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The Tarborough southerner. [volume] (Tarboro', N.C.) 1875-19??, May 07, 1875, Image 4

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AGRICULTURE.
tST This Departtnent is devoted eapecialy to
the interests of Agriculture. Contributions from
Farmers art respeetfuUy solicited.
From Edgecombe.
Editor State A gricxilhtral Journal :
Dear Sir I notice in a recent
issne of your invaluable journal, an
exhortation to young men, advising
them to "stay on the farm." Such
advise could not have possibly been
more appropiate at any time than
at present, for with the present ex
tensive diffusion of education and
refinement generally, there seems
to have been created a universal
dislike for agriculture aud, espec
ialy so with the youth, who are ap
parently imbued with the idea that
in the pursuit of agriculture there
is not enough intellect and acute
judgment required to bring into ac
tion and to utilize the great acumen
which many beleive they possess.
If any labor under this ridiculous
opinion you will concur with me in
the assertion that they are, in the
highest sense of the word, mistaken.
As every one who has ever given
the matter any thought must be
convinced that the successful pur
suit of sericulture requires the same
amount of judgment that many of
less importance reauire; ana tnai
all the scientific and intellectual at
tainments that we may have acquis
red, find in the farmer's sphere an
ample scope in which to enlarge
and improve themselves, as wen as
an opportunity of being of honora--
ble avail. The young man, there
fore, who tears himself heedlesly
from the dear old farm upon which
he has been reared, and launches
out on life's broad ocean in quest
of wealth, honor and fame, but who
avoids agriculture's furrowed fields
as if it were some tearful, rocky
strand, whereon his bark may be
forever grounded, commits an un
pardonable blunder. If the com'
plaint be made that farming is too
much attention, I ask you to show
me any vocation that you can bo
successful with, unless attention is
given. For it seems to be an in
exorable fiat cf fate that without
diligence there cannot be success
And the negligence to recognise that
important truth accounts very sat
isfactory to our minds tor the nu
merous failures which are almost
daily announced. Let the young
men turn their unwavering atten
tion to the farm, and prosperity
will not be long in returning to our
country.
Edgecombe.
Tarboro, April 21.
The Cotton Supply.
The tot&l receipts of cot;on at the
ports from the 1st of September, 1874,
to the X4th of April, 1875, were 3,
84,706 bales, and for the correspond
ing period of last year, 3,545,715
bales. This shows a decrease in re
ceipts thus far iu 1875 of 260,909
bales. The total shipments to foreign
pjrts from the 1st of September, 1874,
to the present date, amount to but
2,225,239 bales, against 2,424,216
bales for the same period of last year,
showing a decrease iu exports of
193,977 bales. At first sight it seems
surprising that a shipment of cotton
fihjrt bv nearly 200,0U0 bales, togeth.
r with the prospect of Bhort receipts
from this date until the new cotton
year in September, as compared with
the same period of last year, should
exercise so little influence on the price
of cotton at home aud abroad.- for
cotton is to-dy fVlly i cent a pound
cheaper ia Liverpool than list year,
ami 2 J- cents a pound cheaper than ia
1874. The explanation, however, is
readily found in the dullness of the
market for cotton goods and ia the
diminished consumption of cotton by
foreign as well as domestic mills.
The shipments from the United States
to Europe from the 1st of September,
1873, to the 26 of April, 1874, amoun
ted to 2,424,216 bales. The stock of
America cotton in Europe and afloat
was at that titaa 1,247,000 bales,
showing that Europe used from the
1st of Ssptember to the 26th of April,
3,177,216 bales of American cotton.
Now let us turn to the present cotton
year. We sent to Europe from the
1st of September. 1864, to the 26th
of April, 1875. 2,225,239 bales of cot
Ion. On the 26th of April the stock
of American cotton in Europe and
afloat was 1,142,000 bales, showing
that Europe consumed 93,977 bales
less ot American cotton during tbil
period of nearly eight months than
during the same period of the previ
ous year. In other words, the unusu
al stagnation of trade in cotton fa-
brics made our short shipment short
by nearly 200,000 bales less felt
than it would have been if the ordina
ry amount of business had been done.
But dull as the cotton trade of Europe
has been, with consumption short by
nearly 100,00ft bales in eight months,
it is nevertheless true that the visible
-supply of American cotton in stock in
Europe and afloat is diminished by
nme 40,000 bales, as much compared
with the same period of last year.
And it is but reasonable to assume
that should there be merely an indU
cation of a revive 1 of trade in cotton
fabrics in Europe, whidh will natural'
ly run cheifly on the American staple,
the short supply from here would at
nca be felt. The present crop was
over estimated by 400,00 bales or
more, for it was at one time supposed
that the supply would reach 4,333,000
bales, whereas the most sanui enow
reduce thse figures to 3,750,000 or to
3,800,000 bales. It follows, thwrelore,
that the hj-o for a plentiful supply
of cotton during the list four months
of the pre:eut calendar year depend
entirely on lie new crop, half of which
is not ye iu the ground, The vicis-i-tud3
of th new (V'p w 'I threiort
bo w.ttvd wi'h irc.it ioiiwat. If u
rfvival o( tra l. j-houi-i mn in und
in Kuropo, a t ool un avefaga but a
pi. ii'ilu! cn.p fc.r V e yar 1875 '76
i ; tt; y d rato Hipplv nW
David Dickson cn Planting Cotton.
The f olio win cr ia cobitd from a
'Tretise on Agriculture,' by tha late
David Dickson of Georgia :
1. Lay off cotton rown tour ieet
anart. with shovel plow, doable,
and put in the fertilizers eight
inches deep.
2. Rid?e with a lone scooter, fire
inches wide. Make the beds with
turn plow, subsoil the turn plow
furrows; split out the middies wnn
shovel. Plant with cotton seed
sower, and cover with a board or
harrow.
First plowing run 22 inch sweep
with right wing turned down, hoe
out two or three stalks to the
hill every nine inches ten days after
plowing. Second plowing use
same sweep, the right wing turned
up a little more. Third plowing
iu same way run a third furrow in
the middle to level.
3. Cotton standing thick iu the
drill will be much more forward in
maturing.
4. Cotton only requires distances
one way.
6. Have a deep water furrow in
the Spring; work flat in hot weaths
er.
7. On level land run the rows
North and South.
8. A cotton plant to stand two
weeks drought, must have four in
ches soil and six inches subsoil;
three weeks six inches soil and
same subsoil; four weeks eight
inches soil and the same of subsoil
ing.
9. I( you prepare your land and
carry out this plan well and man
ure liberally, you may expect from
four hundred to one thousand
pounds of lint cotton per acre.
10. Fertilizers bring a crop of
bolls on the cotton early.
11. To improve the cotton plant
select seed every year after the hret
digging up to the middle of Octoe
ber, taking the best stalks and the
best bolls on the stalk.
12. On all farms there are some
acres that produce cotton better
than others; seed should alway be
selected from those spots.
13. Manure everywhere you plow
aad plant : your labor will be more
certainly rewarded. It pays to
use manure and it pays best on land
that pays best without it.
14. From the 10th to the 20th
of April is the best time to plant
cotton.
15. Apply ono half of all day
labor and knd to the making of
full supplies of all kinds that are
needed on the farm and enough to
spare for those engaged in other
pursuits and you will have more
money than if the whole was em
ployed in making cotton.
16. Leave no grass to bunch and
cause a future bad stand.
17. Plow cotten every three
weeks and let the hoes come ten
days behind, cleaning it perfectly
18. Continue plowing cotton till
the 15th of August. Once or twice
during the seaaon eiuore out
the middle with a furrow to keep
the land level.
19. The plowing of cotton requir
es one and a fourth days per acre.
20. Cotton plants commence
when small to take on and mature
bolls and continue until they ex
haust the soluable matter or reach
the full capacity of the land. Two
stalks will do that much sooner
than one and will so a voyd the late
drought caterpiller, etc.
21. Cotton will grow number of a
year in succession with plenty of
manure.
22. Make just tfce amount of cot
ton wanted, at paying prices. Keep
out of debt; be the creditors-; make
your suplies at home; then aud ocly
taen will you have power.
23. Rotation of crops deep and
peeper plowing every year, incor
portion of vegetable mould, return
ing the proceeds of the cotton plant
except the lint to the soil, making
as much manure as possible com
priie my system of improving lands.
24. (Joe object in cultivation is
to keep the surfc&e broken so as to
let in light heat, aud a&. Never
stop the plows for dry weather,
25. My policy has been to make
the most money with the least labor
and capital, even if it appeared to
be wasteful.
26. The cotton planter should
m&ka hjs whole supplies everything
necessary to rn the farm.
The premium cotfoa.crop exhibit
ed at the State Fair in Jjeorgia, in
1869 of eighteen bales on sis awes,
was cultivated according to Mr:
Dickson's plan. With a capital of
$25,000 to commence with, he made
in fifteen years 500,000 by farm
ing. He has been equally success
ful sinee the war. Pluck and brains
will tell in fansitg as in any other
vocation.
How Cotton Mills Pay.
Tbe annual meeting of the Gran'
iteville Cotton Manufacturing Com
pany was held last week. The
report of President Hickman shows
that the nrcfits of tha ear went
$114,588, a trifle over nineteen per
cent, ot the capital stock. This
result is very satisfactory and en
couraring, for the year was con
fessedly a hard, one for cotton mills
and many in the Eortb either ran
on short time or stopped altogether.
The Graniteville mills were run on
full time and at full pay during the
whole year. Their productions
wer- 10,536,500 yards of fabrics,
besides a quantity ot knitting yarn;
8,171 bales of cotton were consum
ed, which cost 14 33100 cents a
pound. The old Board were un.
auimously elected, and the pros
perous fwstory enters upon another
year with bright prospects.
Capt. Sanjuel X. Williams wi de
liver the address at tht memorial on
th 10th of May at Wilson.
The question of making t'.ie 20th
of May a holiday throughout the
bute is beiajj gouxail distiuMd.
MISCELLANEOUS.
REMOVED !
MRS. J. FELDEMEIMER
Haviog removed two doors from her late
stand to the handsome brick building recent
ly rrrrtnA hr Mr. B. J. Keech. now lias in
creased facilities for cond acting the
Millinery Business in
all us Brancnes.
A FULL LINE OP
DEY GOODS, BOOTS & SHOES, CLOTH-
ING, TRUNKS and VALISES,
alao in stock which will be sold at low fig
ures. Thanking her numerous friends fur tbeir
past patronage, she now extends a cordial
welcome to them all. particularly the ladies.
aid will endeavor to ser e them as faithfully
ia the future as heretofore.
She i ready and fnlir prepared to meet
the wants of all and Invites the public to in
ducements which are constantly offered.
Mrs. J. Feldendeimer,
Main St, Tarboro', N. C
Feb. 6, 1875. ly
THOS. A. HARDY & SONS, Agents,
NORFOLK, VA.
Mar. 5, 1875.-2m.
THE ROCKY MOUNT
COTTON MILLS.
tarE ARE NOW MANUFACTURING,
f V of the best quality, for the Lome
trade,
COTTON YARNS,
COTTON PLOW LINES, all sizes
HEAVY 4-4 SHEETING.
Orders from prompt customers filled without
delay.
TERMS : Net cash, within thirty days.
Address,
BATTLE SON,
Dec. 4,- Rocky Mount, N. C.
FOtTTZ'S
HORSE AND CATTLE POWDERS
a
I
To the Citizens of Edge
combe and adjacent
Country.
THE undersigned respectfully announces
that be has again opened business of a
General Blacksmith,
on Church Street, near Mr. Doztcr's Store.
Special attention paid to
GUN AND CITY WORK.
i?a$jcl$r care paid to
Also the manufacturing and repairing a
kinds of agricultural and general BLACK
SMITH WORK.
An experience of over TWENTY YEaRS
in Edgecombe is sufficient testimony to iny
capability. I respeetfuUy return thanks for
the various manifestations of kindness here
tofore received and hope to continue to de
serve them.
Nov. 8-tf. I. B. PAL AMOUNTS IN.
NEW STORE !
NEW nOQJ)S !
Prices to Suit the Times
I, C. J. AUSIN, formerly of R. H. Austin
Co., and late with T. H. Gatlm, bate the
pleases gf informing my friends and the
public in gefterai'Sh r ?;v opened a
Geifl Grocery Store
ir-. ...
uu main oireei, Detween the stores of Messrs
H. Morriss & Bros.. a.nd T. If r.ati;.,
I will keep on hand a choice selection of
guuus at inn lowest market rates, viz :
NEW MESS PORK,
NEW RUMP PORK,
C. YELLOW SUGAR,
C. WHITE SUGAR,
A. WHITE SUGAR,
PL-UR A 'SWff&TBD SUGAR,
S. C. HAMS,
BACON SHOULDERS & S1DSS,
D. S. SHOULDERS & SIDES.
C. R. SIDES,
SPICED BEEF,
BEEF TONGUES,
BOLONA & PORK SAUSAGES,
CAKES, CRACKERS.
BUTTER, CHEESE,
PLOW" LINES,
MILL FEED,
m ' GATS, BRICK.
FERTILIZING LIME. VC
which will be sold very low for CASH.
Call and examine.
C. J. AUSTIN.
Feb. 5, 1875. iy
TWT TIC ir twi.
Double Turbine Water Wheel,
Manulactnred by
POOLE & HUNT.
Baltimore, lid.
7,000 HOW IK V8EI
Simple, Strong, Durable,
alwayg reliable and satis,
lactury.
jnanuraetnrers, also, of
fc 4C umony
'ing Ischial
"-J""'. J .w ius, jfiour.
j ri.MuuMu. peua ior circulars.
T. IV. BOGART
Washlneton 3NT. O.
BBALXR in
Pure Medicines, Books, Stationery, Fancy
toods, Picture Frames, Tassels and Cords
Wholesale and Retail agen for Peters Musi
cal Monthly, Folio and Demorests Magazines
Chrnmos 17x36 as premium. Keeps all the
latest music at Publishers prices. Any Book
lurulshed to order.
Respectially,
Dec D.N. BOGART.
AM H fi
Til ft
jff"' J tasit iTi
Eft S m
3. ft S3
q ra
L m
I
B. j. 1 "
(fl S i
o
od B h
- Pi
"4
n
m S P Ui
aA
III . ' wd
H
LJ jES
0 $
1 1 o- H -
t
AJ p
W- ob SJ'as
Eft
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
FurniturearpetingjWindow Shades
AND GENERAL HOUSE FURNISHING.
THE OLD AND RKIJABLE HOUSE OF
Cox-. 3VIa1zx and. Grantoy Streets,
NORFOLK, A.,
CiTILL stand at tbe head of the trade and call the attention of their old customers and the
3 tbe general public to the very large assortiueut of HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AND
CARPETING contained in their extensive establishment. We guarantee New York prices
on all our poods and our well selected stock is the largest of any house South of Philadel
phia. We call special attention to our
PIANO AND MUSIC DEPARTMENT.
We are A"iits and keen constantly on hand a full stock of CHICKEBING & SONS CEL
EBRATED PIANOS. Also Agents for GEO. WOOD'S CABINET ORGANS, all of which
we sell nt manufacturers prices.
fiW Catalogues and Price Lists furnished ou application. mrI9-t )
Wiesenfeld,
Cotton
AND
General
Make liberal (Jahli advances on consignments of Cotton and other
Produce.
Also with approved security, will adyance oa accommodating terras,
SUPPLIES to FARMERS for carrying on this year's crops,
Those desiring to avail themselves of the above oflfer, will apply to
our Agent, J. B. Coffield, Tarboro', N. C.
J. B. COFFIELD,
Gen. Commission Merchant
AND WHOLESALE DEALER IN
Whiskies, Wines, Tobacco, Segars,
Sash, Blinds, Doors, JBuilctag
and Shell Lime, Gu
anos, &c., de.
Tarboro', N. C.
Feb. 19, 1875. ly
HE AGRICULTURAL WORKS,
Manufacturers of Wagons, Carts, Plows, Gin
and Mill Gearing, and Agricultural Im
plements generally.
We keep on hand a very large stock of Seasoned Wagon and Cart
Materials, and are prepared to furnish on short notice any vehicle in
this line iri a Ytzht one horse wagon to the heaviest carts and wagons
for Saw Mills. Vk liae
EIGHT FOOT GIN GEARING,
In the best style ; have never heurd a complaint of one of our Horse
Powers. We furnish a full set of Bolts with these powers. Price $55.00
complete. Reside several varieties of Turning Plows we make a specN
alty o' tf.c
- 15 1..
"EDGECOMBE COTTON PLQW,"
which we believe has met with more general favor than any Cotton plow
ever made. These plows are now made after two patterns, one intended
especially for use in hard and stiff land.
x,ii:i:VX. work
done on Engines, Saw Mills, Gins, Horse Powers, and all kinds of im
plements. Tlie undersigned is manufacturers' agent for Tanner's Engines and
Saw Mills', Left'ell's ;rbir.e Vrter Wheels, Grist Mills, Pulleys, Shaft
ing and Gearing. " : ,
These Goods are all Warranted.
XI. V. WALKER,
Nor. c-tf SUPERINTENDENT.
oT. . ,
BLATCHLEYS
IniDiorod CDCUM-
3 12i BE It WOOD TMTMP
maikei, uy )0)mar
verdict, the best un)p for tlie least
money. Attention is invited to
PilntfhIevTs Tnmmvpd Irap.kpr Mia
$ Drnti ( hpt'lf Valve wlni'h ran Im
'i?.BA ..,;!. .1. .ni.Tr. .. III. ...if A,.r ,.. 4lt.
vt' " 1 1 11 11 .iii'uii 11 i.iL nt vi 1 1" tur:
joints, and t he copper chamber
which never cracks, scales or rusts and will
last a life time. For sale by Dealsrs aad the
tfado generally. In order to be sure that
yon gt'ntchle?'s Pa nip, be careful and
see that it bas liy-triidp-arj: rs-s.l;ove. If
you do not know where to buy, tlcscriptia
circulars, together with the uams and ad
dress of the agent nearest you, will be
promptly furnished by addressing with
stamp.
CHAS. G. BLATCHLEY, Manufacturer,
506 Commerce St., Philadelphia, Pa
Feb. 12, 1875. 9m
Select Boarding
AND
Day School,
BCUIstooro,' IVT- O-
rpHE fcirty-8acOTid Session of the MISSES
I NASH AND MISS KOLLOCK'S School
will open Friday, 5th February, ISY5,;anU
continue twenty weeks.
Circulars forwarded on application.
Dec. 25. tf
W..W. THOMAS, "
Practical Carpenter &
Builder,
TAIUJOHO', IV. c.
WOULD be pleased to serve the citizens
of Edgecombe and adjacent counties.
fi Terms liberal as tbe times will afford.
For further information address me at Tar
boro, N. C. febl9-tf
mm
Stern & Co.,
Factors
Commission Merchants,
U;iltii:iois Ma.
A LECTURE
TO YOTJlSTGr 3VX333J-.
Ju.t Jrullisi 'ed.fri a sealed Envelope. Price 6 cents.
A leciare n th "atnre.Treat
raent, and Jiadical Cure of'Semi
nal Weakness, or Spermator
rhoea, induced by Self-Abuse, Involuntary
Emissions, Impotency, Nervons Debility,
and Impediments to Marriage generally ;
Consumption, Epilepsy, and Fits; Mental
and Physical Incapacity, Sic. By Robert
J. Cplverwell, M. D., author of the "Green
Book,'1 &c.
The world-renowned author, in this ad
mirable Lecture, clearly proves from his own
experience that the awful consequences of
Self-Abuse may be eectualiy removed with
out medicine, and without 'dangerous tmrgi
cal operations, bongies, instruments, rings,
or cordials ; pointing out a niodo of cure at
once certain and effectual, by which every
suffeier, no matter what his condition may
be, may cure himself cheaply, privately and
radically.
i-f This Lecture will prove a boon to
thousands and thousands.
Sent under seal, in a plain envelope, to
any address, on receipt of six cents or two
dostase stamps.
Address the Publishers,
CHAS. J. C. CLINE & CO.,
127 Bowery, New York ; P. O. 3ox, 4586-
Oakdale Institute,
Edgecombe Co., N. C.
A Select Home School, at tbe residence of
the late Dr. J. P. Battle. Limited aumber
of boarders. Spring torn commences Feb.
10th, 1875. For circulars, containing full
particulars, apply to J. J. Battle, Esq.,
Kecky Mount ; Geo. L. Wimberly, Esq., Tar
boro, or to the Principal,
MRS. C. W. SMITH,
Fob, 12,-tf. Batttoboro', N. C,
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
J. A. WILLIAMSON,
General Grocer and Produce Dealer
Til i-Io
500
BUSHELS SEED OATS.
100 Balea Hay.
80 Buahels Black Peas.
50 Bbls Corn.
100 Flag Chairs.
20 Boxes Plug Tobacco all
grades.
150 Lbs Smoking Tobacco all
grades.
CO Bushels Sweet Potatoes.
10 Bbla Early Eose "
10 " Peach Blow "
Fresh Fruits and Confectioneries in Quantities.
TIX, WILLOW 4XD W00DEX WARES, i SPECIALTY.
J5s3" For sale low at wholesale and retail.
J. .1. W JLJLl.I.liSO.V,
Feb- gy- Main Street.
ENRICH YOUR LANDS
and make good crops by using
Whann's Bahama Guano,
which has been successfully use-4 by tbo farmers io all sections op eyprj
variety of crops. As a
IF US TILI
it is especially adapted to the wants
ty of making their lands produce the
agent for
which has been thoroughly tested through the entire Soyth, apd syefeis?
ful yields have been the result where they were used. These famous
Guano? are again at my command and I have yet to hear of a single
complaint from those who have used them.
1 Liberal Offer to Farmers t
For42 lbs. Good Lint Cotton, I will give one ton of eithsr of tl-esi
' ' Iff ' fi'i
excellent Fertilisers, purchaser paying freights upon delivery of Quanw,
J. B. COFFIELD,
Cen. Com. Merchant & Wholesale Liquor Dealer,
Jan. 29, 4 m.
pounds
Price aWp'1 jawfe Price
$50 00 WWf' f 58 00
g?r ton $mm$mg&m per
of k:lMmfetr:'-i2.oooihs
fpHE HIGH STANDARD OF QUALITY HAS BE FN FULLY MAirAINED, AND IT
is considered by those who hare given it a fair trial tb
mi AND CHEAPEST
FERTILIZER kl iftuFjIJREp.
LIBERAL AND ADVANTAGEOUS TERMS
FOR LARGE LOTS, GIVEN ON APPLICATION.
AT ALL THE PRINCIPAL DEPOTS.
DeROSSET & CO.,
GENEE AL AGENTS
F0H NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA,
WILMINGTON.
O. C. PARRAR & CO., Agents. Tarboro, N. C.
B. Q. WILEY, Agent, Plymouth, N. C
Jan. 22, 1875. 01
NAVASSA GUANO
ACID PHOSPHATE,
FOR COMPOSflNfl WITH
COTTON SEED & VEGETABLE' MATTER.
MANUFACTURED AT "
Wilmington
Terms Liberal.
Jno. L. Bridgers & Son,
Tarboro', N. C, MarcU 5, 1S75. Sm
!'. 3V. c.
Si ... -wv
100
BBLS FLOUR, ALLGRADK.S.
300 Head Lucas Cabbages.
200 Lbs Common Candies.
100 " Fine "
20 Bbls Sugar.
2 Hhda Bacon Shoulders.
4 44 Bulk 44
50 Heavy C 11 Sides.
50 " D S 44
20 Bbls Mess Pork.
10 44 Bump "
10,000 Gallons Molasses in Hoggs
heads and Barrels.
of those who appreciate the necessi
highest possible yield. I am also
FS SUPER PHOSPHATE
f
Payable
Nov. 1.
A FIXE OPPORTUNITY TO
BUY A
First-Class Bar
2 V A 3JD
Billiard Saloon,
BOTH DOING A GOOD BU8INE83. '
I desire to sell a stock oi fine Liquor, choice
brands Cigar, and two Billiard Tablet in
excellent condition.
I will a!t" cell the bnildiDg on Main Street
now occupied by myself and MoNair Bros.
Satisfactory reasons given for wishing to
sell. Apply to R.H. ROWS.
Tarboro, Mar. 19, 1875. '

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