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Vernon County censor. [volume] (Viroqua, Wis.) 1865-1955, June 01, 1898, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85040451/1898-06-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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Official County Paper.
ADVERTISING RATES.
L TiaaT l'ln. A lwj4li|t<3BSsSWSt
} week. wToo *Too tali
I ,-seeks 1.50 * 35 5.75 i.75 6.00 U.o*
I wseka..*.oo| J oel 6.00 T.tajta.oo 11.5
1 month S'H S'® *.*51K.00 IS M
I months *.OOI 4.801 *.OO 11.T5 IT.® H.S
• months 4. 00U. 45111.4516.00 . 00 MJR
• months 6.M 8.00 H.OO 80.00 81.08 61.06
I rear .:...|lO.Oo|ta.OOilg.(o|O.OolM.ooi Z.g
Business cards, no* exceeding fty* p,(g
Legal advertisements at legal rataa.
merits inserted with do specified a.
published until ordered out, and charged roc ay
oordlngly. All bills payable quarterly
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
County Officers.
Oounty Judge 0. W. Gbaves
Sheriff J. W. WHITE
Oouuty Clerk Wm. Brandon
Oounty Treasurer A. T. Fobtun
Register of Deed* Wm. Hutchison
Clerk of the Court H. C. Cost :no
District Attorney IRA 8. (Jhikfin
bounty Superintendent Howard Miller
Surveyor W. 11. KnoWkb
G. P. Aiken
Chairman Board of Supervisors Alex. Hill
Poor Commissioner E. Tilton
Superintendent Insane Asylum. ..F. Wilkins
CITY or KICK Kg.
•f• • • • Aug. Smith
City Clerk ..,.,..11. K, Packard
Treasurer A. C. Cobh
assessor Jos. Omuu so..
Police Justice J. Henry Bennett
lustl. es l R. S. McAP. hael
Vlar.lia'l Coo. W. Stimble
SOCIETY DIRECTORY.
r A BEL IE LOME A. F. & A. M. NO. 84.-
Ii Meets the First and Third Wednesdays of
jach month. Hall in Williams' block.
\riROQUA LODGE. 1. O O. F —MEETS Ev
ery Saturday night lu Williams’ block.
\TIROQDA ENCAMPMENT. I. O. O. F.. NO.
V 60. Meets every Monday evening.
Ancient order of united workmen
—First and third Tuesdays of each month-
ORDER OF CHOSEN FRIENDS.—MEETS
second and fourth Saturdays of each mth.
American legion of iionor.-meets
second and fourth Tuesdays of each m th.
Alex lowiiie tost. o. a. r—meets
lirst Monday evening or each month, lu
W. R. C. hall.
Regina lodge, daughters of re
bekah. No. as, meets first and third Mon
lay of each month in l. O. O. K. hall.
Modern woodmen of America, no.
IDOi. meets Friday night of each week.
VriBOCUA CHAPTER, 0. E. 8., MEETS
second Tuesday ot each month iu Masonic
hall.
\[IROQUA CHAPTER, R. A. M.. MEETS
v every second and fourth Wednesday of
each month.
TX 7 'OMAN'S REED ■ Oiled. -MEETS OX
Tv alternate •- "i .mu.
\\r C. T. if.-MEETS ALTERNATE TUKS
vv . days at 3p. ni.
T 0. G. T. LODGE. ON EVERY
Jl • Wednesday evening, in Alliance hall.
'I'IIE VIROQUA COUNCIL, NO. 129, A. P. A-.
I meets at Alliance hall every Tuesday night
7:30 o’cl ;ck.
\/ IROQUA K. O. T. M—MEETS ON EVERT
V Monday evening lu Alliance hall, at 7:30.
CHURCH DIRECTORY.
fjufETHODIST
fJWI 10:80 a. m. and 7:30 p m. each Sabbath.
Sunday school at 13 m. Prayer meetings ou
Thursday evenings.
Congregational church-serviceb
at l<i:3o a. m. and 7:30 p. m. each Sabbath.
Sunday school at 13 m.
rtHUfICH OF CHRIST.-rREACHING EV-*
V. 7 y Sunday at W:80 a. m. and In the even,
ing. Sunday school t 9:30 a. m.
VTORWEGIAN LUTHERAN CfIUROH.-
1 v Services every Snuday at 8 o'clock.
BUSINESS CAltDa.
H’ P. PROCTOR, ATTORNEY AND
.. Counselor, Vlroqua, Wis. Will practice
!n all Courts of the state. Special attention
ii*en to Collet 1 ns.
*— - B L ii
(CIUAUQH & LARSON, ATTORNEYS.
l r Special attention given to collections. Of
■je in Ferguson Block, second floor, Mata
Street, Vlroqua, Wt.
JACKSON SILCAUOH. JOHN S LABSON.
WM. A. COTT, M. D , PHYSICIAN AND
Surgeon, Vlroqua, Wis.
Office hear residence. 1 bl'k E. Lysne’s hotel.
*A P MIN SHALL, M. D„ PHYSICIAN
/ V. and Surgeon. A graduate of Keokuk
Medical College, one of the best of its kind m
the United States. All call ) promptly attend
ed, day or night. Latest and mo t approved
methods of treat ment use l.
Office in Caaaon's Ml'k Viboqca. Wis.
T 7 E. MORLEY. IYI. D., PHYSICIAN
r . and Surgeon, Vlroqua, Wis. Office over
Craig A Co’s drug store, on west side of hall.
All calls attended promptly day or night.
M. SOHENSON. CIIAS. H. TroWDUIDOE
CURENSON A TROWBRIDCE,^
kd PhysiciansandSukokons, v iroqua, Wis
Calls in city or country promptly attended
Office over Craig a Co’a drug store.
~| OHN DAWSON A CO.- GEAERAI
*1 Iniuraocc and Coal Estate Agency.Vlroqua.
Office In Williams ’ lock, second floor.
VERNON CO. COURT-REGULAR
V terms in the first Tuesday of each
month, at the i ourt bouse from 9 to 1- i. in.
and IJO to (ip. m. D. O. MAHON". £.
County Judge.
H. J. Buttle, md. W. M Tkowhsidob, mb.
DRS. SOTTLE & TROWBRIDGE.
Dr. Trowbridge, late resident physician and
■urgeon Cook county hospital, Chicago.
0 ALL CALLS ATTENDED PROMPTLY •
Day or night, from offloe.
GEO. E. CHAHBERS,
dentis nr.
Crown and Bridge Work, Metal Plates
sud all other bran lies of denial work done In
the latest and most Improved manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Office In Towner's block
VIROQUA, • • AVIS.
IH. ChasMSS
DENTIST.
Office over Chandler’s [ Vlroqua*
C. W. Graves. D. o. Mahoney.
CRAVES A MAHONEY.
Attorneys & Counsellors at l aw
• * .
Practice In oil Courts. Money Loaned
on Real Estate. Collections Promp
tly Attended to.
Office over Bank of Viroqua*
VIItOQUA, WIS.
WE CAN DO
anything In the line of
PRINTING.^
FLA IN or FANCY
PRINTING....
EXECUTED
Restaurant i Boarding.
MIPS. L. C. RICE
I* now located In her new building, second
floor, and is prepared m furnish board by day
or week. Lunches a rved a: reasonable rates.
Suppers furnished lor balls and private par
ties. Accommodations for 75 couples. Bakery
•applies for sale.
OYSTERS
•TIN BULK OR CAN.
Ontario Steel toG&TOKS. %
WIS. H. TIMMERMAN, Proprietor.
——
Steel bridges, Stocf Steel "Uubea for
Sub-Structures, Culverts, Arches,/ C - of any diameter or length.
ITWRITE K“0 INrCr MAT I° N nkkouo.
THE VERNON COUNTY CENSOR
VOL. XLILI.—NO. 9%
Royal makes the food pure,
wholesome and delicious •
PfM
S,OY4|
<©6
POWDER
Absolutely Pure
ROYAL BA HI NO POWDER CO., NEW YORK.
Driven to It.
Her husband had reproved her for her
great, loquacity:
“It will never trouble you again,” in an
gry tones said she.
So she solemnly sat down—
On her face there was a frown—
And she never siwke or stirred
For an hour—then he heard
A report as from a bomb or a cannon
overloaded —
Drop the curtain—drop it slowly—she’s
exploded.
—Cleveland Leader.
The Japanese are capturing the
match and umbrella trade in India and
Burmah.
W. F. LINDEMANN, H. LINDEMANN.
President. Cashier.
Bank of Viroqua.
IStatk Bank—Capital $5o,ooo.oo.)
Lindemann & Rusk, Props.
United States bonds. Inland and foreign
exchange, gold, silver and uncurrent money
bought and sold. Certificates of deposit
issned payable on demand, to draw interest
If left six months.
Business Hours, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
Collections and banking business promptly
attended to and remittances made
on day of collection.
S. B. Beque,
Dentist,
VIROQUA, - WIS.
Orowrn and Brld. Work. Hstal scat all
•tbr branch** of Dental work ta Ik* lat**t
Improved manner. W* ruarant** work.
Omni in Di vLEN * Block.
I RARNEY,
• D. i>. •
VIROQUA. WIS.
JfiSDOE3 FIRE DEHTAL WORK.
Enc listing, "ridge. Crown and Gdd Plate
Work. Special attention given to correctina
IfrrcillftrlS?. and OI tliO IlStUm!
teit’i. Twenty four years practical experience
and study. Dental Parlors in Herrick Block.
O. He MINBHALL,
Attorney-at-Law,
Vlroqua, Wla.
Loans,Collections and Pensions,
PATENTS.
Office In seconl story Williams’ Block
IRA S. GRIFFIN, Attorney at I,aw.
IRA s. griffin;
LIFE, FIRE, KXiuuU AM) TORNADO
INBUUANCE.
Ckneral Collecting Agency. Loan* Negotiated
~ ' - —Vtboqua, Wis.
N. A-SYriouJivi,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
FINE CUSTOM WOIIK A SPECIALTY.
• Perfect Fit Guarantoed.*
VIROQUA , WISCONSIN.
VIipUASTEIT
LftUNDBY>~
Everything' New, Complete
and First-Class.
The proprietors have spared nothing in
work or expense to equip a plant suit
able to the needs of the publio. Ev
erything is nnder the direction of a
manager with 12 years experience.
Individual and Family Laun>
dry work Guaranteed.
lie member the Steam Laundry and give
it your patronage. All packages col
lected and delivered. In same block
with Opera House,
\7II=?CDCSY-JA, WIS.
N. Coe & Son,
—PROPRIETORS OF
THE
NEW HARNESS
SHOP!
If von want a good doulie harness
(or spring work, now is the Kme to place
’ our order. We know we oan supply
/ our wants
REPAIRING JS/PECIALTY
BOTTLED UP IU THE BAY
Spanish Armada Is Entrapped
at Santiago de Cuba.
SCHLEY BLOCKS DONS’ WAY.
Admiral Lervera Will Now Be Forced to
Surrender or Fight.
Onr Squadron Is Guarding the En
trance to the Trap at Santiago de
Cuba and Spain’s Ships May Never
Leave Thut Harbor Madrid Hus Of
ficial Advices of Cervera’* Predica
ment-Town Is Short of Provisions
and Could Soon Be Starved Into Sub
jugation.
Washington special.
The Navy Department has official and
positive information that the Spanish
fleet is at Santiago dt; Cuba, and that the
American warships arc on guard to pre
vent its escape. A cipher dispatch from
Commodore Schley was received at the
Navy Department stating that he is off
Santiago, guarding the harbor entrance,
to prevent the escape of the Cape Verde
fleet. In his message Commodore Schley
gave the source of the information that
came from him about Cervera’s "presence
in Santiago bay, but it is understood that
COMMODORE W. 8. SCHLEY.
the Spanish ships are not visible from
Commodore Schley’s pc sition on account
of the hills that surround the bay. A dis
patch to the London Daily Mail from
Madrid says that official dispatches from
Cuba confirm the reiiorts that the Ameri
cans are blockading Admiral Cervera at
Santiago.
This places Admiral Cervera and his
ships in prison and incommunicado, ac
cording to Spanish regulations. They are
as securely imprisoned as any insurgent
in Morro Castle. The Spanish admiral
has played himself a Spanish trick and
has bottled himself up in a harbor where
lie could not go out and make an ev,-n
fight if he wanted to. A much inferior
force could prevent the Spanish fleet leav
ing the harbor because of the narrow in
let which permits only one vessel to pass
at a time. He would have to take his fleet
out iu single file and be able to use only
his forward guns, while the ships wqitintr
taMUc ermra pour broadsides into him as
ho made the run.
Sampson and Schley have the Spaniards
imprisoned and can keep them there until
they surrender. The naval authorities
say that with the Spanish fleet at San
tiago de Cuba, it ceases to be a factor
in the war. It is imprisoned and cannot
be released. Should Spain send another
fleet to Cervera's relief, Sampson can sta
tion his monitors in front of the inlet to
destroy Cervera’s fleet as it comes out,
and take the fighting ships to meet the
coming licet. The only question with
naval officers is as to how long it will take
♦o starve out he Spaniards. It is not
believed that Santiago has enough food
to support the people and the Spanish
troops and ihe Spanish navy for more
than two or three months.
TO FORCE SPAIN TO SUBMIT.
Powers Said to Be Resolved to Enter
the War Soon.
A dispatch from Madrid says that Senor
Castillo’s reason for not joining the min
istry is that Senor Sagasta is determined
to carry on a vigorous war, while Senor
Custlllo is aware that Spnin’s friends in
Europe, especially France, are resolved
to insist upon her suing for peace at the
r ~ T ~~ css rt e
SANTIAGO HARBOR.
first favorable moment. It is hoped that
Spain will be able to retain the Philip
pine Islands, which will be utilized in
making political combinations later on.
The dispatch adds that the time is very
near when Spain will be asked to propose
pourparlers for pence.
CAPTAIN 18 9HOT.
Fate of the Spaniard Who Fuilcd to
Fire at Dewcjr.
News fins reached Madrid of the exe
cution at Manila of the captain of the
Spanish revenue cutter Callao. He was
shot on the order of Captain General Au
gust!. The Callao arrived at Manila a
few days after Dewey’s great victory, and
was at once surrendered. The vessel had
been away from communication with its
home Government for thirteen months,
and r ,n into the bay of Manila, unaware
that war between Spain and the United
States had been declared. Having fallen
into a hopeless net, surrounded by the
American war vessels, after being fired
upon and without the slightest chau-r of
escape, the captain of the Callao *u;:en
dered. For not returning the fire of the
United States ships the captain was exe
cuted.
Demonstrated His Courage.
When William Mitchell of Birmingham,
Ala., bragged that he could whip a • ar
load of Spaniards, somebody in the crowd
laughed at him. Mitchell pulled out his
revolver. The coroner had charge of the
two corpses that were picked up in the
street a few miuulffs later. Mitchell es
caped.
Antler* Refu-.td a Permit.
The Secretary of War is receiving a
large number of applications daily from
persons who wish to accompany the vari
ous army corps ns sutlers. To all of these
the Yar Department makes the uniform
reply that no sutlers or food contractors
will be allowed to go w ith any part of the
army, in the camp or in the field.
Major Under Arrest.
Maj. Walter D. Col lid ay of the Fifth
Illiuois infantry, at Chickatuauga, was
placed under arrett pending examination
of charges that he was intoxicated and
abusive to h i* men while the regi(&°t
wm on the way to Camp Thomas.
VIROQUA, WISCONSIN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, IS9B.
COMMODORE SCHLEY’S FLYING SQUADRON.
DRILL LIKE REGULARS,
Volunteers at Camp Thomas Make an
Excellent Showing.
The event of Monday at Cliiekainauga
I’ark was the review of the First division
of the First army corps by Maj. Gen.
Breckinridge, inspector general of the
United States army. It was a splendid
spectacle, grand in proportions and sub
lime in suggestion. The l#ng line of men
in double rank extended from the north
on, Kelly field straight as a die across
the field, through the grove, out into the
Brotherton field, across that field, over
into the hills’ and valleys and well into
the grove beyond. And this was only two
of the three brigades. The third brigade
was formed back of the first in Kelly
field. These long lines, aggregating more
than a mile in double-rank formation with
distances reduced, was nothing short of
an effective army. The men had the bear
ing and set-up of professional soldiers.
They were fully armed and equipped.
Their alignment was perfect and every
movement like clockwork. This division
consists of tho first regiments sent out
by the various States represented in it
and these regiments are consequently will
equipped. Their showing on the review
surprised the veteran army officers on the
field. From tlie moment the regiments
began to assemble, pouring out of the
groves and camps from every direction
and in every formation, until they broke
from the column afte. passing the review
ing stand every movement was made with
a dash and snap truly Inspiring.
After the review Gen. Breckinridge
said: “I was surprised at the showing
made by the troops. The review was su
perb. Some of the regiments made an ap
pearance that would have done credit to
any soldiers in any army iu the world.”
Maj. Gen. Wilson was equally enthusias
tic. “It is a splendid division,’ said lie,
“and the men moved off like soldiers. I
was impressed with the size and quality
of the men. They are better men and iu
much better condition ns regards drill,
equipment and discipline than the soldiers
of 18G1.” “The men did splendid work,”
declared Brig. Gen. Burt. “I have been
in the army for thirty-seven years and
was all through the_ civil war, and I want
to say I never soldiers.”
GENERAL VIEW OF SANTIAGO DE CUBA.
The regiments participating in the re
view were the First Ohio, Fifth Illinois,
Third Wisconsin, Third Illinois, Fourth
Ohio, Fourth Pennsylvania, Sixteenth
Pennsylvania, 157th Indiana and Second
W isconsin.
COULDN’T BLUFF DEWEY.
Plucky Admiral Refuses to Allow
Germans to Kntcr Manila.
A special dispatch from Manila says
that the German consul there tried to
land provisions from a German ship, but
that Admiral Dewey refused to iiermit it.
The consul then declared, according to the
dispatch, that he would force the landing
under the protection of two German cruis
ers, In*. Admiral Dewey threatened to fire
upon the cruisers, and the attempt to land
the supplies was abandoned. Another dis
patch asserts that Admiral Montejo, com
mander of the Spanish squadron destroy
ed by Admiral Dewey, is to be court-mar
tialed on the charge of cowardice.
The Navy Department received a cable
gram from Admiral Dewey, which says
hat the situation remains unchanged, and
that the strict blockade continues. There
is great scarcity of provisions in Manila.
Foreign subjects fear an outbreak of the
Spanish soldiers.
Hawaii to Be Used as Base.
The Hawaiian Islands will probably te
used ns a base by the expedition to the
Philippines. Owing to the lack of trans
ports, the ships which started the other
day will l>e forced to return for another
installment of troops. There are not suffi
cient vessels fitted for carrying men across
the Pacific, but many coasting ships can
Ik* impressed to land soldiers at Honolulu
and from that point they can be taken to
Manila on the City of Peking, City of
Sydney and City of Australia.
The Auxiliary Fleet.
Since the outbreak of war with Spain
the Government has acquired ninety-nine
vessels for the auxiliary fleet and these
are exclusive of over thirty transports
which have beeu only chartered. Iu this
auxiliary" fleet there arc fifteen cruioets,
thirteen in commission; seventeen vossa's
belonging to what is called the mosquito
fieet, and sixteen revenue cutters, now
with the Cuban blockading fleet. There
are beside numerous tugs and colliers.
Why the Agent Surrendered.
The agent of the Centra! Pacific Hail
road at Ogden, Utah, demanded £SO
above the contract price for transporting
a carload of horses from that city to Sau
Francisco for the Minnesota troops. Maj.
Digules refused to pay and ordered two of
his soldiers, who are experienced railroad
men. to seize the train and “kill any man
who attempts to interfere.” The agent
surrendered.
War Cry Boked in Their Bread.
Capt. Duval of the United States com
missary department at S’. Louis has
made r. contract with local bakeries for
GlO.taJ ' pounds of army crackers. This
is equivalent to 3,000 barrels of flour. On
each will be stamped the words, “Remem
ber the Maine.”
Uncle Sam to Buy All Mules.
Lieut. Col. Smith, assistant quarter
master of the United States army at St.
Louis, received instructions from Wash
ington to buy mules suitable for the use
of the army without limit.
Blanco Imitates Filigree.
Gen. Blanco has adopted the Phtgree
plan to provide the starving people of
Havana with food. Patches of yams and
other vegetables are living planted near
the city.
Recruiting Immune Regiment*.
It i* announced that the Preeideut wHI
take irumeditt* atepi to recruit ail re#i
mvnta of immune*.
The Hudson’s Sm< tv-stack.
This is how the smokestack of the Hud
son looked when that bat ered gunboat
returned to Key West after the fight at
RIDDLED HY SPANISH SHOTS.
Cardenas. This was the engagement
during which the Winslow was crippled
and Ensign Bagley- killed.
WAR BULLETINS.
There are believed to be only 13,000
Spanish, troops iu Porto Ilieo.
Spaniards In the Canary Islands live in
dread of bombardment by the American
fleet.
The wonderful submarine torpedo boat
Holland has been bought by the Govern
ment.
The war has caused an immense de
crease iu first and second-class ocean
travel,
A dispatch from London says Queen
Victoria favors an alliance with the Unit
ed States.
Havana advices by way of Jamaica say
that the Spanish troops in Cuba ere dis
heartened, and openly express a wish that
American victories will cause Spain to
abandon Cuba, and allow them to return
home.
Marine insurance companies are great
ly agitated over Spain’s new threat of
privateering.
France is worrying over the possibility
of an alliance between Great Britain and
♦lie United States.
All our revenue cutters have been un
der fire in Cuban waters and have proved
their great usefulness.
Several of the cannon captured at Ma
nila will be sent to Annapolis Academy
to be added to the . >phies.
A high fence has been erected around
the Carpenter steel works at Reading,
Pa., as a further protection from spies.
The Philippine insurgent chief Agui
naldo has issued a proclamation to his
followers at Manila to obey the orders of
Admiral Dewey.
To maintain an army of 200,000 men
for six months will cost $30,000,000, ac
cording to estimates prepared 1 . Paymas
ter General Stanton.
Our troops iu Florida are hampered by
lack of water and how to supply the
transports that will convoy them to Cuba
is a serious problem.
The American cable companies in "Lon
don have issued instructions to their
agents to refuse to transmit any Spanish
Government messages.
Tampa is 250 miles from Havana. The
transports can land tioops near the latter
city in twenty-four hours after sailing
from the former rendezvous.
A United States cruiser is said to have
had a narrow escape from destruction in
Hampton Roads by a floating mine cut
adrift at night by Spanish spies.
James G. Longstreet, son of Gen.
James A. Longstreet, has been commis
sioned as second lieutenant in a battery
of light artillery at Atlanta, Ga.
A cargo of 4.00 U tons of con! reached
Manila on the British ship Honolulu from
New South Wales, and was seized by
Dewey for the use of his squadron.
The pompous Spanish prisoners o' war
nt Atlanta, one of whom is Weyler's
brother-in-law, are indignant because ne
gro orderlies are acting as their guards.
ENIRANCE TO THE HARBOR AT SANTIAGO.
It is saki that the populace of Manila
is reduced to eating horseflesh.
Before Dewey’s arrival at Manila the
Spanish fleet .bombarded ”obu and massa
cred about 100 natives at Tonde, a suburb
of Manila.
A strong detachment ot troops has been
detailed to guard the United States pow
der works, near Dover, N. J., against
Spanish spies.
The talk of an Anglo-American alli
ance seems to have had a marked effect
in Europe. Friendship for the United
State* i* now being displayed by power*
which before were believed to be intense
2y to*til* to thta country,
QUOTAS OF THE STATES.
Number of Men Each Should Offer
Toward Making Up the 75,000.
The following gives an approximate es
timate of the State quotas necessary to
make up the 75,01X1 troops called for in
McKinley’s second proclamation:
Alabama 1.500 X<.,V Hampshire. 451
Arkansas 1.230 Xew Jersey...... 1,778
California 1.183 x< w York 7,507
Colorado 704 x„ rt i, Carolina . .1.545
Connecticut i*J5 Xortli Dakota 270
Delaware 21" Ohio 4,^340
Florida 450 (i r( . go n 577
Georgia 1.005 Pennsylvania ...6,458
Idaho 150 Rhode" Island.... 426
Illinois Dakota ...1,110
heliana 2,581 Carolina.. 448
lowa .....2,201 'fennersee * 1,0,50
Kansas I.OGH Texas 1,454
Kentucky 2,045 Utah 255
Louisiana 1,104 Vermont 397
lalne 750 Virginia 1.073
Maryland 1,160 Washington 704
Massachusetts-. 2,832 West Virginia .. 833
Michigan 2.022 Wisconsin 1,005
Minnesota 1.723 Wyoming 138
Mlssiss'ppl 1.205 Arizona 100
Missouri 3,240 District of Colum-
Montam 314 bin 108
Nebraska 1,440 Ne\. Mexico.... 209
Nevada 142 Oklahoma SO
The organization and division of this
extensive force .s yet to Ik: arranged by
the Adjutant General’s office. Generally
speaking, however, the 75,000 men will
suffice for the formation of seventy-five
regiments. With three regiments to a
brigade, which is the present basis of or
ganization, this will make twenty-five
brigades. In turn, eight divisions of three
brigades each will be formed, and out of
the eight divisions the entire force will
be divided into three army corps. T' s
general division, of course, is tontuthp,
but it shows the general formation of this
large body of volunteers.
EXPENSES OF THE ARMY.
Alger’* Supplemental Estimates for
Its Support the First Six Months.
Secretary Alger hus made supplemental
estimaites for the support of the armies
for the first six mouths of the coming
fiscal year. They are as follows:
Expenses of the coinandlug gen
oral's office SI,OOO
Contingent expenses of Inspector
general’s department 1,000
Slguu! service of the army 114,001
l’ay, etc., of the army 4,017.504
Fay of volunteers 25,026,266
Subsistence of the army 10,219,635
Regular supplies of quartermas
ter's department 0,000,000
Incidental expense., of quarter
master’s department 2,500,000
Horses for cavalry and artillery.. 2.0011.000
Barracks and quarters 750,000
Arm v tjnairuoart at lon 90.000,000
Clothing ami camp ami.garrison
equipage 13,000,000
Contingencies of the army 50,000
Medical and hospital department. 354,000
Ordnance service 325,000
Ordnance, ordnance stores and
supplies 3,394,000
Armament of fort locations 130,5.10
Manufacture of arms 640,000
Equipment of engineer troops. ... 75,000
Civilian assistants to engineer
officers 40,000
Total $88,038,840
Up to this time the estimates and appro
priations already made ou account of the
war aggregate $205,210,840.
Fine Body of Men.
A correspondent writes from Tampa:
“The American soldier of to-day is in
comparably better than his predecessor.
Conditions of enlist-.lent are more se
vere. He is more generously treated. His
rations are improved and he has facilities
and privileges formerly unknown. He is
offered incentives to manliness and self
respect. How far these have been suc
cessful is indicated by the statement that
among all the troops in this place I have
JAKAZO FORT.
A type of blockhouses defending Santiago from
the interior.
not observed a single case of drunkenness
or disorder of any description.”
Sixty Killed at Cartagena.
Advices from Cartagena, Spain, say the
explosion at Castle San Julian caused a
panic in the city. Arms and legs were
picked up at a great distance from the
scene of the explosion. The castle con
tained thirty-eight privates belonging to
the artillery and infantry and 123 work
men, not one of whom escaped uninjured.
The dead numbered sixty-two, including
the governor of the port.
Soldier Killed in Collision.
A special train on the Florida Central
nnd Peninsula Railway, carrying North
Carolina troops, col'-Jed with a freight
train. Private Wd'vim Barbee was kill
ed, and Private J. M. Colelough was fa
tally injured.
Many ?Yi*h to Be Officer*.
Seventy-eight second lieutenants are to
be appointed to the army by the Presi
dent, as a result of the passage of the
battalion measure, which increased both
the numbers and the officers of each in
fantry regiment. For these places there
are 1.800 applicants, and more are expect
ed before the appointments are an
nounced.
Spanish Powder Mill Blow* Up.
An explosion occurred in a projectile
factory near Carthagena, Spain. Fire
soldier* and five werkmeo were killed out*
right tod *l*ty*tlt p*fMO* wvwely in
jured*
CALLS FOR MORE MEN
President Asks for 75,000 Ad
ditional Volunteers.
LISTS ARE NOW OPEN TO ALL
Recruits Are Not to Come Entirely from
National Guard.
President McKinley Asks the Several
States to Let Him Have More Troops
With Which ta Whip the Spaniards
—Call 1* Thought to Indicate Early
Invasion of Cuba by Army Now iu
the Field - Germans Failed to Bluff
Dewey at Manila.
Washington special:
The President has issued a proclamation
calling for 75,000 more volunteers. This
will make the total army strength, regu
lars and volunteers, 280,000. The second
official call for troops is as follows:
“Whereas, An act of Congress
was approved the 25th day of April,
1898, entitled ‘An act declaring that
war exists between the United
States of America mid the Kingdom
of Spain,' and
“Whereas, By an act of Congress
entitled ‘An act to provide for tem
porarily increasing the military es
tablishment of the United States in
time of war and for other purposes,’
approved April 22, 1898, the Presi
dent is authorized, in order to raise
a volunteer army, to issue his proc
lamation calling for volunteers to
serve in the army of the United
States;
“Now, therefore, I, William Mc-
Kinley, President of the United
States, by virtue of the power vest-
Am
m TIP
SECBETARY OF WAU ALGER.
ed in me by the constitution and
the laws, and deeming sufficient oc
casion to exist, have thought fit to
call forth, and hereby do call forth,
volunteers to the aggregate number
of 75.0Q0, in addition to the volun
teers called forth by my proclama
tion of the 23d day of April, in the
present year, the same to be appor
tioned, as lar as practicable, among
the several States and territories
and the District of Columbia, ac
cording to population, and to serve
for two years, unless sooner dis
charged. The proportion of each
arm and the details of enlistment
and organization will be made
known through the War Depart
ment.
“In witness whereof I have here
unto set my hand and caused the
seal of the United States to be af
fixed.
“Done at the City of Washington
this 25th day of May, in the year of
onr Lord one thousand eight hun
dred and ninety-eight, and of the
independence of the United States
the one hundred and twenty-sec
ond.
“WILLIAM M’KINLEY.
“By tne President.
“WILLIAM R. DAY’,
“Secretary of State.”
It is confidently predicted in Washing
ton that this second call for volunteers
denotes an early and concerted move upon
Cuba and Porto Rico. With this under
standing of it the proclamation of May 25
will be as welcome to the American peo
ple as was that of April 23 calling out
the first 125,000 volunteers, and will be
responded to as heartily and as promptly.
In answer to the first call the quotas are
practically all filled except those of u -Cw
Southern States. When the full number
of men allowable under these two procla
mations has been enlisted, and when the
regular army has beeu recruited to the
limit permitted under its present organ
ization, the United States will have under
arms, including regulars and volunteers,
a total of nearly 280,000 men. With such
an army to supplement our gallant navy
we ought to be able to take anything short
of Madrid itself.
Like the men called out under the for
mer proclamation, these new volunteers
are to be enlisted for two year*, unless
sooner discharged. But unlike the oth
ers these will not be drawn exclusively
from the State militia organizations. The
enlistments will be open to all men of
proper age and physical abilities, irrespec
tive of whether they have had previous
military training or not. This will give
a much desired opportunity to many pri
vate organizations of a military nature to
see active service, and it will also give a
similar chance to thousands of patriotic
individuals who have lielongod to no or
ganization at all. Reports from various
States indicate that the call will meet
with hearty response. Independent com
panies axe already organized in many of
the States, und these will be offend to
the service of the country. .
Not to Learn War Secret*.
President McKinley has established a
“censorship” over the cabinet. Hereafter
only Secretary Long of the Navy Depart
ment and Secretary Alger of the War De
partment are to possess the war secrets.
The other members of the cabinet are to
know only such war news as the Presi
dent and his war aids may thiqk advisa
ble to tell them.
Poldier* Get Free Postage.
The introduction in Congress, and its
reference to the Postoffice Department, of
• bill to extend the privilege of franking
letters to soldiers, brought to light a for
gotten statute allowing them to transmit
their correspondence through the mails
without affixing the customary stamps,
the postage to be collected ou delivery.
Frenchmen Offer Spain Cash.
The railway companies, backed by
French bankers, heve offered to advance
the Spanish Government 250,<X)0,000
francs in gold if their concessions are pro
longed. Senor Gamazo, minister of pub
lic works, is opposed to granting any pro
longation of the concession.
Order for ItOO Maxim Gun*.
The Washingtcn navy yard has receiv
ed an order from he Navy Department to
at once make 200 Maxim rapid-fire guns
for delivery within two weeks.
Blanco Must Surrender.
Persons arriving at li>-.gston. Jamaica,
from Havana declare Cnba if able to re
sist only one month longer, owing to
scarcity of provisions.
Says He Will Hold Manila.
Gov. Gen. Aogusti ha* reaffirmed that
be will distribute every rifi* and cartridge
be poMeaM* aad defend Manila to the
laaL
4?
ESTABLISHED 1855.
STARTS FOR MANILA.
CRUISER CHARLESTON C'Hj T 0
JOIN DEWEY.
Expedition Leaves Pan Francisco to
Support Admiral Dewey iu the Phil
ippine Islands-7,000 Troops on the
Way—Monitor Monterey Is Delayed.
Go to Dewey's Aid.
The cruiser Charleston Is well on her
way to Manila. She will call at Hono
lulu for coal anil then proceed direct to
the Philippines, and in less than thirty
days at the outside she ought to report
to Admiral Dewey. Though the monitor
Monterey has been ordered to Manila, it
will be several weeks, probably, before
she can get away from San Francisco.
Her executive otlieer, Lieut. Carlin, said
the ship must wait for certain kinds of
ammunition desired by Dewey.
Fully 7,000 troops will soou be started
for Manila. Those who did not go on
the three steamers will go later on the
China, Centennial, Colon and Zer.Nndia.
Three steamers —the lVkin, Australia and
City of Sydney—started together. A licet
of transports will be met at Honolulu by
CRUISER CHARLESTON.
the Bennington and thence convoyed to
Manila.
Every steam vessel in the harbor blew
an rovoir to Capt. Glass and his crew as
the Charleston steamed out of the Golden
Gate. None of the forts in the harbor
saluted the vesse , but the demonstration
made by the (1,0(10 soldiers gathered at
the Presidio was tremendous. When the
vessel was sighted eoming down the bay
the soldiers gathered on the beach and
cheer upon cheer rang out from the men
who were to soon follow the Charleston
to the scene of Admiral Dewey’s triumph.
It. was expected that the trip would oc
cupy aliout twenty days. This allows for
a somewhat lower rate of speed than is
usually made by steamers like the Pekin,
Sydney and Australia, the authorities rec
ognizing the necessity of economizing tlie
coal supplies when carrying heavy car
goes.
The War Department is still negotiat
ing for other steamers to be used for
transport purposes between San Francis
co and Manila. The Government at pres
ent has the services of five ships. It is
believed, and, in ease Congress shall de
cide to give Amerii an register to vessels
of the Northern Pacific Steamship Com
pany, the whole fleet of that company will
be placed at the disposal of the Govern
ment on reasonable terms.
HAVANA IN DIKE NEED.
Letters Via Mexico Say the Situation
Is Desperate.
Deters from Havana by way of Mexico
say that the sit •'at ion is desperate there,
and that the people are beginning to eat
horse meat, the few cattle in stock having
been seized by the army. The insurgent
bands are controlling the interior, and
have taken possession of some towns,
while Spaniards in large numbers control
the northern coast. A strong Spanish
military line has been placed along the
railway between Havana and Batabano.
On account of the great scarcity of
coal, Gen. Blanco issued an order stop
ping the gas works and all manufactures
iu which coal is needed; and the coal has
s*> iO'ry I
r *• *****&••
HAVANA ■- J?
fa if/* • Vn -
a/e A/ares
IIAUDOR OF HAVANA.
lieen stored by the Government for its
use. Gen. Blanco says the dearth of pro
visions will be soon relieved. At a coun
cil recently he said: “Be confident, anil
let the people be confident, that Spain is
not going to abandon us.” Gen. Arolas,
military commander of Havana, is letter
prepared to rei>el an attack than is gen
erally believed. The rabid Spaniards are
making strenuous efforts to win over the
Cuteins. In a manifesto addressed to
the Spaniards born on the peninsula or in
Cuba they say: “Let us forgive the small
differences of the past, and unite like
one >n.n against the common enemy.”
REFI'T, TO TRANSPORT TROOPS.
Steamship few?''" nice Attempt to
Fleece Uncle Bain.
The delay in sending troops to the Phil
ippines was explained by an official of the
War Department. The Government has
be< - unable to secure the necessary trans
ports at what was considered a reasona
ble figure and will therefore proceed to
impress tin? vessels necessary to carry the
troops which have been ordered to Ma
nila. The Government had offered a sum
which was considered satisfactory for the
transportation of the men, and since this
—< _ —— ■'
FORTIFICATIONS * SANTIAGO.
lias been refused, i will proceed to put
the soldiers on boatu 'he ships and com
pel the owners to carry them. The offi
cial said that this was the only cause of
the embarrassment, the Government did
its best to reach an amicable agreement
with the steamship companies, but failed.
It then decided to set Je the matter by ap
pointing a commission to determine a rea
sonable coiti;-euj ition and the steamers
will be compelled ti transport men at
that figure.
Roosevelt’s hough Killers.
“Roosevelt’s Bough Riders” iuelude in
its muster rolls the most intrepid fighters
and the most experienced plainsman of
the West, and though some of these are
daring men, who would fight with vv r
desperation, they have the true Western
spirit of self-resjiect. Most of them have
left valuable interests to go to the front,
and there are almost as many profession
al men In the ranks as there are plains
men and business men They are for the
most part brainy as well as brawny.
Polo Leave# Montreal,
ben or Polo y Beruabe sailed Saturday
from Montreal for Liverpool by the
•teenier Doahtion, with ii hie tuff,
Official City Paper.

Book MPmtiiig lose
• liti KXXTXMI OJP
Job Printing
MEMPirr BXBHIIBM
Ifl a Mac* Satisfactory Manner.
pgHQKtS'
y , i?pr.ess
The strategy board is in imminent dan
ger of becoming the vermiform appendix
of the war.—Washington Post.
Gen. Merritt is the latest man to learn
that a newspaper interview may be full
of mine fields.—Philadelphia Ledger.
These personally conducted summer ex
cursion# in Cuba are worrying a young
person in Madrid.—St. Paul Dispatch.
Spain has discovered us again, and the
secoud surprise was probably greater than
the first.—Memphis Commercial-Appeal.
There is a general disposition to declare
all book agents, as well as bill collectors,
Spanish spies.—Memphis Commercial-Ap
peal.
“Everybody knows a woman can’t keep
a secret." “Men can?" “Yes.” "How
about the strategy board?”—Cleveland
Plain Dealer.
At the propec time Dewey will proba
bly apologize to the board of strategy for
the irregularity of his porformance.-
Wnshington Post.
Ambassador Hay says that Commodore
Dewey is a very mild-mannered man.
This accounts for his winning ways.—
Salt Lake Herald.
As further evidence of martial spirit,
the new baby that is christened Dewey is
likely to la? immediately up in arms.—
Philadelphia Times.
The moment that a Spanish fleet leaves
Cadiz for the Philippine Islands an Amer
ican fleet should leave for Spain.—Mem
phis Commercial-Appeal.
There is one difference between Or
vera’s fleet and die Flying Dutchman—
the latter does not cave to call anywhere
for coal. —Philadelphia Ledger.
Some of the now members of Sagasta’s
cabinet may not have much experience,
but it will not be long before they have
acquired a great deal.—Washington Star.
Ti.ose enterprising Individuals who are
engaged in manufacturing relics of the
Maine for the wholesale trade report a
flourishing business condition. —Washing-
ton Post.
Uncle S&ui supplies his soldier boys
with plenty of tobacco, In which regard
they are favored above any others in the
world. All the smoke of war will not
come from artillery.—Boston Globe.
The Grand Old Mia.
lie understood his time, but he was lu
advance of it. —St. Paul Pioneer Press.
What seemed to him in injustice any
where was a personal affliction to him.—
New York Times.
If Mr. Gladstone was inconsistent the
history of his time is inconsistent.—ln
dianapolis Journal.
He was equally at home in religion,
science, statesmanship and literature. —
Ohio State Journal.
Gladstone made a great place in history
as an exemplar of conscience in states
manship.—Kansas City Star.
His goodness was the essential part of
his greatness. He was a man for the
people.—Cincinnati Enquirer.
Probably there never was a famous
career more distinctly foreshadowed from
the start. —Philadelphia I/odger.
Asa statesman he was bold and un
compromising, and yet in social life he
was as tender and considerate as a wom
an.—St. Louis Republic.
In everything that goes to the muking
up of statecraft Gladstone is to bo ranked
with the greatest products of this or past
ages.—Baltimore Herald.
He impressed his marvelous and benefi
cent personality upon the laws, the Insti
tutions upon the politico-mural sense of
mankind. —Boston Advertiser.
His life offers a complete refutation io
the oft-repeated charge that a man can
not enter am] continue in public life with
out damage to his character.—Burlington
Hawkeyo.
The range and scope of his labors, the
breadth and growth of his ideals and be
liefs and tile variety and character of his
knowledge and his avocations, are alike
wonderful to contemplate.—Cleveland
Leader.
Among the great figures of English
statesmanship in our duy his is the lofti
est, in that he was always calling on the
people of England to rise above their tra
ditions and prepossessions.—Springfield,
Mass., Republican.
In statesmanship, in the domestic vir
tues, in broad humanity, and in that force
of character which impresses the qualities
of its possessor upon the age in which he
lives, Glads one was one of the world’s
greatest men.—Boston Post.
Americans lxdioved in hi .ineerlty;
they caipe to regard him with good will,
and he is mourned by them to-day, no less
than by his own countrymen, as one of
the majestic figures in the history of the
Anglo-Saxon race.—New York Sun.
John Hull’# New Plan.
It doesn’t appear that the Hon. Joseph
Chamberlain is a constant reader of the
St. Janies’ Gazette.—Nnsbville American.
But the trend of events for the last few
months certainly seems to have inclined
this people to regard such an alliance with
greater favor than ever before.—New
York Tribune.
We want no “entHugling alliance” with
Great Britain or any other country. The
United States is amply able to take care
of itself in any legitimate undertaking
and we should engage in no other kind.—
Springfield R<*gister.
Nothing can be said, ns the ulliance Is
to le based on conditions not yet exist
ent. The shadow of the alliance stretch
ing over Europe will undoubtedly prevent
the development of the conditions—Roch
ester Democrat and Chronicle.
Let us proiK-rly recognize anil acknowl
edge every evidence of English good will
and friendship, but we must not lose
sight of the admonition of Washington to
avoid alliances with European nations
which might entangle us iu their compli
cations.—Omah.. Bee.
Is it possible that we have been swift
ly swept into this tempestuous sea of
world politics? Chamberlain assumes that
we have and rejoices because of it. Mr.
Chamberlain counts on too much. We
are not ready to enter into foreign alli
ances. But the future may force us be
yond our traditional policy.—St. Louis
Republic.
We cannot favor an alliance with Great
Britain which would involve ns in that
nation’s world-wide contentions, but we
can but be grateful for the great service
Great Britain has rendered us in letting
the powers understand that in the event
of any interference with us by them that
Government, with its powerful navy,
would l<e found the ally of the United
States.—lndianapolis Journal.
Hporks from the Wires.
The President has approved the Alaska
homestead and right of way bill.
Popular opinion in Italy thinks an An
glo-Saxon alliance would tend to preserve
the general peace.
Mrs. S. L. Rose of Granville, Ohio, a
native of New Hampshire, has celebrated
her 100th birthday.
State of Ohio, Cits or Toledo, • ~
Lucas County. \
Frank .1. Cheney makes oath that he Is the
senior partner of the firm of F. J. Cheney K
Cos., doing business in the City of Toledo, County
and State aforesaid, and that said Bnn will pav
the sum of ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS for each
anil every case of < atarrh that cannot be cured
by the use of Haix’s Catarrh Clue.
FRANK .1. CHENEY.
Sworn to tefore me andsubscritied in my pres
ence. this cth day of December, A. D. IBC.
J ~ ' i A. W. GLEASON,
- seal j Notary Public.
Hall's Catarrh Cure Is taken internally, and acts
directly on the blood and mucous surfaces of the
system. Send for testimonials, free.
F. J. CO., Toledo, 0.
er’Sold by Dnuwist#. 7*#,

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