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The People's vindicator. (Natchitoches, La.) 1874-1883, August 29, 1874, Image 1

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Pm ,.An, a.l.s.The Welfare of th People l h the Supre LaweR
n (3 per
VOL. N& CITOC , LOUISIANA, AUGUST 29,1874.
pOL. 17 ____O1
• • . - ..1c ~~~I.,I  "-,t-• ,
ARRIIfAfiA '4(D VE1'Aft1YRES.
(hLenoy vil'luarnuticen12Aiandr
• : 7. A.M. 4 f 1 . ,+ f', :
SIIREV.EeTik, oa , , XMsr
thaviff, ald Pealunt fl1f-1daity at
' 0 A M t * , , ', . " ,7*
NACOGa SlMeolrsee Chirine. Ban
Aigusntine giaumodlctp, "bipe.
town, Maly siid Ft. 'Jesup-ma ies
day Thu day" Itd a6 s Ikulº'*at
HO.MER, MfinJen.cki U 6~qk o id,
Coausattl' a
day and Friday, at 3 j',, .
WINNFIELD, AtLapts, Autton and Rt.
Maurice-on Tuesday and Prlday,
at9 A. M.
MAILS CLOSt
At 6 A. M.for New Orleans, Alexondria
and Cloutierville.
At 9 A. M. for Shreveport, Keachi, Mane.
field and Pleasant 1Hil.
At 6 P. M. for aýJ~Ogdoehbe, Texas, Met
rose and Ian Angustin,
At 5 P. M. for Homer, Lah, luckhorn,
Conshatt and Cahipte.
At 10 A. M. for Winnfleld, &c.
Office Ilonur-from 10 A. Ar. to 2 P. M.
and from 3 rseto 7 t M.
J. F. DThVARG., Post Mastec
Professional Cards,
-w. H. JACK. D. PtOI f ON.
Jaor, dt Pierson,
Attorneg.,and Coueselors at Law,
NATCHITOCHE8, LA.
W fLL prac tice to the Coerta ef Natnhttnhee
Sabine, DeSeto, Red River, Win, Bapideq,
and Grant, and in the Supreme Court df the
State. Claims promptly attendedto.
June20--ly.
I. M.IKEARNEY. M. J. Cp;NINMG IAM
Kearney & Cunningham,
Attorneys and Counselors at Law,
Omce on St. Denis Street,
June 20--ly. ,atmh  eeto La.
L.ey cb Pierson,
Attorneys and Counselors at Law,
0f1ce corner Second & Trudsa storeets,
Jane 20-ly ' Natchitochea, La.
Business Cards.
M. IH. CARVER. R.1. TAYLOR.
OCarver d Taylor
Wholesale san Batsil dealers In
Dry Goods, Groceries,
HBDAIOWAE,
" SHOES,
HATS,
CIROCKERYWARE, etc., etc.
FRONT STREET,
S Natchiteches,  a.
A rE8 sat eltec stk. o:f alwag y'o
oan and, hibe baving been palretased;m
a cush bls en>bas a to ot er~etr lnduace
meats t eashb juyers.
Highest easltries pald for eftton and ethet
pridohe, sad liberal advances made in chli
or wmerehadhiee o eawpab
Jaeu sa-ty.
ORIt 4 DOME TIC
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
_ 'IJOTS),
SH0~ andd HATS.
C~ou r ofI Pdt di 4t n Irh Stoefe.
Jane SEA2I . :
. i . i t c ,.
Als -aent hr, -n,
,, n . ,
#9 arAM Staple
tIQUflas.
e'aA. BULLARUl N, II. CAMIlBLt
Bu1. ird: & C,.ampbl c1o
DRY GOODS, . u, ,
GROCERIES, U •t
R HARDWARE,
And General Merchandise..
. Crner Faotr b LUAarur Street;
1$ 7 hVatchitecha, ,L.
r.,=I Tcsh price d for.eotan d,,
'ie l;de in or mer mn .
laterspettbn fat, aTWhghteu= & Lafa d
NatMitcbee 1 .
DRY GOODS, Groceries,
Iardware,
Crockery,
Hats,
'Caps,
Boots,
Shoes and Notions.
Special inducements offered to Cash
purchasers. Cotton and country pro
duee, both at highest Cash rates.
June 20.1y.
fleverly T koi.er,
Corner Front and St. Denis street,
NAcrnIrodnvs, La.
RETAI deale ti choice Family OGreerie.,
COFFEE,
O'WINER ,
Ctgars iad Tobacco, &c.
tP Cheaper that the Cheapest.
JunAe am.
.Ale]. Grmula,
(~lhe.People's Favorite Grocery.)
K"Ec" HonstF'tlv Ron band
.BACON,
LARD,
h1AMS,
And in fact a full line of fancy ftsafi sup.
plies. Give hle a cll. Satisfaction garau.
teed. June SO-ly.
Theo SChuz2mas1,
-DEALER IN
DRY GOOD0 ,
GROCERIES, and
GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
Cor. FRONT and ST. DENIS Streets,
June 20- Natchitoches, La.
..
June 40-1y.
D'' . CALVES,
Surgeont Denltistw
,(qpGer Alet - SeoISt 8i 4t.)
N aATOOCR LA..
theI$ ttsue) Oet Pp b.u~t$,
V ý rawtet~werb Madsct Ide
the and m nto
hi 'IR
c.a.. . . .. s w, ,
]deli a I e.48bgbIope wipb, t
I.p ose (}th dignsthe
Astua ieoiart o couny tr$..
Jb·9WP.
Orilg of the Black League jS
'the State of Mississippi.
UNION BROTHEItJlOODS, ETC.
N. O. Bulletin, eint.
" This Republican sheets of the Nortl~
accepting the mendacious reports of
their Southern coajutors, have pre.
sistentlyiisrepre seuted. every;,effori
made ly the white, people of the
South to secure an honest erection
and admfointration, And In iao one
particular have they labored-, more
streunously than they hlave to create
a" falal inpression concerning the
'object;'bf tlie "White Leauge," Ig
'nodrathe fect that' acouatnr leafgue
on the.part of the blacks has existed
ever since the year 8(idi .
A brief history of the origin of the
Black League in the State of Mis
sissippi may contribute, in some miens
ure, to correct the opinions formed in
consequence of these false statements.
Soon. after the close rV the war the
ounth was flooded with a clasp nf ad
vdnturers who diiscovered, in tihl ig
irg!ance and superstition of the negro,
a sure means of elevating and en
riching themselves. They began by
alarming their dupes pith reports
that the white men intend to de rive
them of their recently.acquired lib
erties; that they were resolvqd to
grant thenm no privileges under the
law, and that all their efforts were
being directed to the end of reduieing
them again to slavery; Under the
specious pretext of providing a main.
tenance for widows, orphans au4 sn
perannuated negroes, they orgasized
societies which were given the ifame
of "Union. Brotherhoods." Small
sums of money were exacted from
each member, ostensibly for the pur
pose of providing a benevolent fad,
bit, inreality, to further the ends of
their carpetrbag leaders,
These brotherhoods were soon
transfi~med into secret organizations,
anid assumid the name of "Black
LeMgue.'.. Imposing upon the efedu.
lityandesuperstition of the negooes,
they, ound them by the most terible
oathp tosecrecy; and instructe ithem
in digns, passe-words, and all' the other
forms of secret orders. So thd6eagh J
ly under the control of these leagunes
were the members, and even ;thone
who were not members, that they
dare not take the responsibility of
acting independently of their instruec
tions. When the constitution of 18%6
was defeated, by a majority of 7000,
in Mississippi, numbers of negroes
were prevailed upon, and assurances
of protection against outrage from
their fellow-negroes, to vote against
it. They trembled te they polled
their vote, and invariably exclaimed
that they looked'for protection to the
white people. In many instances
they were really attacked, and their
lives threatened, while, at the same
time, they were upbraided with hav
ing violated their oaths. In all sub
sequant elections not one of them
has dared to vote . otrary .to the
diretijon of hip league., ,Just lefore
eletiop a courier passes from planta
tied to' plantation, and reads an edict,
puripfdtng to be an' addreds from the
Cnttal -.Hepubliean Committee, butl
what in,realty is a secret orderfroa
the headquarters of the league.
The Blacki League of Mississippi
has long been, in efftrect, a military or
Gaiistie;-. fthe members have de
nied themelves, inh many instances,
the necessarles of life, in order to
imraeure airms nd iamunnitioi,' Negro
adlimtaN; rom their pulpits, denounce
dire judgmeeta upon those who have
the rashness to act for themselves,
and hurl denunciations agalqst the
white jsille of the most ineendlary
chataterat Religiomi is ptotidtmited to
prty ends, and pryers are aiddes
Sothe Deity, breathig vengeance
abdatrled aganast the white race.
l1t. let the Radieal press ofthe
NIhl;,bvestltgate this mathti, +ett
tlem:acquasint themseive'owtl h the
9P1etp,,of therprt la the,
Bouth n.6and for the lqre of justice
add coiMistened'aevote Its columns to
dOrb ahfit~b seCobd tid0 them pets
of~ jr!l rn letthem ralse theery
go6l, tIli* " ~t 6t r'the~euforemene'
ehtP'f dtto the Blan IJAgueti'
thifi hsmlibeofsaimea l d age ~ il .a i
prtsr at the wll spe
uamlats dighe 'i dA fro tr
tudwie uiue ir., A. serIobs looki
(ilouSdrewtlhl dish toward ifbme,
lthbi- tWuwlema;mi inserttd  hit fOgtk
iate;he~ a bad trnserred t to bit
*w pla, rlesukings 81tr, doieu
IP+ uoab'* at t : a llwm,
perMbetly well I Engla hat sines i
.mherelef k5,00 a yai ier ordoaing
notmhan. who winath an dii gl·.-e
.nothmng. Who wouldnr't be a privic 7'
I From the Yisoo City Demuocrlt.
The Color Line.
We see that mnly of our cotempo.
raries are begiuning to advocate a
white man', party, a party based on
color, which shill include all the
whites if the Stal regardless of old
party ties, name of fflliation. This
is an issue that the conservative- or
Democratic press' and people have
tried earnestly to tave off, and have
used every mInean epnsisteut with lion.
or to avoid, and have approached
even to the verge eo'timidity in their
desire to prevent patty lines from be
ing based upon races This line was
early establihsed by the Radical and
they have been as e ldulous in keep
ing up and strengthning this it as we
have been in trying to break it down,
in our siqeere belief that it could
only be productive of mischief, and
probably Iii the end beget an animo
sity that wotfld prove destructive of
the best interests of our cotntry.
But the issue is upon us and we can
not longer avoid it if we would. We
have tried: onciliation, We have nused
reason, argument, persuasion, all in
vain. Conciliationl and copromise
has met with coldness and distrust,
reason and argument with sneers.
The negro is thoroughly inqculate4
with the idea that the White Muan'
interest is necessarily antagonistic to
his own, and lsa been firmly impres
ed by his scalawag and carpet.bag
leaders anll instructors, that what
ever ii to the' white man's interest, is
beyond all question to his disadvan
tage. They have been taught to re
gard with suspicion any and every
thing that came from the white man,
and well have they learned thelesson,
He will believe'teadily, whatever any
straggling adventurer, claiming to be
long to the loyal al.leagu, may choose
to tellohim, if it be but something
against or detrimentaltto the interest
or honor of the Southern white manr.
To convince the colored man that
we were not opposed to Northern man
and a Radtcal, for the Gubernatorial
Chair, believing him a good man, who
would do justice to both sides, aid
again, giving away to his prejudice,
because, he was a brother-in-law of
that Mahonmet of this worship, Gen.
Grant. What was the renst of this
concession! The negro voted dead
against him, because, the white man
souported him. ,.,
Hdw  uchk longes must it take ti
whilte peolet to unde'statid that tfis
Color Line is already established, and'
drawn in, the deepest and darkest hues.
We may. hut our eyes, and atteonpt
to ignore it, but it will not alter the
fact that it is so. The Radicals have
drawn thetine linid arrayed the ne-1
groes in solid ranks, with a strict cen
sorship to prevent " their, straying.
Their Leagues are strictly organized,
and bind theim'b tie strongest oaths
that they kdow rhow to administer.
Every negroio. Siaor against the
white man.., Tooe is only one thing
left for us, and that is to meet the s.
sue manfally. ' liere is no .dodging
it. !M us h 'b~iird'`vhith leagues
aid -oppose ou,dointry'se aemies and
luanderers with a spiritstrooger and
more determinedthpln that ,by whclh:
we are opposed.
SNew Deparbien of State.
WOM5N QUAnRTERED I THE ST. LOUS 10O
TEL-il' MONEY OF THE WIHITE TAX
YPaERn 4Oal To PATY EWf, OR THen COl-1
WOED.lIAl,-CiLi LuiHTs BOi ,IqG
We give the following news from
thie New Orleaas' Balleth. as rather a
startling way 'of. disposing fanuds
wraung from our impoverished people
It seemu these hell hoeande eanuot rob
s sdieientljy in. a egislatti'vnway
and have made the bpa pr a aparty
to a "hash houselfthlr btddin will
be chesp-, Ple 'it ei. yrou: only
stre-gthen the white qai el, their des
terminatlonto rid thbiselves of 3yeu
fourelow l & : . re i ?,
+,We had been ' abrifg for eIonth
past rder the benign spell of a Rip
asmWinkle slee p unti alsed yes.
eida. We had. takctih~ o6riakrble
paihs to aunravel alltltbih t~a dhnnect.
,d with the ltat-Hoeasjet and give
t eo the worl? tl -nfpjtI'  lbist
the r, u bas a of t i . Louis Hot
f i* te purmiOb l't 0n el/t0 oor
aytothe ktewledge thet'
neJuspd tthe asql oi4s eF podio to
n-abithraetudine Sati ,i ieadl
gm ar o! uol the . ' l
ele #wsnd ! te o.d lieeo e
we ewhere ". F*t'he proMi
gersteofthe s Lwreouis' a heporswt-tto
era tl in onv pptin wh h ami -
whllo demanded his busiumaHi 0b .
here private 'puiustsmd what he
ina tp thre br." 'Taee dooi oriz I
eral rooms were:open, and the report-
er (still in coivwrsation with "thc5 ooi
man) looked in. There was conside
table attention paid to creature com
forts. The beds were ch'ant chairs
leatf and in fiict every thin wrth in
just the order one would esipect to
find in some rich seraglio. The wo
aman stated that a colored woman was
"gw'ine fur to start a boarding-house
t p stairs hero next week," and seeiin
ed inclined to be willing to take the
reporter cheap. A lunher of other
dusky dames longed about in careless
eboniy grace, and seemed to think the
visit an" intrusion.
After the woman had exlitastied her
oposition the reporter left and de
scended otIaUehowling PsrOmIsw
the Convegtion, The contrast how
marked.' Above, all serenity and
peace; below, pendemonlnm itself.
The rooms now occupied by these
women are on the third floor of the
Chartres street side of the Hotel, and
the public cannot enter. How and
by what authority a part of our State
House is taken possession of and turn
edi into a hoarding-house we cannot
say. If Kellegg, Packard or any
body thinks that our people are goi:
lng to stand such a disregard of every
tlhingthat is proper they are mnista
s Tihe whole affair compares very
favoraly with other of H]adical tricks,
and will serve to unite the oppomi
tion.
For board ovlodging apply at the
St. Louis hotel, up stairs."
SENAtOR MORTOx AND LOUISIANA.-..
In an article criticizing the recent
Speech of Senator Morton at Terre
Haute, the St. Louis Republican re
marks:
In vain.does Senator Morton with
carefully judggled phrase invoke new
politic life for himself and new pros.
pect for his fortunes from the trans.
portation question. The memory of
Louisiana whom he struck down in
his pride and power, haunts him.
Even while he prates of the "wrong
of the farmer," the pitifnll face of the
stricken Commonwealth is upturned
to him in, her agony, and upon it is
written the story of wrongs of the
farmer are almost trivial.
No mabI may escape aXemesis, and
such is, Louisiana to Morton. The
memory of her woe is branded upon
the muids of men as with a searing
Iron, and with the smarting brand his
atd 'in Ineffaceably coupled. We
ase not ofithesewho ceaselessly yearn
for lyeange. , There are Wted who
ha-stlpned in the way of oppressing
Secnquered people, who can be and
ate freely forgiven for the sake of
their reletance, told in good works
even at the eleventh hour. But Mor
ton is not one of those men. The
ti& turned, the eleventh hour passed
and still' fdnd the maths of hias n
gem fresh upon the throat of Louis
iana, so that for him it is too late to
repent.
"I neker get tired of studying the.
Londoih"'1by," writes the Danbury
NEWs man.' "IfHe i aludays on the
street, and always in the * ay. I
never saw such a boy in any other
city. He 1p not quarrelsoume, nor
saudy, not addicted to smoking,.nd
I never heard one of them swear,
even underi the _most favoratble clr
comstanees., To tell the troth, .I
never heard them say much of any.
tding.; i He is' a helpless yoPth, ad
dieted to store windows, kubbing
a~galbstlnltdinga, udan topfJll~bg over
obstrue is.. l.e lia iMa dreadfdal ten.
dency to be alwaysy aekippp against
sbkmethin, mbd' issingt to
the detnuiment of his bones. 'Odly
they do not fall with silftient f6rcee'
to break a bone. Ihae seenoae of
thent slide front tha side of a lanmp
post, torn apart mammergautt recov
erhilwself, hit all aalanst the post
again, slip off the enrb~ dthd grad
l get dowE o hisbback l nthe gut
ter--t ing sll sfsqmdien seconds
to d it, ile a Ameidcanboy would
grdosu and stave% ho!i in theimack
o-ibis head, sad make a doetor's' bill/
of.I0! in les thatn secondA.
' i*tinu alt AwiJr.-.Wednesday
afternoon a ientseotil individuali
who easeofroumt some to*Jv in Geie
see  Cnay was. unodiced * aderiyg
arp-un Franklli sIte avuing.cpanle
siderable moeny i bnd lei, tie
aloeke toihm anlid Ymnt iii' that
he hld belerW lot·k out bol himself;
heu' ~~ r mpre4+:.9Lhoo94
rolled up In ball and tcik l of
red, Jqt bowiie-Lkuialtt i'm ,x.tum
Yei~dy base policeman found
tbesjmlnidu ylinq asleep beek
"of acI fis e e !iIrad
aedt hid # A i,.&fWere nnie.
" 'Mtew,"la1the 1b*,a. hbe ioked
ta.,.ms'.s, wl hqepb, , "ay, aren't
you timsthatinntderols I ,th nortn
oaia " nThe at naps ' up oke
taesnd 't a 'dolied way, u idenlo
rpliledt "No, 1.- Mhmt te tly, thusa
derlt, hbat f'al the deafool who
tug1t hpbe tul-Detrt ieree Press.
'A'e ihid whid"oone atarttedlu tie:
cotose of evil conduct is like a loeo
motive on the wrong track--it takes
the switch tim get it ,I..
Farm and Household (ojunm
A Bee-keeper gives this plan to
prevent a swarm of been from getting
away from the hive, with the state
mnent that after ten years' exiperience
he has never knownt it to fail but
once :As soon as they show the first
sya3ptolas of swarming stop up some
of the 'utlets to the hive so as to
force them to a considerable time
coming out. The swarmi being made
iup in part of young bees, many of
them unable to fly well, and, as the
swarm can do nothing Utntil all are
ltt iind flying about in the air, by
proloigtiig'their s it the feeble oneis
become tired, al~~ findling their plans
frustrated, they slight to arrange
theft jobfney. If.they can leave the
old hive at oiee they eatetery little
about alighting.
THE GRANtOERS.-4Ve learn front
thei energetic Deputy tirt this Parish
antd Vernon, Mr. Joseth ii. Ifynson,
fliittlie has wittln theltlat few weeks
organliz t*d ttl uoe Granges on the
North side of lied Iiver. This is
right and we are, only sory' that the
uittier Is ttwo, instead of twenty a
*eek. 'his side of.the river seems
lp h slow albot getting pp their lists.
We have.seard of Beveta, however,
in the process of prelimihnary orni
satloit otr herte and have no doubt
but that they will spring up briskly
this Fall, when money gets a little
Chore plentiful thlan it now is among
our planters. We would like to see
every planter in the Parish heldog to
the order and then they could control
the labor question as it ought to be
bantrlled by them.-Caueasian.
From'six to ten drops of the Con
centrated solution of chloride of soda
in a wineglasdul, of pare spring wa.
ter, taken ilnmediately after ablu
tions of the morning ate completed,
will sweeten the breath by disinfeet
ing tihe stomachq which, far from be
ing injured, will be benefitted by the
medicine. If neeeary, this may be
repeated in the middle of the day.
In some Cases the odor from carious
teeth is combined with that of the
stomach. If the month is well rins
ed with a teaspoonful of the cblution
of the chloride in a tumbler of water,
the bqd ordor of, the teeth will be re-'
movtL
A correspondent of, the New ,York
Tribune gives the following as a sure
pireventive against bydrophobia:
One apd a half ounces of decam
pane root (green preferable, if ob
tainable)5 boiled in a pint of milk
until redueed to hal a plnt, Take in
time orninog, fasting and do not
breakfast until 4 o'cloel lit the after.
noon. Intermit another day, and
then take samte dose as last. hlis
will be effectual if, taken at any time.
before the pardysmsul come on."
. Hot di -water is A resent munges
tion pt an insectleide. It will plesa
troy ' 'and black loitsn cochroaches,
spideir, chinch'bmigs; 'Aid 'all tid
crawlin peste which fetbst our ahos
es. Tae two pounds of alsu and
dissolv it in three or four quarts of
boiling ater; let it stand on the fire
till the t disapears; then apply
It with' brush whle 'nearly belling
hot to eerv joint and ereite in your
closets, a beds , .I.ltty-sihelves,
and the; like. Iruslh the crevices in
the loot of the skirting or mop-boards,
if you suspect that they harbor ver
min. If, in whitewasehlng a ceiling,
pleaSty of ala stmit added to the lime,
it wial also serve to keep insects at a
distace.. Cokroaches will flee the
paint whlci ~pa been wasled in.cool
laiu wrath. 8agaorbairrels and box
es can be freed frotm asitsby drawing
a chalk mark just around thie edge of
the tpp of them, The nlark mnet be
unbroken, or they will Creep over it;
batu toetipuous ehalk mlark half an
inch tn widt.t wiil set their depredr a
tionsat nasUght. Powdered alom or
bora will keep the chinch-bug. at a
rnpecitable distance, and travelers
should aiwt carry a pacimkage in
their, band-bgs to scatter over and
pndif their illows in places where
they hlave reaiti t suspect theim pree
enceof seuk bei-fellenws.
BoxETHIN FR EvEItBono '.-
"WOod lice" in ffalteYor pots may
be trapped 'with a piece of apple or
poetato a balt ooeely lncasel i'n dry
1 4t'of the dhadolsr that cross ocr
path through life dAe caused by our
standing in ur ot own light.
i :Iss~~mlisted that thete ilre one'
mll.i bushes 6f wheat along th6'
sie and trIbuttary to the Dakota
89 a e lped, ina Ntelrak~ and.
TIm;l'e Oranges In Whitbeside county,
-ll.rnis, have relveqo. to go into the
-inauaetre of agrenitural imple-.
met. nn a 6 capital of *10,900.
.+j B~Ftelpe, tn takinu
partchen. Lay boards
twoen the rows tdh helter thiem in tihe
dtytine, and they' Will mnakea car.
nival of the tbaO at night.
A etrong solation of carbolie, acid
iIst water poured into holes, kills all
fthe ants it touches. and the surrivirs
imnmediatelx take themeielves off.

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