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The Superior times. [volume] (Superior, Wis.) 1870-1912, January 28, 1871, Image 1

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THE SUPERIOR TIMES,
PUBLISHED AT
SUPERIOR , DOUGLAS CO .. WISCONSIN
DT THK
SDPEBIOS TIMES PEIffONG CO.
TERMS; - - $2.50 Per Annum.
The Entry.
During the past year the interests hostile to the
development of Wisconsin, have been in the habit of
decrying the advantages of the natural harbor formed
by the St. Louis river at the head of Lake Superior.
Minnesota bases its claim to ask the general govern,
ment for ar. appropriation to aid in the construction
ol a breakwater at Duluth outside of Minnesota Point,
upon the misrepresentations made in regard to the
action of the current of that river at the point where
it enters the open waters of the lake, and it may not
be amiss therefore at this time, to briefly refute the
statements put in circulation by the Western Land
Association and other speculators in Duluth corner
lots, for the purpose of inducing Congress to devote a
large portion of the money of the nation to the inter
ets of the bankers, brokers and capitalists who have
invested in that village, and seek to build it up, in
defiance of the advantages nature has accorded to our
side.
In speaking of that subject we are borne out in our
statements by the report of the proper officers of the
United States, made to Congress, .oid based upon
careful surveys and a thorough examination of the
entire ground. Such a survey and report was made i
w ith the express purpose of devising the most feasible
means of constructing a harbor for Duluth itself, and
by men totally unbiased in the matter. They argue
that the cheapest, if not the only feasible manner of
providing Duluth with a proper harbor, is the contin
uance ot the improvements now in progress at the
mouth of the St. Louis, between Minnesota and Wis- j
cousin Points, and the dredging out of Superior Bay
where Duluth touches it. As such an improvement of
the natural advantages of the location would too glar
ingly show the superior advantages of our town in I
comparison w ith that place, of course Duluth declines j
accepting government aid on those terms.
It is a misconception that the bar at the mouth of
the river, just outside of the points, is formed by the
deposit of the river. The bar consists of pure sand,
and the St. Louis river carries down no sand. Before
reaching the open lake the St. Louis river passes
through two basins or expansions, the bays of St.
Louis and Superior. As there is but very little cur
rent in either of those bays, it is evident that any solid
matter brought down by the river from above would
be there deposited, and the fact that the relative depth
of these two basins has not materially changed for
many years, that soundings taken now show about the
same water as those laid down on the map made ten
years ago, affords the best evidence that the St. Louis
river, passing over a succession of falls and rocks, finds
nothing to abrade, nothing to take up and carry along,
and therefore contains nothing to deposit.
The bar at the mouth of the river, formed by the
sand thrown up by the waves of the lake during a
storm. The northeaster sweeping along the south
shore of the lake, wave upon wave rushing along that \
beach, stir up the sand and carry it along. The sand
is not brought up from the bottom of the lake, but
carried along by the waves as they break along the
beach. If therefore the piers now in construction
at our entry are once carried over the bar, the current
of the river confined between those piers w ill wash out i
a channel to a depth amply sufficient for any vessel
navigating the lake?, and the piers on either side will
prevent the sand from being carried into the current
of the river and will thus protect the channel from
being tilled up.
Again the current of the river, rushing nut through
the entry at the rate of four or five miles an hour, and
meeting the waves of the lake during a storm, has the
power to check the force and headway of those waves,
and by that means to protect the piers from damage.
This fact was most remarkably exemplified, during the
late northeaster, whose effects were so serious upon
the breakwater at Duluth. The improvements at our
enuv 'nave proceeded so far as to give us now about
fifteen feet of water in the channel. ,
Ihe day after the storm, and after the people of
Superior learned the damage done by it to the Duluth
con-tniction, a party of our citizens went to examine
the piers at the entry. The most outward piers had
not been fini-hed last fall, and a large amount of square
timber intended to be used in their construction,
together with some wheelbarrows used for wheeling
rock, had been left on the lop of those piers, entirely
unfastened, and only a few feet above the level of the
lake. But not a stick had been moved, not a thing
was displaced, and the same storm which broke up
the boasted breakwater at Duluth, was unable to move
a wheelbarrow upon the piers at the mouth of our
river, though the piers there extended further into the
lake than the Duluth breakwater. The spray had
reached the piers and everything was coated with ice, i
but the waves of the lake had lost their headway, their
force, the current of the river had protected the piers, i
It is true that in the fall of 18t>9 a bar was formed
at the entry, which was partly composed of clay, clay
which was carried down the St. Louis river. This is
an isolated fact, and was brought about by a conjunc. i
tion of circumstances which will probably never occur
again. The Lake Superior & Mississippi railroad was
then in process of construction along the banks of the
St. Louis. After an extraord nary wet season, during
the whole of which tlic river kept up above its average
height, this country was wis lied in that fall by a heavy
rain for nearly an entire week. The river rose to an
extraordinary height, sweeping away the newly made
embankments of that railroad which were formed of
elav. Mr. DaCosta, the engineer of that road, esti
mated the amount of clay thus swept away at between
thirtv and forty thousand cubic yards. The extraor
dinary rise of the river created a strong current through
the Bav of St. Louis and that of Superior, and the
elav which the railroad company had thrown into the
river in making their embankments was carried along
with the current and deposited at the entry where the
waters of the lake met the current.
But it is evident that the formation of that bar was
due, not so much to the rise of the river, nor to de
posits which the current even at that height would
have carried down from natural causes; but that it
was owing to the exposed condition of the grading and
work of the Railroad Company, then newly made,
which the current of the river swept away It U most
improbable that such a combination of circumstances
will occur a second time
The above is a plain statement of frets, well known
to every person who has paid any attention to the
-u j >ct. and amply sustained by the report of the Gov
ern-!.’ nt officers who investigated the matter, t on-
THE SUPERIOR TIMES.
VOL. 1.
gress derives the right to appropriate the people’s
money in making harbor improvements from the pro
vision of the Constitution which gives to it the power
to regulate commerce between the different States,
but it is an abuse of that power to favor one State at
the expense of another, to destroy a good natural har
bor, amply sufficient for all the demands of commerce,
because it is partly in Wisconsin, and contributes to
the advantages of that Slate, with the intent to build
up another artificial harbor in Minnesota at an enor
mous expense with the single view of depriving Wis
consin of the advantages nature has given to her.
The proposition seems monstrous, yet such is the act
ual and necessary effect of the bill now pending before
Congress, if it should pass that body. We call the
attention of Congress to the report of the Government
officers (as set forth in Ex. Doc. No. 66, Senate, 41st
Congress, 2nd Session) who in 186 y examined this
location thoroughly, under a 'esolution introduced by
a Minnesota Senator, and with instructions to seek a
harbor for Duluth, and we claim that such report
clearly shows the injustice and impropriety of the
measures lately .ntroduced by the Senator from Min
nesota.
“ Foster.”
In the debate on the 19th instant in the House of
Representatives, on the St. Croix Land Grant, Mr.
Randall of Penn, opposing the revival of the grant,
flourished again that old “remonstrance” which has
been repeatedly shown up as an emanation from the
pine timber monopolists of Stillwater, Minn, to which,
through artful and dishonest suggestions, some signa
tures among the settlers on the Wisconsin side of the
St. Croix were obtained, but which afterwards, when
the imposition on them was discovered, was expressly
repudiated by the same communities, in a counter
petition, wherein also the circumstances under which
the first instrument was signed were explained.
Mr. Randall stated in substance that this remon
strance was placed in his hands by a whilom resident
of Philadelphia, now living in the West. Mr. Wilson
of Minnesota called fo* his name, and thereupon the
waiting country is informed his name is Foster. Mr.
Wilson asked Mr. Washburn of Wisconsin if he knew
Foster, and Mr. Washburn declared he had never
heard of him, and it does not appear that any one in
the House knew him, except Mr. Randall and (accord
ing to the latter) his colleagues.
We ask, what is the country coming to when such
lamentable ignorance prevails among our representa
tives in Congress? Don’t know Foster? Why gen
tlemen, not to know him argues yourselves unknown.
If you don’t know Foster, of course you don’t know
just the superserviceable, sly intermeddler, who of all
the world would be the very one to place in Mr. Ran
dall's hands that obsolete “remonstrance.” “And
the same with intent to deceive.”
Don’t know Foster! Well! Well! Why almost every
body in this country knows Foster as well as Mr. Randall
and his colleagues. And it is an obscure man in Min
nesota that doesn’t know Foster. (We beg Mr. Wil
son’s pardon, but really we can’t soften this much, even
for his sake.) Donnelly knows Foster. Duluth knows
Foster. Mitchell of the Duluth Tribune , nose him
(vide under “Nosegays” in that paper) and we know
him; and for the benefit of unhappy and uninformed
people who don’t know Foster, we announce that
Foster is Dr. Thomas Foster of Duluth, Minnesota,
editor of the Duluth Minnesotian , now and since 1849
a citizen of Minnesota, precisely the man who de
sires to have the development of Northern Wisconsin
retarded, for the present, and who has show n how low
he can stoop to accomplish his end.
The Superior Harbor.
The La Crosse leader, one of the ablest ami most
influential journals published in the Northwest, in its
issue of the 21st thus refers to the persistent efforts of
our jealous enemies to destroy the harbor of Superior.
The Leader is well acquainted with the situation at
the head of the lake, one of its editors having visited
this locality last year:
The Superior Times in a late issue complains, and
very justly too as we think, at the determined efforts
of Minnesota and Jay Cooke to ruin the harbor of Su
perior.
So far these efforts have been confined to windy me
morials from the Legislature of that State to Congress
setting forth that it is impossible to establish a perma
nent channel of a sufficient depth to admit the larger
steamers entering the harbor. These representations
are made in the face of a report of Government engi
neers, who say that such a channel cun be secured and
maintained.
The real trouble, so far as Minnesota is concerned
is, not that the entrance to the harbor is a tortuous
and shallow one, but that it is at Superior. Were
this same entrance at Duluth, it would then become
ample for the demands of commerce.
Tne Duluth end of Superior Bay is very shallow,
vessels of any considerable draught cannot approach
that thriving town nearer than two or three miles.
This fact may intensify their zeal in the unrighteous
warfare waged against the entrance to the natural har
bor.
But the cap-sheaf, on this pillar of injustice is Jay
Cooke's proposed route for the Northern Pacific rail
road. This road he intends to run down Minnesota
Point, and bridge the channel to the Wisconsin shore.
Then, indeed, is the doom of Superior Bay sealed
For what Captain would steer his vessel for the en
trance to that harbor, knowing that a bridge barred
the way ? Not one.
The interests of Wisconsin are in this matter identi
cal with those of Superior, and must be protected.
Minnesota is seeking to build up a large city at the
head of Lake Superior, and is doing this in the face of
great obstacles. The breakwater necessary for the out
er harbor will cost, when completed, not much loss
than two million of dollars. One-fourth of that sum
will make the entrance to Superior Bay safe at all
times to vessels of the greatest depth of water sailing
upon Lake Superior.
The harbor of Superioi is one of importance to Wis
consin, and it it must be saved intact to the State.
nos. L K. Stannard of the Minnesota Legislature
informs us that the joint resolution of the Legislature
of that Stale requesting its Senators and Representa
tive* iu CoagrcM to vote for the extension of the St.
Croix iand grant, passed the Minnesota Legislature on
the 25th iust. The presiding officers of the two houses
informed Hoc. JS. M. Wilson of that fact by telegram
forthwith.
The people of Xortiorn Wisconsin thank our sister
State for the fair and honorable treatment accorded to
thorn The efforts which the lion, E. M. Wilson from
Minnesota has made in behalf of justice to our citizens
has laid them under lasting obligations.
One of the very first acts of the Wisconsin Legisla
ture after its organization on the 11th, was to pass*
similar memorial. The appeals from the
of the two Stales most interested in the extension,
together with the ver> earnest efforts of the delegation
from those S aUs in the House, ought certain!* to
convince Congress that it is just and proper to extend
the grapt
SUPERIOR, WISCONSIN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 28, 1871.
Communicated.
Mr. Editor; In your leading article of last week the
conduct, or if you please, the misconduct, of the so
call and non-resident proprietors of Superior is animaJ
verted upon with much force and plainness. I suppose
the persons especially referred to are the disjecta mem
bra of the old “ Superior Company” which as an asso
ciation, if I am rightly informed, has been for some
considerable time, defunct.
Doubtless your strictures were in the main warrant
ed by the facts of the case, and doubtless too there
are those among the gentlemen in question who are
willing to make sacrifices for the common good, and
who therefore would not be obnoxious to your com
plaints.
But it is not my purpose to attempt the vindication
of any of these, but rather to protest against the ap
parently inveterate assumption, that the destiny of
Superior is in the hands of any or all of them. From
the “ Avery House” to Conner’s Point, is a stretch of
territory about three miles in length, fronting on the
Bay, which affords one of the most eligible sites in the
country for a large commercial city, and in which if
any member of the late “ Company’’ is at all interested,
it is to a very inconsiderable extent.
With the nucleous of a fresh settlement established,
for instance two miles above the hotel, at or near the
base of Connor’s Point, where all railroads might con
verge, and where unexcelled commercial facilities
could be enjoyed, and liberal subsidies in lands and
lots can be obtained for the endowment of a live rail
road company intent on practical results, it would
seem that we can afford to let the non-resident pro
prietors alluded to, stay out of town if they so will it.
For too long now, it has been to our great damage
represented abroad, in monied circles at the East, and
in political circles at Washington, that Superior con
sists mainly of the possessions of the non-resident pro
prietors whose lands environ the Neraadji river.
Let it be advertised that there is a Superior which
those parlies do not own, and are not authorized to
speak for, wherein first-class inducements can be held
out to capitalists and railroad operators, and the de
velopment whereof would leave in the background,
those other interests that.have been hitherto so offi
ciously and so persistently thrust to the front.
It should be understood also that there is a Superior
consisting of bona tide residents, amounting in number
to about twelve hundred citizens of Wisconsin and loy
al subjects of the United States government, and as
such having claims on our representatives at Madison
and Washington, for protection against harbor spolia
tion, and unscrupulous endeaver? to deprive us of our
land grant. *
Interesting Letter from Dtir Boston Corres
pondent.
Hub, January 16, 1871.
Editor Superior Times:
Dear Sir : Not having such startling news to electrify
your quite neighborhood with, as the astounding in
telligence that the “Keweenaw has just cleared for
Detroit,” or “the schooner Pirrepont for pons down
the lake, with a load of lumber; ” you must excuse the
dullness of this brief epistle.
Pea nuts are ten cents per quart in Fairmont; 4 Ruta
bagas and Strawberries” are also in fair demand, the
latter mostly for “ hotel” consumption.
W e are having most unseasonable weather; mild,
muggy, damp and muddy. During the last six months
scarcely any moisture has fallen either in rain or snow.
The result of this is, that unless we should have copi
ous rains before the 18th the Cochituato water will be
shut off from all manufactories, in which case some ten
thousand artisans will be thrown out of employment.
At the late annual sale of pews at the Plymouth
Church Mr. Beecher made one of his characteristic
speeches iu which he intimated (the auctioneer being a
little late) that as he was acquainted with the locality
through which he was supposed to weud his way be
fore arriving at the sanctuary he might not be in a
condition to attend to business. The auctioneer on ar
riving was introduced as “Mr. Pillsbury, sober.” Tire
bidding then began, the first choice being sold for
£46(>.
In this connection I would state that the engage
ment of Mr. Charles Fechter at the Globe Theatre
came to a close last evening. He is an actor enjoying
a great European reputation, and is I believe consid- 1
ered by critics to be second to none in his profession I
We may infer this when we think of his receiving two '
thousand dollars per week, the terms upon which he l
was finally induced to favor a Boston audience for a
. few weeks.
If my memory serves me this is more than Mr.
Stephen Bongo ever received w hen settled at Fondu
| lac.
The citizens, feeling I suppose a weight of obliga
i tion from such action on his part, decided upon gp ing
him a benefit the hist evening of his engagement and
having obtained the consent of Mr. Cheney, the gen
i tlemanly proprietor of the Theatre, they auctioned off
the choice of scats at the Music Hall (near the Big
Organ) in a similar manner as at the Plymouth church,
before referred to. The first choice brought £75, and
three seats wp sold to one gentleman for the paltry
sum of £225. -he play was that known as Ruy Bias.
If the Debating Society of Superior have exhausted
the subject of “ Woman's Rights,’’ and it would not be
considered irreverant, I would suggest for debate (as
suming that I might presume to otT r a suggestion)
1 the following questions; Which of the two gentlemen
can give the most accurate information as to where
the Northern Pacific R. R. Cos. wil make their Lake
terminus?—he who bought the tickets to Fechtcrs
benefit or he who bought the pew before mentioned.
Attk-komeg.
D. GEO. MORRISON,
Register of Deeds,
TOWH CLERK, ROTARY PUBLIC.
AND
COMMISSIONER FOR MINNESOTA.
Office No. 2U3 West2ad St., Superior, Wis.
Hiram Hayes,
Attorney at Law,
SUPERIOR, - WISCONSIN,
WINTER ROUTE.
BAYFIELD,
SUPERIOR,
DULUTH
Stage Company.
R. D. PIKE, )
J. A. McCLUSKEY.f Prop’rs.
Staves •line, carrying freight, passengers and U. 8
Mail leave Bayfield on
MONDAY. WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY
of each week, arriving in Superior on every
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY.
Return Stages leave Superior on each
TUESDAY, THURSDAY, and SATURDAY
arriving in Bayfield on every
TUESDAY, THURSDAY, and SATURDAY.
Team* of the Company will convey passengers and freight to
and from he Depot of Lke Superb r 4 Mississippi U. K., con
necting with morning and ever tog trains.
F"ll information regarding freight, rate of passage, 4c., can be
obtained upon application to He D. Dike, Bayfield, Wig., M. L.
Avery, Nn erior, W.t , K. F. Prince. Agent for U. S. Express C>.,
Duluth, Minn., and J. A. McCluskey, office L. 8. 4 M. K. R.. Bt.
Paul Minnesota. Jau-8-tf
Bayfield, Wisconsin, January 14th, 1871.
a great bargain !!!
For Sale at $10,600.
57 CHOICELY SELECTED LOTS in Superior, on
First to Ninth Streets inclusive.
Apply to E. W. ANDERSON, JR.,
lical Estate Agent,
Superior, - - _ _ Wisconsin.
For Sale or Rent,
- The Steam Saw Mill at Milford, with a
good dwelling and eighty-seven acres ofj
land. Situated on*St- Loui* River about!
six miles from Duluth ami Superior, and 1
accessible by railroad and water.
Also for sale several tracts of choice
PINE LAND.
E- W ANDEB3OH, Jr.,
Real-Estate Broker, Superior, Wis-
BURNED OUT.
Pcrrv’s Insurance office is removed to the west Cor
ner of Nettletou Avenue and Second Street and is open
ed for business ovary day.
Now is the time to insure. The late disastrous fire
should impel those who have property that will burn,
to indemnity. Delay has proved dangerous. The
.Etna and Andes are live Companies, and a policy in
either would prove a great blessing after being burned
out. “ Get the beat.” WILLIAM R. PERRY Agent.
Superior Dec. 27th 1870.
THOMAS CLARK,
Attorney at Law,
Probate Registrar and U. S. Court Commissioner
for Douglas County, Wis.
Removed to No. 282 Second St,
SUPERIOR - - - WISCONSIN.
DtTj. C. MERRITT,
D E NTIST,
OFFICE NO. 18, PENDLETON’S BLOCK,
Opposite Clark House, Dclutd, Minnesota.
EMPIRE HOTEL
AND RESTAURANT,
KNAPPEN & BRO , Prop’s.,
Lake Avenue, Minn. Point,
DULUTH, - - MINNESOTA.
Eetrty Painted and Furnished in*Good Style.
BOARD, BY DAY AT REASONABLE PRICES*
i The location of our house on the Point just above the Ferry
Dx k, leti'lers it very convenient to Superior people, and unch in
I want of a good meal in Uulu.h would do well to give us a call.
DULUTH & SUPERIOR MAIL AND EXPRESS
LINE.
SHAW & INGALLS, Proprietors.
Stages will leave Superior for Duiuth at 8 a. m. and
Si p. m. and leave Duluth for Superior at 11a. m., and
at 7 p. m., after arrival of train from St. Paul.
£tgT"Orders carefully executed in Superior or Du
i lutli. 16 3ni
;Oi ty >1 eat 31 arket I I
S. WAKELIN, Prop’r,
j Nos. 365 , tt* 367 , - 2nd St., Superior,
Will keep constantly on hand a full stock of FRESH
! BEEF. PORK. VEAL, MUTTON, SAUSAGE, FISH,
1 &c. Also SALTED MEATS and FISH. Turkeys,
j Chickens, Venison and Oysters. Orders solicited and
i promptly filled for large or small quantities. Give
Ime a call. lam sure you will be suited in price and
quality. 15— S. WAKELIN.
THE
Wakelin House,
S. WAKELIN, PropT.
Day Board,
3
Established in 1857.
'William. Cranwell,
REAL ESTATE AGENT,
OFFICE 343 2ND STREET,
Superior, .... Wisconsin.
I
DR. S, S. WALBAHK,
‘ JPlij-sioian & Surgeon,
OFFICE IN HOTEL BLOCK.
All calls promptly attended to.
1 Superior, Wisconsin.
No Rest for the Wicked!
HARD TIMES AND PLENTY 01
MONEY
R. A. BIGGER,
Provision and Grocery
STORE.
Where you can get Jhe worth of your money and no
change back. me a call
Heavy Mess Pork and Good Stoves-
Good Butter and Grindstones-
Vinegar and Dried Apples
Lard and Tobacco-
Raspberry Jam and Salt Codfish.
Sugar and Soap.
A No 1 Flour and Kerosene Oil.
Syrup and Salt-
Onions and Blacksmith Tools-
Beans and Ox-Yokes-
Cheese and Oakum-
Teas Resin and Stovepipe
Double and Single Blocks and Potatoes.
Prunes ad Mustard
Crackers and Snowshoes-
Log Chains and Copying Ink
Shovels and Carpet Sacks-
Trunks and Spike.
Bags and Boring Machines-
Brooms and Sewing Machines-
Blaikets and Rafting Rigging-
Candles and Dried Currants-
Rice and Dried Peaches
Coffee and Cigars-
Corn Meal and Powder Horns.
Lamps and Spile Rings-
Mens Clothing and aMI set (f Cking uten
sils for the Lumbering Business.
CASHES 4 GASSED FECIT.
All kinds of Groceries, every thing you want and a!
number of things you don’t want.
R. A BIGGER, 272, Second St.
Superior, Wis.
GREAT BARGAINS AT
F R E i € UT Si
- IN—
STOVES,
TIN AND HARDWARE.
Having just received a full and complete stock of
the above goods, I now propose to sell "them at the i
very lowest possible figures for cash.
Don’t rely on what some may say, but call and i
examine my goods and prices for yourselves, before 1
purchasing elsewhere, for I am confident you will find
it to ronr advantage. Among my stock of stoves will
be found the
“ALL RlGHT,(heating) (J
AND THE
“REVOLVING RESERVOIR,” (Cook,)
besides a great variety of other styles. In my stock
you will find
ROGER’S, WOODHEAD’S and AMERICAN
Pocket Cutlery,
J. RUSSEL k CO.’S
TABLE CUTLERY.
ROGERS k BROS.
No. 1, Table Spoons and Forks,
SEYMOUR’S & SONS
SHEARS AND SCISSORS.
WHEELER MADEN k CLEMSON S
WOOD AND OTHER SAVS.
RED JACKET, HUNT’S k FENN’S
AXES,
Universal Clothes Wringer, Extra.
WILLIAMS AND CO’S
LADIES , GENTS AND BOYS
SKATES,
BUILDERS HARDWARE of every description,
and l,mi other things, too numerous to mention,
including the useful RUBBER STRIPS for Windows
and Doors. Last, but not least, the charming, silent,
WILLCOX AND GIBES
Sewing 3lachines,
which will he sold on most liberal terms for the pur
chaser. B. The old Tin Shop still runs at
R. W. FRENCftPS.
A. ZACHAU,
DEALER IN
DRY JGOODS,
GROCERIES,
BOOTS & SHOES,
YANKEE NOTIONS,
Crockery,
Glass Ware,
Willow Ware,
ROOFING AND BUILDING PAPER,
STATIONERY,
Canned Fruits,
TOBACCO, CIGARS,
WINES ans r-iautOßS.
A. ZACUAU.
Advertising Scale.
1 week. 2 weeks. 4 weeks. 3 nm’.. fi n.oi. 1 year
1 wpiare, I 1.00 I 1 50 $ 2.00 $ t.oo f ,oo s.o.m>
2 equnres 2.00 Sift 4.00 7.0(1 10.00 15.0
3 squares, 3 00 4 00 0 00 lo.ro 15,n0
X A column, 5(0 7.50 10.00 15.00 22 in) „ocU
column, 8.00 12.00 16,01) 24.00 35.00 So.oo
1 column, 12.00 18.00 22.00 30.00 60.00 80.00
A square will be counted the space of ten lines of Ibis kind of
type.
Business cards 5 lines or less f6.00 a year.
Legal advertisements charged at the rates prescribed by slat
ute.
Special notices 10 cents per line for each insertion.
Transient advertisements must be paid for hi advance; all
others quarterly.
Advertisements not otherwise ordered continued, will be con
tinued until ordered out, and charged accordingly.
No proof of legs! advertisements furnished until the dvrr
trsement is paid for.
1856. SUPERIOR 1870.
LAND AGENCY.
OFFICE, NO. 347, WEST 2ND ST.
E. W. ANDERSON, JK„
Real Estate bought ami sold on commission.
Titles Examined and correct abstracts furnished.
Taxes Paid for non-residents.
Land Warrants Located, and all business in cor
uectiou with Real Estate promptly attended to.
Desirable Lots and Lands in and around SUPE
RIOR, DULUTH, and FONDULAC, for sale.
Several Tracts of Choice Pine Lands on naviga
ble streams and ve^ - accessible, for sale.
Foreign and Domestic Exchange bought and
sold.
Passage Tickets to and from all parts of Europe
for sale.
With an experience of focrteSN years in this sec
tion, I am thoroughly posted in all that pertains to
real estate, and parties desiring to invest in or around
Superior or Duluth, or having properly to sell would
do well to confer either in person or by letter witii
E. W. Anderson, -T i*.„
REAL ESTATE BROKER,
Superior City, Wisconsin,
Peter E. Bradsliaw. Bradshaw.
P. E. Bradshaw & Cos.
9
2nd St., Superior, Wis.,
Wo have recently received a largo and well selected
stock of
GOO3OS,
which we arc selling at the LOWEST MARKET'
RA TES. We do not claim to sell goods at, or below
cost ; but we do claim to sell them at prices which,
will give satisfaction to our customers.
DRY GOODS:
In this department will be found a general assort
ment of DRESS GOODS, and trimmings of the
latest styles and patterns and also a largo variety o (
CLOTHS and CASSIMERES kc.
CLOTHING:
Our stock of clothing has been purchased with spe
cial reference to the climate and to the
WANTS OF THE PEOPLE ,
and we think we can suit all who may favor us with
a call. In this line will be found a good selection of
RUBBER GOODS, consisting of COATS, BLAK
RETS, LEG OIKS, kc., and also, OIL CLOTH IKG
of various sizes.
Carpeting and Wall Paper :
Of CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS , and WALL PA
PER, we Lave many handsome and excellent varie
ties to which we invite attention.
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS:
If wo are overstocked in anything, it is in Grocer
ies and Provisions, of which we keep a Good SUxk,
consisting of CHOICE and FAKCY GROCERIEE,
as well as STAPLES. In this line we would call
special attention to our TEAS, which we think are
not excelled by anything in the market.
ty When visiting our store, if you do not see what
you want, ASK FOR IT.
PERRY’S
Insurance Office.
JKDEMKITY UKQ UES TI OK ABL E.
yptn a of Hartford.
Andes of Cincinnati, and
The National LiLe of 17. S. A.
$8,000,000
Cash Capital Paid Up.
Life, Fire, and Inland.
Risks accepted and Policies written on all insurable
property and Lives at reasonable rates.
£3f~“GET THE BEST.”^3
WILLIAM E. PEERY Aotsi.
Superior, Wis., October 6ih, 1870.
KHGLER & SCHAFER,
Second St., - - Superior,
[East Side of Coddington Block.]
WINES, LIQUORS, BEER, &C.
rl{r/ FIRST CLASS BILLIARD J>LF*
/ 3’
NO. 21.

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