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The Tarborough southerner. [volume] (Tarboro', N.C.) 1875-19??, May 07, 1875, Image 2

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THE
ntboxa' Bouilittntt.
Charles & Williamson,
Publishers and Proprietors.
W.P.WILLIAMSON, - - Editor.
JAS. C. CHARLES, - Associate.
TA15BOHO. IV. C
Friday,
: : : May 7, 1875
AX ELECT IOX TOR OXE HUXDRED
AND TWENTY DELEGATES TO A COX
VENT J OX TO REJ'ISE THE STATE
C0XSTITVT10X WILL BE HELD OX
THE FIRST THURSDAY OF AUGUST,
1875. THE COXVFXTIOy WILL MEET
AT RALEIGH OX THE 6TJ1 OF THE
FOLLOW IXG SLFTEMBER.
The Radical Gams.
There seems to be a general de
lusion with the democratic press
throughout the State that the radi
cal party proposes to elect only such
delegates to the convention as will
go there and adjourn without mak
ing any amendments to the consti
tution. We are not surprised that
such is the case. The- radical pa
pers everywhere are calling upon
the party to elect such men, but it
is merely a feint. "We believe their
object is to secure a majority of the
delegates at any cost, and this doc
trine to adjourn without touching
the constitution is promulgated to
engender a lukewarmness in the
democratic masses. They will spare
no efforts to secure a majority and
if they succeed in getting it, two
objects are patent. They will so
gerrymander the State as to have
absolute control of the Legislature
in times to come. Then they will
put it beyond the power of the peo
ple to undo their work ; we mean
they will so legislate that it will be
a matter of impossibility to rectify
any evil that may be inflicted upon
us by a radical majority. They
will insert a clause that no conven
tion shall be called within a speci
fied time from the date of ratifica
tion by the people of their revised
constitution. Suppose they should
say for instance that no convention
shall be called in twenty years, or
only by an unanimous vote of the
Legislature, and in the event that
they were to patch up the constitu
tion to suit their own ends and inn
ilict the most intolerable burdens
r.pon us, what redress would our
people have ! We would be power
less. Our hands would be tied and
nothing short of a revolution could
unloose them.
We are of the opinion, therefore,
J '.at the issues ;it stake are most
ital. It is no child's play. Had
iwilism when driven to desparation
mast indeed be dreaded. We will
l-e called upon on the first Thurs
day in August to consider a ques
tion that involves the fundamental
; i inciples of guvernmtnt of liberty
::.-elf. What Nerth Carolinian tlien
iio loves his State will prove re
creant to the interests of his fellow
v. 'aite men on that great day?
Surely there will not be one.
MMMi sltWh)
Farmers complain of hard times.
es, times are hard and why so? Not
mainly because farmers go on the
ill cotton' principle, not the effect
"f the usury bill at all, but sotne
i fiing else that $300,000.00 dol
1 irs Edgecombe annually consumes
m whiskey. Think of it, three
hundred thousand dollars every
year for whiskey ! Nothing left to
diow for it a. ileal waste. Of
course times are hard.
The real estate in Edgecombe in
round numbers is valued at $4,000,
000.00. Take eight per cent for
the profit annually accruing from
that amount and you have 320,
000.00. $:!00,00e00 of the sum
are wasted in whiskev. As Ions
as this sort of thing is kept up,
farmers may expect no money and
very hard times.
Edgecombe farmers ti few years
ago wanted a rail road from Tarbos
ro to Williamston : the enterpiiie
went by the board. A year or two
a.'O, Edgecombe farmers wanted to
establish a female seminary at
Tarboro : the enterprise went by
the board. Of late they tried to
sustain a steamboat lino on Tar
River : the enterprise went by
the board. Suppose the $300,000.
00 annually spent for whiskey were
invested in enterprises of this
nature. In a few years there would
be a female seminary in Tarboro, a
steamboat line on Tar River, a
rail road to Williamston, all in a
flourishing c l,titMi and times
Mould never be- h.trd.
What v.irli the Editorial Conven
tion on the 11th at Wilmington, and
the (J rand Lodge of Odd Fellows
on the same day at Elizabeth City,
the Medical Convention at Wilson
on the l'Jth, and the Centennial at
Charlotte on the tiOih, the editors
of the Siat.' i ! I be kept quite busy.
Some of ih. -in !nut, indeed, be
ubiqu: ou-. to attend all.
The North Carolina Centennial.
On the 20th of this month, says
the Washington Chrnicl, republic
can, the anniversary of tha Dec
laration of Independence comes off
at Charlotte, Mecklenburg county,
North Carolina. We learn that ex
tensire preparations are being made
for tbis celebration of an event so
honorable to the character of that
modest and unpretending State.
The citizens of that State from her
mountains to the seaboard will
unite in this auspicious event. The
State of Tennessee, the daughter of
North Carolina, through a com
mittee appointed by the General
Assembly of that State, and the
Tennessee Historical Society have
expressed co-operation in this event;
and recommend that the 20th of
May shall be a centennial holiday.
The Virginia House of Delegates
have recommended its citizens te
participate, and blend Virginia's
'sisterly sympathy and good will
in North Carolina's rejoicing.' The
Historical Society of Philadelphia
has, with other sections of the coun
try, expressed similar sentiments.
It is event of which the State
of North Carolina is justly proud.
It stands as a monument of patrio
tic daring, unsurpassed if not un
equalled in the history of the couns
try. That 'the men of Mecklen-
burg,' without any immediate peril
of invasion, without any intimation
of support, or co-operation from
any power, or concert of action
from any other section, should on
the 20th May, 1775, declare them
selves 'a free and independent peo
ple under the control of no power
than that of God and the general
government of Congress,' is a sub
ject of admiration, and full of moral
sublimity. The tone and character
of these people were formed from
the moral training and teachings
of their early settlers. Many, nay
the most, were emigrants from
Scotland, Ireland and Germany.
These first landed in Pennsylvania,
and then settled in North Carolina.
They, fleeing from persecutions
cf the old world, took with them the
principles of true religion and in
domitable patriotism. These were
signally displayed in the event we
refer to. Ennobling as this event
is, there are other historic events
relative to this modest State which
should be remembered. It was on
the shores of this State that the
firsr, Anglo-Saxon anchor rested.
In July, 1584, the ships sent by
Sir Walter Raleigh rested at Roa
noke, where they found, in the lan
guage of the historian of the ex
pedition, 'a people most gentle,
loving and faithful, void of all guile
and treason.
It was at Alamance, May, 1771,
that her sons, exasperated by op
pressive taxation, met in arms the
loyal troops led by Tryon, and then
and there wa3 the first blood of the
colonists spilled for Liberty. It is
not, then, wonderful that a people
thus trained should have early de
clared independeace. We wish the
centennial at Chrrlotte on the 20th
inst. the most abundant snccess.
Gen. Matt. W. Eansom-
A correspondent of the Wilming
ton Journal says :
The unwavering support uniform
ly given by your paper to this dis
tinguished Senator finds a cordial,
enthusiastic endorsement in the
great, popular Democratic heart cf
North Carolina. His recent great
speech in the Senate places him in
the front rank of American states
men. It is a rare luxury to read
his masterly exhibition of patriotism,
eloquence and statesmanship. The
abilities and services of Gen. Ran
som should make every true North
Carolinian proud of the man and
proud that North Carolina has such
a faithful, untiring, exalted, mag
nanimous Senator ia Congress.
His comparative silence in the
Senator for so long a time
caused impatience in some of hia
friends at home, but it is plain that
they did not comprehend the wis'
dom or skill of the noble Senator.
He was there laying these deep
foundations of influence in the
Senate and of usefulness in the na
tion which he has attained hy his
course, but which he could not have
secured by much talking on the
floor of the Senate. Big speeches
he can make at any time in the
Senate, but Senator Ransom went
there to serve his State and the
South, as well as to cement the
Union, and there were abundant
occasions for the exercise of hia
splendid powers to these noble ends
outside of the too popular custom
of making speeches, made as too
many of them in Congress are, for
Buncombe or for sectional effect
alone. Silence is often wisdom aiid
reticence the highest order of
statesmanship. Politicians do not
comprehend this truth, but states
men do, and it requires a states
man like General Ransom to know
when to speak and when to maintain
silence. He has spoken at the
right time and accomplished by it
a vast amount of good. No Demo-oratic-Conservative
Senator from
the South has gained such an ia
fluence in Congress and at the
North, and is now able to wield
such a power for his State and for
the South as Senator Ransom.
The Cape Fear reigon has no
better or abler friend. No man
ever worked harder for Wilmington
since he has been in Congress. But
though living in the East he has a
heart so large and so warm for
North Carolina that he embraces
alike in this common devotion the
East and the West, the North and
the South.
In due time he will enter upon
the campaign of the Constitutional
Convention, speaking at different
points in the State. He has con sented
to speak in the new county
of Pender, to which he is warmly
devoted A rousing mass meeting
will welcome him to Pender.
Judge Zelly's Southern Trip.
Judge Wm. D. Kelly, of Penn
sylvania, of late a member of Con
gress, returned to Washington, on
Thursday last, from a six week's
tour through the south, and is high
ly pleased with what he saw. He
bears most emphatic testimony
against the southern policy of his
own party in the last Congress.
When asked what he thought of the
political condition of the south, he
used these word : 'The vote I most
regret during my fourteen years
service in Congress, is that which
I cast last winter in favor of the
force bill.' He further said, that
so far as his observation went, dur
ing his extended tour, there was no
more necessity for the use of fed
eral military force than there is in
Pennsylvania and Ohio.
He talked with Confederate soL
dierf, with nothern men, carpet
baggers and travellers, and he was
surprised at the good feeling. He
said he should hereafter take little
stock in southern outrages, espec'al
ly if they are reported as occurring
in the section he visited.
He Gays so far as he saw, and he
went with his eye3 and ears open,
there was no feeling of fear or dis
trust on the part of the colored
people, and he could not for the
life of him see what use there was
for force bills. He was very glad
to have made the trip, for it had
enabled him to undsrstand the con
dition of the south better than he
has ever understood it before.
He Baid ii was not the Ku klux
that was ruining the south, nor was
their unhappy condition to be at
tributed to the hatred by the south
ern people to the people of the nonh
nor was any political question in
volved. He thinks the whole trou
ble in the south arises from finan
cial and industrial causes and he
believes that the Bouth will not im
prove and advance until the Forty
fourth Congress repeals the finan
cial legislation of the 43d, until the
industries of the country are revived
and we are forced to live within our
income, the south will grew more
and of better.
At a recent San Francisco ban
quet Senator Sargeant made the
following singular statement con
cerning Grant. ''I know from his
own lips that he looks with anxiety
for the speedy end of his service.
In a recent conversation he said to
me, '1 had no rest during the war;
I had none under the succeeding
administration only anxiety and
responsibility; I have had no rest
during the past six years; I have
two more years of this labor to en
dure, and shall be glad when the
end comes." Now, we submit if
this be true we have been deceived
most wofully. We thought the
restlessness was entirely confined
o those Republicans who wanted
the President to say he did not de
sire a third term.
We have received a copy of the
proceedings of the North Carolina
Press Association held on the 21th
of May, 1874. We agree with the
Roanoke Newt that there is much
of interest and importance to the
fraternity embodied in them and we
are surprised that they should have
been so long withheld when it was
actually necessary for each editor
to be supplied with them as a guide.
In no other way could they know
whether or not they were acting in
accord with their brethren for it was
impossible to recollect all that was
said and done.
The three candidates most promi
nently spoken of for the next speak
ership of the House of Representa
ties, namely : Kerr, of Indiana,
Randal of Philadelphia and Fern
ando Wood, of New York, are all
Pennsylvanians by birth.
The Washington Republican
don't like Judge "Kelley's opinions
of the south and the situation of
the country. Of course not, nor
will any other extreme radical who
has been flooding the country with
lies.
The Wilmington Star thinks
Beaureguard's letter, printed in
the New York Herald of Friday,
would better have never been writ
ten. It was neither time nor place
for unbosoming himself on such a
subject. In fact there is no time
nor place where such unbosoming
is pleasant or desirable. Nobody
wants to hear a prominent military
man confess that he ever desired
the raising of the black flag. Such
memories of the war throw a pall
over these "piping times of peace"
and philanthropy and union. Gen.
Beaureguard's whole course since
the war shows him to be a gentle
man unusually alive to the public
interests, and we regret that he
has made this rash publication,
which could subserve no purpose
whatever.
We clip the following strange
statement from a Northern paper,
which takes the American Press
dispatches :
Richmond, Va., April 30. The
first game of base ball ever played
south of the Potomac was played
here yesterday between the Red
Stockings of Boston and the Wash
ington Club.
Base ball is as common at the
South as kinky heads and cotton
patches.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
OFFICIAL VOTE
OF THE
Town of Tarboro.
Id pursuance of the provisions of the Act
of the General Assembly of North Carolina,
entitled " An Act for the better government
of the Town of Tarboro," ratified the 18th
day of March, A. D. 187.ri, an election was
held at the Court House in the 1st Ward of
the town of Tarboro', on Monday, the 3rd
day of May, A. D. 1ST"), for the purpose of
electing two Commissioners and one justice
o! the Peace in said ward, when and where
the following ballots were cast:
FOR COMMISSIONERS:
Jesse A. Williamson received - "t votes.
Jacob Keldenheimer " - 3.1 "
A. li. Macuair, " - ti "
Wm. H. Johnston " - 5 "
FOR JUSTICE OF THE PEACE :
William M. Tippen received 32 vote.
Robert C. Drown 2 "
Wherefure the undersigned. Judges of said
eUctiou, dee.'.tre that Jesse A. Williamson
and Jacob Feldmheimcr are duly elected
Commissioners, and that William M. Tippen
is duly elected justice of the Toaee.
W. M. TITTEN, Registrar, )
J. W. COTTEN, Inspector, Judges
O. C. DOGGETT, " S
In pursuance of an Act of the General As
sembly of North Carolina, entitled An Act
for the better government of the Town of
Tarboro," ratified the 18ih day of .March,
187o, an electiou was held ia tiie office ot
Orren Williams, in the Second Ward of the
town of Tarboio, on Monday, the ord day
of May, 1875, for the purpose of electiug
two Commissioners and one Justice of the
Peace in the said Wani, when the following
votes were cast :
For Commissioners :
Frederick Philip
Daniel V. Hum,
John Norfleet,
II. D. Teel
Fox JrsTica op t:ik I
James M. Sprain
li. J. Keucli,
43 votes
...o'J "
lij "
..-.l'J '
ace :
. . 41 votes
...21 '
Wherefore,
tiie undersigned, Judges of
e.ection, ueclare rieueuc i hii.ps and Dan
iel W. Hum daiy eeced Ct:ii iiMotjei5
and James M. spiaiiis duly elected Justue
of tiie lVue.
D. W. HURT!', keijUtrar,!
J. S. D.ANCV, Inspector. J udges
1). J. KEi.CH, " )
In pursuance of au Act of the General As
sembly ot North Carolina, entitled " An Act
f.r the better government of the Town of
Tarboro," raiilied iho 8Ui day of March A.
1). 1873, an election was held in the Market.
Hall in ih Thiid W'.iid ot the town of Tar
boro. on Monday, Hie :;,, day of May A. D.
17". tor tiie puit...,e of electing two C mii
iui) ..- .u d o h J us: ice of the Peace in
said ani, .,eu ui- toilowiug votes were
cast :
For CoMnis.-nostus :
Alexander McCabe, 81 votes
Joseph Cobb, "
Joseph li. liaker, -jo "
Marcellus L. Ilussey 21 "
Tor Jcstick of the Pea.ce :
Win. S. Battle i rotes
Warren J. Jones, 43 "
Moses Chase, 43 u
Whereas, the undersigned, Judges of e'ec
tion, dsclare Alexander McCabe and Joseph
Cobb duiy elected Commissioners ; and they
further declare that whereas no person re
ceived a majority of the votes for Justice of
the Ptace in the Urd Ward, there is no elec
tion. D. ANDERSON, Registrar,)
W. J. JONES. Inspector, ' Judes
J. W. REDMOND, )
May 7, lh7o. ot
SHERIFF'S SALE
For Taxes ! 2
I will sell before the Court House door in
Tarboro, on the 1 t Saturday in June
which is the 3rd, the following tracts of Jand
lyini; in Townshiu No. 6, viz :
The tract of land of Wm. Wormack, con
taining liO acres.
Another tract, the B. F. Brantly laud, con
laini'ig 50 acres.
The tract of land of W. H. Knight's estate
containing 162 acres. '
Terms Oath.
B. BRYAN, late Sheriff,
,, by 31. S. Petwav, Deputy.
May 3rd, 1S70. 5
LARGE
SALE
CKS
ON TUESDAY, THE FIRST DAY OF
June, will be sold at
PUBLIC AUCTION,
at the Court House doer in Tarboro the
TWO RILXS OF BRICKS,
made for the Edgecombe Female Seminary
Terms six months credit, approved notes
GROKGE HOWARD 5
WM. M. PIPPEX 'CCom.
M. WEDDELL, S
Tarboro, May 7, 1S73. 4t
Floor! Flour!
CHOICE FAMILY FLOUR, for saie hy
. ., R. B. ALSOP.
Apnl SO ,f
Attention Democrats !
At a mcetins: of the Democratic Eexeentive
Committee of Edgeeo"nibe county, on Tues
day, the 20th of April, it was ordered that a
County Convention be called on TUESDAY
the 15th day of June proximo, to consider
the propriety of pimine: candidates in the
field for the State Convention.
Each Township is requested to hold a pri
mary meeting ou or before June 1st, to select
delegates to the Coanty Convention.
JOHN s. DANCY. Clim'n.
w. P. Williamson, Suc'y.
NEW ADVERSEMENTST.
Attention, Infantry Brigade
:o:
Prettiest and Cheapest JLine of Mi ah if
Carriages in the Uarfcet at
the Hardware Store
ATTENTION, FARMERS I
The be&t and cheapest handled steel Planter's IIoc9 ever offered in this
market, at the Hardware Store.
Grain Fans, Trace Chains, Repairing Links, Lap Links, Hames, Back
Bands, Cotton Plows, Plow Bolts, in fact a full line of Plan
ter's Hardware always on hand and at the Lowest
Cash Prices, at the iardware Store.
ATTENTION, BUILDERS !
A full line of Carpenter's and Mechanic's Tools at the Lowest Prices.
Builder's Hardware of every description.
A.ttoaition, "Wlieelrijrlitssi !
A full stock of Carriage, Buggy, Cart and Wagon Material, always on
hand at Lowest Prices.
mention. Housekeepers :
Call and examine Stamped Cup Tins, French ColFee Pots, Nicest Sauce
Pans, Baking Pans, Toilet Ware (very nice and cheap),
the best and cheapest Cook Stoves" ever offered
in this market. Complete satisfaction
guaranteed for every stove sold.
Best Cuoumtoor Xii2aa.s.
J5 Buy yeur goods from the Hardware Store and save money.
W. G. LEWIS.
May 7th, lS7o.
Steam Engines, Boilers and Machinery,
May
BOOKWALTER portable engine.
The
April 9th, IS 7.".
I ' ' 'C w:'A l"
a Mil r
SPRING SUMMER GOODS
AT
E. C. BROWN & CO S.
(:o:)
Ml the latest Novelties and the best
Qualities at the very lowest prices
I,. O. BROWN -Sc CO.,
Aprai6tf- MAIN STREET.
SAIV MILLS, GRIST MILLS, COT
TON GINS, &0.
Agent for Edgecombe, Halifax, Pitt,
Martin and Beaufort Counties.
CiT These are elegant Engines and cheapest foi
their power ever offered in this' market.
Very Machine for Gin.
ning Cotton.
SivA e .your Iulc. Iloli.
A f.ii.r a; il a ba'f Horse Power Eni: e guaranteed
to ri. ii a seventy saw e;., and nu seven
bi!es cotton per day.
f-RICE 4K THE REACH OF ALL.
li fteen years sdd can :vn it with safety
than half cord uf Hood per day.
"s-ICE, 3 0 30.0 0,
P Y I51.E NEXT FALL (!: "WiNTE!!.
W. G. LEWIS, Agent,
' TARBORO", X. C.
ltn
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
LOST!
Certificate of 1 Simie No. 1784 iu W. & W.
It. K. issued Nov. 19. 1863. Notice is
hereby given that application will be made
to the Board of Director to issue a new cer
tificate. J. A. DAVIS.
April SH. t
ATTENTION, FARUBR8
A LL persons havinir Cotion Oins OUT OF
1m. KKl'AIK, should hive tin .-m put in prop
er order during the ismnmcr months. Uy
doing so they will jret a better job of work
done, also on more reasonable terms. No
pay is required until the crop is made and
giued. (jive me your orders at once.
GEO. T. WILLIAMS,
April SO.-Iuj. Tarboro', N. C.
PRIVATE
Boarding House-
MRS. V. E. LIl'SCOMii respectfully an
nonnecs that she has opened a Private
lioarding House in 'J'artioro, 011 the eorner
ot Bank and I'ilt Streets.
Coed Frtio, IMcriNant Koonis, Comfor
tabic Ited. lioard .Moderate.
Feb. If), 1ST.-,. ly
SN llETURSISfi THANK3 TO MY
H friends aod the public for the very liberal
patronage extended to me during the past
year, 1 sigain solicit a continuance of the
same, and invite the attention of ill to my
choice and tel( ct stock of
BOOKS, STATIONERY,
FANCY GOO OS,
CIGARS & TOBACCO.
9W Picture Frames furnished at tdiorl
notice. Call and examine.
April .-lm. T. E. LEWIS.
FITS CURED FREE!
Any person suffering from the above dis
ease is requested to address Dr. Piiee, and a
trial bottie of medicine will be forwarded by
Express.
FREE!
The only cost being the Express charges
which owing 10 my large business, are small.
Dr. Price has made the treatment of
FITS OF EPILEPSY
a study for years, and he will warrant a care
by the use of his remedy.
Do not fail to send to' him for a trial bottle;
it costs nothing, and he
WILL CURE I OC,
no matter of how long standing your case
may lie, t bow tinny other remedies may
have 1'dit d.
Ciivuhiis ni.d testimonials s'-nt with
FREE TRIAL BOTTLE.
P.e particular to riye your Express, as well
as your ror-i umee direct lull, a.nl
Address,
Apiil 2-i ly.
I)li. CHA.-i T. PRICE.
William t., New York.
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mi mm m.
iew Goods !
icw Goods !
M. Weddell &Co.
Have now in f-tore a full asEortment of
SPRSrVG m SUMMER
G-OODS,
to which they invite Ihe attcntiou of their
cu-'.oiuers and the public.
Til.' Goods were bought
FOR C28H,
and will be sold at a
Small Advance,
C" Cai! and examine before buying.
M. WEDDELL & CO.
Tarboro, April H'i. if
Good Work,
Good Stock
AND
Beautiful Fits.
CH. DOUGHTY IIA3 JUST RETUKN-
ed with the largest lot of Freneti and
American Calf Skins ever brought to Tarboro.
The latest and prettiest tiling ont for Sum
mer U the CLOTH BOOTS, MOKOCJO
LEGS TIPPtD WITH PEBBLE GOAT, for
only eifrht dollars, at C. H. Douhty's
The LUCCA TIE surpasses anything In
the way of Shoes yet made for style aud com
fort, at C. 11. Dousjhfy's.
If you want a pair of MOROCCO LEG
BOOTS in the latest style with full bot. Tips
and Enclish Bead Soles, fro to Douh;ts.
Go to DOUGUTY'S and look at He NEW
STYLES whether you wish to pui cause or
not.
Tarboro', April 6, 1S75. tf
M I SCEL L A N E O U S .
Dr. E. D. Barnes
DEJT TIST
THANKFUL for the liberal
. ee-.ved in the past, desires to ; ;
With inei-on.,,.,1 f. ..in,: , k '. !'r
,.1C 1.umic mat he
-."" iu perforin all
tions liartammL' 10 11... .'
ired
pera-
in the best manner " lHiUi,try
BST Olliee over H. Morris & Bro
jui noro, pni !), 1 Vjo.
1 s (.trtnv
"in
Br. A. H. Macuair, Ag't.
D?US & PBESCSIPTIOIT STOP.S,
MAIN ST., TARBORO', N. C.
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED
DKl'UGIST IX EASTFJU
nmil CAROLS 4.
70UI.D U Kol'ECT F U I.LY INVITE
r the e.tter.t ion of Lh friends ....i
public generally to his spring opem.,,, j
iMvsh Drugs, rhetr.i jals, Patent MiitiH,.c
Fancy Ooods, Tui'C.t Articles. "u
CP" A'ent !r Dr. Avei's Valu:,l,,. jr,.(1;
fines, 1;. P. Hall ('c CoV Preparalions "and"
Virginia .Mineral Waters.
Look out for the Red Mortar.
ApriUl, 1875. tf '
CAN NOW GO TO
T. H. Gatlin's
With the assurance of finding most
desirable stjles of
PRIINTTS.
All grades of
Dress Goods,
Hats, Hosiery,
Lisle Thread and
Kid Gloves,
Beautiful Em
broideries, Variety in
Ruchings,
&c, &c.
Having ust received my
SPRING STOCK,
The public nre respectfully invited
to call and examine it.
A full stock of very desirable
Goods, including everything usual'
ly found in .1
First-Class Store.
April 9th, 1875. tf.
iimn mi
W r.
1 1
JjMii i iiij
OPEN THE WAY!
AXT LET TIIE RUSH COXTIXUE OX
ITS WAY TO
itESLDWSKrS
who has Iv.st received a large and fine as
sortment of
! DRY GOODS.
consisting in part of
DRESS GOODS, or all kinds,
Prints, Pe reals,
Piques, Victoria
and Bishop Lawns,
Bleached and
Unbleached Shirtings,
Fancy Goods in variety,
Clothing, Boots, Shoes,
Hats, taps,
Trunk, Valises,
AND
MILLINERY GOODS.
COME OXE. COME ALL, AXD BE COX-
FXCED TH A T I SEIL
Cheaper than the Cheapest.
S. Kresldwski.
Tarboro, April , 1875. 3m
" Worihinxton's Cholera and
Diarrhoea Medicine."
Ofiice of Purveyor General for State of N. C,
Raleigh, N. C, June 23, 18(5:2.
Dr. Worthinpton's Cholera nnd Diarrhoea
Medicine has luoi; enjoyed a. bi?h reputation
iu this Suite, both in aud out of the array.
Respectfully, E. WARREN.
Southampton Co., Va., Dec. 15, 1W;9.
This is to ceitit'y that I h.ive kept aud used
in my family for upwards of twelve years Dr.
R. H. Worthiutrtou's Cholera Medicine aud
can safely say have never known it to fail in
anv iustance for the purpose it is recommen
ded. BEN. E. fOI'E.
'Everybody's Vegetable Cathartic Pills.'
Hoydtow, Va., Dec. 1st, 387a.
Gentlemen I have been a prcat sufferer
for several years with Liver Complaint and
general debility, and at times troubled with
immense pain in the regions of my liver. I
have had t he attendance of the best medical
meti to be had here, but without any perma
nent relief. I was at la-t advised to'try "Eve
ry body's " Tills, and I feel no hesitation in
saying that one bottle did rue more jrood than
all the other Medicine I bad taken before. I
now lecl entiriy relieved, the pain Uaviug loft
iu". I have a good appetite, and what I eat
agrees with me. 1 have no hesitation in say
iu t'-iat I owe my pood htath, and perhaps
my life, to the use or " Everybody's " Tills.
Very respectfully, . A. DAYES.
March lsJ, 1875. Sm
Washington, N- C
Topographical Surveyor.
RETURNS thauks to the citizens of this
and adjoining counties, for patronage
received, and respectfully solicits a contin
uance of the fame. Having provided him
self with a suitable instrument, he is prepar
ed for
Topographical Surveying, Leveling, &c.
Uefekexcks : Wm. S. Battle, W. G. Lewis,
Enas Carr, J. A. Williamson, Edgecombe,
Wm. King, W. R. Williams, Pitt country.
Jan. 8. 1875 ly.
Whitcloek's Vcgctaior,
Superior to any Fertilizer
made in the
United. States,
For COTTON, CORN, TOBACCO.
87" For sale bv J. M. Lauchlin fe Son.
Charlotte, N. C; Weil & Bros., Goidsboro',
N' f: : II if ni).itnn(!n K f! Vl.irrv A.
C., Wiiiaingtou, N C ; Williamson, Up
chuich & Thomas, Ra'eigh, N C ; W L Mc
Ghe?. Franklir.ton, N C ; TimberlaSse Jk Fares,
Tacifie, N C ; Branch & Co., WTlsoa, NU; M
A Angier, Doroam, N C. iur-2tt.

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