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The North-Carolina standard. [volume] (Raleigh, N.C.) 1834-1850, December 05, 1849, Image 1

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"THE CONSTITUTION AND TUB UNJUN ,qy IIH XATI2jTIIEY.:tMUST. iPRESERVED.5 J X
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RALEIGH. NORTH CAllOLINA,. WEDNESDAY
Volume
XVI.
NG, DECEMBER 5,7181
T-
CI hi.
Number
'I
THE NORTH CAROLINA STANDARD
IS PPBLI8HKD WIIKLTt BT-i .' ".'' ;
WILLIAM W. HOLDEN,
EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR, v - '
7. ; . v, . ' -
- johtii Carolina Staitdahd is published week
. Tinllnr tmt ariTiTjm.Tinvuble in advance.'' In
w ii i "' 1 " 1 J
instance will thd paper be sent, unless the money for
j?' same shall accempany the order.. , Subscribers,- and
v,r who may wish to send, money to the Editor, can
Tso at all tiJes by Mail and at his risk. ; ReceipU for
jumswillbe promptly. transmitted. : ,
fnr one dollar, and twentv-five cents for
"Th subsequent insertion ; those of greater length in pro-
Court Orders and Judicial Advertisements will
wed twenty-five per cent, higher than the above
A reasonable deduction will be made to those who
,Irtise by the year. ; .
CQHPTROLiLER'S REPORT.
Executive Department, )
Raleigh. November 23, 1819.
ToSeatok Gales, and Wiluam W. Holdix, Eaqs.
Editors oj iiaKiga igiacr tk ' v v
Standard. -
r.pvTiiMKs: The Report of the Comptroller of
pWi Accounts for the fiscal Year ending 31st Oct.
isi9. is herewith sent, with the reqaest that you will
pre the same one insertion in your respective papers.
O . . T. - 1 1 - A) aanr'
l am. very repecnuuv vuui u - ,
. CHAS. MANLY.
Comptroller's Office,
Raleigh, November 25, 1849. J
Sir: In obedience to an Act of the General As-,
sembly of North Carolina, passed at tne session or ,
isfinnd '7. entitled " An Act eoncerningr the Comp
troller's Office," I have the honor to hand you here
with a Report, exhibiting the receipts and disbnrse-
ments at the Public treasury ot iNorth Uarolina,
from the 1st day of November 1848, to the 31st Oc
tober 9 inclusive, i
1 have the honor to be, with gTeat respect.
Your obedient servant, '
WM. F. COLLINS, Comptroller.
His Excellency, Charles Maj.lt, Governor of
Xorth Carolina.
Charles L. Histox,' TWasurer of Literary Fund,
in account with the President and Directors of the
literary Fund. .
1543 DR.
Nov. 1. To balance due President and
Directors of Literary Fund of North
Carolina, on the 1st day of November,
148,
$136,212 69
Cash ree'd as .entries of vacant land,
1,061 44
- V. H. Jones, CaslTrof Bank of Cape
Veir. as dividend on 5322 shares of
St ock held in said Bank by Literary
Fund,
Wm. Dawsom, Aue'rof Craven conn-
tv, his Auction tax,
Jno. M. Rose, Auc'r of Cumberland
County,
Dp?. Entries of vacant Land,
Tavern tax Sheriff of Cherokee Coun-
" Andrew Joyner, President Roanoke
Navigation Company, Dividend, No.
18 on 500 shares of slock,
Wm. Smith, Auct'r New Hanover
county, bis Auction account 1847 and
1548,
Tdlcot Burr, Auct'r of New Hanover
county, his account,
1519. Entries of vacant Land
January. Wm. H.Jones, Cash'r of the
Bank, of Cape Fear, as dividend of 4
per cent declared in 5027 shares of
stock held in said Bank,
15,966 00
35 39
5 35
2,589 80
11 23
- 730 00
65 25
97 02
1,090 13
20,103 00
" Gov. Manly Pres't Ex-Officio of the
Literary Board as Interest on Bonds of
the Raleigh and Gaston Rail Road
Company endorsed by the State and .
held by said Board,
" Gov. Manly Pres't Ex-Officio Literary
Board as Interest on Bonds of the Wil
mington and Raleigh . Rail Road Com
pany collected on Bonds held by said
Board, and endorsed by the State,
" Gov. Manly Pres't Ex-Otficio of the
Literary Board as Interest collected on
Bond held by said Board against Wake
Fnroct lftltporA.
4,644 00
4,050 00
612 40
u Gov. Manly Pres't ExOfficio of the Lit
erary Board, as Interest collected on
Loan made to Floral College,
60 00
38 25
415 78
220 88
201 52
" A.M.Campbell aact'r his acct. of auc
tion tax for 1847-8,
Feb. Entries of vacant land,
March. Entries of vacant land,
April. Entries of vacant land,
" George W. McNeill, Treas. Cape Fear
Navigation Co., being .dividend on 650
shares of stock held in Cape Fear Nav.
Co., by the President and Directors ot
Literary Fond,
650 00
May. Entries of vacant land - '
lllam H. Jones, Cash'r. of Bank of
Cape Fear, being dividend on 5,322
shares of stock held in said Bank of
Cape Fear by Literary Board,
1 G. VV. McNeill, Treas. Cape. Fear
Navigation Co., being dividend of 1
perct. on 650 shares of stock held in
said ComDanv bv the President and
15,966 00
Directors of Literary Fund,
650 00
105 17
June. Entries of vacant L:
and
u Andrew Joyner, Pres't of the Roanoke -KaTijation
Company, being amount of
the 19th Dividend of .the , Roanoke
Navigation Company on 500 shares of
slock held by the Literary Fund,
ly. Entries of vacant Land .
" Gov. Manly Pres't Er Officio Literary. ;.
Board, being Interest - on bonds of the ;
Raleigh and Gaston Rail Road Com
pany, held by the Literary Board, " '
gov.. Manly Pres't Ex-Officio Literary '
Board being Interest collected on the .
Bonds of the Wilmington and Raleigh
Rail Road Company, held by the Liu
ry Board and endorsed. by the State,,
G. Manly Pres't. Ex-Officio of the
Literary Board, being Interest collect '
d on Loan to Floral College, bond
held by Literary Board, : .
Gov. Manly Pres't Ex-Officio of the
Literary Board, being am't paid by ,
Granville county for the support of the
jW and Dumb School, ' '
paries Dewey Cash'r of the Bank of -
InA , t"i ii i t
1,000 00
195 62
4,509 00
4,050 00
CO 00
150 do
-oidie, oeing a dividend .oeciareu on - r, ..-.., .
5027 shares 6f Stock held in said Bank ,
jythe President and Directors of the""
iierarv Fund. - - Ql.Sfil 75
AQV,
Uov- Manly, President ex-officio Lit--:' vww-tt
'aryB'd, being am't xee'd from Row-,,A c. ....j -
county for. support of Deaf and f .
5lnb Schobfr - ' Mi60 00
neriffs as tax on retailers of spirituous' : ' 'JTO
.39.67
paries Manty. Gov'r and Pres't
JJcio of the Literary Board, , beingv
Hount paid bv SheriflTof Moor fio.7
ex-
waaidcounty in support of Deaf and Xd - '
of.T.Shen bwg tax on renters. ,
Oct. rfiZ n1a?"t ; ,8.797.44
h T, cs OI vacant land,'
iav"n tax Rh'ff Caldwell,
3 76
J. X. Riggsbee, ; Auctioneer of ChV
ham Co.,;. .,., 1
" E. W, WUkings, Auc. of Cumberl'd
. county, , .55
" A. M. Campbell, do. do. . . - ' 113
"iS. V, Tillinghast, do. do " ' : 57
Michael Crawley, Auct'r of New Han-
over, Co., . . , 110
Henry J.Green, Auc'r of Craven coun-. -
ty, t : .88
L. W. Peck. Auct'r of Wake county ; 5
$241,600 98
v
Receipts; tr
$136,212 S9
6,782 80
: 52,040 00
Recapitulation of
Balance on hand Nov. 1, '48,
Entries of Yacant Land,
Bank Divid's B'k Cape Fear,
. 4 of the State,
Int. on Ral. & Gas. R. R. Bonds,
Wilmington do.
Cape Fear Nam. Dividends,
Support of Deaf and Dumb School,
Floral College Int. on loan, .
Wake Forest "
Roanoke Navigation Dividends,
Tavern Tax ree'd from Sheriffs,
Auction Tax,
21,364 76
9,153 00
8,100 00
1,300 00
375 00
' 120 00
4 12 4ft
'1,750 00
' 3,117 04
673 30
$24 J, 600 98
1848 CR.
Nov. By cash paid Gov. Graham's war-
rant as President ex-officio of the Lit
erary Board to defray expense of the
members of said Board on a visit to
Swamp Lands, ;
" The following counties for Common
Schools :
Ashe County,
Beaufort,
Bladen,
Buncombe,
Caldwell, .
Cherokee,
Chowan, '.
Cleveland,
Columbus,
Cumberland,
Davidson,
Edgecomb,
Granville,
Guilford,
Halifax,
Hertford,
Hyde,'
Iredell,
Jones,
Lenoir,
Macon,
Martin,
Mecklenbnrg,
Moore, Spring div'd 1848,
31 25
660
947'
604
873
454
303
474
601
330 52
1191 75
1233
1155
1391
1665
1189
559
506
1283
346
556
428
591
1429
339
671
713
686
977
968
583
1958
671
730
1118
533
1054
466
Moore,
Fall
do
Nash, "
Nash,
New Hanover,
do
do
1847,
1818,
Northampton,
Onslow,
Orange,
Pasquotank,
Person,
Randolph,
Rockingham, Spring 1848,
Rockingham, Fall 1348,
Sampson, Spring do
Sampson; .Fall do
Rowan.' 1 """" '
942
98X00
Rutherford,
Wake,
Washington,
Wayne,
Wilkes. Spring 1848,
Wilkes, Fall do
Richmond,
Warren,
Cabarrus,
Caswell,
Lincoln,
McDowell, t
Dec'r. Cherokee,
Chatham, ...
Greene,
Haywood,
Montgomery, j
Pitt, - .
Stanly,
Stokes, 1 .
Surry,
Brunswick, ;
Camden,
Carteret, .
Craven, . -Currituck,
" Wm: D. Cook Superintendent of the
Deaf and Dumb, part of his compen
sation, ' - '
44 Wm. D. Cook, part of bis compensa
tion as Supt. Deaf and Dumb,' -"
Silas Burns making Franklin Rod for
Deaf and Dumb Asylum,
Wm. M. Morrison Sec. of the Litera
ry Board, to defray expenses of the Lit
erary Board, ' ' "
Henry D.Turner for record Book for
f the Literary Board,
1849 Burke county Com. Schools, Spring
Jan'y. 1848,
1181 03
1627
348
855
506
1002
668
875
761
1079
925
422
159
1281
490 95
440 74
460 99
876 78
446 65
1379 25
1304 34
401 24
453 90
549 06
1042 87
532 08
850 00
150 00
65 00
243 00
7 00
283
561
312
619
279
608
226
502
268
531
925
Burke ' do ,
Kali do i
Spgdo
Fall do '
S'p'gdo .
Fall do ..'
Sp'g do
Fall do
Sp'gdo
Fall do
Fall do '
Davie do '
Davie
Gates
Gates
Henderson
Henderson
Vancy
Yaney '
Catawba"
Wm. D.- Cook Superintendant Deaf
and Dumb School, part of his.compen
83 1 ion as Superintendent,
" R.' Mast, Pres't Caldweir and Ashe
Turnpike Company, - being"aro?t. ool
lected on the sales of untenanted land
in the counties of Caldwell and Ashe,
.,. as appropriated by Act of Assembly,
1 ratified ,18th Jan. 1847, as part of the
State's subscription for said Road,
Feb! Tti.'J. Lemay. Treas'r of the N. 3.
500 00
1,200 00
'Institution for the education of the Deaf , ,
and Dumb, being the sum appropriated
by an Act of the last Gen'l Assmbly,
entitled " An act amendatory and 8up-s : :
plemental to an act . passed at the last
session of th Oeri'i Asseflkbly, entitled ;
an ct to provide suitable buildingsfor, '
the comfortable accommodation of the '-.
Deaf, Dumb and Blind pf this State' .
ratified 37th Jan. 184,' for furnishing - I
the. building and for other -purposes, 2,500
March Th. JLemay, Treas. N. C insti- .b
tutioo for Deaf and Dsmb, being aorV' '
of annual appropriation for the same, .N 2,500;
Tb. J. LeaiayiTreas; being amfordef- 4' '
00
.11
00
. v
-,;.dered tp be paid by v the Trustees from - -4
the special appropriation made at the1 t
last sessioAQt4hGerteral Assembly- ; 4,000 00
TyweUcoBntyiCwnnSchooJs', n '335v6
Perauimans. do dojfvvv"? ; c m560"'05
Q, C, Raboteau in part for printing the
Laws and forms for Common Schools,.
JL, C- Manly JSec'y of the .Literary
' Board Ao defray expenses of the Liter.
17 mu-r--.
i s 50 00
. 150 ho
arVUoard toi tnree monms, y i
Thomas JrLemay,bibtli forfdrerti-
fAtktn&:Daqon4for adverting distri
bution of Common School fund, - ?
April. Tyrrel county Common Schools,
91
15- 00
371 64
John W. Johnson for copying 4 maps J .11
1"
of the Swamp Lands by order Literary r.'j
Boards v ' . 7i -', S: ''V r'" 32
E, B Freeman Clerk of the Supreme
Court being cost : incurred ia euita in-'j v.-.,,.:.
stitoted by the Literary Board against ; V.. ta.
MajVJno. Clark,; '.-t ivi 14
R. P..Finch Clerk of the Superior ' ?
Court of . Wake county as costs incur- ; ; '
'i
red in suit instituted by. the Literary c- 7 , 7 nr-
Board against John Beckwith, .1.7 v. 7
may . oeauiori county Aom . . . , ..- - ; -
moii Schools, ... . : -V "- u
44 Cleaveland . , . :s t
637 00
405' 00
7 541 00
: 937 00
1107 Op
341 'DO
562 00
7 583 00
658 00
' 288700
v 251 DO
y. Franklin
Granville
Guilford:
: Hyde, ; ; - :
Johnston ,
- Pitt...:,- , .... ... :. , y,
Rowan . i , . t .
.Slanly-'v ,,: .. : , :, J.-
. Tyrrell .- ... -,
Columbus Sp'g div'd 1848 L.
161;
UaUmbus rail .do . do - .
Columbes Sp'g dp 1849
Camden
Cumberland -Edgecomb
...
Jones
Lenoir ; ' i : : :
Mecklenburg-,
Montgomery
Onslow
Orange
Person .. ;
Randolph- .7
Robeson . -
Warren
Wayne .; ,
Catawba
Iredell - . ; - 7 ; '". :vv
Martin,
Washington 7 -. ..
Caldwell
McDowell , .
Pasquotank
Sampson -. . i:
Thos. J. Lemay, Treasurer of the Trus
tees of the Deaf and Dumb School'
from the fund for the support of the
Deaf and Dumb School, -George
Little, to defray expenses of
03
67
54
22
00
90
79
55
97
83
96
02
48
78
87
Literary Board for attending sale of :
Swamp Lands, ,
44 William H. Mayhew, printing done by
order of the Literary Board,
44 H. Dimmock, printing done by order
of Literary Board'
44 C. C. Raboteau, printing Laws and
. Forms in relation to Common Schools,
44 C. C. Raboteau, printing pamphlet re-
turns to Common-Schools, . -June.
Ashe County Common Schools,
Cabarrus.
- Caswell.
Cherokee
Chowan .
Craven ' .
Currituck
Greene . :
Hertford
Lincoln
Macon -Nash
New Hanover -..
...liNottkmmpton
!-Perqwmane " . ' -
Richmond
Surry
Wilkes
Stokes
44 Thos. H. Smith, Cl'k of Hyde Sup.
Court of Law, being cost incurred in a
suit against Major John Clark, by Lit
erary Board, - -
44 Editor of Edenton Sentinel, for adver
tis'g sale of Swamp Lands,
44 R. L. Myers, his bill for services and
expenses, &c.,
July. Th. J. Lemay, Treas. of Trustees
for Deaf and Dumb School, for the sup
port of the Institution,
44 L. C. Manly, Sec'y of Lit. Board, to
: defray expenses of Lit, Board for the
quarter ending 30th June, 1849,
W. W. Holden, his print'g bill against
Lit. Board,
Anson Co. Com. Schools,
.' Buncombe
Chatham
Halifax.
Haywood ' " J :"! . '
-Yancy . . -
Aug.' Carteret -
Bladen ! ' ' ";
Duplin Fall '48 - !
Duplin Sp'g 44 .
44 -Th. J. Lemay, Treas. being for support
and management of Deaf& Dumb Sch'l,
44 Seatoh Gales, printing by order of Lit. '
Board,
Sept. Th. J. Lemay, Treas'r of Trustees
for Deaf & Dumb Asylum, being part -of
special appropriation made at the last
. Gen'l Assembly, -
Rutherford County Common Schools,
Henderson. .,. '
Wake ' -'i 'T
Oct. Anson ' - '
Beaufort ' : '
( Buncombe- . -f- ! ': '
Rowan. ... ? 7'r
Washington 7 ' '
90
77
60
75
10
19
00
92
37
90
00
38
84
55
73
94
02
25
18
25
95
622
289
463
658
00
00
00
652
00
S78 40
440
878
00
00
00
13
21
33
25
83
01
675
923
76
17
15
25
94
41 64
IS 00
69 50
00
73
500 00
163 00
14 60
792 00
586 00
863 00
800 00
298 00
358
369
407
845
426
00
00
00
43
75
1000 00
v 34 00
2,000
831
302
' 1095
972
783
720
- 807
' 288
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
50
00
07
00
81
5?
03
50
18
25
44 J D. Latham, for sundry services ran-
dered: in relation to Swamo Lands, 10-00
" L. Oi Manly, Sec'y to Lit. Board, to ?
defray expenses of LiUBoard for the ' '; ;:
quarter ending 30th Sept." 1849; ? ! - 5 - 162 00
$116,893 42
124,707 56
"1
- Balance, :
$241,600 98
,:f. . -- -'J -J-
Recapitulation or Disbursements.
Support of Common. Schools,1-1 '
99,449 '38
. support ot near anc uumo,
Caldwell and Ashe Turnpike Road,
Expenses Literary Board, &c,
Superintendant Deaf and Dumb,
Silas Burns for do.,
-13,000 00
1,200 00
1,679 04
-fl 1,500' 00
65 00
- 11,893 42
-124,707 56
..', .;
jf Td be tontinuti.'J
$24i,600 98
X-
, pol feller, who has been ,fijiperseded by Colonel
gremont as Mexican boundary .comojissionei will
stand a gop4 chance tq be U, S Senator fiora ; Cali
fornia. , It is reported ahai the party i engaged sfwith
biro. in running the jlin? would resign vif he.. were
superseded., This would greatly increase the expense
of, iberCommission and -alK tQ; gratify ,he sspiteof
GenTaylor. against a bra ve democratic officer ,ia4he
Mexican war. .7. ,.' 'k vfecfrsd b-s
cThe endowments f thtJoi versify, of 'Oxfordlare
about'' Xl30,000t per TannurWrnd "'oi 'Cambridge?
jBHO,O00r Besides,'the Univefsify arid Colleges of
Oxford have within? theirpatronage 463 livings, the
annual value of which is 138,900 ; those in the gift
of Cambrid gre 3 1 3, valued at 9,900 per annum.
1Tbe' fGaielta flays Tom) Ewiirg i n self-rnade
raanlW tie glad Jo. hear it, for sliould be
sofrv td thint tltatBuch. a -compound of venaliryj cor
ruption and political rascalityf came irr the right line
of descent from the first Adam.
Exchange.
70
07
81
22
33
i
41
30
'.i.. :Ui we ,n f:vw J Froia the PresbyteViani
THE SCOTCBT-IRrSH OF NORTH CAROLINA.
! The term Scotch-Irish i designates thar part of our
Protestant community which has emigrated to this
country from the northern counties of Ireland .v ' "The
name is peculiar to; this" cou'ntr. In 'Ireland these
emigrants are known as Scotchmen for ''their'bl6od
has never been mingled ! with' that of the : Irish.'
Scotchmen and Scotch-Irishmen are bolh7 of Scbtch
ancestry -the one came to this country through Ire
landthe other came directly from Scotland. Be-
00
.i
J . '.
? ".
70
4 fore the' Revolution, two waves of these .emigrants"
met n ss ortn Uarolina. One. came by the way tof
Charleston," Sooth' -Carolina, up ; the valleys of the
Pedee andWateree:thfr other came from PenhsyV
vania, through the Valley, and the Piedmont coun-
jdants are lobe found chiefly iri 'the rotioties'of Gran
Ville, ' Orangey Caswell,- Alairrance, ' 'Rockingham,
Guilford, Rowan, Cabarrus,- Mecklenburg, and Lin
coln. ' Although we must lament that manv individ
uals have departed Irom' the faith and discipline of
.L .1 .1 - . tl 1 o -111
25i Irish ofNorth Carolina Btil! adheres to that'ChurthT
-incir laiuf-io, ' yei me larffe maioruy oi xne. escoven.
318 00 1 for whiebltreir fathers prayed and fought and died."
215-0$ The experiment -in self-gwemmehfr of theseUrii-'-306
00 ted States is "not -yet finished.''" Into our political
802 00 cauldron are constantly pouring elements from every
; 778 00 eountry in Europe social elements as diverse as' the
.: 233-. 001 features language, and costumes of those who bring
375 00f tnem. Wer the faith and practice' of the -Sco'tch-962
OO-f Irish more widely disseminated, no lover of this coun
310 00 ' try need to fear the result of onr experiment. For,
393 00 without disparagement to any of their worthy co-la-1317
00 boureis in .the Revolution, it may lie" safely asserted
493 00 that the elements which the Scotch-Irish have intro
753 00 duced into our social compact, 'nire among 'its most
- 563 00 healthful ingredients. In civil matters they claimed
- 589 00 for the governed the right to settle the form of their
'576 00 government; they incalcated submission to the estab-
622 50 iished authority-when 'properly exercisedvand they
867 00 d'emanded the abrogation of all privileges to classes
.398 00 in society, .whether civil or religious. In religion
236 00 they taught that it must be pure and undefined before
- 306 00 God and man; they asserted that the Bible alone
286 00 should have supremacy over the conscience, and that
453 00 each man had a right to worship God as his con
635 00 -science directed. 1 How "early and how earnest the
. ; Scotch-Irish of North Carolina were in the cause of
; the colonies, history has fully Set forth. They freely
eontributed their fortunes, and fearlessly sacrificed
500 00 their lives to maintain Unstained their most sacred
honour. Of their aniiety to secure among them-
. , selves the blessings of the sanctuary and school-house,
.300 00 Dr. Foote has recorded many interesting proofs in his
. valuable Sketches of North Carolina; Bat history
34 25 has hitherto wanted the means for accurately . deter
raining the share which the Scotch-Irish have had
18 15 in diffusing and settling the' principles on which' the
... State system of. North Carolina has been founded.'
168 75 It is now settled beyond a doubt that the Scotch
Irish of North Carolina did set forth a Declaration of
-50 00 Independence in May, 1775. - But we must not Te
444 00 gard this declaration as a sodden burst of enthusiasm,
513 00 called forth - by the news from Boston. and Lexing
725 00 ton. The colonists of North Carolina, especially
212 00 those in Western Carolina, had for many years suf-
319 00 fered great burdens from unjust laws unrighteously
682 00 executed. In 1771 the Regulators were contending
358 00 for what are now very plain rights. There were un
330 00 ruly spirits among them who disgraced their cause ;
377 00 but very many sympathized - who could not then go
50 the length of open resistance, and were frightened
l .1 . I . . 1 T" .
by the excesses of the lewder sort of the Regulators
But when the time came, the Scotch-Irish showed
that they too had severely felt the burdens which the
Regulators had attempted too soon to throw off. Laws
UKfeieh
.passed -at their suggestion immediately
after the general Declaration of Independence prove
that they did not co-operate as a body with the Reg
ulators only for the sake of peace, and full trial of
00 protests and remonstrances. Resistance was to them
an ultima rattoontt not lightly to be presented, but
when once urged, to be maintained to the death. Be
sides the matter of taxes and fees, the Scotch Irish
felt very .deeply another oppression,' against which
also they firmly and with dignity protested until they
saw that forbearance was no' longer a virtue." The
colony of North Carolina had been laid off in parish
es, and each parish was expected to maintain one of
what was called the Orthodox clergy of the Church
of England.. The State of society must be almost
Utopian, in which the union between Church and
State will pr6ve to be any thing but an abomination.
How very unjust it was in North Carolina may be
inferred from the fact, that the Episcopal Church in
North Carolina was not able to support a prelate un
til 1823. , The following papers will show the temper-
with, which, ' for a while, the Scotch-Irish bore
this excessive tyranny. - To render them fully intel
ligible, it must be remembered that the act for estab
lishing an orthodox clergy, dated from 1715, and as
early as 1711, the colonial assembly passed an act
permitting. Episcopal clergymen only -.to solemnize
marriages within the colony of North Carolina. -When
no such clergyman - could be procured, a justice
of the peace might officiate, provided he handed the
fee over to the -clergyman of the parish. In 1796,
this act was amended So as to legalize the' marriages
solemnized by the Presbyterian clergy, and to permit
them thereafter to perform such ministerial acts upon
procuring a - special license, from the Governor, and
securing " to tha. minister of the Church of England,
having a care of any parish, the fees for all marriag
es in such parish, if he do not refuse to perform the
service thereof.". :The paper first quoted below, is a
remonstrance: against this amending act as implying
a censure of the Presbyterian clergy. The passing
of this act assumed that otherwise all marriages so
lemnized .-by Presbyterians were illegal that the
children born of snch' marriages were illegitimate,
and had no right to any property that might-come in
virtue thereof. The Scotch -Irish loved "their minis
ters too well to submit to such imputations' The act
for establishing Vestries was passed in 1764. It pro
vided a vestry of .twelve freeholders in every parish
in North Carolina ; compelled all freeholders to vote
Tor-such vestrymen on every; Easter Monday, of for
feit twenty shillings; and forbade any Episcopalian
or dissenter, from declining to serve as a vestryman
Davis's- Reyisaf,' printed at Newbern in 1773, 'eon
tains ail the laws here complained of. The papers,
which are now printed, for-the first1 thne are without
date.. William .Trybn, to whom they were addressed,
was the.Royal Governor of North Carolina from 1765
to 1871. '-
"To his Excellency, William Trypn, Governor and
Commander-m-Chief in and over -this, his Majesty's
7 Province ef North Carolina : The Honorable his Ma
jesty's Counciland gentlemen of Ihe General Assem
v bly of this Province, the petition of the inhabitants of
. Tryon County, (now'Lincoin,;Rutherford, dec,) being
t of the' Presbyterinn denomination, ' bvimhly showeth
i that we, your -petitioners, humbly conceive lhat.wc
- . have been much aggrieved for some years -last past by
-.- an act concerning marriage ; )t i n :i ' ' Prf
-' 1. 1 By the preamble;. ' herein i . Itis Se( forlb' that
the ministefS of our profesiojl,' ndt considering them-,
selve's inclnded,and testrained!iby' th'e l4S hereto-'
fore tnade -and : priov Id ed .d i d 'fra o J ulehtly andn'nTa'
fully celebrate maiager)'hhqnt, licence tt publica
tion of bansV; This'chargee j&6' feet, is' yvrdngful-1
ly-thrown p"onsnye. 'iirbJsoxrHhat report, so
scandalous to usihd b"o '1inJ6rio6's"to'that reputation
we- desire'alw'ays to maintain, ;haa ever been. orjciB bef '
rieved." 3 Thd practice1 li'ad ribtiheh iidr at jiny :tumji
before-obtained mbidiifA'Cp
Church in commoh-w A o'uf brethren f theChnrch
6FEnlahd;eqoiresthrice"jublitfati6n.' Ana tfany
minister presumes to jbin' "persons in wedlock' with
ontl'reencelor publication of bans he briogaf himself
under the finally' of a total' suspension froni his'-Office
by tBe rules pf ouV 'Church. .T - ? I ! "1
2. By the eighth 1 and ninth: sections bf this act
our mlnlstersTfre forbid lb? marry" with rightful jub
llealidn B"f aMcaifrm!ege)iicn'Ja
fellewrofeasors" in America "now-enjoy ;' yvhbse an
cestors have enjoyed ever since "they settled on this
continent. ;jfeitheras it . ever taken from, any dis
senters in America ,unti it was taken (torn us by this
Btl OI wnicn we now complain. W e pray and be-J
vm wuioereiore,o reetore us back to .the enjoy
ment Of thiS tmvilptrp- in mmmnnanilh nnr'noin.U.
lUYiuces. . t,et us. not, we. entreat, be
the
penonso-wnomjt is denied.'; ? ,. .. ..
. However, creditable this paper is iothe good sense
iu ggou temper otthe iScotch lriah of, North Caro
lina Jhe followinsr document is a still mora noble
monument of. the intelligence', fearlessness,, faithful
ness, and liberality of put , Presbyterian forefather's.
gAu.-H)V nauawruing ot. waigbtstill Avery, who
was a member of the .Charlotte town Convention jn
.7Pt tnari'-i l whose advice, was much sought, and
opinions much respected in the times of the Revolu
tion.,. In 1777 lie was appointed the first Attorney
General of North Carolina..,.'.- ' 'i - ' . t "
? To hi Excellency, William Tryon, Esq. Captain-General,
Governor, and Gommander-inChief in and over
the Province of, North Carolina j &C-; JO the Honor
ble Speaker and gentlemen of the House of Burgcss
,.,e forsaid Province: ,ir-.r : :V-.ti
44 The petition and addresses of the inhabitants of
JVJeckJecbarg. county, of Jh Presby teritm denoaiiaa
:tionyfhembly hoeth, ,r-v.,-. .) -, 7rVv i- . '
petition the Legislature i of this Province for redxees
ot gneyances. , . , . . '!,.:.:,.
"We theretore beg leave freely to ; represent our
case, trusting, to your candor ndupngutness, to re
dress our grievances, maintain our Tights, and. privile
ges, ana prevent all infractions of the same.
,44 ,Wa would inforin you that there are about one
thousand freemen of us, who hold, to the Established
Church, of Scotland,; able, to bear arms within the
county of Mecklenburg. ., i . ;
.... We declare ourselves faithful arid loyal subjects,
firmly attached to'his' present majesty and the gov
ernment ready, to defend t his majesty's .dominions
from hostile invasions. . : -L.. - . . .
" We declare ourselves zealous to support govern
ment and uphold the courts of justice, that the law
may .have its free course and operation. And we ap
peal to his Excellency, the Governor, how ready and
cheerful we were, to support , government in time of
insurrection. .... . . .. .--. .... .
- 44 We declare, ourselves entitled to have and enjoy
all the rights and privileges of his ipajesty's. subjects
in Great Uritam, to wit, England and Scotland.
" . '.'.- - V v "! - '' J
44 WrJien settled under assurances of liberty.and the
quiet and peaceable enjoyment of religious rites, se
cured to us by law, by the charter, and, by his majes
ty's instructions to the lords proprietors,, we. think it
a burthensome taxation tp 6upportan Episcopal clergy.
- 44 We would by no means cast reflections upon
our sister Church of England,. No ; let them wor
ship God, according to their, consciences, without
molestation from lis, We wish on our part, that we
may worship God according to our consciences, with
out molestation irom them.
i. 44 We think it as reasonable -that those who hold
to , the -Episcopal Church should pay their clergy
without our assistance, as that we who hold to the
.Church of Scotland should, pay our. clergy without
their assistance. . .-' ...
44 -We now . support .. two - settled Presbyterian
ministers in this, parish : we tlierefore. think it a
grievance that the present law makes us liable to be
still further burthened with .taxes to support an Epis
copal clergyman, especially as not one twentieth part
of the inhabitants are of that profession. : -
44 We think that were there an Episcopal clergy
man in this parish his labours would be useless. ,
44 We think ourselves aggrieved by the exorbitant
power of the vestry, to tax us with the enormous sum
often shillings each, taxable, which is more than
double the charge of Government, and that for pur
poses to which we ought by no means to pay any
thing by compulsion.
44 We therefore think that, under the present law,
the very being of a vestry, in this parish will ever be
a great grievance. . .- ..r.t '
... ..." .
44 We conceive ourselves highly injured and ag
grieved by the marriage act, and preamble whereof
scandalizes the Presbyterian clergy, and wrongfully
charges them with, celebrating the rites" of marriage
without license or publication of bans. , :
44 We think it a grievance that this act imposes
heavy penalties on our clergy, for marrying after pub
lication of bans by them made, iri their own religious
assemblies, where the parties are best known.
. 44 We declare that the. marriage, act obstructs the
natural and inalienable righ.af . marriage. ...
44 We pray that to those several grievances you
will, in your wisdomj and good nessK grant that red
ress which we ask in . this legal and constitutional
method. .. i . - . : K:v: , . - : x
- 44And we assure your Excellency, &c., ...
that we shall ever be mare, ready to support that Gov
ernment under which we jind liberty v" ; -
A.copy.of this petition was circulated among the
inhabitants of Tryon county, who speak of themselves
as being 'several ; hundred freemen Presbyterians,
Dutch. Lutherans, and Dutch ,Calvinists"-and as
supporting 4Jwo settled ministers one Presbyterian
and one. Duteh" ;J ; 7. . t
It may be , true that agitations-for toleration, and
freedom -of conscience almost always -proceed from
.the oppressed classes, and that history exhibits them
as peculiar to no one body of Uhristians. liut the
Scotch-Irish of North Carolina have the merit of in
sisting on the. same doctrines- when, relieved from
oppression, they had become influential in the State,
and might . have attempted some retaliation- for-, their
past grievances. Happily, the papers which prove this
fact are still extant although .'but lately. discovered.
Some extracts .from then will be given ' hereafter.
But had we. no other memorials of the principles and
proceedings of our forefathers than those given above,
every-Presbyterian has abundant .reasons.'to rejoice
in them. .. The clear . perception, and manly, declara
tion .of right&7tbe dignified tone of the remonstrance
against their violation, and the. catholicity of theipe
tition, am worthy of great praise, and perhaps are un-
aurpassed by any. contemporaneous paper.. ; C. P.
WASHiffotps National. Moxumekt.Oi'fice, )
November 16, 1849. -v.
As,a circular .has been prepared, in compliance with
a resolution of the Board of Managers, to be sent to
the principals and teachers of mil the colleges, acade
mies, anA; public? and private scnoowot the .United
States, requesting a periodical ccwitributioa from the
students nnd pupils attached to the same, in aid of the
great National .Monument, now in. the course xf erec
tion in. injs-cuy H,wut gwauy aasii lit currjriijf uc
plan into .operation., if. .the teachers and others will
oblige the Board by furnishing a list of .the institutions
of learning and the names pf thosehavirrg charge of
them in their respective towns. Counties, &c-, and ad
dress .tbe. same to. the Hon.. EiiSlta: Whittlesey gen
eralngepe,,,;:jGEORGE4yAT'nERSON,r. yx.-.vsi i
&!!.'.: .;- yr?-tt Secretary W. Nv.M.,Sotaefy.
7; 7-h :' .. - -''-it 'J'J i 'j---..'rib
...,A. Balloon Fbpseji. .- Mr GypsoU and: another
; gentleman, ascended in balloon, yesterdy week,from
iJe4wrdno,VV hen aV ani; eie.vatlod ot two miles they
got into a cloud' of., sip at and-: .snov-and; the balloon
.wasquickiy covered, with ice -The gas mor began
tajexpand.but intjtrying the. Vilvt.aboye.and' below,
it1was.0fi?u;h4 obe.. frozen. :rJnihiaeoiergency they,
applied, a. kuife and fnadepni ieoisido of twtsoty-fouT
iuchS in iLle sijk; vThe g$ issued forth in'ooe eon
linupus; gtrea.ipB IhJpughs alW.efuoilnpentngand,
pingqlar .to.fplatctbegas that bad passeji.into the
silkenA.gl3be.aa, invisible, vapor rusyid out as. jvhite
as. tha. steam from a s.tearn-engine.uch waa tber af
fect. of, thefrMty pif open the gs.. And thuslthe
eronauts were rescued from the jaws; of destruction.
They descended aafely.,,, j A Liverpool Journals
JPpetry , says some 6ne'is the flower Tof literature,'
quafdrttU wjj 'f,be ipice and. jifppeitpYeii8
are the emetics, letters containing remittahVes are
apple dumplings.
SOUTHERN CONVENTION.
-"i Whatever disposition may be made of the slavery
question in connection with the Territory of Califor
nia, there' is still a pressing necessity for a: conven
tion of the Southern States to take counsel together' in
regard to the threatened invasion of ihetr rights in the .
District ef Columbia and other.' euartersi and to take
A into consideration the expediency Of a ntvr. irenigto-
iion , oy our (nmrneretal jtelalions &ilh Eurvpc with, a
view of establishing u regularly system of cTttct'ni
pottaiionfby.the South: H M t. -.iWrV ii
The next Cbngresa will- bealled. upon to giva a
Territorial Government to Nevr Mexico'; Texas, has
Territory, which, at no distant; day, must be erected
into a new State ; and no one can doubt that the Free
soilers will make a desperate effort, to fasten the in
famous W ilmot proviso upon these. Territories vand
that they are determined -to abolish slavery in the Dis
trict, is clearly 'proven by the scenes which occurred
at the last session of Congress,-and tbe resolutions
of the Conventions of nil . political parties at the
North during the past , year., Havei-we no remedy
againstsuch an unconstitutional and. lawless outrage
npons our rights 1 Undoubtedly we have. ;Aod ought
the.e nolle be conceit and; union in the onthinfix
iag pon tha remedy Party should have nothing
more to do in this; m&Uer, Ihan-in resisting the prt
gress -of jh': small pox or the'cholera As we said
en a . former occasion, : .?.Tho interests of tho ithble
South are involVed.iq one common, struggle; the. vig
orous and nnliring energies of all hould;be periled,
in the common strife. -..Let .the. South unite, in one
urjbrpker .phalanxi .Falriolism. should, be the altar
upon which parties, should surrender and compromise
their predilections and feelings the love of country
should give purity, and dignity and permanency to
their movements. A Southern Convention consti
tuted and governed by these;. elevatedand ennobling
principles ; swayed by considerations of regard for
the Union, surpassed only by an intensity of devotion
to. our dearest rights and . honor, and a determined,
yet calm and forbearing intention to.defend thero, could
not fail to convince vour- Northern . brethren that we
were at least united ,-" and it could not fail to cheek
them in their mad and mischievous purposes. . . '
Again- it is now a good. time for the South to con
sult together on the subject of establishing her com
mercial independence.- This is. no: contracted party
scheme; but one in which the whole Southern people
are. deeply interested ;. and should be zealously . sup
ported, as a Southern measure, by all parties. ; ,.-..y
. Why should not the Southern people be their oWn
exporters and importers 1. .There .is nothing to pre
vent, but much to . encourage it. . We possess the
extraordinary advantage of fumisbipg yearly. all the
articles of export, in the great staples, .cotton, corn,
rice and tobacco. We have safe and pom modioli s
harbors as. well suited to the foreign trade, as could
be desired. Yet with these natural advantages. we
employ. the merchants of the Northern cities as our
agents in this business. They export our productions
and import our articles of consumption ; ; by which
they are enriched, and still contiuue to enrich them
selves, at our expense. . It is this that has also given
the North the overwhelming political power and in
fluence,-by which she thinks she can with impunity
now put her- loot upon, the neck.of the south. and
fetter the hands that have contributed to her opulence
and pride and greatness, Is it not time to put an. end
to this-unequalState .pf things 1 . Should we not as
Southern men,, thus, treated, lay hold upon our own
natural advantages, and adopt measures to secure the
full enjoyment of them to ourselves and pur posteri
ty 1 . Should wo no tad opt this certain and wholesome
method of breaking that unscrupulous power and in
fluence which our hitherto suicidal course has built
up, and thereby effect our deliverance from the threat
ened dangers 1 - Let this plan be adopted, and it will
as certainly . draw down the insolent power of -the
North as the hoisting of a flood-gate jets off the head
of swollen waters; and will in the same ratio increase
the population and affluence, and power of the South.
In such a scheme. North Carolina has a deep in
terest. Central as she is along the Atlatic seaboard ;
possessing a harbor, as safe, commodious, and. easy
of access as any on the coast ; and having under con
sideration a project which can easily be made to pour
into this port the immensely valuable products of the
central and western portions of the State, she may,
possibly, by. seizing this opportunity, make the town
of Beaufort, on our own coast, .a great commercial
city, and lay the foundation of future greatness which
will vie with that ot the proudest sister of this glori
ous Republic. , . . Raleigh' Star
Rev. Theobolo Matthew. We regret that the
want of room prevents the publication ot the admira
ble letter of Gov,' Lumpkin withdrawing on behalf pf
the State Temperance Convention of Georgia, that
assembled at Marietta last summer, his invitation to
rather Matthew to visit that State, in furtherance of
the object of his mission to this country.. It will be
recollected that Mr. Matthew was charged- by Loyd
Uarrison, on his refusing to attend the Anniversary
Celebration of Slavery emancipation in the British
West India Islands, with being an Abolitionist,-and
having jointly, with Daniel O'Connel, and some sev
enty thousand other inhabitants ot Ireland, signed an
appeal to the Irish residents of thi oountry, to join
with the Abolitionists of this country, and to 44 never
cease their efforts, until perfect freedom was granted
to the black: ma,n, as well as the white.", j .t (a
luese developments conn to the knowledge of
Judge Lumpkin, about the first of September he.wrote
to rather Matthew, to know if he still cherished the
above sentiments, stating that his capacity for useful
ness in the coutU would depend upon his answer to
these questions... After waiting about, one month, tbe
Judge received a very brief reply, marked 44 private"
In the meantime he learned that several Temperance
Associations, bad withdrawn their invitations, 1 hese,
however, were withheld until a response to the Judge's
inquiries, should be received. in the reception ol
the private note, Gov. JLumpkin again addressed xatu-
er Matthew through a friend in Boston, requesting
the removal of the injunction of privacy, or to give
some more, satisfactory explanation; of his ..views and
feelings upon the subject under consideration, reiter
ating his opinion that a, visit tp the South,, under the
circumstances., would be - productive of, nothing but
evil to the cause of Teraperance,,;17p to the 6 th of .this
month, nothing more satisfactory to the public fiaying
appeared, and the private communication neither deny-
ing ine genuineness, or lnuroaiing any cnaneo oi cen
tlment on the part pf the Rey.. signer, Gov. Lumpkin
fejt constrained, on account of tlte nearness of b.is in
tended visit to the South, to make known the above cir
cumstances, tq thus publicly withdraw his invitation.
I he circumstances detailed in the circular of Jyagp
Lumpkin, leaves not a. shadow of dpobof ; Father
Matthow's identity ,with the mischief , makers ,an4.diy
tnrbers of pur peace,.aiid that by his tortuous, unrnao
ly hypocritical, and invasive course on the subject of
slavery, be has forfeited, the confidence and counte
nance of; every, friend of Temperance in the South,
and that no good can arise to our cause by the advo
cacy of this-"jWpjf irjsbeep's clothing,' and we wish
thus publicly, to refuse aU.fraternHy witu nim y.-,,
Althountrour priaeinles are.dear to us, .we are not
disposed to welcome auxiliaries; wlw come wih the
ipinperanve pannes in one nanuaim iHeHiwuum.iyitii
in the other. 8. V. rcmper$n diimner,
ot Hartford apepded-tlieWouse- .pf R.epresentatjvca
last aprjnw tpread, prayers, auo, pejng ppiwijrequesj
ed to remain seated near, &eppeaker durin&je df-
hatebe fpurimself the spectJtorof e? vnmfmpng
process so alien. o his own vocation, j.and sacharaQ
teristic of the legislaturejof Connecticut, that the re
sult was the fol.lowipgi voosxA
Addressed by , $ Prsesl to theLegiswure tyt ConrucH.tuf,
7 ' i4, Fo? 'qvllo'c ..1I connections 4ani'ed.aa,
i.fawB. injpnei but yavAci. i r;ii
ncn legislature seems to say.
What you coxnkct-i-cut away." Calendar.
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