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Wausau pilot. [volume] (Wausau, Wis.) 1896-1940, July 22, 1913, Image 6

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WAUSAU PILOT
E. B. THAYER, Publisher.
WAUSAU, - . WISCONSIN
BIG SUMS COVER
STATEEXPENSES
APPROPRIATIONS OF $5,221,159 TO
BE MADE FOR TWO YEARS’
TIME.
4
LEGISLATURE IS EXPENSIVE
State Aid to County Institutions, In
sane Asylums ar i Schools Totals
$415,500 .for .Fiscal .Year.— Few
Branches Are Self-Supporting.
Madison.—The sundries appropria
tion bill, which has been introduced
In the senate, carries appropriations
aggregating $2,555,124 for the fiscal
year 1913-14 and $2,666,159 for the fis
cal year 1914-15. This is the budget
bill that carries the appropriations for
the different state departments.
The sundries appropriation bill di
vides itself into five groups of appro
priations. It is estimated that it will
cost $1,658,744 this year and $1,645,-
229 next year to operate the state de
partments, boards and commissions;
$33,855 this year and $33,355 next year
for aid to semi-public and private so
cieties and associations; $104,550 this
year and $104,600 next year for the
departments maintained by receipts
only; $342,475 this year and $467,475
next year to maintain the legislature
and the courts ami $415,500 this year
and the same for next year as state
aid to counties.
The maximum amounts that may be
spent by the different state depart
ments during the next year are dis
tributed as follows:
Executive department $ 23,600
Attorney general 26.650
Secretary of state 46,200
Treasury of state 24,000
|aaurance commission 52.300
Industrial commission 120,000
Tax commission 189.565
Railroad commission 183.000
Civil service commission 23.565
Bupt. of public instruction 72.775
Commissioner of fisheries 61.380
Fish and game department 144,000
Veterinarian & livestock san. lid. 15.440
Dairy and food commission 85.000
OH inspection department 59.554
Hoard of immigration 16.000
Rtate law library 10,000
Itevisor of statutes 14.300
Treasury agent 4,590
Geological A: natural hist, survey 35.000
Hand department 5.000
* Conservation commission 1.000
Ranking department 45.900
Fupt. of public property 157.610
Hoard of bar examiners 2,000
Hoard of teachers’ examiners... 800
Bta'e Historical society 71.945
Hoard of canvassers 150
Committee on uniform legislation 500
Committee on printing 16.720
Wisconsin National Guard 150,000
$1,658,^44
Th gum of $33,855 is appropriated
for various private and semi-puDlic
associations, included in which is
$2,000 for the State Firemen’s associ
ation, $9,000 for the State Horticul
tural ppciety, $7,009 for Live Stock
Wreeder*' association. $3,000 for Wis
consin Dairymen’s association, sl,ooo
for Southern Wisconsin Cheesema
kers* association; S6OO for Wisconsin
Rafter makers’ association, S6OO for
Wisconsin Cheesemakers’ association,
$259 for Wisconsin Cranberry arsocia
tion and $5,000 for Agricultural Exper
iment association.
While the grain and warehouse
commission and the state fire mar
shal’s office are supported by fees, the
budget estimates that it will cost
$75 ,000 to maintain a warehouse com
mission annually out of these fees and
$29,550 to'maintain the fire marshal’s
office. The budget estimates the cost
of the supreme court at $72,475 annu
ally for the next two years and $195,-
000 annually to maintain the circuit
courts.
According to the sundries budget
tate aid is granted for the following
purposes:
I'ounty agricultural societies 1120.000
County training school for
teachers . 94.500
Teachers’ county institutes 9.000
County schools of agriculture ami
domestic economy 32.000
Milwaukee county criminal insane. 70.000
l>ay schools for the deaf 75.000
Day schools for the blind 15,000
9415,500
The same amounts are appropriated
'or state aid next year as for this
year. Most of these are continuing
appropriations and the budget bill
groups th ra together.
Lineman Is Electrocuted.
Two Rivers. —Fred Witt, lineman
Tor the Two Rivers Telephone com
pany, was electrocuted while making
repairs on the cables of the company
He fell to the curb and died instantly.
Dog Bite Fatal to Boy.
Marinette. —The bite of a mad dog
caused the death of 9-year-old Greg
ory DeGauld. The child had to be
confined in a straight jacket for about
twelve hours prior to his death.
State Insane on Increase.
Madison. —Statistics compiled by
the board of control for the year end
ing June 30, show an insare popula
tion of 7.039 in the state as compared
to u,SSI a year ago.
Father of Enameling Dies.
Sheboygan.—A. J. Bollrath. presi
dent of the Enameling Association of
America, died here, aged 64. He is
practically the father of the enamel
ing business in this country. He was
a thirty-second degree Mason.
Hangs Self Near River.
Green Bay.—An unidentified man
hanged himself by tying one end of
his suspenders around his neck and
the other to a willow tree along the
Fox river.
Much Ore Is Shipped.
Ashland. — Ashland has shipped 172,-
000 tons of ore so far this season in
excess of last year. Up to July 1 last
years the shipments were 1,322.000
tons, as compared with 1.509.000 this
year. This is an increase of over 12
per cent.
Catches Freak Fish.
Neenata.—A local fisherman caught
m freak fish here when he pulled out
double mouthed slieepshead. The
ifish was caught in Lake Winnebago.
New Rival of Caw Promised.
| Oshkosh. —Louis J. Monahan is at
srork on a formula of an emulsion to
!e equivalent to cows' milk. The
(emulsion has all the essentials of
cows’ milk, with by-products of skim
fen ed milk, butter milk and condensed
toilk.
CHARGES ARE DENIED
REPRESENTATIVE FAIRCHILD OF
NEW YORK FiRST HOUSE COM
MITTEE WITNESS.
MULHALL STILL ON STAND
Asserts Senator’s Secretary Was in
the Employ of Cushing—Also Al
leges Congressman Who Favored
Labor Legislation Was Defeated.
Washington, July 15.—For the first
time lobby hearings were proceeding
on Monday at both ends of the Capi
tol. While M. M. Mulhall continued
to identify letters delivered to him
by the New Yor* World and offered
in evidence before the senate com
mittee, the house special committee
sat in open session to receive a state
ment from Representative George W.
Fairchild of New York, who, Mulhall
charges, as a member of the National
Association of Manufacturers, assist
ed at political meetiffgg and dinners
of the association in forwarding cer
tain legislation.
Mr. Fairchild denied serlatum all of
the Mulhall charges, declaring that he
never was a member of the National
Association of Manufacturers, had not
attended their dinenrs and had never
met men named by Mulhall as having
been in conference with him. He in
formed the committee that Mulhall
had been in his district during the
1906, 1910 and 1912 campaigns, on
each occasion for only a day or two,
doing detective work, coming in 1906
and 1910 at the request of Republican
campaign managers, who paid his ex
penses.
Mr. Fairchild said he had copieß of
all correspondence between himself
and Mulhall and would furnish them
to the committee. He was excused
without cross-examination, but will be
recalled after the committee begins
the examination of witnesses.
Much intreest centered at the sen
ate committee meeting in the declara
tion of Mulhall that for months he
had been trying to obtain the publi
cation of his letter files without cost,
and that he had declined to accept
$150,000 offered by the National Asso
ciation of Manufacturers for the let
ters. The facts regarding the ar
rangement finally made for publica
tion of the Mulhall story were left
for another session, when the witness
will present documents now at his
home in Baltimore and when other
parties to the transaction will testify.
The National Asociation of Manu
facturers has been ordered to present
all papers.
Washington, July 15.—The senate
lobby committee again had Martin M.
Mulhall on the witness stand Satur
day. The former agent for the Na
tional Association of Manufacturers
was closely guarded so as to defeat
any move that the house committee
might make to secure Mulhall as a
witness befqre that lobby until they
had his full “confession.”
After Mulhall had been on the
stand for nearly five hours the com
mittee took a recess. Senator Over
man excused Mulhall for the day and
permitted him to gc to New York,
A’here he had important business.
On resuming the stand Mulhall
took up the identification of his let
ters. Before he could begin, how
ever, James C. Emery, counsel for tke
National Association of Manufactur
ers, made a formal request upon the
committee for the right of the asso
ciation to be represented by an attor
ney. Robert McCarthy, former attor
ney general of New Jersey, was pre
sented as the attorney. Chairman
Overman said the committee would
decide later whether McCarthy
should have the general privileges of
an attorney for the association.
Mulhall identified more letters
showing his relations with Marshall
Cushing, secretary of the National
Association of Manufacturers. He
testified he had an understanding
with Cushing that he was to receive
SIOO a week and S4O a week for ex
penses for general field work and
lobby work in Washington.
Mulhall testified further of how he
worked to defeat the late Senator Mc-
Comas of Maryland, although he pos
ed as the senator’s friend. He said
he had received 500 letters from Cush
ing directed against McComas.
“I turned them over to Carl M.
Downs, secretary to McComas, he
added.
"Do you mean you delivered these
letters against McComas to his sec
retary?" demanded Senator Reed.
“Carl M. Downs was in the pay of
Cushing,” replied the witness, who
went on to explain that he quarreled
with Cushing because he was “buy
ing out" the secretary of a senator.
A letter to Senator Foraker, Sep
temper 9, 1904. referred to a sugges
tion that Mulhail go to Rhode Island
to help Senator Aldrich in his cam
paign. He testified he went later at
the request of Aldrich.
Slit Skirt Brings $5 Fine.
Newark, 0.. July 16.—Mrs. M. Liv
ingston of Cleveland, arrested for
wearing a decided slit skirt on the
street, thereby attracting marked at
tention. was fined five dollars and costs
in police court, ar.d paid the fine.
Governor at Scene of Strike.
Lexington, Ky., July 16.—Acting
Governor McDermott arrived in Lex
ington to look over the situation and
to see if troops are needed because of
the street car strike, there being no
attempt to run the cars.
Eighty Perish in Floods.
Budapest, July 16— Floods in the
Maros-Torda district of Transylvania.
Hungary, have caused the loss of 80
lives. Fifteen villages have been de
stroyed. In many places the water is
five feet deep.
Editor Jailed for Contempt.
Memphis. Tenn.. July 16. —G. D.
Raine. publisher cf the News-Scimitar
of Memphis, was committed to jail
by Judge A B. Pittman, who sen
tenced him to teu day 6 in jail for
contempt.
Diana Sails for Arctic.
Sydney. N. S . July 16.—The Crocker
land expedition, under Prof Donald
P. McMillan, in the New Found
land sealer Diana, is on its way
to the arctic. The Diana sailed on
Monday.
Negro Waiters to St. Louis.
Little Rock. Ark.. July 16.—A1l ne
gro waiters in Little Rock are leaving
for St. Ixiuis to take the places of
white waiters now on strike there
Trains arc carrying out hundreds of
them
GREAT TREES ENDANGERED BY FIRE
Forest fires on the slopes of Mt. Tamalpais have endangered the giant sequoias of California, and the peril Is
not yet over. The photograph gives a vivid Idea of the size of these monster trees.
12 KILLED, 50 INJURED
TWENTY MORE VICTIMS MAY DIE
FROM COLLISION.
B. & O. Flyer, Westbound, Hits
Street Car at Cambridge, Ohio—
Storm Cuts Off Communication.
Los Angeles, Cal., July 15.—Twelve
persons were killed and about fifty
were injured Sunday night when a
Pacific elect-ic interurban train ran
into another one at Vineyard station,
a junction oa the outskirts of Los
Angeles.
Several three-car trains on the Pa
cific Electric line, en route to Los An
geles from Venice and Ocean Park,
were stalled at the Vineyard switch
by a broken trolley wire. There were
no lights, and apparently a flagman
had not been sent out. Without warn
ing another three-car train from Ven
ice swept around the curve and
crashed into the last train at 40 miles
an hour.
The last two cars in the rear train
stalled on the line were completely
telescoped by the fast-moving train,
which plunged through the coaches,
loaded to the doors with holiday seek
ers. There were approximately one
thousand people on the trains in
volved in the accident. Many were
killed outright and others died before
they could be removed from the
debris.
Newark, 0., July 15.—Six persons
were killed and 18 were injured, sev
eral probably fatally, when a Balti
more & Ohio passenger train from
Wheeling, W. V’a., to Chicago, crashed
into a street car at a Cambridge (O.)
grade crossing on Sunday. A storm
sweeping through this section of Ohio
carried down the te!cphoP.§ wires.
fFLASHEsI
g OFF THE WIRE j
Leavenworth, Kan., July 12.—Mi
chael J. Young, Boston, Mass., and
Charles Wachmeister, Detroit, Mich.,
two of the alleged dynamiters re
ceived at the federal prison January
1, were released on bonds.
Bayfield, Wis., July 11.—George An
drews, logger, loaded six stumps with
dynamite and lighted all the fuses.
One of the fuses appeared to have
failed, and after waiting a minute,
Andrews went to relight it. As he
leaned over the stump the charge ex
ploded and killed him instantly.
Newport, R. 1., July 11.—A farm,
small, but fully equipped with modern
appliances, is the latest “toy” of Vin
son Waist McLean, the $100,000,000
baby.
Newport. England, July 12. —Mrs.
Humphreys Mackworth, the richest
militant suffragette in England, was
tried and found guilty of smashing
letter boxes for the “cause" and was
fined SIOO. Mrs. Mackworth was ar
rested on June 26 after she had demol
ished a number of letter boxes and
destroyed the contents.
Havana, July 15. —A tense political
situation exists here in consequence
of the assassination of General Riva.
Reports were current that followers
of General Asbert would attempt to
storm the jail and liberate the pris
oners.
Marietta, 0., July 16.—Eighty pas
sengers, the majority of them women
and children, stood in water up to their
necks and faced death near for five
hours, while a frantically working
train crew rescued the entire number.
500 Suffer From Poison.
Dayton, 0., July 15.—Physicians
were busy following hurry calls sent
in by nearly four-fifths of the 500 per
sons who were taken sick with pto
maine poisoning shortly after return
ing from a picnic.
Stefansson Off for Pole.
Nome, Alaska. July 15. —Vilhjalmur
Stefansson left Nne on the polar ex
ploration ship Karlup Sunday, going
as far as Port Clarence, where the
engines will be given a thorough over
hauling.
New York Judge Freed of Charge.
Albany. N. Y., July 14. —Supreme
Court Justice Daniel F. Cohalan was
acquitted by the legislative committee
which investigated the charges pre
ferred against him by James A Con
nolly.
President Nearly Hurt.
Cornish. X H., July 14. President
Wilson had a narrow escape from a
serious accident on the return trip
from Hanover. N H.. when his au
tomobile skidded on the newly oiled
road.
Kuhn Leaves Directorates.
Pittsburgh. Pa. July 12. —J. S. and
W. S. Kuhn resigned frim the board
oi directors of the Colonial Trust com
pany. W. S. Kuhn also resigned as a
director from the Commonwealth
Trust company.
Johnson in France to Stay.
Havre, France, July 12. —Jack John
son. the negro pugilist, arrived here
on board the Corinthian and imme
diately on landing announced his
determination never to return to the
United States.
GIG STRIKE AVERTED
CONGRESS PASSES NEWLANDS
BILL AMENDING THE ERD
MAN LAW.
SIX ON ARBITRATION BOARD
President Signs Measure, and Threat
ened Labor Trouble Is Stopped—
Rail Heads and Labor Leaders Con
fer With Wilson.
Washington, July 16. —President
Wilson on Tuesday signed the New
lands bill amending the Erdman law,
which increases the arbitration board
from three to six members, following
its passage by both houses of con
gress.
The railroad and labor represents
tives thereupon promised to submit
their contentions to arbitration, and
there will be no strike of the trainmen
of the eastern roads, at least until aft
er such arbitration has taken place.
President Wilson characterized the
conference as “simple and satisfac
tory.”
“Both parties were willing to end
their differences under the Newlar.ds
amendment to the Erdman act, if this
amendment could be passed,” said the
president. “The railroads felt that
three arbitrators, as provided by the
original Erdman act, were not a suf
ficient number to deal with the ques
tion, and the N-ewlands amendment
will increase the board to six.
“The railroad representatives also
desired an independent board of arbi
tration, which is provided by the New
lands bill. It is expected that the
measure will be passed by both houses
and signed by me by nightfall. This.
I hope, will put an end to the differ
ences between the railroads and the
employes, and both sides will be able
by arbitration to settle all their dif
ferences amiesMy,"
President Wilson spent practically
all of his time before the conference
going through a mass of documents on
the subject, and went to meet the oth
ers with the belief that there were no
serious obstacles to be overcome, al
though he felt that the question of the
composition of the board of arbitration
—the principal point at issue—was
most important.
It was explained that the roads’
chief objection to Erdman act arbitra
tion was that too much responsibility
rested upon a single man—the third or
neutral arbitrator.
U. S. MAKES ITS CROP REPORT
Cereal Yield Expected to Be Lower
Than in 1912 —Oat Crop Is
Less.
Washington, July 11.—The govern
ment crop report for July issued
Thursday indicates bountiful crops of
all the cereals, but the total produc
tion this year will be far below the
grand total for last year, when there
were record yields of nearly all the
leading grains.
The total yield of the leading cereals
is placed at 4,929,000,000 bushels, com
pared with 5,561,000,000 bushels a year
ago.
The big loss compared with a year
ago is in oats, which promise a yield
of 1,031.000,000 bushels, against 1,418,-
000,000 busels a year ago. Corn is
short 154,000,000 bushels and the total
wheat crop is 29,000,000 bushels less
than last year. Barley is 59,000,000
bushels less than a year ago at 165,-
000,000 bushels.
Becker Denied New Trial.
New York, July 15. —Charles Beck
er's application for anew trial on the
charge of murdering the Gambler, Her
man Rosenthal, was denied by Su
preme Court Justice Goff. Counsel had
sought to reopen the case
Lake Boat Sinks; Two Drown.
Erie, Pa.. July 1. —The steamer Aua
bella Wilson, bound for Port Colborne,
Ont., was sunk in a heavy "storm which
swept Lake Erie. Cant. Daniel Mc-
Intyre and his wife were drowned, but
the crew were rescued.
Forest Fire Under Control.
San Francisco, July 14. —The Mount
Tamalpais fire is under control in
every quarter, and, save for the un
txpected springing up of a high wind,
the battle to save the Marin county
towns was won.
Train Hits Auto; Two Killed.
Minnecla, N. Y.. July 14. —Two men
were killed and four injured when
an automobile was struck by a
Long Island railroad train at a cross
ing near here. Seven men were in
the car.
3CO Mexican Troops Drowned.
Tucson, Ariz., July 12. —A communi
cation from Guayamas says 300 consti
tutional soldiers met death in an effort
to swim across the bay when state
troops were repulsed by a hidden
Huerta force.
Murderer Escapes From Jail.
Detroit, Mich., July 12. —Joseph M
Miller, the Detroit music prolessor
who brutally murdered Marie M. Jen
nett, one of his pupils. April 5, 1912,
with a hatchet, escaped from Jackson
prison.
FLAMES PERIL TOWN
MICHIGAN CITY, IND., NEAR TO
DESTRUCTION BY FIRE.
Conflagration Rages in Huge Lumber
Yards—Loss Is Placed at
Over $1,000,000.
Michigan City, Ind., July 15.—This
city suffered a property loss of over
$1,000,000 on Saturday, when the huge
lumber yards of the Haskell & Barker
Car company burned. The blaze was
seen by citizens of towns a hundred
miles away.
Appeals for aid were sent to nearby
cities. Chicago rushed fire companies
with their apparatus, under Battalion
Chief Edward Buckley, to the fire on
a special train.
In the meantime dynamite was sent
from Gary, Ind., and was used la an
attempt to check the flames.
The fire started in the south end of
he yards, near the Michigan Central
railroad. The fire company of Michi
gan City responded at once. It was
handicapped by too few men, inade
quate apparatus and the fact that
there were few hydrants in the vicin
ity of the fire. The flames spread
quickly to the north.
Before the arrival of the Chicago
companies hundreds of volunteers car
ried lumber from the unburned parts
of the yard to a distance of safety.
The Haskell & Barker Car company
is owned by Miss Katherine Barker,
the property being held in trust by
the First Title Trust company of Chi
cago. It is one of the largest con
cerns of its kind in the world and is
situated on the east outskirts of
Michigan City, east of the Michigan
Central tracks.
PLANS TO AID U. S. SAILORS
Secretary of the Navy Daniels Declares
He Will Make Service More
Attractive.
Chicago, July 15. —With the aim of
making a thorough inspection of the
naval yards, training stations and
equipment on the Pacific coast, Joseph
Daniels, secretary of the navy, accom
panied by his wife, spent six hours in
Chicago Sunday.
The secretary said his trip at this
time has not the remotest connection
w'ith the Japanese agitation that has
arisen in California. He said his tour
there is part of his program to visit all
naval stations throughout the country
for the purpose of familiarizing him
self wdth them and enabling him to
map out in a comprehensive way the
program he has in view during his oc
cupancy of the secretaryship.
Asked regarding the 'hanger and im
provements he proposed to make in
the navy its equinpment during
his term of office, he said: “The most
marked change is in connection with
the enlisted men. 1 wish to make the
service more attractive than it has
been in the last and remove from it
the vestige that it is simply a position
of drudgery.”
U. S. Demands Release of Americans.
Washington, July 14.—Secretary
Garrison ordered Col. Edwin P. Brew
er of the Fourteenth cavalry at Fort
Mclntosh, Tex., to demand the re
lease of five Americans, with 350 cat
tle and 30 horses, held by Mexican
revolutionists.
Japanese Ex-Premier Is 111.
ToUio, July 15. —Prince Taro Kat
sura, former premier and foreign min
ister of Japan, is seriously ill with
cancer of the stomach.
Drowns Saving Girl.
Chicago, July 15. —In an attempt to
rescue Margaret Jennings, five years
old, from death by drowning, Edward
Lippert, Chicago, was drowned in
Deep lake, near Waukegan, Surday.
Another boat rescued the child.
Threatens U. S. Embassy.
Mexico City, July 15.—An anony
mous letter containing threats to blow
up the United States embassy was re
ceived by Ambassador Henry Lane
Wilson and immediately referred to
the Mexican foreign office.
$50,000 Loss by Fire.
Marion, 0., July 14.—The Erie Rail
way company suffered a loss of about
160,000 here when an ice house, one
of the largest in the country, and a
part of a transfer station was burned
The fire was of incendiary origin.
Chicago Wins Endeavor Convention.
Los Angeles, Col., July 14.—-Chicago
was chosen for the next biennial ses
sion of the International Christian
Endeavor society, in July, 1915. The
vote was made unanimous after sev
eral ballots had been taken.
Robbed of $32,000 in Paris.
Paris, France, July 12. —Mrs. John
F. Martin of New York was robbed of
jewelry valued at $32,000 at her hotel
on the Place Vendome. She had left
the jewels wrapped in a handkerchief
on the table in her suite.
Rome “Grafter” is Suicide.
Rome. Italy. July 12.—A sensation
was caused here by the suicide of the
engineer, Giannini, who was a witness
in the notorious graft disclosures in
connection with the construction of
the Palace of Justice.
ON THE GREEN
DIAMOND
•'•V'M’-V * 'l' 4' ’l'
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Clubs. W.L.P.C.! Clubs. XV.L.P.C.
New York 50 Hi .6,6 Brooklyn ...35 3? .486
Phlla’eriii .41 ' .577 Boston S3 42 .440
Chicago .41 37 .S.’S St. Louis 32 45 .416
Pittsburgh .38 38 . 500 Cincinnati ..5145.382
AMERICAN LEAGUE. ,
Phila'el'ia 56 20 .737 Boston 3R 37 607
Cleveland . 49 3t .613 St. Louis 33 52 .338
Wash’ton . 44 36 .569 Detroit 32 52 .381
Chicago ...43 3S .631 New York ..23 52 . 307
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
Milwaukee .52 35 . 598 Min’apolls ..41 41 .W
Columbus ..46.'15 .558 St. Paul 87 44 .457
Louisville .46 3S .549 Toledo 37 48 .435
Kan. City. ..4* 12 .512 Ind’apolls ...30 50 . 375
WESTERN LEAGUE.
Denver 54 26 . 676‘Oroaha 31 52 .373
Des Moines.4l 36 .544 Sioux City.. 33 47 . 413
St. Joe 42 38 .525 Topeka 31 46 .403
Lincoln . 43 37 .538 Wichita 32 52 . 3SI
THREE-I LEAGUE.
Dubuque ...42 S5 . 545 Danville 39 38 . 503
Quincy 42 35 , 5-'5 Springfield . SS S3 .491
Davenport .39 31 .534 Decatur 36 42 .462
Bl'mlllgton .38 37 . 507 Peoria 32 45 . 416
CENTRAL LEAGUE.
Gd. Rapids.',’. 29 .646 Dayton 37 41 .474
Springfield .4i 87 .527 Terre Ha te.,34 44 431
Kt. Wayne.. 42 36 .538 Evansville ..30 46 .895
CENTRAL ASSOCIATION.
Muscatine ..4P 26 .6,06 Keokuk 32 34 . 497
Ottumwa ...40 26 . 606'Monmouth .31 34 .467
Burlington .40 30 , 571!Kewar*ee ...26 41 ,3S!>
Waterloo ...32 35 478 Ced. Rapids. 24 40 .375
WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE.
Gehkosh ....42 24 .636 Green Bay. .35 38 . 479
Rockford ...35 25 . 583 Madison 28 40 . 412
Racine 31 29 .540>AppIeion ....21 39 .391
Fd. du Lftc.33 27 . 550 Wausau ...,.26 38 . 397
MARKET REPORT.
Milwaukee, July 15, 1913.
Butter Creamery, extras, 26Vsc;
prints, firsts, [email protected]; seconds,
[email protected]; renovated, [email protected]; dairy,
fancy, 25c.
Cheese —American, full cream, uew
made twins, 14%@15c; Young Amer
icas, [email protected]%c; daisies,
longhorns, 15%c; Umhurger, new,
brick, J4c.
Eggs—Cun ent receipts fresh as to
quality, [email protected]'.5%c; recandled, extras,
[email protected]; seconds, ll(g<l3c.
Live Poultry—Fowls, 15%c; roos
ters, [email protected]; broilers, [email protected]
Wheat —No. 1 northern, 94c; No. 2
northern, 93c; No. 3 northern, 90Vfcc;
No. 1 velvet, 93 1 / £c.
Corn —No. 3 yellow, 61 %c.
Oats—No. 3 white, [email protected]; stand
ard, 41c.
Barley—No. 4, SSS-eOc; medium,
61c; Wisconsin, 61^56c.
Rye—No. 2,63 c.
Cattle —Butchers’ steers, [email protected];
cows and heifers, [email protected]; feeders,
[email protected]; calves, 9.75<§.' 10.75.
Hogs—Good heavy butchers, 8.75<3
8.90; fair to best light, 9.10©9.20;
pigs, 8.00#8.75.
Chicago, July 13, 1913.
Cattle —Beeves, [email protected]; stock
ers and feeders, [email protected]; cows and
heifers, [email protected]: calves, [email protected]
Hogs—Light, [email protected]; heavy, 8.45
@9.07; rough, [email protected]; pigs, [email protected]
9.10.
Minneapolis, July 15. 1913.
Wheat—No. 1 hard, 91 %c; No. 1
northern, 91 No. 2 northern, 89c
Corn—No. 3 yellow', [email protected]
Oats —No. 3 white, [email protected]
Rye—No. 2, [email protected]
Flax—l.3o%.
News Notes of Wisconsin.
Fewauskum. —Yeggmen entered the
postofiice by forcing a rear window.
They then attempted to drill through
the vault door, but, failing to open it,
knocked off the combination with a
hammer. ■ They then drilled another
hole, but whether they were able to
secure any funds will not be knowm
until an expert locksmith opens the
vault. Asa result of the robbery
Kewaskum was without stamps and
postals until Postmaster Koch was
able to secure a supply from Camp
bellsport. It is believed the robbers
escaped with a team of horses stolen
from a local creamery. The horses
and rig were found near Fond du
Lac.
Madison. —Thaddeus M. Wild of
Milwaukee, chief clerk in the office of
the state commissioner of banking,
is in a critical condition at the Madi
son General hospital as a result of a
mistake in taking bichloride of mer
cury instead of a headache tablet.
Capt. Wild started for Cincinnati on
a seven days’ vacation. On the train
he had a headache and took what
he supposed were aspirin tablets. He
was taken suddenly ill in Cincinnati
and returned home immediately.
Madison.—George D. Bartlett, sec
retary of the Wisconsin State Bank
ers’ association, has filed articles of
incorporation with the commissioner
of insurance of the Bank Deposit Ltm
ited Mutual Insurance company. There
Is no capital stock. The liability ol
the members is limited to the annual
premium, which is one-fourth oi’ 1 per
cent of deposits a year. A meeting
will be held in Madison on July 22
for election of officers.
Appleton.—One hundred and seven
teen pickerel in less than two hours
is a record established by five men
fishing in the Wolf river near New
London. ,
Madison. —Fire losses in Wisconsin
were $303,130 in Jurxv according to
State Fire Marshal Clem P. Host’s
monthly report. There were 186 fires
reported. The insurance carried on
the damaged properties totalled $946,-
395. The most prolific was
lightning, forty-five fires arising from
this source, causing damage of $54,-
920.
Madison. —In an opinion to tne act
ing commissioner of Indian affairs at
Washington, AJ.t->rney General Owen
holds that automobi’as owned by the
federal government must take out a
state license.
Madison.—Gov. McGovern nas ap
pointed Ralph Smith, Merrill, presl- ,
dent of the state board of control. -
This appointment is made by author- !
ity of a law passed by the presen* leg
islature. Heretofore the president of
the board lias been chosen by the
members of the board. The new law
also increases the salary of the pres
ident from $2,500 to $3,600 a year.
Marinette. —Four men and a mule
fell twenty-five feet with a section of
tramway at the Ludington company’s
sawmill. Only one was injured, Jo- ;
seph Larson, sustaining a fractured
ankle.
Black River Falls —The corner stone
of the new Masonic temple was laid
here in the presence of grand lodge i
officers of the state and a large dele
gation from a number of neighboring
lodges. The Black River Falls lodge j
has had no meeting place since Octo- j
her 16. 1911, "Then the flood swept j
away their rooms.
Black River Falls—The body of J. |
H. Clark was found at the fair gronnd* '.
here. He had been missing since July
4, when he left the county faun, ol
which he was an inmate.
Business Directory
ATTORNEYS
Nnal Brown L. A. Pradt Frod Genrieh
BROWN, PRADT & GENRICH
LAWYERS
Practice in nil coot*. Loans, Abstracts snd
Collections. Offices orsr First National Bank
Ireutzer, Bird & Rosenberry
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. corner Feurtk anil
Scstl itrceti. in Wiwasdn Valley Trust build
ing. Money to loan in larga or Kuril amounts.
CoiJodioni a apeciiity.
Connor & Haddow
Attorneys at Law
Office 501 TiiiidSt., Wausau, Wis.
REGNER & RINGLE
ATTORNEYS AT L*W. Loans mi Collet
toons a
RYAN & SWEET
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Office in first v alional Bank Bldg. Telephone 1630
FRED GENRICH
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Oiiice in Fint Nations)
Bank building.
SMITH & LEICHT
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
612 Third St. Phone 1753
, F. E. lii mi- H. H Ms. s'son
BUMP MANSON
Attorneys and Counselors at Law
Money to Loan
Oilices in First National Hank lildg.,
Third Floor. ‘telephone No. 1178
PHYSICIANS
DR, HARRIET A. WHITEHEAD
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
Ten Years' Experience
Eight Years in Wausau
Hours: 9 A. M. to 12; 2 to 5 P. M.
Spencer Building, (iO , Third St
Telephone I OHO.
DR. A. L. BROWN
DHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. o{ii<* one door
•outh oi the Fu-t National Bank. Special •tlcn
tion given to disuses oi* women anJ children.
Telephone connection.
__ _ %
; MRS. CLARA BOETTCHER
OBSTETRIX
I
MIGHT GALLS ATTENDED TO.
i 620 McClellan St. Telephone 1557.
Dr. D. Sauerhering
Ofliee over Albers’ Drug Store
3*'l Third St.
TELEPHONE NO. 1684
R. M. FRAWLEY
Physician and Surgeon
Oflire oxer Dunbar's jewelry store. Ofliee
hours—B:3o to 10:30 a. m.: 2:00 to 5;03 p. m.;
7:00 lo8:eO p, m. 't'hone J 625.
DRAY LINE
C. H. WEGNER, PROP.
All kind* ol light and heavy driying,
housthold goods moved, freight delivered,
etc. Rates the lowest and service prompt
TRADE MORAL—Nobody would
have known the Good Samar
itan's kind act were it not tor
Our Saviour's parable. Be the
home folks' Good Samaritan,
Mr. Merchant; make this pa
per your commercial bible;
write your own parable and
put it in our advertising col
umns.
OPJA * good Dame
Fortune enter your
yfS business through the
advertising door.
When you keep your business
a secret you are locking Mme.
Fortune out.
See us to- da., about our ad.
rates.
SECS
* 'COBTrt.HI * w s.
GHAB H. WEGNER
LARGEST GENERAL
STORE IN WAUSAU
Groceries* Glottiinft* Crockery* Hey*
Teed* flour* Produce* Etc.
A STOCK or FRESH RCA. SUTTER AJCD FARM FRODOCZ ALWATS OK HAITO
DENTISTS
DR. J. H. KOLfER
DENTIST
McKinley Bldg., Wausau. Wis.
C. W. Chubb uck
Dentist
Offices— Lawrence Block
Nos. 515 517 Third Street
DR. CONLIN
Dentist
OFFICE OVE3
National German American Bank
Telephone 1711
Dr. Russell Lyon
Dentist
Wisconsin Valley Trail r.*a
Ilulldliig, Cor. 4th and Scott St a.
WAUSAU, WIS.
P. A. RIEBE
Dentist
OFFICE
Faff Block. 216 Third Street
Dr. G. G. Anderson
DENTIST
Office ove* Mueller > Jewelry
DIL A. H. LEMKE
DENTIST
Office. 312 S. Pint Avenue, ever Albers’ west iiJa
drug stars
GREEN BROST
Proprietors
City ’Bus and Baggage Line
Corner Second and Jefferson Sts.
WAUSAU. WIS. f
THE ONLY TRANSFER COMPANY IN THE CITY
Telephone 1022
wn. zmneK
Decorating,
If you are (5 Paper
in want O Hanging,
of any V Hardwood
Finishing,
CALL 079
wn. zinncst.
P. O. box, 215; telephone, No. IMOt
Estimate* ulren ou abort notice.
yt'AL SHOWN LA. PRADT C. S. GILBERT
ABSTRACTS
We have ihe only abstract of Marathon
county. We have a thoroughly qualified
abstractor, and make abstracts at reason
able prices. We are responsible for all
abstracts made by us and guarantee that
they show the condition of the title proper
ly as it appears on record.
An abstract oi title is useful if you do
sire to sell or mortgage your property, and
is very valuable in ascertaining defects in
your title that can be easily remedied, and
yet might be sufficient to spoil a sale. it
you desire an abstract of the tide to yoci
property, call and see us.
Wausau Law & Laud Association
Property Owners
.INSURE WITH-
Zimmerman & Rowley
—Who represent-.
Fire Insurance Companies
that pay losses promptly
Piscment Marathoi County Bank
Phone 1030
M. J. KLIMEK
.
Proprietor of
Sixth Street Livery Stable j
Telophone 1487
j; *uruishe<l for funerals, wed
dings and parties, aiso ’busies to'
pi nics. etc. Drivers furnished.
Everything Firtt-Claia
Term * Reatonoh'e

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