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Watertown leader. [volume] (Watertown, Jefferson County, Wis.) 1909-1911, July 28, 1911, Image 8

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William Wiesemann
Fresh and Salt Meats
Highest Market Price Paid for
Poultry and Live Stock.
Telephone 35 208 Vest Main Street
WATERTOWN. WISCONSIN
ROBT.W.LUECK
Attorney and v*
Counaelor-at-Lww
Hertel & Hoffmann Block, Main Sf
Watertown, W isconsin,
Frank Tercinski
302 East Main Street
(ABOVE QRUBE’S SHOE STORE)
Manufacturers of all kinds of
Hair Goods and Shampoo Parlors
Switches and Curley Puffs, made
of Combings
O. E. Meyer
DENTISTS
No. 102 Main Street, next to Mer
hants National Bank, Watertown, Wis.
’Phone 143-Y
W. A. KRAHMER
Wholesale and Retail
BAKERY
114 W. Main St., ’Phonw i55-Y
The only home made kettle boiled Lin
seed Oil in the city, sold by
THE J. B. MURPHY COMPANY
Also good things In the llns of
Wall Paper, Window Shades, Pic
ture Frames. Machine Oils
Cbas. A. Kadlng Elizabeth Holste Kadln
Kading & Kading
Attorneys-at-Law,
Masonic Temple WATERTOWN W IS.
Phone 163-8 Res 163-2
Livery, Sale and Boarding Stable
Hacks for Weddings, Funerals and
Parties. Careful Drivers Provided
First - Class In Every Respect
All orders will receive prompt atten
tion. Good service. Prices reason
able. Patronage solicited. Phone 41-y
HENRY J. KRUEGER & SON
PROPRIETORS
116-118 North First Street Watertown, Wis.
SUMMER JOYS
INCHIGAGO
Great Throngs Flock to
Riverview Exposition
Every Day.
The popularity of summer amusement
park enterprises in large cities, and the
growth of this form of outdoor diver
sion, is perhaps more strikingly empha
sized by the success of Chicago’s River
view Exposition this season than in any
other way. This big park has already
had two Sundays and one holiday (Dec
oration Day) on which the crowds for
each day numbered 200,000, which means
that nearly one-tenth the population of
Chicago was out for amusement on these
days. For some unexplained reason the
“MONITOR AND MERRIMAC"
public is more keen for summer amuse
ments than ever before. Anticipating
the conditions, the management of Riv
erview, considered the largest outdoor
amusement enterprise in the world, has
built up to the cravings of the crowds.
Riverview- is the only park in the world
that had the courage to put half a mil
lion dollars in two spectacles such as the
‘'Monitor and Merrimac” and “Creation,"
each of which leave impressions of glory
and splendor with the visitor never to be
forgotten. The “Monitor and Merrimac"
is a most realistic production of the fa
mous battle in Hampton Roads which
revolutionized naval warfare. “Crea
tion, w-ith beautiful electrical and scenic
effects and living tableaux, illustrates the
birth of the universe. Each of these
spectacles is described by interesting and
impressive lectures. Another peculiar
feature about the amusement park idea
this summer is the demand for exciting
rides of the “thriller” type. Riverview
has more of these than any other park in
the world, and they are crowded with
riders all the time. Aside from all these
expensive shows and rides, Riverview
has one asset that other parks in Chicago
would pay thousands of dollars for—
great acres and acres of shady trees and
green grass. Riverview also employs
none but the best bands, which give con
certs every afternoon and evening.
Carl R- Nowack
UNDERTAKER
And Licensed Emtalmer.
Reliable and Satisfactory Service Givet
Undertaking Rooms:
Cor. N. 4th and Madison Sts.
Phones—s4 v and 208 y Watertown, Wis
YAWKEY-CROWLEY LUMBER CO.
Lumber. Lath and
Shingles
Watertown, - Wisconsin
Dr. Eugene Goeldner
DENTIST
Evans Block No. 103 flain St.
Up Stairs.
L. A. Willenbockel
Architect and Superintendent
Designer of Residences, Stores and Office
Bldgs, Schools and Public Bldgs.
Phone 306-Y
102 Main Street Watertown, Wis.
Dr. U. N. Barber,
DENTIST
IVo. I MAIN STREET
W atertown, Wisconsin
(Over Salick’s Jewelry ccore)
DR. W. E. LYONS
DENTIST
Masonic Temple
Office’Phone 264-X; Res. Phone'l7B-w
HpDER
SCHMUTZLER
AND
KRIER
FURNITURE
Embalmers-Funeral Directors
’Phone 65-x
Residence 100-x
401 Main St., Watertown Wis.
Brooks S Boyle
217 Main Street.
Embalmers & Funeral Directors
Calls promptly attended to and best, of
services gauranteed. Night and Dav
Telephone Service. -
LADY ASSISTANT.
THOS. BROOKS JAMES W. BOYLE
314 W. Main St. 217 W. Main St.
FRANK WALLOCK,
Scientific Maker and
Repairer of Shoes.
Work Promptly and Neatly Done
Prices Moderate.
Reference; Our Customers.
. No. 107 Second Street,
■ promptly obtained In all countries OR NO FEe/H
JH TRADE-MARKS and Copyrights registered. ■
9 Send Sketch. Model or Photo, for FREE RE- H
■ PORT on patentability. Patent practice ei- ■
■ clusirely. BANK REFERENCES. B
■ Send 2 cents in stamps for invaluable book B
■ on HOW TO OBTAIN and SELL PATENTS, B
■ Which ones trill pay, Hovr to get a partner, H
■ patent la\t and other valuable information. ■
D. SWIFT & CO.
B PATENT LAWYERS, ■
B 303 Seventh St., Washington, D. C.^
HE MBS
Over Eight Thousand Dollars
to Be Awarded to Farmers
Who Raise These Crops by
International Barley and
Hop Exhibit, Chicago, Oct.
12 to 22.
■— P
Mk MONO the Important crops In the
fyk states of the central west,
northwest and Pacific coast
1 are barley and hops, both of
which require considerable care In
cultivation. The chief market for the
better grades of barley is tbe malting
industry, which supplies principally
the brewing and distilling trades. The
principal and almost exclusive market
for hops is the brewing industry.
For a number of years American
and European scientists have devoted
much inquiry to these crops for the
purpose of deciding upon which prop
erties are conditioned their value to
the consumer.
With regard to barley, there Is con
siderable difference of opinion, the
views of American and European in
vestigators diverging to an extent.
With regard to hops, scientific inquiry
has not yet proceeded far enough to
state w r ith auy degree of certainty
which are the leading characters of
the plant that make up its value to
the manufacturer who uses it.
Departments of Agriculture Study
Barley and Hops.
The agronomists and chemists of the
State Agricultural colleges and several
specialists of the United States de
partment of agriculture have devoted
a great deal of time to the study of
barley and hops and their improve
ment. They have been advising the
farmers to devote attention to the pro
duction of those properties in these
crops which are most desired by the
consumer. In this work, however,
they have met with considerable diffi
culty from the fact that they have
been unable to state positively what
those properties are that the consumer
desires.
In the purchase of barley and hops
the individual judgment of the buyer,
’ 'SHHHBHBBEiK''' IS
rhv mPP
SiBII mtSm
STEMS OP WHITE CLUB AND MANCHURIA
BARLEYS.
based upon personal experience, has
been the controlling factor, and as the
individual judgment Is often biased
by personal preference and even preju
dice it has been difficult to define what
character of goods would best meet
the reauirements of the market
* Improvement of Barley and Hops.
A movement is under way to bring
about improvement in the growing of
barley and hops and to lay down cer
tain standards by which they can be
valued regardless of the personal equa
tion.
At the present stage this movement
is crystallizing in an international bar
ley and hop exhibit, which will take
place Oct. 12 to 22, 1911, at Chicago,
in connection with the American Ex
position of Brewing Machinery, Ma
terials and Products. For this exhibit
there .will be available a prize fund
of ever $B,OOO, which will be appor
tion ;d to the different varieties and
strains of the crops with a view of giv
ing the greatest possible encourage
ment to the farmers who raise them.
The .growers who may wish to par
ticipate In the exhibit should address
the committee on awards, 1508 Repub
lic building, Chicago, and ask for the
necessary application and entry blanks.
The committee on awards embraces
not only a number of the most eminent
experts among scientific men, growers,
dealers and consumers of these crops,
but also specialists from the agricul
tural department of the United States
and the several barley and hop grow*
ing states. Among those serving on
the committee on awards are the fol
lowing;
United States department of agriculture,
bureau of plant industry—Professor M. A
Carleton, Professor H. Y. Harlan, Pro
fessor W. W. Stockberger; bureau of
chemistry—Professor J. A. Le Clerc.
Agricultural experiment stations—Pro
fessor G. W. Shaw, Berkeley, Cal.; Pro
fessor Charles E. Saunders, Ottawa. Can
ada; Professor Alvin Keyser, Fort Collins,
Colo.; Professor F. D. Farrell, Boise, Ida.;
Professor V. M. Shoesmith, East Lansing,
solves a Deep Mystery.
“I want to thank yon from the bottom
of my heart,” wrote C. B. Rader of Lewis
burg. W. Va., “for the wonderful double
benefit I got from Electric Bitters, in
curing me both of a severe case of stom
ach trouble and of rheumatism, from
which I had been an almost helpless
sufferer for ten years. It suited my
case as though made just tor me.” For
dyspepsia, indigestion, jaundice and to
rid the system of kidnev poisons that
cause rheumatism, Electric Bitters has
no equal, Try them. Every bottle is
guaranteed to satisfy. Only 50c at
6amm Corner Drug Cos.
O^TE6'TAPIENT.T|IBff? •
FINDING A LOST BIBLE
II Chronicles 34:14-33—July 30
“Thy word have I hid in my heart, that I might
not tin against thee.”~Palm 119:11.
IN conjunction with Josiah’s refor
mation and cleansing of the tem
ple, a copy of the book of the
Law was found. Presumably
this book contained the Pentateuch or
five books of Moses. The long period
ef Idolatry preceding Josiah’s work of
reformation had placed the Testimo
nies of the Lord at a discount, so that
evidently the king had never seen, per
haps had never heard of the Divine
Law up to this time. The royal copy
was doubtless destroyed long before.
The king caused the manuscript to
be read in his hearing. It detailed
what blessings
would come upon |
the service of the
Almighty and His Sr
Laws and became ~
Idolatrous. Deu- L—
teronomy 28 is a Thc Book of the Law.
very clear statement of what appear
ed to be the penalty due Josiah’s king
dom because of idolatry preceding his
day. The king was astonished. Evi
dently Divine judgments were due.
Why they waited he knew not He
reflected that possibly something might
yet be done to offset the evil. He sent
therefore to make inquiry on the sub
ject
The Inquiry came to Huldah, a
prophetess of that time, who gave the
Lord’s answer, saying that all the
woes foretold in the Law would surely
come to pass because of the idolatrous
course followed by the nation. But
the message declared that this trouble,
this chastisement, would be deferred
and not come in King Josiah’s day be
cause of his earnest repentance and
manifestation of sorrow In connection
with the matter as soon as he learned
about it
The Bible Lost Today
It may amaze some when we say that
to the masses of the people today,
God’s Book is lost. What! do yon say,
have we not over a hundred million
Bibles in Christendom, and are we not
printing more than a million copies
every year?
Alas! Bibles we have, but to the ma
jority of the specially cultured they
are Bibles no longer—they are the In
spired Word of the Almighty no longer!
They are studied, believed and obeyed
no longer. It is still fashionable to
have Bibles; It is still customary to
take texts from them —this is done
even by ministers who privately con
fess that they have no faith in the
Bible—that they have no more faith in
the Bible than In Shakespeare. And
the number of religious teachers who
have thus rejected the Word of God
as the Divinely inspired Message is
much greater than the majority of
people surmise. Nearly all ministers
graduated during the past twenty years
from nearly all of the colleges and
seminaries of Christendom, in Great
Britain, Germany, the United States
and Canada—are really Infidels, unbe
lievers. These today are styled High
er Critics, but Higher Critics are really
Infidels —some of them even profess
atheism, denying a personal God, rec
ognizing only nature as God.
How did the Word of the Lord come
to be thus lost?
We answer that history shows a long
period called the Dark Ages in which
the Word of the Lord was set aside In
favor of church councils and decrees.
, Then came the
jjrjM] ft period of the Ref
| |4|| | j | ormatlon. The Bi-
ISJjSI |]j |■ ■ ble was translat
( j ed by the Catho
m lies Into the Eng-
Ii ffiL- } S lishand, styled the
1 1/ Douay Version.
Um it was translated
\ by the Protes
iT' ' tants into English
iHI Vi if&v anc * styled the
lU*il • King James Ver-
Luther Find* the Bible. Blollf and once
more the Word of God began to exer
cise a transforming influence upon hu
manity.
But alas! the errors, the darkness,
the superstition of the Dark Ages al
ready in the human mind gave to the
Word of God peculiar distortions and
made It appear through the colored
glasses of sectarianism to mean things
wholly irrational and inconceivable.
Asa result school men, college pro
fessors, Doctors of Divinity, etc., have
charged up against the Word of God
various doctrines which It does not
teach—amongst others Purgatory and
eternal torment for all except the “very
elect.”
Finding the Word of God
Now, in due time, the Word of God
is being found. The dust of the Dark
Ages is being brushed aside. The Book
is being investigated in the light of
its own teachings. It Is shining with
upon the path of
the just. We are seeing fulfilled be
fore us God’s promise that the path of
the just will “shine more and more
nnto the perfect day.” Its bright shin
ing at the present time betokens that
the New Day, the New Era of Mes
siah’s Kingdom is nigh, even at the
door (Matthew xxiv, II Peter I. 19).
•%
TO ST. PAUL AND MINNEAPOLIS
VIA
THE NORTH WESTERN LINE
For fast daily trains between Chicago
and the Twin Cities. The scenic way
by day: the comfortable route by night.
Convenient schedules and equipment of
the most modern type. The service in
cludes the “Beat of Everything,” in
railway travel. Full information on
application to Ticket Agents, The North
Western Line.
Smoke "Latest Out.” 5c cigar.
AT THE CHURCHES
FTRST M. E. CHURCH
Sunday School at 10 a. m. Lesson
Epworth League at 6:45 p. m. Topic
“An Upward Way.” Leader, Miss Isabel
McNeill.
Public Worship at 11 a. m. Theme
“A New Testamental Call to Advance.”
At 7:45 p. m. Evening worship. Theme:
“God’s Request of the Wicked.”
A meeting of the entire church mem
bership will be held at the church par
lors next week Thursday evening for
the purpose of electing a Lay delegate
to the Lay Electoral Conference to be
held at Antigo, Sept. 23-4-5 next.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist, ser
vices held every Sunday at 10:30 a. m.
Subject: “Love”
Testimonial meeting Wednesday even
ing at 8.4)0 o’clock. All cordially invited
to these meetings. Reading room, cor.
Fifth and Spring streets, open every
afternoon, except Sundayfrom 2:30 until
4:30 o’clock.
ST. PAUL S CHURCH
Sunday services: Holy Communion,B
a. m. Sunday school, 9:30 a. m. Morning
service, 10:30 a. m.
MORAVIAN CHURCH
Sunday School 9:15 a. m. Preaching
Service, 10:30 a. m.; Y. P. S. C. E. 6:30 p.
m. Evening service, 7:30 p. m.
GERMAN M. E. CHURCH
Sunday school at 9 a. m., preaching at
10:15 a. m. Prayer meeting Thursday a
7:30 p. m. each week.
ALICETON (SALEM) CHURCH
Sunday school at 1 p. m, and preach
ing at 2p. m. All are welcome.
ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Sunday school at 10 a. m.; sermon al
11 a. m.; evening service at 7:30 p. m.
All cordially invited.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
Rev. H. F. Eggers, pastor. Services
10 a. m. and 7:30 p. m.; Sunday school,
2 p. m.
ST. HENRY’S CHURCH
Low mass at 7 a. m.; high mass at 10
a. m.; vespers at 3p. m.
ST. MARK’S LUTHERAN
Rev. J Klingman. pastor. Sunday
school at 9 a. m., sermon at 10 a. m,
ST. BERNARD’S CHURCH
Low mass at 8 a. m„ high mass at 10:30
a. m.; vespers at 3 p. m.
EVANGELICAL PROTESTANT
Rev. Herman Sterz, pastor. Services
10 a. m.: Sunday school 9a. m.
REFORMED CHURCH
Morning services 10 a. m.; Sunday
school 11 a. m.
The Markets.
RETAIL BUTTER AND EGGS
Eggs—Strictly fresh, 15 cents
Butter —Dairy, 21 to 22 cents; creamery
28 cents
The following quotations on buttei,
eggs, vegetables and fruit are up-to-date
and furnished the Leader by the best
local authorities.
VEGETABLES
Potatoes, 18 cents per peck; 65 per
bushel.
Cabbage—s to 8 cents
Onions —5 cents pound
FRUITS
Lemons —Dozen 30 cents to 40 cents
Oranges—Dozen 20 cents to 40 cents
FARM PRODUCE
The following quotations are reported
by E. Graeszel, 300 West Main street:
Beans—s2.oo
Eggs—ll
Live Chickens 11 to 12 cents
BUTTER
Chicago, July 20,1911—Steady Cream
ery-Extra, 21% cents; Print cents
firsts, 22 to 23 cents; seconds, 16 to 17
cents; dairy, 18 cents
CHEESE
Chicago July 20, 1911— Steady Daisies
11 to 12 cents; twins, 10 to 10 cents;
young Americas, 14 cents
BARLEY
The following quotations for barley
are reported by H. Wertheimer, Barley
Headquarters, Main street;
Barley, 70 to 90 cents.
GRAINS AND FLOUR
Red winter wheat—Boc
White winter wheat—Boc
Spring No. I—Boc
Spring No. 2 —7Bc
Spring No. 3—76
Corn— 65 cents
Rye—7B cents
Oats 44 cfints
Patent Flour—sl.4o sack; $5.60 bbl.
Straight Flour—ss.oo per bbl; $1,25
per sack
Middlings—Per cwt., $1.35
Bran—sl.2s
Rye Feed—sl.2o
ARE YOU SICK
Pep-Senna Produces Remarkable
Results for Kidney, Liver and
Bladder Sufferers
If you are run down, do not fail to
make a request to the Woodworth Labo
ratory, 1161 Broadway, New York, for a
sample of Pep-Senna, the great kidney,
liver and bladder remedy, which is cur
ing thousands. The well known saying
that “delays are dangerous” applies more
fully to the kidney, liver and bladder
diseases than to anything else. Diseases
of the kidney, liver and bladder will
stand no trifling, because there is no dis
ease so deceptive, and nothing more
fatal.
Look backward and recall to memory
the many sufferers, and others who have
died during the past year. Have you
ever stopped to think how many of them
could have been made well and happy
just by the use of Pep-Senna, this great
health restorer? If you feel down
hearted and discouraged, send for a sam
ple today.
CASTOR i a
for infanta and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bought
Bears the Sp
Signature of C
Advantages of a i.
Checking Account Saf Fu U n a ds mg
Over ninety per cent of transfers of funds in
business are made through the medium of bank
checks, thus avoiding the dangers incident to
carrying large sums about, and risk of making
the wrong change.
This method enables the business man or in
dividual to keep his money safely in the bank,
instead of dn the premises or about the person,
where it would be subject to hazard.
A checking account at this bank is a great convenience
and costs the depositor absolutely nothing. To obviate
handling the account at a loss the bank requires that
reasonable average balances be maintained.
BANK OF WATERTOWN
Hot Water 1 Bn! our pri , CfS ar *
tt dICF as economical as our
what you want ~ Ta \ /
l;i your kitchen. y
er, buy one that util- I \f" / T V i| \t^*= === *Z._
I zes all heat In heat- 9 f/ H W /ty< U— -I
Ing water —its more 9 1/ \\ \J ' \\{ •
economical also.
bililil L liiii._
-v Ii _____ V// ,
The J
„ Atfomadc EistataiEGw to ft ..* i \^l|>
) ~C —Water Heater n
/ utilizes practically all heat generated by the burner
" x / J%/\ * n h es ding water,
/ My- A That’s one reason why its instantaneous—water
/ flows on the turn of a faucet is another.
/
No gas turns except when water is drawn.
Watertown Gas & Electric Cos.
Open Wednesday and Saturday until 9 p. m. Phone 94
Three Months Trial
25 Cents
In order to introduce the Watertown Weekly Lead
er to those who are not regular readers, the management
will give a three months trial for 25 cents. If, not at
the end of that period, the reader is not satisfied, the
subscription will be discontinued. Try the Leader and
be convinced of the merits of the paper as a news
medium.
THIS OFFER IS GOOD ONLY
TILL FRIDAY SEPT. I St,’ll
The management of the Leader is determined to
increase the circulation of the paper and to that end has
recently increased its size from a six-column to a seven
column quarto. The Leader is a most valuable adjunct
in keeping in touch with the happenings and development
of Watertown and vicinity. This offer should appeal to
the reading public and hundreds will no doubt take ad
vantage of it.
Bea Leader Booster
Send or bring 25 cents and secure the Leader for
three months and help to boost the circulation of the
Leader, which is bound to grow, for it is “delivering
the good.”
1911 = WISCONSIN = 1911
STATE fair
Milwaukee, Sept. 12 = !6
An Educational Exposition of Agricultral Progress
A Mirror of Wisconsin's Greatness Picturing the
Best Efforts and Endeavors of the University of Wis.
State Horticultural Society
Cheese and Buttermakers Association
Dairy and Beef Cattle Breeders
Poultry and Pigeon Fanciers
Machinery and Farm Utilities Manufacturers
Fine Arts, Women’s Work, Education, Etc.
You Must Entertain to Instruct
lO Bands of Music Free Vaudeville
!6 Trotting and Pacing Events
$20,000 Purses
The Progress of Aviation Afternoon and Evening
Demonstrations by Aeroplanes, Dirigible and Hot Air Ballons in
action at some time
AND MANY OTHER FEATURES
LOW RATES ON ALL RAILROADS
ADMISSION 50 CENTS

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