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Vernon County censor. [volume] (Viroqua, Wis.) 1865-1955, May 25, 1910, Image 3

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SUN SPOTS SEEN
BY ASTRONOMERS
UNUSUAL recurrence: but not
SUFFICIENT TO CAUSE
ANY UNEASINESS.
THOUSANDS SEEK VIEW OF
COMET.—VALUABLE OBSER
VATIONS MADE.
|
Chicago. May 19.—Thousands gath
ered throughout the city last night to
peer into the west for the incandes
cent ta'l of the comet. The comet was
the topic everywhere. There was lit
tle for tee unitiated to see, but as
tronomers found much of interest.
Reports to the Associated Press indi
cated that conditions here were the
same throughout the country.
At the Yerttes observatory at Wil- j
iiams Bay, Wisconsin, the astronomers
secured photographs and accurate rec
ords of meteoric phenomena and vary
ing heavenly illumination under at
mospheric conditions nearly perfect
for work with camera and telescope.
The pictures and data are considered
ot unusal value and may develop sci
entific information and theories of un
expected importance.
Professor Edward Barnard, one of
the world’s authorities, is pleased with
the results of his observations, ex
tended almost without Interruption,
for 48 hours. Painstaking search
made through the tail of the comet
tor spots where illumination might be
lacking. This lack of illumination, It
was indicated, may aid in determining
tine substance of the glow that follows
the comet’s head.
The party at the observatory In
cluded Professor S. A. Mitchell, of
Columbia university. New York; Pro
fessor Edwin B. Frost. Professor Sher
burne W. Burnham. Prof. Edward Bar
nard; Professor John A. Parkhurst;
Professor Storrs B. Barrett; Professor
Frederick Slocum, Oliver J- Lee, Mary
L. Calvert. They were assisted in
their observations by the following
members of Yerkes observatory staff;
Miss Florence L. Baldwin, Frank R
Sullivan. Oscar E. Romare, Henry J.
Fciote, Wilford Beguelin, Diedrich J.
Oetjen, Louis F> Clay.
Sun spots were reported from sev
eral points. The largest was reported
by Professor T. J. J. See. United
States naval observatory at Mare
Island. He said; “One spot is esti
mated at 60,000 miles long and 30,000
miles wide. The spots will reach the
sun’s central meridian in another day
or two. and if any disturbance of tae
earth’s magnetism is to occur from
this cause it Is likely to come about
Friday.”
Portland. Oregon, observers report
ed two spots on the sun. Professor J.
S. Rieard, Santa Clara. California, col
lege observed two large spots on the
sun. in*enselv black.
"Three awful groups” is the way
Father Brennan described the spots
at-the St. Louis observatory. *‘A re
currence of the spots at this time is
unusual, but there is nothing to
cause uneasiness.”
No solar eruption was observed by
Princeton university astronomers
Dr. Harold Jacoby, Rutherford pro
fessor of astronomy at Columbia uni
versity, said the sun .-pots reported
from various observatories in the
west, might be due to the passage of
the comet across the" face of the sun.
or might be merely fortuitous.
Fears of the superstitious were
aroused at many places and was
thought the world was coming to an
end.
•'Nearer My God to Thee.”
"Nearer My God To Thee” was sung
by men and women of the Unitarian
conference clustered on the roof of a
downtown hotel skyscraper with all
eves turned toward the western
heavens. It was probably the most
unique of many “comet parties” held
all over Chicago last night.
A theatre crowd met with a cloud ot
flying dust when it emerged. A cry
was raised that comet dust had
reached the earth’s surface and a gen
eral scramble followed.
An unidentified woman, whose mind
has given way through fear of the
comet, is held by the police. Two sui
cides are attributed to fear of the
comet. Negroes of the south side are
greatly perturbed.
SH'tRMAK SCORES
IOWA SENATORS
Kalamazoo, Mich., May 19.—At the
first anniversary celebration of the
Uncoln Voters' league, held yester
day. Vice President James Sherman
and Senator Burrows were the prin
cipal speakers. The address of the
vice president was devoted to a de
fense of the Taft administration.
He bitterly assailed the two lowa
insurgent senators for the'r utteran
ces at a political mass meeting at
Pes Moines last week. He said the
speeches were a reflection on the hon
esty and integrity of the president
and a majority of the republicans in
both houses of congress.
Manufacturers Elect.
New York. May 19 —John Kirby, Jr,
of Dayton, Ohio, was reelected presi
dent of the National Association of
Manufacturers yesterday and the as
sociation finally adjourned. The an
num 1 banquet was held at the Waldorf
Astoria last night. The association
will meet in New York again next
year.
GIVE NAVAL OFFICERS
HIGHER RETIRING RANK
: Washington. May 19. —The naval ap-
I propriation bill, heretofore reported to
he senate, was committed to the com
mittee on naval affairs to permit the
incorporation of other amendments
agreed upon vesterdy by the commit
tee. One amendment authorizes tne
retiri ment of naval officers under
ertain cotid tions, with a rank aoove
ihat held. Another abolishes the bu
reau of equ'pment in the navy depart
ment.
The rank amendment is intended
e_ peciaJly to permit the retirement ot
Paymaster General Rogers with a
rank of rear admiral.
CHINESE RIOT ON
OCEAN STEAMER
Seattle, May 19. —Twenty-three of
400 Chinese passengers on the Blue
Funnel liner, Keemun, arrived last
night from Hong Kong, were woundad
in a battle on the ship three days ago.
a feud having broken out between
Tongs. .Knives, chairs and everything
portable were used. The officers and
crew quelled the fight with difficulty.
150 PASSENGERS
PANIC STRICKEN
WHEN RIVER STEAMER STRIKES
SNAG AND SINKS.—ALL
ARE SAVED.
Kansas City. May 19. —Panic-strick-
en by a realization that they were on
a sinking steamer, 150 passengers,
men, women and children, fought
madly to escape from the excursion
steamer Uncle Sam. when it struck a
.-and bur and capsized in the Missouri
river near here yesterday afternoon.
The coolness of the boat's crew pre
vented loss of life.
The accident occurred in midstream
where the river is wide and deep. Tie
steamer was attempting to turn
around. The entire right side of the
boat was crushed in and filled rapidly.
Instantly the officers and crew found
themselves in the midst of a strt g
gling mass of humanity. The boat
was headed for the shore, but before
arriving sank on one side, submerging
half of the deck. A few jumped over
board, but as the water was shallow,
they were rescued without difficulty.
A govern .nbnt steamer rushed to the
rescue.
The rapid filling of the hull cooled
the boilers and probably prevei ted an
explosion. In less than ten minutes
after the boat sank every passenger
was vafelv on shore.
The loss is estimated at S23,iMX).
SENATOR BIRD IMPROVES.
,)
Indications, Point to a Complete Re
covery.
Milwaukee. Wis., May 19. —A letter
received yesterday by Colonel A. G.
Weissert from the secretary of Sen
ator H. P. Bird of Wausaukee slates
that the latter, who has been serious
ly ill for some weeks, is improving
and indications are that he will fully
recover. Senator Bird is a member
of the Vicksburg National Park asso
ciation for Wisconsin, with Colonel
Weissert and O. J. Burnham. Owing
to his illness, there has been no
meeting of the commission for some
time, but one will be sailed as soon
as the senator is able to attend.
TIMBER INTERESTS WILL
FIGHT RATE ADVANCES
Washington, May 19. —Indications
point to a retrial before the inter
state commerce commission of the
North Pacific coast lumber cases.
Information has reached the com
mission that the transcontinental
lines, including the Harriman lines,
Northern Pacific and Great Northern,
propose, at the expiration of the two
years' limit of orders again to file
maximum advances on lumber and
minimum advances on other com
modities. The proposed! advance will
be approxiately 10 cents a hundred
pounds on all forest products.
Timber interests will contest bit
terly any advance-
KERBY CALLS FOR
SALARY DUE HIM
Washington, May 19. —Frederick M.
Kerb.v, the stenographer, who was
dismissed by Secretary Ballinger as
the result of a statement regarding
the Lawler memorandum to the pres
ident on the Giavis charges, called at
the interior department yesterday for
personal effects and two weeks' sal
ary due.
Kerbv said he had taken a position
with the Press Association to which
he gave information, but that the
character and place of employment
bad not been decided.
SOLICITS BANKERS' AID.
| Director of Mints Makes Appeal to
. Financiers.
St. Louis. .May 19. —The national
Monetary commission will not attempt
to frame a bill embodying new finan
cial legislation before the coming
winter, according to Dr. A. Piatt An
drew, director of the mint and spe
cial assistant to ti e commission, who
addressed the Missouri bankers’ con
vention yesterday. Andrews appealed
to the bankers to give the commis
sion all possible aid.
EIGHT INJURED IN
PASSENGER WRECK
St. Louis, May 19.—Eight persons
were injured at 9:30 last night when
the Illinois Central. Diamond Special
crashed into a wrecking train at the
mouth of the tunnel at Eighth street
&cd Ciartr avenue.
GERMAN EMPEROR
! ON ENGLISH SOIL
ARRIVES AT SHEERNESS AND
WILL LEAVE FOR LONDON
THIS MORNING.
COMES TO ATTEND FUNERAL
OF HIS UNCLE, KING
LDWARD.
London, May 15#.—Thousands ot peo
ple, marching in double tile on either
side ot the catafalque, on which rests
the coffin ot Edward Vll., pas>vj
through Westminster hail yesterday,
and when the doors were closed at 10
o'clock last night, there were seem
ingly tniles of them still in line
Throughout the afternoon Victor* •
station was the scene ot a constant
stream of arriving foreign represent
atives. King Albert of Belgium ana
King Manuel of Portugal, were met.
by King George and his eldest son.
the duke of Cornwall. Other arrival*
included tile dutee of Aesta, represent
ing King Victor Emmanuel; XI. Pich
on, the French minister of foreign af
fairs, representing President Fall
ieres; and King Ferdinand, of Bul
garia, the crown prince of Roum&nia.
the crown prince of Pervia, Prince
Henry, ot the Netherlands. Prince
Charles, of Sweden, two Chinese mis
sions headed by Prince Tsai Tao. I
brother of the prince regent, and rep I
resentatives of various German prin- |
cipalities.
The German imperial yacht, Hoheu
zollern, arrived at Sheerness last
evening, but at the emperor's request
no salute was fired The emperor
will land this morning and proceed
to London.
The official program of Friday's
ceremonial, which ws issued last
night, occupies five or six columns in
the newspapers. Colonel Roosevelt,
special ambassador of the United
States, with M. Plnchon, will ride in
the eighth carriage in the procession
MONSTER SUNDAY
SCHOOL CONVENTION
Washington, May 19. —Sunday
school workers from all parts of
America and beyond the teas arc here
to take part in the convention which
opens today of the world's Sunday
school association. Of 3,500 accredit
ed delegates more than 1.000 arrived
yesterday, among the foreign dele
gates being 150 from England, Ireland
and Scotland, Many visitors, not
delegates, ar<r attracted to the meet
ing. It is expected that during the
entire week the convention lasts
there will be at least 10,000 strangers.
More than fifty nations will be rep
resented and more than 26,000,000
Sunday school students.
There will be a parade Friday of
10.000 men around the capitol build
ing. President Taft will speak this
morning at the opening.
EXPLOSION KILLS
RURAL GUARDS
DYNAMITE DESTROYS EARRACKS
’OO PERSONS REPORT.
ED DEAD.
CATASTROPHE MAY HAVE BEEN
WORK OF CON
SPIRATORS.
Havana, May 19. —Two almost sim
ultaneous explosions of dynamite,
about 3.000 pounds, demolished the
rural guard barracks in Pinar Del Rio
yesterday afternoon. Fully one bun
dred persons were killed and nearly
as maijy wounded.
Most of thp dead are rural guards,
but the entire families of several of
ficers are reported killed also, as wen
as several employes of the puWlc
works department and residents ot
the city, on which fell * deluge of de
bris.
It is not known whether the explo
sion was the result of an accident or
due to an act of conspirators. Sev
eral relief trains carrying surgeons
and rural guards started yesterday af
ternoon to the scene, 108 miles dis
tant.
The names of the dead were not re
ported, with the exception of Capta'n
Alfredo Revena and Captain Gasper
Betancourt of Garrison. Their fam
ilies are reported buried in the ruins
of the officer.- quarters adjacent to
the barracks.
FILIPINOS STAND
FOR INDEPENDENCE
Washington, D. C., May 19.—“ Our
desire for independence remains unal
terable,'' declared Speaker Serjio Os
roeaa of the Philippine assembly, in
a cablegram to Delegate Quezon, who
petitioned the house Saturday for im
mediate independence of the Filipi
nos.
The me.-sage was one of a number
cong atulating Mr Queson on bis
spe*-ch. Speaker Osmena cabled that
the Filipino people craved the ad
vancement of the national cause by
all possible means, that ten years of
American administration showed that
the Filipinos sere capable of main
taining an independent government,
and that justice of the American peo
ple would decide in favor of Filipino
I freedom.
I Chairman Alberto Barreto of the
nationalist party cabled his warm
congratulations on the expression of
desire of the Filipinos to the Amer
ican people. Delegate Quezon belongs
to th ; s part, which is domlram in the
Philippines, embracing, it is claimed,
90 per cent of the people and sixty
five of the eighty de'egat*s to the as
sembly.
STRIKERS SEEK SETTLEMENT.
Mil.tia Wilt Receive Orde s to Return
Home.
Hannibal, Mo.. May 19.—Unless un
foreseen developments arise. Govern
or Hadley wilt order the militia on
cuty at Haseo to return home The
strikers yesterday- began negotiations
for a settlement of the trouble which
led to the shutting down of the cem
ent plant and the calling of troops.
Bess than 100 workers ha\e re
turned to work. Warrants charging
rioting have been issued against 44
men.
TRAIN STRIKES COW
MAN FATALLY HURT
Dewitt. Mo., May- 19. —A Wabash
fast train, eastbound, drawn b> two
engines, struck a cow on a curve five
miles west late yesterday afternoon
and in the -wreck following one man
was fatally injured and three serious
ly hurt. A score of passengers suf
fered slight injuries.
engineer Thomas Davis was so bad
ly scalded that he will die. Engineer
Charles Greeey. and Fireman George
Blaine and G. XV’. Petiick sustained
dangerous injuries.
rooseveli” meets
KING HAAKON
DINES WITH AMBASSADOR REID
AND NUMBER OF NOTED
ENGLISHMEN.
Lot lon, May 19. —Colonel Roose
velt had an audience wiith King Haa
kon of Norway and met King George
of Greece yesterday. With all the
members of the American special em
bassy, he wrote in the books of King
1
”■ . ‘L:’
Si?
y’IN?: v V
jiu' riU'iO or utpj£e‘ci'
Alfonso of Spain. Prince Henry of
Prussia, Grand Duke Michael and
other royalties. At lunch with Am
bassador Reid lie met Ixird Laris
down, Lord Cromer and other noted
Englishmen; while at dinner land
and Lady Londonderry were among
the guests. The colonel
visited the shop of a taxidermist who
is mounting some of his African troph
ies.
Asked to Accept Chairmanship.
St. Louis. May 19—A cablegram
was sent to Theodore Roosevelt last
night by the national Florence Crit
tenden mission conference, asking him
to accept the chairmanship of the ad
visory committee.
DEAL IN RESTRAINT
OF TRADE ILLEGAL
Frankfort, Ky., May 19. —The Ken
tucky court of apiteals yesterday held
that any contract made in restraint of
trade is illegal, void and cannot be
enforced The case was the Mer
chants' Ice and Cold Storag- company
of Louisville vs. John Rohrman, who
gold hit fee business to the cold stor
age company, under a contract not to
engage in the manufacturing or sale
of Ice for ten years.
UNCLE JOE WOULD
HUG INSURGENTS
New York. May 19— Shooting, were
too gentlemanly a fate for certain re
publican insurgents Speaker Cannon,
of the house of representatives,
shouted last night, in an address at
the annual banquet of the National
Association of Manufacturers at the
Waldorf-Astoria. He was making a
defense of his conduct as- speaker, and
v.as cheered. He said that hanging
should be their fate, as among th-m
were men who would have competed
wuh Judas.
Mr. Cannon said that If he were a
mere partisan lie would welcome Dol
llver, Bristow. La Foiiette and Clapp,
joining champ Clark and company.
But that would bring short wages
and misery to millions of hearth
stones.
MME. GARCIA 18 DE ‘ D.
Once Celebrated Singer, Daughter of
Noted Tenor Passes Away.
Paris May 19— Mme. Michelle Pau
line Viardot-Garcia, once a celebrt ted
rinjef, died yesterday She was born
in 1821, the daughter of Emmanuel
Garcia, the noted tenor. Her sister,
Mme. Maiibran. also was famous as
a vocalist.
STATE MUST PAY
INGALLS' EXPENSE
ATTORNEY GENERAL HOLDS
COST OF EUROPEAN TRIP A
LEGITIMATE CHARGE.
"REASONABLE NECESSITY" ONLY
QUESTION AND THAT NOT
EASILY DETERMINED.
Madison, May 13.
That the state of Wisconsin must
pay the expense account of Assembly
man Wallace Ingalls, amounting to
$560. arising out of his trip to Europe
as member of the special legislative
committee on industrial insurance, is
held bv Attorney General Gilbert in
an opinion rendered yesterday .
Secretary of State Frear presented
the question to the attorney general
asking "whether o, not the committee
is authorized to incur the expendit
ure’ and "as to whether or not any
records from the committee, showing
the authority therefor, should accom
pany the statement"
Attorney General Gilbert recalls the
language of the law creatin', the spe
cial legislative committee by the legis
lature of 1909. wherein Is a provision
that each member of each of said
committees shall be reimbursed by
the state lor his actual necessary e\-
jtenses, but shall receive no coinpen
saiion for time devoted to the wo-k
of such committee.”
The attorney general also quotes
from the opinion of the supreme
court in the case of Rosenheim vs.
FYear, where it was held that "the
legislature has a broad discretionary
power to investigate sny subject as
to which it desires Information in aid
of the proper performance of Its
legislative function or of any other
act delegated to it by the funda
mental law. state or national, and to
that end may proceed by a duly au
thorized committee of one or both
houses, ami may incur reasonably
necessary expenses, payable out ot
the public funds."
Under the doctrines of the decision,
the attorney genual says, the only
limitation placed ii|K>n the legislature,
in. respect*to the expenditure of pub
lic funds for the investigation of sub
jects within its domain, is that such
expenditures be reasonably neces
sary ”
' AS to whether or not the commit
tees provided for in chapter 518 have
power to incur the large expenditures
of money ior trips not only through
out this country but extending to
Europe, depends upon whether such
trips by one or more of their inem
bc’-s are ‘reasonably necessary' for
the Mcoomplisluneni of their pm
poses,” says the opinion.
“In the absence of express legis
lative authorization an exceptionally
>trong showing would, In my judg
ment, be required in order to say as
a matter of law that the purposes of
any of said committees mac. it Tea
senably necessary* that members
thereof should go op long journeys
outside ot tie* state, either in this
lountry or abroad, to pursue their In
vestigations.
“In order to Justify you in auditing
the bill in question, it should be form
ally approved by the committee of
which Mr. Ingalls is a member, cer
tified by section 9 of said chapter. It
should also, in my opinion, he aecoan
pained by a record containing facts
establishing that the expenses in
curred were 'reasonably necessary'
for the accomplishment of the pur
poses of the committee. In the ab
sence of such a showing tin* claim is
lone which, in my Judgment, should he
presented to the legislature for ac
tion thereon.
Mr. Ingalls, as a member of the
special committee, went to Europe
fdr the purpose of making a personal
Investigation of industrial lnsutance
to assist the committee in the formu
lation of measures for presentation
to the legislature. He visited 1 Eng
land, Germany, France and other
countries making an exhaustive In
quiry and his bill for $560 is for act
ual exjienses incur Ted. When the
bill was presented to Secretary of
State Frear for audit and payment
he thought best to have an official
opinion by the attorney general upon
the general proposition of the state's
liability under the law-, for the reason
tbaf the question involved is one that
may arise frequently in the future
and a legal determination of it
seemed necessary.
Whether the legislature. In passing
the law had In view the possibilities
that might arise out of it, may be
seriously questioned, although In the
present instance the expense wan,
perhaps, justified—certainly for the
length .-.ad duration of the trip the
account rendered by Assemblyman In
galls Is modest.
APOPLEXY CLAIMS O'CONNOR.
Brother of Weil Known Physicians of
State Passea Away.
Rhinelander. Wls., May 19. —Dr. <
H. O'Connor, a dentist, expired In his
office of apoplexy. He is survived by
a wife and 3-year old daughter. He
Is a brother of Dr. Walter O'Connor
of Ladysmith, Dr. Don O’Connor of
Appleton, Attorney General E. O'Con
nor of Eagle River and a brother In
law of ex-Senator D E Riordan of
Ashland. He was 38 years old
Janesville. Wis , May 19.—Wffiiam
Henry Harrison Madoon, aged 60.
dropped dead In his office yesterday.
He was cue of the wealthiest real es
tate owners in the city and has been
prominent in republican politics for
a Dumber of years. He was a strong
La Foiiette mail.
SLAIN BY DETECTIVE.
Illinois Miner# Take Officers for Rob
bers, Turn and Flee.
Chicago. 111, May 19. —Three coal
miners who had just arriver in Chi
cago from the village of Vernoir, 111,
mistook four detectives for robbers
early yesterday and fled. The offi
cers gave chase, and each fired a
shot, killing one of the men instantly
and severely wounding another. The
individual killed was John Pubinski
His wounded companion is Micbaei
Ventor. The third miner, Michael
Dubinski. a brother of the man slam,
was arrested.
CREATES NEW DIOCESE.
Will B; Named Toletana, Latin for
Toledo, in Cincinnati.
Cincinnati, O, May 19. —Unofficial
notice was received by the adminis
trative officer of the Roman Catholic
arohdioee.e here yesterday that the
pope has created anew diocese in the
province of Cincinnati. The new dio
cese Is named Toletana. which is the
Latin for Toledo, and the center of
the diocese probably will be the Ohio
city of that name. Rev. John T.
O'Connell of Toledo is mentioned as
the possible bishop. The diocese ot
Taletara will include the northwest
ern part of Ohio.
EXPLAINS HIGH
PRICE OF COFFEE
IMPORTER TESTIFIES BEFORE
SHIP SUBSIDY INVESTIGAT
ING COMMITTEE
Washington, May 19.—-Herman
Slelcken, a New York coffee Importer,
told the house ship subsidy investi
gating committer' yesterday that the
middleman’s profit in this country is
approximately 15 cents a pound,
against Germany's seven-rent profit.
Germany imposes a tariff on coffee.
The United States does not. Steleken
said that during many years the price I
of coffee laid iJnwn at New York aver
aged cents, anti the cost of roast
ing and preparing It is 2 to 2** cents,
the consumer paying for this 25 cents
a pound or upward.
Mr. gieleken and Lorenzo Daniel.
New York commission merchants,
told of the efforts of large coffee con
cerns to counteract the misstatements
which portrayed a lack of shipping
facilities between the United States
and South America. A speech of
former Secretary of the Treasury
Shaw was cited as containing some
ot the earlier misstatements.
The investigation has been drag
glng on for weetks, but the committee
has obtained little or nothing bearing
out the charges reflecting on .members
of congress In connection with the
proposed ship subsidy legislation.

PARR TESTIFIES
IH KIKE CASE
New York, May 19.—Richard Barr,
government employee, whose raid on
the scale houses of the American
Sugar Refining company in Williams
burg (Brooklyn 1 November, 1907, first
uncovered the gigantic sugar under
weighing frauds, took the witness
stand yesterday at the trial of Charles
R. Helke, in the criminal branch of
the United Slates circuit court,
Helke is secretary of the American
Sugar Refining company and with five
former employees stands charged with
conspiring to defraud the government.
Burr described how he found in the
scales a steel spring by which, it is
alleged, tinderweighing was accom
plished; how he found holes hoped in
the scales to admit the spring, and
how he caused drafts of sugar to be
weighed to show the discrepancy was
doe to manipulation. His story prob
ably will be continued today. The
defense will attempt to prove the
fault lay in the scales and that the In
accuracies were due to clogging,
weather conditions and other causes
QUEEN LOSES CLAIM.
Liliuokalarvi, Former Hawaiian Ruler,
Again Meets Defeat.
Washington, D. C, May 19—LIlluo
kalani, former queen of Hawaii, has
again met defeat in her effort to se
cure $40,090 —the rentals from the
crown lands in Hawaii The court
of claims has just decided that these
lands belonged to the government ot
Hawaii and that the queen find no
persona! claim upon them.
TO PRtVENT SPREAD
OF OPIUM HABIT
Washington. May 19.—One of the
several steps, necessary to bring
about the suppression of traffic in opi
um and other habit forming drugs,
was taken yesterday by the senate
committee on foreign relations, when
it reported to the senate a bill ex
tending to the United States consu
lar districts of China, the pharmacy
laws of this country.
Admits Starting Fire.
Wausau. Wis., May 19 —Charles
Blake confessed yesterday morning
to having started the fire in Mosinee
and pleaded guilty in court to arson.
He will be sentenced.
Vote on P ohibition in Denver.
Denver, hjy 17.—Whether Denver
shall become anti-saloon teritory will
be decided at today’s municipal eleo
tion.
MODERN STATION
FOR WOOD TESTING
GOVERNMENT LABORATORIES AT
FOREST PRODUCT BUILD
ING TO OPEN SOON.
FINE APPARATUS IS INCLUDED
IN EQUIPMENT—SIXTY PER.
SONS ARE EMPLOYED.
Madison, May” 19
Together with the great concern
which '*> being shown in the conser
vation of the natural resources of the
country, the United States is devel
oipng other sources for the pveven
tion of exhaustion. The movement
has been es(>eeially applied to the
wood Industry, and in several places
the government has erected elaborate
and well equipped/ experimental sta
tions for the determination of the
ad&ptihlltty of certain timbers.
The most elaborate, and, without
doubt, the most fully equipped of
ot these stations is the new forest
products laboialory In this city. The
building, which is erected on a cor
ner of Camp Randall and is included
[among the departments of Wisconsin
university, Is rapidly nearing comple
tion and, it is expected, will lie ready
for operation by the time of the form
al dedication the first part of June.
So complete is the apparatus of this
new department that the timbers may
be stilt direct from the forests in
t their roughest state, amf be put
through every test and process known
in the science of forestry. The ex
periments Include all operations froas
timber testing by heavy machines to
the determination of heat conductiv
ity to means of the lee calorimeter.
Heavy work and minutely delicate
calculations may alike be performed
with extreme accuracy in the nine
modern laboratories, and the many
other departments.
The operation of the experiment
station will require the employment of
tit least 60 people, most of them
skilled mechanics, engineers, and
chemists There are. however, quite
a number of deities and stenographers
employed. Those who ar to take
charge of the different laboratories
have already begun their duties, and
ate directing the finishing work in
their departments. The men are em
ployed by the national government
and carry on their work directly un
der the direction of the forestry de
partment.
Besides the main building, a fully
• quipped sawmill and a large storage
fhed are included In the local station.
The rough timbers will be sawed at
the mill and gotten in shape for test,
or further finishing in the wood shop’
Probably the inoatt Interesting ot
the laboratories is the pulp depart
ment where experiments on pulp and
grades of paper are to take place.
Hie laboratory is provided with the
great assortment of vats necessary
tor the preliminary preparation ami
iilso contains a small paper mill. The
apparatus is not exceptionally large;
but it is fully as complete In every
detail !i8 any used in the most mou
cm factories.
Ihe chemical laboratory, which is
Jhe only one situated on the second
fioor of the bußrtln*, is one of the
most elaborate in this part of the
counl: ■ bn ge experiment tables
'onstrueted of white oak and are
covered with heavy stone tops. Faucet
and sink are Included in the table*
and are provid'd for each chemist
All the other equipment In the room
, equally as complete, and Is fash
lorn-d alter the most approved plans.
the remaining apace of the second
diH.r i- occupied by office rooms,
‘-rafting departments, reference ll
tu-ary. and lecture room. The 'centre
hail will he used for university chum
ck. and for the accommodation of
speakers who may wish to lecture on
Some phase* Of the work
Another interesting process is
found In the preservation laboratory.
Here the timbers are put through vi*.
r ed operations )n which the value of
different preservative methods ar e de
ermined. 1 nder this room there are
a number of cells, railed rotting pits
** ‘taher* are exposed to
all kinds of destructive conditions
in the other departments the prod
' “ Hre S!a, >'rted to experimental
for moisture content, strength
-f wood, timber test, wood dlstilatloj*.
aru ' TOany othf*r qualitloa
The laboratory Is. fact, provided
with the means of carrying on any
necessary work, and will be used by
•" government. l„ making a
many of its official testa
AMERICANS INTERVENE
IN NICARAGUAN MIXUP
Bite fields, Nicaragua, May 19.—The
eteamer, Venus, General Irias and a
force of Nicaraguan troops on board,
accompanied by the tiig, San Jacinto,
arrived Tuesday afternoon and de
manded the surrender of General Es
trada, commander of the town of
Biiiefields. The notification allowed
24 hours for non combatants to re
tire.
General Estrada refused to sur
render. American consul, Thomas P.
Moffat; Commander Gilmer, of tbq
United States gunboat, Paducah, and
Commander Hines, of the United
States gunboat, Dubuque, at once In
tervened! They refused to permit the
bombardment and demanded the re
lease of the Norwegian steamer, Dic
tator, held up by the Venus. The de
mand was complied with.
A PROOF.
“Pinna ye ken the owl is a Scottish
hire}?”
"How d'ye mek that oot, Sandy?'*
"Ken ye noo its first cry is ‘Hoot!
mon?' *

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