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The Norfolk post. (Norfolk, Va.) 1865-1866, July 28, 1865, Image 1

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THE NORFOLK POST
Is Published EVERY MO—IMG (Sunday's _twpied) a
No. 18 Roanoke Square,
NORFOLK, Va.,
end sold to Dealers and News Coys at
TiIRQB D;ILI.AR3 Pilft HUNDRED
or sent to snbecribcre by mail at the rate of
TUN DOLLARS PKR YF.IR
pay ible in advance Single HpiM, at the ccmntrr, FIVE
Resident* in the city of Norfolk or Pot time nth, tlcdr-
Ing the paper left regularly at their houses or place.- of
bnsliass, will be served by a carrier, by leaving the n. in ■
and address at the counting-raom of the publication
oOce. • Tbey will settle with the carrier weekly lor ihc
same.
united states 7-30 loan.
ttn itejd States 7-Wloan^
By nuthorlly of tho Secretary of Treasury, tho under
slgUed has assumed the General Subscription Agency for
the sale of United States Treasury Notes, benrins seven
and throe-tenths per cent, interest, per annum, known
as the
SEVEN-THIRTY LOAN.
These Notes are issue' under date of August Uth, i. »
and are payable three years from that rime, In currency,
or are convertible nt the o'i'bn of thr older into
UNITED STATES 6-20 SIX PEI! CENT. GOLD-BEAR
m mm
These bonds are now worth a premium of tine fer cent
including gold interest from November, winch makes the
actual proflt on the 7-30 loan, at current rates, lnclu.Ung
Interest, about ten per ceut. per annum, besides it, exemp
tion from State and municipal taxation, which aJJtfnm
one to thru per emt. more, accordiug to the rate levied en
other property. Tho lutere=t is payable semiannually l,y
coupons attached to each note, winch m:iy be cut on and
sold to any bank or banker.
The interest amounts to
On* oetit per day on a -50 note
Two cents" " " £100 "
Jen » " « .. |gg „
90 " " » " $1000 -
tl •)'•)'• fagg „
Notes ortdl tho d«norair.sttlen« name! will be promptly
furnished upon receipt of subscriptions. This is
THE ONLY LOAN IN MARKET
now offered by the ttofarUMßt, and it is coiiiidontly ex.
pected that Its superior advantages will mske it the
OREAT POPULAR LOAN OF THE
PEOPLE.
Less than 5200,000,000 rilS-ln unscld, which will prcl ,v
bly bo disposed of within thcuwxt sixty or ninety days,
when tho notes trill undoubtedly command a premium, ns
has uniformly beeu tajteSM in closing iho Ftiusoriptioiis
, toother Lot us.
In ordor tint citizens of SVery t -ivn and section of the
•uuntry may lie afforded facilities'h.-!- taking the loan, the
National Hanks, Stiitoßanks, lodi'iiv.ite l...nkeistbreut,!:
out the- country have generally agrood to recoivo fttbftrip
tlous at par. Subscribers w-ill anata* their own ngonts, In
whom they have Ceuutteiico, and who c uly are to bo r<
spouslble for tho dolic Iry or tiio notes for which they re
ceive orders. JAY C JOKE,
a
SuijKrlption Agent, Philadelphia.
Subscriptions will be receive 1 by Ihc Exchange NutUm
>il Bank of Norfolk, Virginia.
FACTS ABOUT THE 7-30's-THE AD
VANTAGES THEY OFFEP.
Turin AdsoU'te Sccchtt.—Nearly nil act.'ye credits on I
»ew based on Government Kcunltleo, an \ bunks hoM ftei I
as tho very best and strongest Investment they can make.
If It were possible to cotiteit'olete the flnhtlflSj failure v
the Qovorument, no bank would baany safe* If money
Is loaned on individual notes or bond and mortgage, ii
will be payable In tho same Ciiriency as the '..'ovoLiuie' '
pays with, and no better. The Government never hai
tciled to meet its engagement*, and lha national debt iI;
first mortgage upon the whole property of tho ooftttrj
While other stocks fluctuate' from ten to fifty, or **M
greater per cent., Guveiuuieut slock-i are always coiupnv:
lively firm. Their vain? Is fixed and reliable, beyond all
other securities; for while a thousand speeulatlts babble
use and burst, as a rule they att never below par, and an
often above.
lis LrsntAL iNirjissr —Tho gcnerul rate of Interest i
six per cent., payable anuually. TAfJ is seven and three
tenths, payable sc.ni-annually. If you lend ou mortgage'
there must bo a searching of titles, lawyers' fees, stani]
duties and dolays, and you will finally have returned t'
you only the same MM of money you would receive fron
the Government, nud less of it. If you invest In this loin
yon have no trouble. Any bunk or banker will obt.iin i.
for yon without charge. To each note or band are aXßxe.
flee "coupons"' or fteieTail tickets, due at the expiration o
each successive half-year. Tho holdor of a note bus sun;
ry to cut off one of that* coupons, press**! it to tho aaanst
bank or Oovornment Agency, and receive his interest; th
Bote itself need not be presented at all. Or a coupon thu
payable will everywhere be equivalent, when due, to is
ney. If you w lab to borrow ninety cents on tho dolls.
npon the ootos, you have the highest security In the msi
hot to do It with. If you wish to sell, It will bring with,
a fraction of cost nnel Interest nt any moment. It w 111 I
eery handy to have in tho houso.
Il is Co»v_HBU into a six per ceut. gold-healing bon
At the expiration of three ft—l a holder of the notes i
the 7-80 Loan has the opt ion of noefpting payment in in.
or of funding his note* lv a six percent, gold-interest bon
the principal payable Lv uot loss than five, nor more tha
twenty years trotn it* date, as the Government usy else
These bonds are held at such a premium ns to make th.
privilege now worth two or tat co per cent, per BMWn, an
adds so much to the interest. Notes of the same class, 1
sued three years ago, are u;w selling at a rato that liii
proves the correctness ol this statement.
lis ExsMl-noN mou SrAix oa IfMMMt Taxation.-
But aside from all 'he advantages we hive eautuenttod,
special Act of Congress exempli all tomb and i,tusm
notufrom local taxation. Ou th* average, thi* exempt.
is worth about two per cent, per annum, according to tl.
rate of taxation in virion* parts of the conn try.
It is \ IfatnstAl Savinds Bans.—While this loan pr.
senta great advantage* to larg* capitalists, It otter* speci
lsduoeuwuU to those who wish H make a safe aad pi lit
ble Investment or small savings. It is every way tho be
Savings' Bank: for every Institution of thi* kind mv
somehow iuvest its deposits profitably In urJ* to pay I \
terest and expenses. They will Invest largely i>i thi* loa ,
as tha best Investment. But from the cross intttreat whie
they receive, they must deduct largely for tho sixpenses .
the Bank. Their usual rate of interest allowed tod po .
ton Is & per cent, upon sums over tiOO. Th» person wl
Invests directly with Government will ruceeVe almost E
per cent. more. Thus the niau who dejiosite jiOOO in
private Saving*' Bank receives CO iledtars a year tßtatM
If be deposits the same sutu In this National Savings' Ban!
he receives 73 dollar's, tor three who wish to find a sal<
convenient, and profitable means o! invtivti'ag th>di'sur»iti
earnings which they have, reserved for tuolr old age or fo
the benefit of their children, there isDokbing "Wen pn>
lent* so many advantages as this National Loan.
Jo- 21 '
npHE "CORNER STORE."
LOCKIIART £ STIVE*,
li. 1 EAST MAINSTKLET,Cf,»NICKBANK.
HALL'S OLD Of/t.M LR.
larg* and select stock of Ladles.' ami Gentlemen's FTH
iUING GOODS in every branc*. of the trade, always or
d, consisting of ladies' aud g' . n tß' TOILET ARTICLE*
PLKNDID ASSORTMENT OF
-~ IJUVELU NO BAGS, •
AND SATCHELS,
VALISES, tc
ANCY OOODS, Phalffn A Sons' celebrated PERFUME
BIBS, eeneclally th* world renowned" NIGHT BLOOMINi.
CERECS," " OOCIN S.ANS PAI'.EIL SO.U 1 ," and " GOtD
BN CREST" Perfunsery generally.
Shirts and Drawers mode to order at short notice and
with dispatch. Special attention paid to the making of
LadW and Ohlldren'a garment*.
This being a branch house, we are enabled to supply the
Jlt LOCKHART A STUCK* J
a_a_a_a_a_a__s— a_a__
I ____ <-*
VOLUME I. 4 NORFOLK, VA., FRIDAY, JULY 28, 1865. NUMBER 32.
NATIONAL BANK
OF NORFOLK.
president:
GILBERT C. WALKER.
JNO. JAY KNOX.
I THOMAS CREAMER. CINCINATUB W. NEWTON.
I EDWARD M. BROWN GEORGE SANGSTER.
, MARSHALL PARKS. WILLIAM NICHOLS.
GOVERNMENT DEPOSITORY AND
FINANCIAL AGENT OF THE
UNITED STATES.
j Exchange Bank Bnilding, Main Street
AGENT FOR 7-30 LOAN.
A constant supply of Notes trill be kept on hand.
IBank trill buy and sell nil classes of OOV'ERN
IECCRITTES at current market rate*.
IS II EXCHANGE and make collections on ALL
UNCIi'AL CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES.
me Government Voucher* on the MOST FAVOR
ERMS. and give Caitirvi ai»d Prompt A ttintmk to
OUSTS OF BUSINESS MEN AND FIRMS,
iv other business entrusted to the Bank.
INFORMATION in regard to GOVERNMENT
tt all tunes cheerfully furnished.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 1
< M i' i. 01 I ..il i KOU tit or L'ORRRNCT, V
Wasuinoion, May 13th, 1860. J
.A3, by satisfactory evidence presented to the un
it it has been made to appear that the "£X
f. NATIONAL BANK OF NORFOLK," in the
lorfolk, in the County of Norfolk, and State of
has been duly organized under and according to
outs of tho Act of Congress entitled "An Act to
l National Currency, secured by a pledge of United
nds, and to provide for the circulation and ro
i fterettV approved June 3d, 1864, and has com-
U :.'! the provisions of said Act to be complied
ire commencing the business, of Banking under
tUREFon;, I, FtsiVA-v Ciarx s Comptroller of
siicy, do hereby certify that "THE EXCHANGE
AL BANK OF NORFOLK," in tho City of Nor
lio County of Norfolk, nud State of Virginia, is
d to commence the business of Banking under
tforcsaid.
In testimony whereof, witness my hand and
pool of oflico this thirteenth day of May
FREEMAN CLARKE,
Comptroller of the Currency.
TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES,")
Division or ihs Nationai Banks, >
Washington, June G, 1864. )
It is hereby corllfiod that THE EXCHANOE NATION
ALBANK <iF NORFOLK, Virginia, a Banking Associa-
It organized under the Act "To provide a National Cur
cy. secured by a pledge of United Stoles Bonds, and to
vide for the circulation aud redemption thereof," ap
vedjsuc 3,1864, having complied with the require
uts of Bccttou 45 of said Act, and with the regulation
this Department mntlo in pursuauoe thereof, has this
been designated as a Depository of Public Moneys, ex
t receipts from Custoini, and by virtue of *ucb dealgua
i will also be employed as a financial Agent of the
IIIIHII I. E. SPINNER,
je 21-tf Treasurer C. 8.
■" ■— A-i 1 ' .:" .:
_ PRINTING.
THE NORFOLK POST
JOB PEINTING OFFICE.
NO. 18 ROANOKE SQUARE,
(roBUSRLI iUE ILUtAfD nCIUiINSj
NEAR MAIN STREET,
ill be cempleto in all Us appoiutmeut*. The latest _t
.ovements in
PRESSES,
TYPES AND
MATERIAL,
Esther with tho most PROFICIENT and KXPERI-
N'CED JOB PRINTERS, will suable us to execute
.VERY DESCRIPTION OF PRINTING in the moat satis
ctcry mauuer. The facilities afforded by the BEST
.ND LATEST IMPROVED MACHINERY. willalsoena
-10 tv to furnish work at n great reduction from former
ices In Norfolk, rendering It unnecessary uitber on ao
unt oi mechanical executiou or yrice. for any to send
cir otciur* il■ .'j to have thciu tilled-
HANDBILLS.
BILLHEADS.
t'A.M PHLETB.
BLANKS.
CAR2»S
d Card wmh of every description, PLAIN and I\
>LORS, will be printed i"v the VERY BEST STYLE aisi
tisfactiuu guaranteed.
All orders should be plainly —ritten, especially prop-r
iiies, to prevent mistakes, and hauiied in at the Count.
j room on the first floor, or il sent by letter addressed to
.. M. Brown, Norfolk Post.
C.csh on delivery of the work, except In oases where or-
I •rs are from regular advertiser*. In the latter coses bills
I ill be rendered monthly.
jTAItD WAR E , CUTLERY
HOUSE FURMI3UINO OOODB,
At -Vo. 11 Ahrtxt Square—Sign of the An.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
I would respectfully informjny old customer* and Us*
I MM* generally that lam receiving daily large addition*
I o my already extensive Block of
chichi invite the public to examine before purchasing
I isesvli.-re. ,
j, 6-tf W R. HCDOINS.
X? IL DU N N & CO . ,
*SADI.ERV »nd
HARNESS,
TRUNK!, _.
j YALIStS.
No. 25 Main Bt "*J
f UMBER.-We are elaily _ cxpecj i * i e
PI ANh"*' " f * carMvf Laml> ". *»°si» Un l«
SCANTLING,
BOAJ.dp,
PALINOS,
... _ LATHS, Ac
veeetl fT , s, Ulli,pW, of low ' M"» wW#k» <—« *•
BUSINESS NOTICES,
lujp A. & C. A. SANTOS,
NufiV* 6 MAIN STREET, AND NO. 51BANK STREET,
NORFOLK, Va.
IMPORTERS AND OIAIEHBIN
DRUGS,
PAINTS, »
0118,
WTNDOTT GLASS,
m
SPICES,
mum,
SOAPS.
PERFUMERY,
Ac ic. 4c.
Onr Btock wtll always be large and select, and buying !
bom first hands, and to a ywi exteut (or cash, and nt n |
proper time, wo ran giv« assurance of the excellence of j
our goods, and can sell at the Lowvst Market Pric- 1 !.
Jy SMI M. A. A C. A. SANTOS.
T> U R G E S S & CORE,
WHOLESALE
Grocers and Commission Merchants.
Dealer* In {,
WINES, LIQUORS, SOAP, CIGARS, SUGARS, MO
LASSES, COFFEE, FLOUR, BROOMS,
BUCKETS. CANDLES, 4c.
Consignments solicited. S*le< t Family Groceries constant i
ly on buind corner Wide Water and Commerce Streets
Norfolk. jy 12—lm
RATIONAL HOTEL, [ '
„. |C NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. |
MALTBY& CO., ,
11
PROPRIETORS.
>2a-tf (
ATLANTIC HOTEL.
A. G. NEWTON, Pbopbietor,
NORFOLK, VA.
' Carriages always In readiness to carry MMM to aiid
j
from the boats.
Tht bar and table always supplied with iv» choicest
(VINES of «T«ry variety, malt and spirituous LIQUORS.
Ja2l
irERWIN & FERGUSON, °
ITX AUCTION
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Wide-Water Si. and Roanokk Suc.ir.c, *
Will attend to the sale of Real Estate, Merchandize, 4c. ,
Liberal advaneea made on couslgumsut-
F. F. FERGUSON.
JoH-tf 9.0. MERVvIX
NICHOLS & CO.,
WUOLjiSAUi AND RSTAIt EEAUr.3 IN
GROCERIES,
STOVES,
CROCKERY _yd f
GLASSWARE, ,
-ALSO
ASSORTED WINES AND LIQUORS, j
17 East M tin street, Opposite Market Square,
Je2l Norfolk, Va. i
T ~O~C~K-Ta R~T &STI NE R, 1
LADIES',GENTS AND CHILDREN'S
FURNISHING GOODS,
PERFUMERY, TOILET AHTICLEB, ic.
Extracts, Soaps, Colognes, Pomades, Lilly
Whites, &c, _c, &c.
No. 1 Main Stpxet,Corner or Bank.
NORFOLK. VA.
■ WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. Agonts for PHALON i
SON'S Celcbratod Perfume ry.
T M. RENSHAW,
M • WHOLESALE GROCER,
COMMISSION A FORWARDING MERCHANT,
BELLS WHARF, XORFOLK, VIRGINIA.
Liberal eatb advances made on consignments of South- •
crn produce, for sale or shipment to New York, Boston, |
Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Agent A'«e York and Virginia SUamthip Company. i
|c 21—tf
nUDLEY BEAN & CO., f
WUOLESALE GROCERS, PRODUCE
AND (
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
49~ liberal advances made on all Merchandise and Pro
duce consigned, e—-tf
OH-RMAM BROTHERS & CO.,
Nos. 16 and 18,
ROANOKE SQUARE,
WHOLESALE DEALERS
a
GROCERIES AND LIQUORS.
j* 22-tf
OHAW & ROBERTS,
AUCTIONEERS~AND GENERAL ,
commission merchants.
Corker Wide-Water and Roanokj: ;
Streets.
Ooodt amsignad sold to the b.s*. advantage,and liberal i
adeaoees made. Particular attention irlven to llie> sale 01
Real Est:' te, anil renting of l.trelling Houses.
Otb« sales ol Dry Goods, Groceries, Ac., will be pro
iierlva^ls.ftised.
All good* oonsigued will be sold promptly and returns
made at once. IT I—tf
JOHN MAYHER, <
• | AGRICULTURAL
IMPLEMENT WAREHOUSE ]
AND SEED STORE, I
NO. 115 WEST PRATT STREET, BALTIMORE, MD.
HANVVACTOIIT, MACUINS SHOP AND FOUNDS',
CORNER'OF PLOWMAN AND FRONT STREETS.
J»>-3m
"T GORDON MILHADO & CO., (
•t/lIfWEM AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
is rear or the Custom House,
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA.
Constantly «& b " ai * •**• "fitment »* Fanvly Grrcc .
ri»». i '- J " '
° CRASKEE BAKERY,
45 Vest Main Street ,
and warrant ft— to girt s_t_Uott/ n "2t_?r___
S3 it to ft* Interest to nice me a OS U U Kan, ur »h
them with Pic- nic a.td Oyster Crack.'". »' _JJ l ".
prices, aud alwajayreah. A liocrul „cou> t ~ l0 " e " l " c
merchants. 29—Sin
Norfolk, Va. J' • B— **"
WM. NICHOLS & CO., ■•• :'::-
--y\ WHOLESALE OHOCERS
Duttns in
CROCKERY,
BROOMS AND WOODEN WARE.
20 aim 22 roanoke 5 j»..ar,
Je 27-tf NORFOLK. Va.
\f AYH E W & BROTHER'S,
X NEWSPAPER, BOOK, STATIONERY
ANt>
PERIODICAL DEPOT,
No-*7 M\in Strict,
NORFOLK, VA.
Tha latest and beat pibllcations by the moat popular
authors constantly on hand.
Agents (or the "ARMY AND NAVY JOURNAL"—t«t
by mail throughout the Department.
STATIONERY for the army and navy.
Orders promptly filled aisd forwarded.
CARTES DE VLSITE c«T celebrities constantly on
hand.
«*" Pbrticnler atteut.on paid to filling orders for She
>aw York, Philadelphia aud Baltimore Dally and Week
ly Papers and Magaiinee, *c, *c.
Deads** in Photograph Albums. Diaries, Blank Books,
terftimary. Fancy Article*, framing Paper, Clgara, Shoe
_____. i* m** 1
—aam—c»s»—h_«—a—■«■_—>*_*_»*_»__
TEAVEIER'S GUIDE.
PHILADELPHIA andS [OHMON D
■hum packet company
• FOR PHILADELPHIA.
TILE STEAMER :
CLAYMONT, Capt. Robinson,
Will leave Bell's Wharf, Norfolk, for Philade-lplila on
BATVRDAY. July 2Sitb, at \i M. For freight or passage,
apply to lUOS. P. CROWELL 4 CO.,
Ho. 5 Campbell's Wharf.
Entil fiti'tlier notice, one of the Meaner*of tkk lint '
will leave Philadelphia uud Norfolk every' gA'i'l'BDAY. ,
Jy st—it <
\TE\V LINE ,
1> FltOM '
NORFOLK 10 cni'ItRYSTONK VORKIOWJT, 1
A*D MATTHJ:V. s COUNTY, t
Tun fast and Favorite Steamer /
< I MAI'TANO,
capt. wtusaut, l
. | Wal comraeric* h«r Regular Irlpi to the above munsd '
places on illl'R.'jUAY, July aifh, l c Co, leaving i
NOIU'OI.K »XR CUKRRYSIONE
! every I
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY ano FRIDAY,
1 and p>r '
YOH-TOWX as-D MATTHEWS COC TV, i
every J
TCESDAY, TnCRsPAY asp SATCUDAY,
frctn W liuii lent of Ho.inc.ke eqnar*. hi 0;S0 A. at- and
from tiie Government Wkari at 7 A. M.. tout king at
FOitT MONROE <
poitig and returning, conncctine witli the ,
NEW I'AILY LINK STEAMERS for BALTIMORE. ,
lioturtiinr-. leaves CFItiItRYSToNE and WILLIAMS '
WIUItF. '• MATTHEWS COUNTY," at 1 P. il. aaid t
FORI MOXRo , at 5:1.0 P. M. i
'I'lie .trainer his excellent Piwsongor accommodations. t
aSbrdlAg th','-i'uvlic fucilitie* ior plsus.cut dully excur-
'sions. I
Capt. HICKB, of the Old Matthews nod Cherrystoa "]
: L n", will 1..y cotmcctc'el v.'ith the Stvuuicr, uud will be i.
bapjiy to 'cc his tri>mis at all times.
for Freight or Passaf*,a{nply on board, cr at the ofß.-e r
on th- New Lino Wliurt. 11. V. TOMPKIVS, c
' iyi:'—tf Audit.
i ILA NTI CCO AB T MAIL (
SlT.A.Msilll' LINE *
FOR NEW YORK! r
TOB NEW AND FIR°T~ CLASS IHJE-WItEEE ( '
Sl'EAinniP
HATTER AS, \.
CAPTAIN IEWIB PAKIBH, ,
Will leaveLicksins Whirf.-very WEDNEBBAT atS'.vo i
o'clock, V. il., Icr Sew York, and thy .
ALBEMARLE,
CAPT. HOAitNE, S
erary SATURDAY. t
For iieialit or Tacsage, havloa excellent accommoda- ,
' tlom, apply to t. 0. YOUXO, '
jy I7_'j No. 6 Roanoke Square 1 '
EOPLE'b LINE I<6~R NEWBERN
A.N I' THIS
INTERIOR OF NORTH CAROLINA!
cam.vino the i'.mtkd states mail.
The onjly and Entirely' New- Route.
The Stcatuei'sorthisllue will leave mail wharf, Norfolk i
1,.r Nswbirn, on the arrival of th* bouts from llaltiinois j
on Tuesday*, iBBTSdajTS and Satmdays. .
Returning, will leave Kewbsru Tuesdays, Thursday. '
and v i inrd'ivs. connecting \> ith railways for uolibberoaidi. (
Raleigh, vTeMea, lieaul'oi't. Hotehsarl City and Wiiuiiu;.- ,
The various lints of Hallways are- nearly all completed '
in the f-'t ,l« of North Carolina, und pass'iigvin will hac.. t
lntle or no Uifticulty iv reacUiiiE their destination on any j
vi Us* lines o: Railway.
Ths boats are of tku Lixsl class, and commanded by men j
->f experience, who will sse no pains spaaed to make pas- ]
seiigeracniulorlable. ' t
Heine cut trely an lul i:id Route, It will be found fe.r moro
pleasant thin by a sea route.
AST Freight taken at Low Rates.
For titriU—' infermaUon, apply to
' W. C. EDWARD?,
Roanoke Island, N. C.
Oeo. Ot.yrT. Nesrbsm. N. P. jy I—tf
IMPORTANT TO TRAVELLERS
JL MOW NORTH.
THE OLD AND I ST All L IS II ED
. BALTIMORE STEAM PACKET CO.
STEAMER LOUISIANA,
CArT AI N OEOII 0 E W. It, USS 11 Is.
' STEAMER DANIEL WEBSTER, ;
C A PTA I N W. It. ROl X,
■ Carrying Hie 0. S. Mail and Adam's IntSSS Company's
Freight, loave tho Ooveinmeut Hhiaf, Noii'olk, daily at 1
' .AS, n ciork lor R.iltlmore. , I
For freight and passenger accommodations, thesteamors '
cannot be surpassed. j
Fa-singers taking tueso Stoamers arrive in Bal'lSDOre in *
■ time to coaaMt with ihe early trains to Washington and t
all points North and West. ,
'Hirongh tickstscan be procured on thess Steamers rot'
Washington, Ptiiladolphiaand New York. {
checked to Wl points free of charg'-, and spe
cial aVtentton Liven to the delivery. 3
TUOS. n. WEBB, Agent.
Old Dotßlnioa copy. jy I—tf
k"o t i cjTi j
THE FAST AND FAVORITE STEAMER £
JENNY LIND ,
Will pin regular trips from this date, as follows: .
Lear* .Vii tedk, for Old Point at I A. M
" OH I'oiutfor Hampton, at » "
" Haniptou for Noi'l'dk, at 10 " I
•' Norfolk for Newport's Ns»ssndnam»- i
ton.at 2 PM. ■
" llauiptou for Noriolk • "
SUNDAYS. j
Leave Norfolk, at 7 A.M I
'• Hampton for Norfolk, at * '' t
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Slaitlu- run liluibeily llrothei'*' wharf, loot »f Main "
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FRIDAY, JULY 28, 1805.
— ■ ,- «■■ I ■ ■ ._, | ___.st . ~.., ■ -■■■■■■ —.1 ..
The Speech of Governor Perry.
A great deal of excitement has been
created among the radicals in the North
about the'reccut speech of Gov. Perry of
South Carolina. We have carefully read
that speech, and must confess we Arid \
nothing in it that any Southern man at
the present time should be condemned I
for uttering, although it might be out of
place for a Northern man to express the '
same ideas to a Nonhern audience. Gen- (
tlemen in the North must recollect that f
the locality makes a great deal of differ- '
ence. "We clip the following interesting
paragraph* from that speech :
TJIE BITTER FIIITTS OF SECESSION".
A cruel and bloody war has swept j
over the Southern States. One hundred '
and fifty thousand of our bravest and t
lnostf-'allant men have fallen on the fields a
of battle. The land is tilled with mourn- c
lng widows and orphans. There is .
scarcely a house in which there has not t
been weeping for some loved one lost.— t
Three thousand millions of dollars have (
been spent by the Southern States in car- t
ryimr on this war. And now we are t
called upon to give up lour millions of «
slaves, worth two thousand millions of f
dollars more. Our country has been <
ravaged and desolated. Our cities, i
towns and villages are smouldering i
ruins. Conquering armies occupy the j
country. Tne Confederacy lias fallen,
and we have been deprived of all civil
ijoverninent and political rights. We
have neither law nor order. There Is no
protection for life, liberty or property. —
Every where there is demoralization, ra- -
pine and murder. Hunger and starva
tion are upon us. And now we meet as '
a disgraced and subjugated people, tope- '
tattoo the conqueror to lvsstoie our lost
rights. Such are the bitter fruits ofse
j cession.
A BETROSrECT.
How different, Mr. Chairman, In tone,
spirit and character, was that meeting
of the citizens of Greenville, just five
years ago, in tne same building, which
inaugurated this most fatal, bloody and
disastrous revolution ! Then all was joy.
hope, excitement and confidence, ftseuteil I
in my law oflice, looking toward this
court house. 1 saw a crowd of persons |
rushing in, composed of college boys ami I
their professors, merchants, mechanics, I
doctors, lawyers and idlers from the ho- I
teis, with a sprinkling of farmers and] I
planters. Bonn 1 heard the public speak
ing commence, and theair was rent With
the wild and rapturous applause of the
excited audience. The more extrava
gant the denunciations of the Uuion,
the louder were the shouts of applause!
I repeated in my heart the memorable
words of Christ—''Father, forgive them,
they know not what they do!" My
mind was thin filled with* the worst of
forebodings as to the future. I thought
1 foresaw all the evils which have since
befallen our beloved country. But my
political influence was gone, and my
voice was powerless to stay the angry
and excited feelings of my' feJlow-citi- )
zens.
After aluding to the causes of the fail- '
ure of the Confederate amis, (which it ;
is objected to that he should have re- j
joiced at rather than deplored—but na- I
ture is nature), he hits a certain trouble- [
some class in the South a hard blow, as j
follows: |
THE ItEBEL CONGRESS ALSO TO BLAME. )
Congress, too, Mr. Chairman, is great- j
ly to blame for their exemption. All be
tween the ages of eighteen and forty- '•
five should have been forced into the '
army and kept there. It mattered not j
whether he was doctor, lawyer, preacher, '
politician, editor or schoolteacher, if an ]
able-bodied man, heshould have been sent '
to the army. Rut, strange to say, the '
three classes of men who were mainly l
instrumental'in plunging their country J
into this mad revolution, were till ex- 1
empted by Congress from fighting! I *
allude to the politicians, newspaper odi- H
tors and preachers of the Gospel. This '
was not lair. The man who gets up a v
tight should always take his share or it. I
PRESIDENT LINCOLN AND PRESIDENT ,
JOHNSON.
It has been said, and repeated all over J
the Southern States, that the South has i
sustained a great loss in the death of |
President Lincoln. Ido not think so.
President Johnson is a much abler and
firmer man than Lincoln was. He is in
every way more acceptable to the south.
In the first place he is a Southern man,
and Lincoln was a Northern man. He '
is a Democrat, and Lincoln was a Whig .
and Republican. President Johnson ,
was a slave-holder, well acquainted with .
tne institution, and knows what is pro- J
per to bo done in thegreat changewhieh
is taking | lace. President Lincoln was '
wholly unacquainted with slavery and l
Southern insliiutioiis. President John
son is a man of iron will ai.d nerve,like '
Andrew Jackson, and will adhere to his '
principles and political faith.
On the other hand, President Lincoln l
showed himself to he nothing more than :
clay in the hands of the potter, ready to
change iiis measures and principles at
the bidding of his party. President 7
Johnson has tilled all the highest and
most honorable oilices in the State oi f-
Teuuessce with great ability and satis- !
f cpoii to the people. There is no stain ,
or Olot on his private character. The j
ablest speech cverdelivered in the Senate J
oi the United tetates on the issues be- ".
i ween the North and South was made by
President Johnson. He voted for lireck-
iuridge in the Presidential canvass of T
l&li'J. Judging, then, from his autece- J
dents, the South should have every hope
and contidence ill tailu.
AN ENCOURAGING VIE\VOF TUErUTTJRE. ,
Mr. Chairman, the future, to my t
mind, is nut so gloomy as some would t
have us believe. I have no doubt that \
in teu years the Southern States will be I
happy and prosperous again, and we •
shall fiaa that the loss of slavery will be i
no loss at all to our real comfort und
satisfaction. The planter and farmer
will find that his net profits are greater
with hired labor than -with slave labor.
Every land-holder can rent his furm or
plantation for one-third of the gross pro
ducts. This is more than he now makes
net; after subsisting his slaves. In truth,
very few farmers in this region of coun
try make anything except by the in
crease of his slaves. These are divided
out amongst his children, at his death,
and they pursue the same course of toil
ing and* struggling through life, to raise
negroes fox their children. And thus
the system goes on, ad infinitum, wlth-
A _
out profit or remuneration. The lands
are worn out, and the country remains
unimproved. If a planter or farmer is
enabled to save anything, after support
ing his establishment, it is invested in
the purchase ofmoreslaves. Hence, in
creased wealth adds nothing to the en
joyment of life, or to the improvement'
ol the country.
The idleness and vagrancy of the ne
gro, in a free state, may be a nuisance to
society. It must be corrected in the best
way we can. I have no doubt in nine
cases out of ten, freedom will prove a
cuisc instead of a blessing to the negro.
No one should turn off his negroes, if
they are willing to remain with him
for "their victuals and clothes, and work
as they have heretofore done. They have
had no agency in bringing about the
Change which has taken place, and we
should feel no ill will towards them on
that account.
PEACE A GREAT CONSOLATION', i
Mr. Chairman, as much as wo feel ttre
humiliation and degradation of our pre
sent situation, and deeply lament the
losses which nave befallen the Southern
Sttites, yet we should be happy to know
that this cruel,'and bloody war is over,
anil that peace is once more restored to
our country. This is a great consolation
amid our wants, distresses and humila
tiou. The husband Will no longer have
to leave his wife andchildren; the father
and mother will not be called upon any
more to give up tueir sons as victims to
the war. It is to be hoped that in a very
short timeelVll government will be re
stored in South Carolina; that law will
once more reign supreme over the State,
and that life, liberty and property will
be protected everywhere, as they hereto
fore have been.
mm * i
General Sherman's Speech.
V
At a banquet given to this distinguish
ed officer in St. Louis, the General made
the following remarks. They contain a
Ivery interesting, truthful and succinct
history of the war in the West; and the
facts he gives are interesting, coming
from the source they do.
The toast "To the distinguished guest
of the evening," was hailed with bound
! less enthusiasm and calls for the Gene-
I ral, who, on rising, wa9 greeted with a
I storm of plaudits. Below is the main
I portion of his address, which is of his*
/ loricul value:
I Heru, in St. Lou/s, probably began the
great centre movement which termina
ted the war—a battle-Held such as never
j before was seen, extending from ocean to
ocean almost with the right wing and the
] left wing, and from the centre here. Ire
member one evening up in* the old Plan
ters' House sitting with General Htilleck
and General Cullum, and we were talk
ing about this, that, and the other. A
map was on the table, and 1 wasexplain
ing the position of the troops of tne en
emy in Kentucky, when I came to tills
State; General Halleck knew well the
position here, and I remember well the
! question he asked me—the question of
tne school-teacher to his child—''Sher
man, Here is the line; how will you
brak that line?"
"Physically, by a perpendicular force."
"Where is the perpendicular?" "The
line of the Tennessee River." General
Halleck is the author of that first begin
ning, and I give him credit for it with
pleasure. [Cheers.] Laying down his
pencil upon the map, he said, "There is
the line und we must take it." The cap
ture of the fort on the Tennessee River
by the troops led by Gram followed.
[Cheers] These were the grand stra
getic features of that first movement,
and it succeeded perfectly. Gon. Hal
leek's plan went further—not to stop i;t
his first line which ran through Colum
bus, Bowling Green, crossing the river
at Henry and Donaldson, but to push ou
to the second line which ran through
Memphis and Charleston; but troubles
intervened at Nashville, and delays fol
lowed; opposition to the last movement
was made, and I myself was brought an
actor on the scene; I remember our as
cent on the Tennessee River; I have
seen to-night captains of steamboats who
first went with us there; storms camo
and we did not reach the point we de
sired. At that time, Gen. C. F. Smith
was in command; he was a man indeed; i
all the old officers remember him as a
gallant and elegant officer, and had ho
lived probabiy some of us younger fel
lows would not have attained our pre- j
sent positions. But that is now past. Wo
followed the line—the second line—and
then came the landing of forces at Pitts
burg Landing. Whether it was a mis
take in landing them on the west in
stead of the east bank, it is not neces- I
sary now to discuss. I think it was not
a mistake; there was gathered the first
great Army of the West—commencing
with only twelve thousand men, then
twenty, then thirty thousand, and we
hud about thirty-eight thousand in that
battle; and all I claim for that is that it
was a contest for manhood; there was
no strategy. Grant was there, and
others of us, all young at that time, and
unknown men, but our enemy was old,
and Sidney Johnson, whom all the offi
cers remembered as a power among the
old officers, high above Grant, myself,
or anybody else, led the enemy on that
battle-field, and I almost wonder how
we conquered. But, as I remarked, it
was a contest for manhood—man td man
,oldier to soldier. We fought, and we
held our ground, and therefore account
ed ourselves victorious. (Cheers.) —
From that time forward, we had with us
the prestige; that battle was worth mil
lions and millions to us by reason of the
act of the courage displayed by the brave
soldiers on that occasion; and from that
time to this, I never heard of the first
want of courage on the part of our
Northern soldiers. [Cheers.] It then
became a game of grand war; armies
were accounted equal, and skill and
generalship came into play. We gained
there by the movement on Corinth
which Halleck designed here; there his
command ceased, and a new shuffle of
the cards of war was made. Halleck
went to the Fast and Grant tothe West; j
but summer overtook us with heat, and
We could not march. Northern Missis
sippi was dry as ashes; it wasiuipossible
for men to live and march from stream
tostream.iind to follow the roads that lie
between these,men would have parched
with thirst-been overcome by heat.—
Therefore we delayed, until fall, and late
that fall I met Grant by appointment at
i Columbus; there again we went over the
, map, and Jie next thing was tn break
■ the line on tho Tallahatchie. Many of
. you here remember that movement.—
I You citizens do not understand it at all,
for I never have yet Been a news
.' paper account of it that approxi
) mates to the truth. [Laughter.] Pember
i ton commanded the army of the Confed
. eracy in our front. Wt had auperior
THE NORFOLK POST
Offers the neat terms to Assaamuts, and its pclosa srill
always coiTeiponsl with tho general advort_ing rateala
other cities.
Twelve uvKupr less will constitute aaipiare.
Per a single insertion par square ONE COLLAR will b*
charged, and for each snbseeiuent iusertiou IH'ENI,'
PIVECSNTS.
Merchant*, Auctioneers and all others who advert! i*
regularly, and occupy one-fourth of a column or mere, can
I make special terms, nud will receive a liberal deduction.
Business Cards, nvi douars per month or rmr Ml
All transient advertisements payable in acivjuce—si
others monthly.
fI^^MnHBaBaHSHHasaaaHSBHsnatBHSBSsBssBSBSHBasiSBSMi
numbers, our men were scattered, and
weihstconoentratedon the Tallahatchie,
below Holly Springs. Grunt moved
direct on Femberton, wliile I moved
from Memphis and •truck directly into
■ Grenaila, and the first tiling Pcmberton
■ knew the depot of his supplies was al
i most in the grasp of a small cavalry
force, and he fell into confusion, und
■ gave us the Tallahatchie withoinja ba(
--> tie. But witli tome people an object
t gained without a battle is nothing. But
t war means succes-s by any and every
i means; il is not lighting alone. Bulla do
. that, and bears, and all beasts; but men
f attain objects by intellect, and the intro
-1 duction of physical power, moved upon
t salient points. Ami so We gained the
i Tallahatchie, and although hardly ngun
5 was fired, yet we gained v buttle equal In
t its results to any other battle on earth.
1 (Cheers.) It gave us uninterrupted i»s
session of Northern Mississippi and «_•
dj-iHited p<i—w-wsixii of the snui'f'cfio! that
, country; and that country has been tn
our pos.sossion ever since, in a military
sense.
Then came the great campaign of your
river, upon which you and I and All of
us were more deeply interested than in
any other that can ever be developed by
any warontliiseontinoiit. The possession
of'the Mississippi River is the posses
' sion of America [cheers], and I say that
had the Southern Confederacy (call It
by what name you may)—bad that pow
er represented by the Southern Confed
eracy held with a grip sufficiently strong
the lower part of the Mississippi River,
we would nave been a subjugated peo
ple, and they would have dictated to us
if we had given up the possession of tho
Lower Mississippi. It was vital to Us,
and we fought lor it tthd won it. Wo
determined to have it, but could not go
down with our frail boats past the bat
teries of Vicksburg. It w sis a physical
Impossibility—therefore what was to be
itone? Alter the Tallahatchie hue was
carried Vicksburg was the next point.
I went with a small and hastily
I collected force, and repeatedly en
deavored to muke a lodgment on
, the bluff between Vielisuurg and
Haines' Blulfs, while Gen. bnuimoved
I with his main army so aa to place him
self on the high plateau behind Vicks
t burg; but "man proposes and God dis
. poses," aud we failed ou that occusion.
. I then gathered my hastily-collected
i force and went down further, and then,
1 for the first time, I took General Blair
. and his brigade under my command.
On the very day I hud agreed to be there
I was there, and we swung oui flunks
around, and Hie present Governor oi*
Missouri fall a prisoner to tne enemy on
that day. We failed. 1 waited anx.
iously lora co-operating force inland and
below us, but they did not come, and
after I had matte the assault I learned
that the depot at Holly Springs had
been bioken up, uud tout Gen. Grant
had sent me word not to attempt it. But
it was too hue. Nevertheless, although
we ■were unable to carry n at that, there
were other things to be done. The war
| covered such a vast area lluyo was pieu
\ ty to Jo. I thought of that allairat Ar»
J kausas Post, ethers claim it,
and they may have it U —«y want it.
We cleaned them out there, and General
Grant then brought his whole army to
Vicksburg, and yon in St, Lot.;-, remem
ber well that long winter—how wo were
ou the levee, with the waters rising and
drowning us like muskrats; how wo
WBi seeking channels through Leer
Crock and Vazoo Pass,anil how we finally
cut a«'anal across the peninsula in front of
Vicksburg, But all that time the tiue
movement was the original movement,
and everythivgpot approximating to it
came nearer the truth. Bui we could
not make a FStfOg&de movement. Why.'
Because you pc"l'» e ftf tUe North were
towuoisy. We coi.'W "ot taks any step
backward, and for th.?* reason we were
forced to run the batterie.'* ut Vicksburg,
and make a lodgment on t. 1 "-' ridgce on
some of the hluits below Vicksburg. It
is said 1 protested against it. It is fift?'
I never protested in my life—never.
[Laughter]. On tlie contrary, General
Grant rested on me probably more re
sponsibility even than any other com
mander under him. For he wrote tome,
" I want you to move upon Haines'
Blurts, to enable me to pass to the next
fort below—Grand Gulf. I hate to ask
you, because the fervor of the North will
accuse you of being rebellious again."
I [Laughter]. I love G rant for his kind'
lies*. I did make the feint ou Haines'
bluff's, and by that means Grant tan tho
blockade easily to Grand Gulf, and
mttdo a lodgment down there and
got his army up on the high pla
teau in the rear of Vicksburg, while
your people here were beguiled in
to the belief that Sherman was again
repu.Sid. But we did not repose confl
uence in everybody, ihen tallowed the
movement on Jackson, and the Fourth
of July placed us in possession of that
great stronghold, Vicksburg, and then,
as Mr. Lincoln srtid, "the 2>Lsbissippi
went unvcxed to the sea."
From that day to this, this war has
been virtually and properly settled. It
was a certainry, then. They would have
said, "We give up," but Davis would
not ratify it, and he had them uuder
good discipline, and therefore it was ne
cessary to light again. Then came the
affair ot'Chickamatiga. The Army of the
Mississippi lying Wig aleng Its banks
Ire called into a new hold of action,mid
>ne mofning early I got orders logo to
attanooga. I did not know where it
s hardly. [Laughter.] I did not
ow the road to go there, liutliound
and got there m time fJuuyUer and
■era]; and although my men were
relets, and the cola and bitter iiostso.'
liter were upon us, yet I muil uill go
Knoxville, th men miles further, to
ieve Burnside. That march *■<■ mt dp.
voice—"And you got there in time."]
en winter fefeed us to he iju.et. Lur
ing that winter I took a littis exercise
dowu the river, hut that, is of no account.
__— • *><j
The Estate of the L.\te Presi
dent.—The Boston Transcript is au
thorized to say that the estate of Presi
dent Lincoln, with the Addition of the
contributions made in Massachusetts.
Rhode Island and New York, will
ainounttoone hundred thousand dollars,
and that the active labors oi tiioac ob
taining subscriptions to the Lincoln
fuud will have vow ceased.
. mt —«
Father O'Reily, Catholic priest at
Newport, has tlenounced the Fenian
Brotherhood in tin severest terms, and
assured his Hock that any of them who
joined it should not only be excommu
nicated, but denied the rightof Christian
burial by the Catholic chUTOh,
' s*.—• '
An expert swimmer is giving exhibi
tions at Fall River. He sutlers ht.-welf
| to be thrown into the water witii ms
hands and feet tied, when he will re
lease himself and perform otne* uupre-
I cedented feats afloat,

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