators
with small classes for individual, thorough,
rapid work. '.' ,''
2. Tutorial System whereby cadets live In
the homes with the teachers, thus being under
instruction and personal care at night
3. BeautlfuV and Commodious Campus, and
unsurpassed drill and athletic fields.
4. Food Supply wholesome and abundant and
served under faultless conditions in new kitchen
and most beautiful dining hall in the South.
5. Two Gymnasiums indoor and open air.
. Ideal Social and Moral Atmosphere, Y.
M. C. A. building, and many unusual education
al advantages in Atlanta. . -
7. Pure Athletics, Championship teams in
baseball, basketball, track, and swimming.
8. Patronage select and limited.
. . Graduates enter West Point and colleges
without examination. ;
10. Nearly 1200 feet above sea level, in the
, foot hills of the Blue Ridge; ideal climate.
Summer Camp and Naval School at Highland Lake, in the "Land of the Sky,"
3300 feet above sea-level, near Hendersonyille, N. C, June 23 to August .25
For Catalog during the summer, address
COL. J. C WOODWARD. Pres., HENDERSONYILLE, N. C, r COLLEGE PARK, GA.

xml | txt