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The Tarborough southerner. [volume] (Tarboro', N.C.) 1875-19??, April 23, 1875, Image 4

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THE
Friday,
: " : : April 23, 1S75
Debts of the Southern States
-Views
of an Outside Party.
From the Washington Critic
North Carolina, at the last session
of its legislature, bagan that process
of liquidation through which nearly
all the southern States will have to
go, if they are ever to get upon
their feet again and regain the vig
or of their former life, by passing
an act to compromise commute, and
settle the State debt. This act
bonds from the
1st of January, 137G, representing
forty per cent, of its indebtedness,
bearing two per cent, interest for
the first two years, three per cent
the next three years, and five per
cent, for the remainning twenty
years, payable semi-annualy. These
bonds they propose to deliver to
the holders of the old bonds of the
State on their surrendering thera,
in the proportion of forty dollars
to the hundred. This is denounced
by northefk papers representing
the bondholders' interest, as high
handed repudiation. 'Why halt,"
says one, 'at forty per cent, of the
principal, or discriminate between
this and five per cent, interest.
There is as much right to ignore
the whole obligation as any part
thereof ; the proposition, if carried
out, ia a bold and daring theft of
the property of honest and conn
dine creditors, and one that must
entail lasting discredit upon the
State of North Carolina. There
ar two parties to the contract of
every bond issued, and in no way
can that contract bo aDrogateu or
narrowed bv either witout the con
sent of the other.'
With reference to the largest
cart of the indebtedness of the
Southern States, the term ' honest
and confiding creditors will hardly
apply, for the purchasers of most
of the bonds held against them
were cO'Conspirators, with the ras.
cally officials who issued them, and
while it is questionable whether an
average of forty per cent, in raon
ey was ever paid for the North
Carolina bond, or could be ob.
tained now for them in open mars
ket, it is well known that some
$6,000,000 of South Carolina
bonds were disposed of at half
that amount in currency when gold
was worth about two dollars, ma
king the specie value about teu
cents on the dollar. If South Car
olina were to offer to pay there
bonds at ten cents on the dollar,
it would be denounced as repudi
ation, and yet nothing is plainer
than that she ought not to pay
one cent of them, as the officials
who issued them and the men who
bought them, were simply a ring
of conspirators and thieves.
The ei ormous bjnded debt im
posed upon the people of these
States, is a mortgage upon every
man's home, and upon every mans
woman's and child s labor for a
century to come. It enslaves the
people by the burden of a debt
which they can neither hope to
work out of for two or three gen
erations. Debt is slavery.
Ii a man owes a debt which he
can neither pay nor get rid of
through bankruptcy, but may be
held by his creditor to work it
out, he is the slave of the credi
tor until his debt is paid. This
was the basis of Mexican peonage,
that system of slavery so similar in
in its effects to the chattel slavery
that existed in the South before
the war.
Now, as between human rights
and liberty, and the rights of credi
tors to their money, the United
States have provided a bankrupt
law, which enables a man who can
not pay his debts to wipe them out.
A State may be bankrupt as well
as an individual, owing, perhaps,
obligations less in the aggregate
than millionaire bankers have failed
for; yet if a State proposes to com-,
promise with its creditors, by offer
ing them perhaps a full equivalent
for what they have paid for her
bonds instead of the face value, it
is at once denounced as ' high hand
ed repudiation.'
People will cease to be frighten
ed at this mad-dog cry after awhile,
and acting on the principles of com
mon sense, will emancipate them
selves from slavery to the money
power, and set the white man free
as they have already set the black
man free.
Liberty is more precious than
property, and should be the princi
pal object of all political organiza
tions. Fraud, peculation, official conspi
racy and financial cunning, have
foisted upon the toiling millions ot
the country a burden of indebted
ness which consumes a large part
of their substance every dav, in
every article they eat or wear, in
taxes on their homes and personal
property, until they are becoming
convinced of the necessity of a new
departure in financial legislation.
Tue Good Niujit Kiss. AJ ways
send you child to bod happy.
Whatever cures may trouble your
mind, give the dear child a warm
goad nihc ki-s as ir to its piK
low. Ttie memory of this, in the
stormy year.- uhicM ny be in store
for the little one, m I be the Beth
lehem's star to the bewildered shep
herd, and bweliin up in the he.rt
wil! ii,. the thought: 'My father
and mother l-.-veJ me !' Lips parch
ed with fever will become' dewy at
this thrill of blissful memories.
Kiss your little child before it goes
to sleep.
Mr. IT. C. Hendy. of Titt county
residing near Greenville, raised lut-t
season from a measured plot of one
and ttireo-fourtii acres, one tl ousan l
pounds of merciititable lint cuttea
Weighed not estimated.
AGRICULTURE.
l"fT This department is devoted espeeuilli to
the interests o f Agriculture. Contributions from
Farmers are i cspectfully solicited.
Ycur.g Ken and the Grange.
It is more than singular to ob
serve the army oil effeminates that
is being recruited in the land. Take
for example the large number of
clerks,salesmen, book keepers, sews
ing machine agents insurance
agents, (and the list might be
continued until a column of type
would he wasted) with tender hands
and slender feet, curled and shining
hair, (and always parted in the
middle) moustache budding into
what term, 'a soldierly respectabili
ty,' waxed at the ends, and curled
on the cheeks, clad in soft raiment,
faring sumptuously every day,
sporting paste diamonds, a plug hat,
and an elegant switch cane, with
boots more polished than their ideas,
a cigar elevated at an angle of 45
degrees, red cravat, pocket in the
back porch of their pants, with just
enough of a fancy bordered hand
kerchief hanging outside to attract
attention, and compare them to the
homey-handed sons of our fanner ',
clad in homespun, cut and made at
home with no very exalted ideas of
ease and repose, but with a head
full of brains, and a bosom full of
an honest heart, the contrast is in
deed striking. At a first glance
the farmer boy thinks his lot an ex
ceedingly hard one. It requires a
good deal of honest persuasion, a
little gentle starvation, with other
influences, equally potential, to keep
him on the farm. He hungers and
and thirsts for a change, (as he ima
gines for the better.) But the satis
factory efforts that are made by the
Grange to elevate and dignify the
pursuits of the farmer will have the
effect to keep the boys at home, to
create in their minds a wholesome
recognition of the duties they owe
themselves and society, and with
these efforts to elevate the calling,
and place the income from the bus
iness of the farmer upon an equali
ty with other callings and pursuits,
the desire to go to town and dress
fine and splurge round generally is
speedily checked.
This is encouraging to our farm-er-boys.
Let them show a disposi
tion to make their mark in the world
in other ways than as mere walking
advertisements for a clothing store,
and as carpet-knights, to bow, and
smirk and fawn before a simpering
lass, and to 'eel the assurance that
when he does take to himself a Let
ter half, he w II i not be compelled to
drag through life a bundle of fash
ionable toggery, composed ef paint,
powder, whalebone and laces. A
sensible woman, and thank God
there are many of them in the land,
looks more to the internal than the
external qualifications of a man, and
she can see through a homely suit j
of jeans a true manly heart, and
from those hands, hardened and
browned by honest labor, she can
confidently expect a handsome sup
port through life, and he will find
in her the material to make a sen
sible man, happy and contented,
under all circumstances. These ef
forts to elevate and dignify the
farming pursuits of the country
are most commendable and will
bring forth fruits which will grow
and increase until the ' fancied mar
gin against it will have disappeared
never again to return. State Ag'l
Journal.
Clover and Acid Phosphate.
Editor Agricultural Journal:
It is not proposed to say anything
about its value, that is conceded by
all parties, the great remaining ques
tion is how to procure a stand and
proper growth.
From two years experience I should
ptate as a very decided opinion thut
the acid phosphate comes nearer en
suring a stand of clover than any
other manure; why 1 state it as an
opinion my experience is not suffici
ently varied and extensive to state it
as a fact
In 1873 I used a bag to the acre,
and the stand was generally good;
the clover was sowed in March, six
quarts to the acre; in the summer of
1S74 top dressed a part with a bag
to the acre, the crop was increased
between 80 and 40 per cent.
In 1S74 about 30 acres were sow
ed at one place three acres were
yhosphated; most of the stand was
v.-ry good. There were some eigh
teen acres of the balance where no
phosphate was used, and I did not
sive one fifth of an acre.
I used aeid phosphate on various
small sections with a comparative
uuiformity of result. The crop sown
this spring I am repeating the ex
peiiment. The clover I sowed in
November, v here no phosphate was
use l, begins to loose its color, last
week it was top-dressed with the acid
phosphate.
Observation goes to show that clover
dies from want of suitable supplies
or provisions to nourish the same. I
know of two lo's where there was a
considerable failure of stand, but in
that part of each lot which contaiuod
portions of un old road the stand was
very good R'on the old road, includ
ing its me auderinge.
The uPiwth of clover has been so
precarious that all facts bearing on
the same ought to bo reported.
John L. BitiDOEits.
A man 'down East' returned Ins
newspaper to the printing-office
with 'jackass' written on the margin
and in the next issue the editor
stated the fact, and wound up the
fjuisgiapu oyasKing, 'Will our in
dignant subscriber please to let
know at what
us
stable he can be
iound?'
Ti e Baptist revival at Durham
continues with unabated interest.
MISCELLANEOUS.
REMOVED!
MRS. J. FELDEXHEIMER
Having removed two doors from her late
stand to the handsome brick building recent
ly erected by Mr. B. J. Keeoh, now lias to
creased facilities for conducting the, w ' ;
Millinery Business., in
all its Branches.
A FULL LINE OF
DRY GOODS, BOOTS & SHOES, CLOTH
ING, TRUNKS and VALISES,
also in stock which will be sold at low us
urps. .
Thanking her i.uinerous friends for their
past patronage, she now extends a cordial
welcome to them all, particularly the ladies,
and will endeavor to serve them as faithfully
in the future as heretofore. ; , - "
She is ready and fully prepared to meet
the wants of all aDd Invites the public to in
ducements which are constantly offeree!.
Mrs. J. Felticndeimer,
Main St-, Tarboro', N. C
Feb. 5. 1875, ' , ' y ?V ly
TllOd. A. IIAKDY & fcO.Ns, -Agents,
NORFOLK , VA.
M ir. 5, lST.-.-2m.
THE ROCKY MOUNT
COTTON MILLS,
-sirE AUK NOW MANUFACTURING,
7? of iho beat quality, for the Lome
trade,
COTTON YARNS,
COTTON PLOW LINES, all sizes
HEAVY 4-4 SHEETING.
Orders from prompt customer filled without
. ' . delay.
TERMS : Net cash, within thirty days.
Address,
, UAT 1XK A BOX,
Dec. 4,- : liocky Mount, N. C.
FOUTZ'S
H033EAKD CATTLE POWDERS,
vr,l mre or prevent IMsemsa.
WpiKG !
To (he Citizens of Edge
combe ami adjacent
Country.
milE iiiuli'Misniil respeetjnlly announces
JB. tiut he has :;-ain opt : business of a
General Blacksmith,
o:i Church Stive!, near Mr. Dozier's Store.
Spcci.d attention paid to
GUN AND CITY WORK.
Particular cure imid to
Xloi-sc-liooing"
Alo the mai'juf.icturins and repairing a
kinds of mrriculturai and general BLACK.
SMITH WOK K.
An experience of over TWENTY YLaRS
in Kdire'-omN; is sufficient testnuony to my
capability. I rcsjieett'iillv return thanks for
the various maiiif-stn'inns of kindness here
tofore received and hope to continue to de
serve th in.
Nov. is-tf. I. 15. rALA MOUNTAIN.
NEW STORE !
NEW GOODS !
Prices to Suit the Times
I, C. J. AUSINT, formerly r.f R. II. Austin
& Co., and latp with T. II. Gallin, hae the
pleasure of infoimiiig my frends and the
public in general that I have opened a
Gen'I Grocery Store
on Main Street, between the stores of Messrs
H. MorrNs & Bros., and T. II. Gatlio, where
I will keep on hand a choice selection of
goods at the lowest market rates, viz :
NEW MESS PORK,
NEW HUMP PORK,
C. YELLOW SUGAR,
C. WHITE SUGAR,
A. WHITE SUGAR,
LOAF AND GRANULATED SUGAR,
FLOUR,
S. O. II .VMS,
BACON SHOULDERS & SIDES,
D. S. SHOULDERS & SIDES.
C. R. SIDES,
SPICED BEEF,
BEEF TONGUES,
BOLOX.V & PORK SAUSAGES,
CAKES, CRA- KERS,
15 UTTER, CHEESE,
TLOW LINES,
MILL FEED,
OATS, BRICK.
FERTILIZING LIME. &C., &C,
which will he .sold very low for CASH.
Call and examine.
C. J. AUSTIN.
Feb. 5, ISTo.
THD IAS. TTTPrr
ScsMe Turbine Water Wheel,
-aiauuiactured by
P00LE & HUNT.
Baltimore, Hd.
T,000 XOW IK XTSBI
Mmple, Strone. DnraWn
always reliable and rnvHo.
V" -41
JVi&linrAJ'tolTAM .Inn J
PlSS.l'ortable & Stationary
Wf &?:ASaw & Grist rni l;-'
1, juui.
sry.Gearinif
rnin. Fin
'ate and of very best liiiiah. Bendfor CiicZ
WnsHiiiBtOM. TVT. O.
DEALER IN ,
Pure Medicines, Books, Stationery, Fancy
Hoods, Picture Frame, Tassels andCords
Wholesale and Retail ajr.-nt fo. Peters Musi
cal Monthly. Folio and Demoreste Magazines,
Chmmos 17x20 as premium. Keeps all the
latest musk at Publishers price. Any Book
furnished to order. - -
Resyectlully,
Dee. 11,-ly. D. N. BOG1.RT.
Mm
a 3.
vi c&
MO
P H p
gP
S- ft
B V
p p
11 '
5
Xffl p
3 p m
S Lj
pm W
Th 53 A
1 -
2 SJ
85 S ' j
5a" .
(3$
8pO
Til
U P
TH
if
5 k
ti EW'ADV ERTI
J. A. WILLIAMSON,
General Grocer and. Produce Dealer,
rl-i i-loi-o IV. C.
500 BUSIIELS SEED oats-
100 Bales Hay.
80 Bushels Black Peas.
50 Bbls Corn.
100 Flag Chairs.
20 Boxes Plug Tobacco
grades.
150 Lba Smoking Tobacco
grades.
' . CO Bushels Sweet Potatoes.
all
all
10 Bbls Early Eose "
10 " Peach Blow "
Fresh Fruits and Confectioneries in Quantities.
TIX, WILLOW W00DEX WARES, A SPECIALTY.
For sale low at wholesale and
J. ml. W
Feb. 26,iy.
I am disposing of
Dress Goods, Ladies
Ready-Made Clothing, fcc., fce.,
COST!
in order to make room for Spring Goods.
Now is the time for bargains.
Tarboro', N. C, Feb. 2G. 1875.
Wiesenfeld,
Cotton
General
Make liberal Cash advances on consignments of Cotton and other
Produce.
Also with approved security, will advance on accommodating terms,
SUPPLIES to FARMERS f r carrying on this year's crops.
Those desiring ta avail themselves of the above offer, will apply to
our Agent, J. B. Ccffield, Tarboro', N. C.
J. B. COFHELD,
Gen, Commission Merchant
AND WHOLESALE DEALER IN
Whiskies, Wines, Tobacco, Segars,
Sash, Blinds, Doors, Building
and Shell Lime, Gu
anos, &c., &c.
Tarboro', N. C.
, Feb. 19, 1875. ly
EDGECOMBE AGRICULTURAL WORKS,
TARBORO', IV. O-
Manufacturers of Wagons, Carts, Plows, Gin
and Mill Gearing, and Agricultural Im
plements generally.
We keep on hand a very large stock of Seasoned Wagon and Cart
Materials, and are prepared to furnish on short notice any vehicle in
this line from a light one horse wagon to the heaviest carts and wagons
for Saw Mills. We make the
EIGHT FOOT GIN GEARING,
In the best style; have never heard a complaint of one of our Horse
Powers. We furnish a full set of Bolts with these powers. Price 55.00
complete. Beside several varieties of Turning Plows we make a speci
alty of the
"EDGECOMBE COTTON PLOW,"
which we believe has met with more general favor than any Cotton plow
ever made. These plows are now made after two patterns, one intended
especially for use in hard and stiff land.
REPAIR WORK
done on Engines, Saw Mills, Gins, Horse Powers, and all kinds of im
plements. The undersigned is manufacturers' agent for Tanner's Engines and
Saw Mills, Leffeli's Turbine Water Wheels, Grist Mills, Pulleys, Shaft
ing and Gearing.
These Goods are all Warranted.
II. A. WALKER,
Nov. 6-tf SUPERINTENDENT.
R. P. JPRICE,
... .
Washington, N- C
Topographical Surveyor.
RETURNS thanks to the citizens of this
and adjoining counties, tor patronage
received, and respectfully solicits a contin
uance of the same. Having provided him
self with a suitable instrument, he is prepar
ed for
Topographical Surveying, Leveling, &c.
Ref buesces :-Wra. 8. Rattle, W. G. Lewis,
Elias Carr, J. A. Williamson, Edgecombe.
Wm. Klnc, W. R. WUHanM, Kit country.
Jan. 8, 1875 17.
SEME NTS .
QQ BBLS FLOUR, ALL GRADES.
300 Head Lucas Cabbages.
200 Lbs Common Candies.
100 " Pine
20 Bbls Sugar.
2 Hhds Bacon Shoulders.
4 " Bulk
50 Heavy C E Sides.
50 " DS "
20 Bbls Mess Pork.
10 Bump "
10,000 Gallons Molasses in Hogsx
heads and Barrels.
retail.
ILZ,I.WtISOJ
Main Street.
my entire stock of
and Gents Hats,
.11. JR. JTO.VIJS.
Stern & Co.,
Factors
Commission Merchants,
Ma.
Wlritclock's Vegetator,
Superior to any Fertilizer
made in the
United States,
For COTTON, CORN, TOBACCO.
SWm for sale by J. M. Laoghlin & Son,
Charlotte, N. C; Weil & Bros., Goldsboro',
NO; EM Houston & Co., N C ; Murry &
Co., Wilmington, N C; Williamson, Up
church & Thomas, Raleigh, N C ; W L Mc
Ghee, Frauklinton, N C ; Timberlake & Earec,
Pacific, N C ; Branch Co, Wilson, N C ; M.
Angler, Durham, N C - ur&a.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
ENRICH YOUR LANDS
and make good crops by using
Whann's Bahama Guano,
which has been successfully used by ihc Fiirmeisio all sections on everv
variety of crops. Asa
RTIL.IZBR,
it is especially adapted to the wants
ty of making their lands produce the
agent for
BRADLEY'S SUPER PHOSPHATE,
which has been thoroughly tested through the entire South, and fuccjs.
ful yields have been the result where they were used. Theae famous
Guanos are again at my command and 1 have yet to hear of single
complaint from thode who have used them.
.1 Liberal Offer to Farmers t
For 425 lbs. Good Lint Cotton, I will give one ton of either of these
excellent Fertilizers, purchaser paying freights upon delivery of Guano.
J. B. COFFIELD,
Cen. Com. Merchant & Wholesale Liquor Dealer,
Jan. 29, 4m. TARBORO', 2ST. O.
oechill a auA.nsro.
A TRUE BIRD GUANO,
AND
Soluble Ammomated South Sea Guano.
Analysis made by order of Prof. W. C. KERR, State Geologfst of North Carolina, by
Dr. F. A. GEXTII. University oi" Penna. at Philadelphia.
AVest Philadelphia, January 4th, 1875.
I have analyzed as follows : 1 sample of " Soluble Aramoniated South Sea Guano, pre
pared for Cotton by 15. M. ItllODtS & CO., 8i South Street, Baltimore, 182 lbs.," which
1 found to contain
Moisture, - 15.53 per cent.
Srf.nble Phosphoric Acid, -1.S2 " " equivalent to 943 percent of Bone Phosphate of Lime
Precipitated " " 4.32 " " " 15.63 ' " '
Nitrogen, equivalent to 2.98 " " Ammonia.
Alkaline Saks, - 8.20 " "
2 Sample of " Orchilla Guano, A. A.. B, 51. RIIODBS & CO., Importers' Agents, 82
South Street, Baltimore, 1C7 lbs. Curacao," which I found to contain
Phosphoric Acid, - 26.86 percent., equivalent to 58,64 per cL. of Bone Phosphate of Lime
Alkaline Salts, - 4.30 ' " -
Both samples were certified to have been taken, set'.ed and . by Thos. Harris Hodgei,
Notary Public, and were in perfect condition. F. A. GENTH.
The Orchilla, which seems to be an organic di-,oait, can be recommended to the farmer
for use in its crude sute, and after a careful and complete analysis, as well aa a thorough
examination of the mechanical condition, as well as from the testimony of several who have
used it in its crude state, and have expressed to me their entire satisfaction. I feel per
fectly justiSed in recommending the Orchilla. W. P. TONRY,
Prof. Anal, and App'ld Chemistry, Maryland Institute.
The Orchilla Guano, which is truly an organic deposit, deserves well the attention of
the farmer, not only "u account, of the hisjh grade of its Phosphates of Lime and Alka
line Salts, but more pai iiculary for the phisical condition and texture in which Guano is
presented. G. A. LIEBIG, Ph. D.
This material decidedly recnniniends itself to the attention of farmers by its large pro
portion of Phosphoric Acid, being iu a form to be -nuch more easily taken up by growing
plants than that of the harder and more compact, Mineral Phosphates. Farmers can them
selves very easily add Peruvian Gnano, Cotton Seed, Mill Refuse or other material afford
ing Nittogen when it is desired to combine the effort of Ammoniacal with that of Phos
phatic Manure. I art, gentlemen, respectfully yours, J. W. MALLET.
Raleigh, N. C.,'Jannary529, 1875.
From the Analysis of Dr. Gentii there is no doubt of the high per centaae of Phosphate
of Lime in this Guano, and I endorse the recommendations of Prof. Mallktt upon the
above testimony of himself and Prof. Liebio & Tokry as to its physical condition that it
offers a desirable source of Phosporic Acid to Cotton Farmers and others who have H,e
means of funii.-bing the Xitiogeuized matter at home. W C. KERR
B. M. RHODES &. CO.,
82 Soutli St., :OAltlxxa.Oxo.
Agents for Edgecombe CorsTv : R. C. Brown & Co., Tarboro ; Stancil, Thigpen &
Co., Penny Jl ill ; J. H. Pippen, Whitakcrs. jan. 29, 3m.
CASH
Price
$50 00
per ton
of
2,000
r -
1i .
ft
pounds.
? r:,ltsm Nov. 1.
rpnE niGii standard of quality has been fully maiitained, and it
is considered by those who have given It a fair trial the
BEST AND CHEAPEST
FERTILIZER MANUFACTURED.
LIBERAL AND ADVANTAGEOUS TERMS
FOR LARGE LOTS, GIVEN OX APPLICATION.
LOCAL
AT
ALL THE PRINCIPAL
DeROSSET & CO.,
GENEEAL AGENTS
FOR NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA,
-AT
WILMINGTON.
O. C. FAKRAB. & CO., Agents, Tarboro, N. C.
B. G. WILEY, Agent, Plymouth, N. C
Jan. 22, lb75.
STORE TO LET.
THE STORE rdjoinlng that of Mr. J. H.
Bell, now occupied by Messrs. H. Mor
ris & Bro.
For particulars, apply to
GEO. HOWARD.
Jan. 18, 1874. tf
of those who appreciate the neceasU
highest possible yield. I am also
m t "Hr tti
per
OOOlbs
,Mmk' Payable.
DEPOTS.
4m.
SITUATION WANTED.
YOUNG LADY, a graduate, deairea a
' ituation as Teacher either in a private
family or a small school, bha teachca the
''ranches usually taught in a College with
Masic an 4 French. Address
LENA FOBDHAM,
Mar. &-8U TbomMTlU, S. C.
if

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