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Alma record. (Alma, Mich.) 1878-1928, July 06, 1922, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
THB ALMA UFOUl)
Timi..lay, July fi. 1022
I CR EVANC
E
SHOPMF.N II AVK NOT PRF.SF.NT
KI A GIMKVANCK SAYS ANN
ARROR OFFICIAL.
In u communication to the Alma
Record jesterday, H. W. Hurt, local
agent for the Ann Arbor railroad
furnished the following information
relative to the strike of the shopmen
on the Ann Arlnir railroad:
"The shopmen on the Ann Arbor
railroad have not presented any
grievance of any sort to the Mr.nage
ment of the Ann Ailor R. K. and
that the strike is one simply in defi
ance of the United States Railroad
Labor Hoard and the Goe i ment.
"The United States Labor Hoard
e ftablislu-tt under an aef passed hy
Congress, after an exhaustive hear
ing, established an hourly wage for
the shop worker:-, iU'eetive July 1,
1922,. which leave:; :;in h worker : a
late of pay ranging from r.5'', t.
L'OO". in excess of the rate prevail
ing December, H'17, but they are not
inclined to accept tlu- i duet ion, and
by united action throughout the
country, are defying the tribunal liv
ing such wage as well a" th' govern
ment. "At revel al conference' held be
tween the management of the Ann
Arbor railroad and the commit tee
rcpiesenting the .shop employes on
that load, every dispute, fancied or
otherwise, was taken up and dir po-. d
of and other concessions otlYred, but
the employes would r.ot agree to a
settlement."
Army
to Train
27,000 Citizen
The war department has issued in
structions to the coipi area com
manders for summer training eamp
in accordance with the sums provided
under the appropriation act for the
fiscal year l'.'li'b
Plana call for the training of UT.nuO
young nun between the ages of IT
and 27 in the citizen's military camps
3,000 to be 'trained in each corps
area for a period of .'?) days. This i
the number for which appropriations
were requested by the war depart
ment. Four thousand and five hundred
members of the Officers' Rese i v
corps will be given 15 days' training,
and 900 an additional .) days' of
training as instructors in the citizens'
milita ry.
Five hundred reserve officers will
be authorized to be trained in each
corps area, divided by grade approxi
mately as follows:
General officer", 1; rnlonels, 5;
lieutenant-colonel-,, l'.t; majors, I'l;
captains, 1200; first lieutenants, 211;
second lieutenants, I Li.
One hundred other reserve eoip;
officers will be sent to special service
rchools for a three months' course of
instruction.
Appropriations were requested 1 y
the war department for the training
tf 18,000 of the approximate w;,uuo
reserve corps officers.
It is impracticable to allot the
$5,000 appropriated for the training
of the enlisted reserve corps. Corps
arc-a commanders have been directed
to recommend as to the number to be
trained.
Just how many of the national
guard will be trained cannot be de
finitely stated until estimates from
state adjutants general have been re
ceived. . It is believed that all the
national guard troops will spend 1T
days in their summ -r training camps.
The four-day preliminary camps of
instruction for officers and i. on
commissioned officers, target prac
tice, except during the 15 day camps,
and state rille competitions have been
eliminated definitely from the train
ing program for the natb.nal guard.
In view of the curtailment of ap
propriations for horses, plans are be
ing considered for sending national
guard, cavalry and artillery to regu
lar army rotations in order to utilize
animals and equipment of the regular
organizations so far as is practicable.
There. are still vacancies at ('amp
Custer, it is reported and those who
desire to attend the camp should con
fer at once with M. YV. Stuckey, at
the local post offi"e, who can furnish
information relative to the'eamp and
in making application.
PASTOR TF.NOKRS
HIS RKSId NATION
(Continued from page one)
been re-organized with department.
Fuperintendents, a graded system
and a standard of efficiency. The
young people's work has been organ
ized under a jjroup system and a
young people's chorus has been or
ganized as a special attraction for
the evening services. A piano has
also been purchased by the various
church organizations.
Rey. Shoufier, in addition to being
pastor of the church, lias joined
heartily in all. of the moveme nts for
the lttermcn,t of tho community,
and has taken an active part in var
ious enterprises. For two years he
has conducted a week day Hible class
for high school students. At present
he is the chairman of the education
al committee cf the Federated
Church Council.
Rev. Shoufier has not yet accepted
any other pastorate and probably
will not. do so until after he has
gone over the field carefully 'with a
vi'ew pf selecting a church that offers
a finej field, and which is located in
rome community that is a good city
in which to live.
m ID
Hot Congressional
Primary Race On
Republicans of the Kighth Congres
sional district of Michigan may sc.
a real warm race between now and
time for the primary elect hn, Sep
tember 12, as two hats have been
thrown into the ring by aspirants to
Joseph V. Forclney's seat in congress,
with every expectation that others
will yet get into the fight for the
Republican nomination, which in past
years, or at least since the advent of
I'dnlney, has I ecu the equivalent of
election.
i A few days after William Smith of
St. .Johns declared his candidacy for
the in mination on the Republican
ticket, an announcement that came
right on the heels of Mr. FordneyY,
announcement to retire, Rird .1. Vin
cent of Saginaw stepped into the race
as an act ive candidate.
Vincent, who is a World War vet
eran, is 12 eair of age. Prior to
'going into the service he va:i prose
cuting; attorney of Saginaw county
and was serving his second term,
when he resigned to enter the service.
After bis discharge he became- city
attorney of Saginaw, a post which Ik:
now holds.
Political rumor, during the last tw
.r thre' das, has been connecting
the name of lr. 1. .1. llaviland of
Owosso, aii' ther war veteran, as a
pos-ible eandidate. He has not yet
atiiinied or denied being a possible
'candidate. At piesent. lie is eonii' t
ed with the veteran" bureau in Sag
inaw. Julius Kiiby of Saginaw al o
is still being; meiiti..n-e as a possible
candidate. Others may also spring
up between now and Augirt 12, the
rmal dav for filing petition.;.
'haive- aie that as the filing day
for petition come the field will iru
row down to Smih and Vincent, or
el e- theie will be : c e ral candidate .
in the . f.-ld. If am.th r .... IMa"
should appe::r i., Sagi:.:'
abb- that ther "
is proii
i'H". ip
. ot'i-r
''!' lit
into the i;c frc'i c :
fe rcunt ics. W hi b ha".-
of the tde of t: CI .!'., f' di.lj"
that with a ti; ht .n ui ."a; in ' '
ty ovr Saginaw's I'l p-r " nf , '!; .
w.uhl !:' a titie chance for a p sib!--"daih
hoi e-" to slip through to the
primary v. ire.
Fertilizer Needed
With Alfalfa Crop
The tomuioii bedief that alfalfa:
can: es the soil to become more fertile',
i; true only in far as nitrogen h
concerned, other plant food element .
suffering a loss as with other crop'-,
according to O. lb Pi ice, of the Mich
igan Agi ii -ultuial Ce,lieg-e soils de-.
paitment.
The result of tlii- lend-n.'y will in
time had to an unbalanced condition
in the soil, unl '-s prope r fertilize,
treatments are made.
Alfalfa, whe n propei ly inoculated
at -eeding, take:-, the nitiogeu from
the air, and, by means of the bacteria
on its roots, stores it in the plant tis
sue," says Mr. Rrie'. When a crop
of bay is ie move d there is l.o loss of
nitrogen from the soil because it
cairn- from the air, 1 ut theie is a los:
of other plant food elements either
than nitrogen, particularly phosphor
us and potassium. Analysis shows
that with every ton of alfalfa hay
said from the farm there is removed
with it 5o pounds, of nitrogen, 4
pounds of potassium.
"Taking the average yield of alfal
fa in Michigan at 2 tons per acre, the
losses of phosphorus ami potassium
would b" M pounds and 1 pounds per
acre-, respectively, where all the hay
is scbl. Fee . ling all the hay and ap
plying all the manure will not bal
ance the loss. About 'I'l per cent of
the organic matter, 2f per cent of the
nitrogen and phosphorus, ami 10 per
cent of the potassium are lost in
feeelillg.
"Many of the farmers in south
' western Mic higan are realizing this
situation and are applying from 2i0
t, :)( pounds of acid phosphate in
their rotation, or are u: ing some high
grade mixed fertilizer. It is a very
good practice to apply 200 to 2."(!
pounds of ;M0-1 fertilize r when seed
ing alfalfa for the first time-."
Hoys and Girls Club
Members Plan Camp
Members of Hoys and dirls (dubs
from counties scattereel all over Mich
igan will gather at the Michigan
Agricultural College from July 10 to
11 for the annual summer camp, held
under direction of the club staff of
the college extension division.
I More than 2()0 county and state
champion.; in the dub work are elig
ible for the state camp, according to
R. A. Turner, state leader of Hoys'
and Girls' Club work. About 150 are
e xpected to enroll for the conference.
County club leaders, as well as mem
bers of the state stair, will gather
I with the members for the we e k.
; 'Ihe program lined up for the con
ference includes everything from
class work in various phases of the
club programs to games and athletic
! contests. Movies, a trip to the state
capital at Lansing, inspection of the
ivariou:) M. A. G. 1 uiblings, ami va-
rious picnics and banquets will add
entertainment to the week's schedule.
The boys and gills will be housed
in the men's and women's dormitories
j respectively, dining their stay on the
i college campus. Meals will be served
i in the M. A. Coining hall at very
low rate's.
This is the fciuith annual state
camp for club champions, the Club
Week taking the form largely of a
prize for honors won during the
year's woik.
Special this week Maple Nut Ice
Cream, 10c per quart. DeLuxe Candy
Cd. advertisement
IS S I FBI
Hi DEATHS
OFATII KATi: FOR HAI1IKS MUCH
1I1CIIKK IHRINC Till: HOT
SUM MLR MONTHS.
"Lookout feir the baby ami the
milk supply." With the coining of
summer these words resound into
every home from every division of the
state department of health. Infant
death rate-s since RJll have been on
the decrease ami the enlargement of
th' bureau of child hygiene this year
gives hope of further lowering.
Placing herself firmly on a plat
form in favor of the proverb that
"none cares to be accuseel of locking
the stable after the horse is stolen,"
Dr. Rlanche M. Haines, newly ap
pointed director of the bureau f
child hygiene ami public health nurs
ing of the rtate health department,
today sounded a warning to mothers
of babies less than one year obi.
"This is the season of the year," says
Or. Haines, "when the infant mor
tality rate begins to climb."
July has always been the signal
for incieased deaths among infants.
Figures compiled in the vital statis
tics bureau for 1121 how the death
rate began to increase in July and
continued upward until September.
Statistics frr six months of RJ21
show the flue (nation of the infant
death lates:
June 5.17
July r,:w
August 085
Se pt ember 752
OcteJ.er f. 1 :
November
o7.5
702
84.7
D5.5
7'..o
)c').7
"Illness of your baby during July,
August or September should be re
gaide'd as serious."
Rreast feeding as the best possible
saf'1: isarcl against summer sickness
i: r. c ommemJed by Dr. Haines. When
bi a I f-echng is impossible babies
sl.o'il 1 1 e fed on certified milk, kept
e,cd and sw-et. "Mothers if you
ha.-- the slit h"st suspicion that your
b;J.y has cummer complaint call the
doctor. It will help to reduce our
high infant death rate," Dr. Haines
concluded.
Jl Ni: CLFARIN(;S SHOW (JAIN ,
The clearings tor the month of
June, VJ'lJt, .show an increase over the
dealings of lliil by nearly $100,000,
ace en dine; to figures compiled by the
First State Hank of this city.
'I he clearini for June r2'2 were
:f51',3:JX.l I as c ompared with the
clearings of $ IIS.ISL'.O! for the month
of June a yrar ugo. The June clear
ings for this year also show a good
gain ove r the May, VJ22, clearing?,
thes ebeing $471 ,40f).l!5. j
I be clearings tor the current week
were $100,738.33 as compared with
clearings of $115,1101.12 for the same
week hat year. The clearings last
week sere $148,804.15.
Order of Services
At The Churches
Free Methodist Church.
Corner of Cedar and Center Streets
E. Mellott, Pastor
Sunday school at 10:00 a. m.
Pleaching at 11:00.
Subject: "The Fullness of Cod."
Mid week Prayer meeting Thursday
evening at 7:-'50.
Kvery body welcome to all of these
services.
First Kaptist Church
Comer Hastings, and State Streets.
F.dw. K. Sboufler, Pastor
Residence 12.", W. Downie St.
10:00 a. in. Divine worship The
pulpit will be supplied by a speaker
from the Sumner assembly.
11:15 Sunday school.
e,:::o p. m. H. Y. P. U.
7:30 p. m. Union services in the
park. Address by a speaker from the
assembly.
Everybody welcome.
Presbyterian Churct'
Corner of W. Superior St. and
Prospect Ave.
Rev. W. L. Gelston, Minister.
10:00 a .m. Sunday school.
11:00 a .in. Morning Worship.
Rev. G. W. Lanftr of New York
will speak.
7 :.'() p. m. Open air union services
in the paik.
All are cordially invited to these
services.
Fpiscopal Church
10 a. m. Morning Prayer and
sermon. Subject: "The Quiet Chris
tian. Strangers and visitors cordially in
vited. Rev. James Moore Horton, L. Th.
Rector.
Universal Belief in Charms
Tei you erry a lucky piece In your
pocket or wear a charm on a ribbon
round your throat? If you do yon
have plent." of company. Relief In
rhnrtr.i and mulcts Is one of the most
Je eply roote ! of all superstition and
Is constantly appearing on the surface
of civilized life. Most any devotee of
the se trinkets aud baubles will swear
by them.
Sairit That Makee for Victory.
A handful of pine -seed will cover
mountain with the majesty of green
forest, and pe I toe will set my face
to the wind und throw my handful ot
aeed on high. Fiona Macleod.
All Along the Line.
No doubt the millionaire also be.
Ileve that they are oppressed by the
roulti-rcllllonalres.
(Classified Hds
AU unelt-r thia titail e'luergid for at
Hit mil' of en rent M wrl. Willi it
minimum ctiiiig- i.f Z' e-iiit. I'ot
ilively m! will tukt-n for this
riiluinn witlitiut eunh in uilvunce. All
Mile t-li'iiluiii in must ! i-uiil for
iM-feiif eluy of "il,liut ion tn insure in
h I'tinn.
WANTKI)
WANTKD Feeder pigs weighing
about 100 lbs. J. A. Hartley. 5', tfc
WANTF.D Kvery farmer 'who has
wool to sell, to see Cash, the wool
man. Wool (aki n at barn at Ar-
cacla Hote l. Rhone f57. 50-Iff
i
WANTKD SALKSMAN - The Atlas!
Oil Company of Cleveland, O.,
maikctcrs since IK'.m; quality Lub
ricants and Raints, desires perma- !
n'iit services of local representative
in O'ratiot County. Rrefer man
qualified to deal with fanners.
Liberal commission with autonio-'
bile expense- paid. Ooods shipjied ;
from Saginaw. Write fully for1
interview. 57-." p
. . i
25 HR1CKLA V KRS W A N T I) D.
Transportation paid Apply Henry'
Vandei llorst, 2)7 tiiand Rapids'
National City Hank Rhlg., Crand1
Rapids., Mich. 5s-.'5e
WANTKD To buy household fumi
tuie and stoves. Derushia eV Co.,
phone IRb 5:-!)p.
WAN I LD - Ciunpe tent girl for ge n
eral housework. Mr;. S. R. Swiss,
2RJ State : tle-et, photic I 57. r.'.l-lc
WAN'I KD Cirl or v;.ni:i:i for gen
eral hoiise woik. Mrs. S. R. Swiss,
home nights pre feiied. Inquire at
:;'J1 Walnut sheet. --5!itl'-c.
WANTKD Machine ts, b dh r mal:
eis, blacksmiths and car nun for
Owosso, Mich Reiniamnt work.
Apply to .1. .. Kae, master me-
chanics, Owosso, or neatest agent,
Ann Arbor Railroad, -5'.-1 1.
WA.TFD---To hear from owner of
good farm for sale. State cash
price, full particulars. D. F. Hush,
Minne apolis, M inn.---5p-p.
1 e)U RI.MT
FOR RKNT Thre-e light hou. c keep
ing rooms furnished on West Ce n
ter .st. 5 IS W. Center. Rhone 5'.nb
5S-LV
FOR RKNT A furnished Iioum-, sev
en rooms at 11.", (J ratio!.. 5X-2C
FOR RKNT Si -room .Iwelling at
'.HO Pine avenue. See S. L. Ren
net t, insurance agent, rooms 4-5
Opera ILiine block. 5!)tf-i.
FOR RKNT New, modern 5-room
bungalow, dose in. ::0tJ Lincoln
avenue. 50-lp
!Olt KAI.K
FOR SALK My piopcity consisting
of two acre s v. ith buildings .and
plenty of fruit in best of location,
Impure at 1125 Mich, ave., Alma,
Mich. Theo Martin.
5X-2p
FOR SALK OR RKNT -House corner
of (Iratiot ave. and K. Downie st.
(-131 Oratiot), iosse.ssion July 1st.
(I. M. Delavan, f.O.l Stale st. 5K-2p
FOR SALK Seve n room bouse, barn,
chicken coop, 1 acre lot. Impure
John Smasy, Ho North drover st.,
Alma. 5t-p.
FOR SALK CR TRADK- High elass
piano, slightlv ired. What have
you to trade, (diaries Kipp, Wheel
er, Mich. 5'.-lp.
FOR SALK OR TRADK
One Ford truck with boely stake rack,
$275.00. i
One F.20 Chevrolet Model T Rig Ton
Tiuck, electrically equipped, in fino j
((.nelilion, .f'.75.oo. j
One lt10 Foiel Touring Car with win-:
ter top, completely overhauled and.
repainted, good tiies, $105.00.
One l!M l Ford Touring Car, a good I
car for fishing and berry trips. i
SIIRKKVK ev RUCCANNING
Chevrolet Dealers Alma, Mich '
5'J-lc.
WK ARK AGAIN SUPPLIKD with:
Michigan State Prison Hinder
Twine-. (let ycurs while ihe stock
lastrv Smith iV: Walstow, phuie 5
rings 5.--5'Jtfc i
FOR SALK Purebred Poland China
pigs from hc.4 bleeding, either
sex. Phone 5, rings 5. Lester Wal
stow, Aima. 5:uf-c.
FOR SALK A Ruffalo-Pitt bean
thresher, wind stacker and self
feeder in good running order. In
ejuire Chas. Fisher, Shcjihard, Mich.
57-Ip
FOR SALK An electric coffee mill.
Ilustod Hardware, St. Ivouis, Mich.
M-tfc.
IFoIay'sCloneyandTar
SURE ami QUICK Rlif from
COUGHS S&Be
Boat for Children and Crown, Peraon
SOLI) KVKKYWIILRK IN ALMA
wi:ar
Nubone Corsets
iiikI )f nsujrcl you
lvk yimr lit.
I-'IIJST- Yi nr rorrrrtly men-'iiri-!
anil fittl.
?F'.e"ONI Th reiliVnt, wovrn wlr
hluy v'lve fso nnil piarrful lines.
Call and M me nhow you the irar-
mfnti.
Nubone Corsclicrc
rhon 407 COH Woodworth At.
ALMA. MICH.
MISCKLLANKOUS
LOST Striped shawl coat abeut ne
mile north of Alma, n the trunk
line road, Friday evening, .June 2.b
Call St. Louis Oveuland Oarage.
Reward. 5K-tfe
NOTICIv For your tin work call 117
L'. W. Albright, 121 Allen Ave.
ri-tfo.
NOTICK- I do nil kinds if carpenter
work, large or small jobs, also cab
inet work and furniture reparing.
Frank I lines, 112 Moyer Ave. Rhone
in;. ::i-tfc
, NOTI ' - -Money to Joan, en first
class farms. Amounts of $2000 and
upwards. 5''.;. Convis & Smith,
jthara, Mich. 5K-tfe
NOflCF All summer dress hats at
one-half price. All sport hats one
fourth off. F.I it e .Style Parlors,
over Wright Furniture Store. 1c
LOST An old rose fat in pocket
beok. I'dnde-r return to Record of
fice. 5'.-1 p.
SUFIS RRKSSLD 50 , light clean
ing extra; mending and darning
reasonable, ('alle-d for and eldiver
cd. Particular ironing (laundry
ep.) 40c per Ixuir in your home.
Drop a card to Heard, i07 Fly st.,
Alma. .",!! p.
ALMA RKA L KSTATF AND
LXCIIANtJL CO.
7-roejin house, good location, large
lot, sewer, water, lights, furnace,
aid sidewalk. Price .f.'iiOO.OO.
X-rocini house in St. iaiis, large lot
and garage, io trade for house in
Alma er foity acres of bind.
: 0 acres eif land to trade for sec n
or eight room house in Alma, pre
fer north part.
If oii want to buy five or len acres
of land cloe te town see us. Other
pi opei ty for sab or trade.
VM". H. PARNLLL. Salesman.
f)on(. osj
Diecovcrcr of Rubber Tree.
The rubber tree was d'scovered by
n .Teu!t uiNdoriary, Father Man-
eelU' INjeniaa. He fUlel It while
on o!o (,f apei..;fnl( Jei.,rneys amoni;
tfie I'ambelas ine':ii:: of South Ameri
ca, and vave it tie slniiar nam' of
the eri'iLM'. Ira. Ipcciiiio b remarked
that the savaves used tl'e sitp of this
tree, wlri liai'den e- "ckly to Make
rude liottles that were iaped like a
syringe?.
"he Hyac;nt.
The liyeclnth Is 111: ji haliivfrad.
placed 1! sie. c!-.v.n. A bet of 1 1 J 1 -eintbs
resembles a mass of 1. Minster.
Thus that gri'at Invention of the ren
aissance', t' N balustrade. Mows !
rain thnnigii It a .'line-- of nature.
This ray of art. the tlow. r. this d l
cati Insplra. .on. unknowingly recpibes
the intelligence of ine !i to dexeloji
Its pos.sitdliti s -AiiLMistc Roclln.
High Cost of Dirt.
Tests made In Lngland of men and
women In factories working behind
dirty windows and the same e iiiploy-es
working behind clean windows, reed
an average of from 5 to 15 per cnt
more etlidency In the hitler than In
the former. This Is bieau.-e the dirty
windows cut off a certain amount t
sunlight.
Ee'ore Printing.
He fere the art of printing all educa
tion was of neee-idty mainly oral; the.
Pcholar Intel to hang on the lips t . f hi,
masters foj- whatever knowledge he ev
pee ted to ;t uuire In the college, acad
emy or parish sc hool ; Ms only hope
besides this was the rale prhlle-e of I
loetklng at a manuscript In some enf j
legiate or monastic library. Smariu.s. I
: ...yrfiy i
7t' i
'W. 1 - Lr--
'.J-Y " -"- f P7.-
ESSEX Coacfii slS4i
Just see tho Coach, ami tako a l idc. That will show
you why everybody is praising it; why you see so
many already in service.
It offers the closed c-r protection you desire. It is
ideal for family use?. It tea delight todrivo. Operat
ing cost is low. Requires little attention to keep
prime. It is beautiful and reliable.
Know its appeal in a ride.
I Motoei I
(442)
.Do You
Know
what kind of a rear construction this is? It
takes a skilled mechanic to recognize it;
but it is only the skilled mechanic who
should work on a car anyway.
You will find thai our men are
p if; in llicir line, ami when
Ihey work l'nr you, you pay for
hraiu.; and not for experiment
ing. SfiacSiaHHl LodlewyOs
for. I'ark and W. Superior Streets
Phone 205 Nifht Phone 185
The Only Shade Macld'WlthTavVcntilator
.w.Mr u i"i.g"
I TZZZTZLVZl tr.' JV J r XI IVav -
Special Reduced Prices
I Fool
; Feet
8 Feet.
$r,.ro
$7.00
10 Foot
EARL C. CLAPP
r - ?', i2---.
y
Ideal for Summer,
GARAGE
W. A. HORTON
en b m
5 Feet $1.25
7 Foot $0.25
I) Foot $8.00
$0.00
IJIUIitf '
JJL
Jr
too
Touring
Cabriolet
Coach .
$1095
1295
1345
Freight mnJ Tmm Ettrm
' pooling
S'X Porcit A
1
aft
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