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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, October 12, 1903, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1903-10-12/ed-1/seq-3/

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CURTAIN 8:30 SHARP,
'there is no king but Dod«."
Thursday, Oct. 15.
iVl'r. Henry W. Savage offers
Richard Golden
in the Comedy Opera success,
Entire Balcony ... ,...V*.»*i.^1.00
W) Gallory ts.50
J.N.RMMM.D. BaWli Wiiln g.
DRS. RINDLAUB
SPECIALISTS.
AT ITA.-:
BYE,
BAR.
NOSE AMD
ARCHITECTS.
ALBRA'NT, W. 0. AUOHJTEOT AND
Superintendent. Plaris, estimates and de
tails. Oillee: No. 64 Broadway, Fargo,
N. D. Telephone No. 53-4.
A. J.'O'SHEA, ARrniTECT AND SUPER
iotendent, practical plans, specifleatlons
and estimates furnished for all kinds of
i buildings. OlHrea. Nv-P. Block, Broadwayi
BKEBK, M. E., .AU •HITISOT- PLANS
and KiiecltlcaMons furnished for all classes
of building. Telephone 75."), office at 018
First Avenue North, Fargo, N. D.
JtlANOOCK BROS., ARCHITECTS, OF-
SI.
oe over Douglas.Block, 119 Broftdway, Fargo,
D. Plans and estimates for all kinds of
buildings.
PHYSICIANS:
l»Biiy«AR.-DR. SORKNESS.—PHYSICIANS
ana Surgeons. Office over WUser's Drug
Staro. Office hours: 10 to 12 a. m. 2 to 5 and
7 to 8 p. m.
1 Ait HOW & WEIBLE, PHYSICIANS AND
all rgeons. Office deLendrecle Block, cor
ner bf Front and Seventh Streets. Ofllc«j
hours: l» to 1U a. in., 3 to (1 and 7 to U
pi,
in. Fargo, N. D.
D&iC. N. CALLANDER. DR. A. 8. MORRIS.
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
Office Hoars:
9 to K a. tto
,\ ,pfltco HOD
v\4l
to
Hours:
12
a.
i 3 to 6 p.
1 to 8 p. m.
Tfel. K office
*S45 Residence.
S
%'tjC
f"
I
v,J nniM!
By Ptxlcy & Ltiders, authors? of
"PRINCE OF PILSEN."
"First drink one and then the other."
1 PB1CBS: ~~T
Eutiro Lower Floor.
THROAT
FARGO,
N.
D.
AcLeadtecfc Block, oppocftc N. P. Dnot
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
ATTORNEYS.
LEE ARTHUR n., ATTORNEY AT LAW,
offices lu Magill IHiildlng, Broadway ana
Front Street, Fargo. Practices in ail
courts.
TURNER, H. B., ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Offices in Kdwards Building, Broadway.
Practices In all courts.
BARNtOTT & REESE, ATTORNEYS AT
Lnw—Offices: 4 and 8 Morton Bnllding,
Broudway.
GOLH, A. T., LAWYER. ROOMS 19 TO 22,
Huntington Block, Broadway.
MILLER. HENRY F., ATTORNEY ANjl»
Counselor-nt Lnw. Over Fargo National
Bonk, Fargo, N. D.
ROBINSON, J. E., ATTORNEY AT LAW,
•ll! Front Street, Fargo. Practices In all
Courts. Tax eases a specialty.
JCOTT, \V. A.,- ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Ojtlce second tloor Morton Block, Bro&d
/#ay, Fargo, N. D.
V V' 1
2 to 5 p. m.
7 to 8 p. m.
Tel. 345 office.
1043 Residence.
UNDERTAKERS.
AND LICENSED EMBALMER—FUNERAn
Snpplies. J. F. Rice, 8 South Broadway,
roar of Moody's atore.
k*fEN! MEN!
You willnefe|a Suit
and Overcoat. That being'
$te case, you had better,
•'see aboutgetting new ones'
right away. My stock is
comprised of the newest
raftterns and I can m£ke,
up a suit or overcoatiti ithe
i&bbiest styles* v
PtER l»|CKTON,
'MERCHANT TAILOR*4
tana «T. s. rum,«. D.
Big assortment of switch
es, and wigs to match
your own hair, or made to
order. Prices wy rea
sonable. The ladies are
invited to call
PR
write.
f¥ir |?ii
J. Kopelman,
S Btahth ftravt tenth.
We are prepared to furnish
ip,goo pair of h|j»vy horse blankets
of every descriOtion from
M%
IWO
UP
IRRIGATION IN MONTANA.
Remits of lrHi^itien as Rractked 0H |be Plains
of Montana*
Thie possibilities of irrigation in the
northwest, particularly in Montana,
which is largely similar in topography
to western North Dakota, are well set
forth in a letter to W. W. Jermane to
The Minneapolis Journal from Billings.
Writing from there wider a recent date,
Jermane says:
"When Gen. W. B. Hazen returned
from his trip over Montana, following
the Yellowstone, rolling through the
country where Billings now stands, he
said in his re'port to the war depart
ment, that it was the most unpromis
ing territory he ever had visited. Speak
ing unofficially, he said to his brother
officers thah even the jack rabbit,
when getting ready for a trip across the
great plains stretching on cither side
of the Yellowstone, had to pack his
grip with food and drink. General
Grant came in later years, when the
golden spike was driven in the comple
tion of another great railway enter
prise. He met here several old time
Galena friends, to whom he spoke in
the most skeptical words of the future
of the country. He thought it could
produce absolutely nothing along agri
cultural lines, and that its value for
grazing was being over-estimated.
Standing near the track where the
golden spike was to be driven, was a
small shed covered artistically with
wheat, freshly cut. Grant asked where
the wheat was raised how far away it
was from honie arid what it had cost
to bring it to Billings. When told that
it was raised on a farm not far from
where he was "standing, he thought it a
joke. Finally he was put into a buggy
and driven out to the farm, where he
saw the new stubble. "I acknowledge
the wheat, if not the corn," he said
"I didn't think you could do it."
And that has been the prevailing
feeling regarding agriculture in Mon
tana for years—in fact, frcim the begin
ning. Colorado and Utah had demon
strated the possibilities of irrigation be
yond dispute, and were extending their
irrigated territory year after year, and
producing the finest crops ever grown
west of the Missouri. But this meant
little to Montana, for the great lines of
railway ran east and west, and Illinois
was a nearer neighbor than Colorado.
The early settlers here outside of the
mining counties were stockmen, and
the state has ever since shown the trend
which they gave it. Billings, for in
stance, the seat of Yellowstone County,
one of the richest agricultural counties
in. Montana, is at the same time the
largest primary wool market in the
world, and since 1891 has sent more
than 14,000,000 pounds of wool to east
ern centers. Agriculture has been mak
ing its way slowly, but its progress now
is to be more rapid. Grazing is not to
be abandoned, wool is still to be ship
ped in large quantities, but irrigation is
to develop the small farm. Already
about 60,000 acres are under irrigation,
for agriculture, in the rich valley of the
Yellowstone, near Billings. Next year
it is said that 25,qpo more acres are to
be reclaimed. When the time comes
for the opening of the great Crow
agency to settlement, many thousands
more of rich land will be available for
irrigation. The country around Bil
lings gives promise of supporting a
large population.
The business men of Brllings believe
that the next ten years are to witness
a radical change in. the character of
farming in Montana. Gradually the big
cattle ranges are being cut down and
the herds reduced in number. The
principal live stock industry in this vi
cinity for years has been sheep raising
This has now reached its maximum, it
is thought, and in a few years will pos
sibly begin to show a decrease. Should
this be the case, it will not be looked
upon an an unfavorable omen. Irri
gation is just beginning to take a firm
hold on the people. They propose to
reach out and do more of it, and to
turn their attention to it as never be
fore. Thus, with the passing away of
the cattle ranges, and the limiting of
the sheep herds will come the spread
ing out of the small farms and the rapid
increase in the population which irri
gation always bwivgs. This change is
just now being'felt. Montana is on the
border of it. She realizes that it is at
hand, and those of her citizens who live
in Yellowstone County welcome it be?
cause they Relieve the new order of
things WM1 profit th$n much more than
thi? old ..y
Billings furnishes "tone 6f th£ bfcst.ex
amples of CQ-opejative irrigation to be
'found in the country. Every water
right in the valley is owned by the
farmers thamselves there are no water
lords und no water tenants—a system
which has proved so disastrous in many
sections. The man who owns trie land
also owns a sfiart in the ditch from
which he irrigates.
This fertile vrilley is a great feeding
center. Alfalfa is grown as far as the
eye can reach, fields of emerald green
from which three heavy crops are cut
annually. Yet the correspondents saw
practically no live stoctf tfiey were out
upon the vast open range above and
surrounding the valley, In October
they will be brought in and fattened
through the thousands of enormous al
falfa stacks. Co-operation among the
Billings farmers extends beyond the
ownership and management of their ir
rigation ditches they range their herds
and flocks during the summer months
upon the same plan. Instead of a farm
er who owns
150
head of cattle or 300
head of sheep sending his pwn mefi otit
on the fjr^e range with thehi, he puts
theriv in with the stock of half a dozen
other farmers, greatly reducing the
cost. Then he can devote himself all
during the growing season exclusively
to farming and preparing for winter
feedingft-iAlf*ffw is a* wonderfully nu
fritiovs bloatf altogether the' greatest
fora^e^pfun^ip the west, and but little
grairTifr to, finish stock for kill
ing. At Hillings" the cattle, sheeo.
horsea. hdgt aftd evitn turkeys and wild
ducks get
far
upon it.
ti ne fir
Chotiirht it W
valley is I. p.
DO YOU GET F?
WITH AXAME BACK?
Kidney
Trouble Makes You Miserable.
Almost everybody who reads the news
papers is sure to know of the wonderful
cures made by Dr.
I
bladder specialist, and is wonderfully
successful in promptly curing lame back,
uric acid, catarrh of the bladder and
Bright's Disease, whicli is the worst
form of kidney trouble.
Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root is not rec
ommended for everything but if you have
kidney, liver or bladder trouble it will be
found just the remedy you need. It has
been tested in so many ways, in hospital
work and in private practice, and has
proved so successful in every case that a
special arrangement has been made by
which all readers of this paper, who have
not already tried it, may have a sample
bottle sent free by mail, also a book tell
ing more about Swamp-Root, and how to
findout if you have kidney or bladder trou
ble. When writing mention reading this
generous offer in this paper and send your
address to Dr. Kilmer
& Co., Binghamton,
N. Y. The regular
fifty-cent and one
dollar size bottles are Ho«n« of ^wam^Root.
sold by all good druggists. Don't makt
any mistake, but remember the name,
Swamp-Root, Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root,
and the address, Binghamton, jtf. Y., on
every bottle.
purposes, but he soon gained faith.
Now he has 2,000 acres in alfalfa and
winter feeds 20,000 sheep. He is one
of the large holders the average hold
ing is comparatively small and the val
ley is dotted with prosperous homes
and ample barns.
While the valley is well developed
and has an enormous production, many
look ahead to a complete transition
when alfalfa fields will be divided up in
to fruit orchards and when the capacity
of the land will be doubled and quad
rupled. This has occurred in more than
one valley in Montana where the con
ditions seem similar to those in Bil
lings. The first development, after the
Indian, is the grazing of cattle—the Bil
lings Valley twenty years ugo was a
free grazing range the second step is
that which, has now been reached at
Billings, the irrigation'of the land, still
for stock purposes the third step is
when farms are ten, twenty or forty
acres, planted to apples, plums and
other deciduous fruits, varying with the
altitude and climate.
The citizens of Billings who are in
terested in seeing it become the center
of a great agricultural community have
interested the government in looking
into the practicability of a great irri
gation project which will divert water
from the Yellowstone Rivety far above
Billings, and reclaim probably 200,00c
acres. The statement Was ventured
that the cost of this reclamation would
likely be between $10 and $15 per acre,
and as the irrigated land around Bil­
*-t-.v
LIT', &
.. i
BEAB VIEW OF
San Juan
:W' v
fcttf!" tftimb "FOfiTTlf' "ASt» DAILY HBTOBttCAf JfOXDAY KVENIVG, OC'fOBKR 15, I'Jfn.
Kilmer's Swamp
Root, the great kid
ney, liver and blad
der remedy.
It is the great med
ical triumph of the
nineteenth century
discovered afteryears
of scientific research
by Dr. Kilmer, the
eminent kidney and
rl#/fcooBpvel|
lings is worth from $50 to $75 per acre?
it would seem that there would be no
question of the government's getting
back its money. A preliminary re
connaisancc has already been made by
the geological survey and accurate sur
veys arc promised the coining season.
At the 160-acre limitation of the nation
al irrigation act, this would create 1,25c
new farms and homes, and give about
7,000 additional population to the Yel
lowstone Valley.
Just south and east of Billings lies
the Crow Indian reservation, the scene
of the Custer massacre. The Crows
are considered "good Indians, al
though alive. They arc being re
claimed by irrigation. And through ir
rigation may come to a great extent the
solution of the Indian problem. The
Indian office has been for some time
buTiTling irrigation ditches for these In
dians. to enable them tc grow alfalfa
for their cattle and ponies for winter
feed, much after the manner employed,
by the Billings farmers. The Crows arc
industrious. hey work digging the ir
rigation ditches then they become part
owners of the ditches and is they have
their land from the government they
are independent. Whether they succeed
and become independent farmers and
stockmen depends upon their enter
prise. The government is now buying
out of the Crow fund, more cattle for
them, to feed upon the newly irrigated
lands. Optimists believe that the Crow
nation may become a tribe of irrigators,
through Uncle Sam's assistance, just as
the Pinas and Papagoes were in Ari
zona at the time of the Spanish cop
quest.
REVIVAL OF SNUFF TAKING.
Fashion's pendulum is forever on the
swing. Inquiries made in the tobacco
trade tend to show that snuff once more
bids fair to play a not insignificant part
in the amenities of social life, says The
London Mail.
A steady increase has been noted in
the consumption of snuff. At both ends
of the social ladder, too, for, like the
pipe, snuff knows-.no distinction of rank
or intellect.
"A dirty habit'' the use of it has indeed
been called, but devotees at once join
issue here with the consumers of tobac
co in other forms, and claim that if a
ballot were taken of mothers, wives, sis
ters and sweethearts, the smoker and
not the snuff-taker would be banished
from the household.
While "Ichabod" is written in the dust
on many an old snuffjar and discarded
snuffbox, the gentle art of snuff-taking
has been sedulously cultivated by high
and low.
Among the poor in the east end of
London snuff is in great demand, and
scarcely, a tobacconist but keeps some
variety of it in stock. Many West end
shops, on the other hand, ignore snuff
altogether. "There is no profit in snuff,"'
said the manager of one of these estab
lishments, "and the sale of it would bring
us a class of customers which we don't
want.''
Some houses are specially noted for
snuff. 1' They are old-fashioned places,
situated oftcner than not in the quiet side
streets, and they carry 011 a "growing"
bitsiriejfs with an aristocratic and well
to-do-clientele. The printers of Fleet
Street arc said to be the largest con
sumers of snuff.
_____ dOOSOTELT, SHOWING BEVOLVEB
It HIS to 20CKET.
When President Roofeteit made hta recent tour of inspection of t^e imj&t
grant station At Ellis Island,Y^T Itarbor, a number of jris. comp£ffotf
were startled* wlMin the ittoDg wlnd suddenly lifted the skirts of th* president'^
coat to the see protruding from his hip pocket ttie banU|
of a revolver cftRpMv It was explained that since the assassiuatton o|
President Jftr. Ifeafee'Velt has never traveled without his pistol, th#
same one, tar iMfe wfcyi 4»e carried the
The "Ste^y 8&tlsfaotoiy" Range,
1 "An abundance of hot water,'*
says the Monarch man, "is
quickly obtained and easily
kept because of the very large
heating surface of the Monarch
pin extension water front. It
is located on the left side of
the fire box and does not inter
fere in the least with the per
fect working of the oven."
RAILROAD NOTES.
PRESENTS FOR WILSON.
Jamestown Alert: A little surprise
was sprung on Supt. C. J. Wilson today
when he was invited into the train
master's room in the N. P. headquar
ters building and presented with several
elegant and handsome souvenirs from
the railroad men on this division. It
was the occasion of Mr. Wilson's leav
ing for another field and the boys all
along the road, from Fargo to Mandan,
had "chipped in" to cypress to Mr.
Wilson their good will at parting and
t} give him something which would al
ways pleasantly remind him of his ten
years' work 011 this division at James
town.
The gifts were a large elegant, black
leather chair, trimmed in leather, and
a splendid article of furniture a costly
recording barometer a magnificent
pair of field glasses, of the latest pat
tern, and a handsome cut glass water
set of pitcher and goblets, on a mirror
reflector. The water set as well as the
other gifts were the finest that could be
had. So many of the railroad boys were
"in on the deal" that the committee
had more money than they could spend
and presented Mr. Wiison with the
balance left over in the shape of thirty
five gold dollars to "pay freight 011 the
chair."
Superintendent A. M. Burt made the
presentation remarks 011 behalf of. the
employes of the road. He spoke of
the good feeling on the part of all to
wards Superintendent Wilson, the cor
dial relations that had existed between
them, and the regret at the severing of
those relations which had covered a
period of more than ten years. This
cordiality 011 the part of the employes
of the division was made manifest^ in
the testimonials which he had been call
ed upon to present.
Mr. Wilson was overcome at the
manifestation of good will and regard
thus made known to him. He was
scarcely able to express his thanks at
the kindness of the employes and as
sociates with whom lie had been so
closely connected for many years. He
expressed his deepest regrets in closing
a period of such relationship, which had
been marked by the most pleasant in
cidents. He ventured to say that his
successor would find the employes of
the Dakota division all as loyal and ef
ficient, hereafter in the work of the
company as they had been with himself,
and he believed they could be depended
upon to do their duty in any emergency.
The gifts were purchased by contri
butions given in small amounts by the
employes and associates of Mr. Wilson
•. "HV
of the rough rider* w
charge
at Elltl Wand he appointed JwSL
tn a 6t four to .investigate chafgea
ie The chalr^# df thla commf
0
INTENDING PURCHASERS ONt-V
riosta! Card us for our new booklet, "Hints for Range Buyers or how I
|cut kitchen work in two." It's worth reading. If you state about ho
soon you expect to purchase a range, we will send you Free a Toy Moi
arch Range, 6 inches high, 5# inches wide, 2% inches front to back- Addres
MALLEABLE IRON RANGE COMPANY,
(remerlr ef St. Loalt, Mo.) BEAVER DAK, WUk
FOR SALE BY D. I. AMES. BROADWAY, FARGO, N. D.
THAT WONT COME
CIGAR
I N S A
4
I N K I S
E
FAVORITE
Our assortment of Mink is
very large. Mink Scarfs in the
popular flat effects enjoy exten
sive showing. Small neck pieces
are being bought freely for early
fall wear. We show fine assort*
ments of our own exclusive
work—these we have made up
during the stmmer months. In
coats, Persian Lamb and Broad
taul are as popular as ever,
though, of course, seal garments
remain staple. For dressy fur
garments, Seal has no superior.
Our display never fails to please
seekers of Fine Furs, for
have what you want.
Denis Bros
FURRIERS,
No. 108 Broadway, Fargo
from every part of the division, 'lip
contributions were received without s4
licitation and no large amount was pe|
mitted to be given. The money car
so plentifully that it was difficult fj
the committee to find a suitable aventf
to expend it.
Baron Alverstonc, lord chief jusll
of Great Britain, chairman of the Alas!
commission is a man of high legal
tainments. He was attorney gcneri|
almost continuously from 1885 to I9f|i
and had been a member of parliamef^
for Launceston. He was rcprcscntitfjjf
an Isle of Wight constituency when
made supreme justice, lie is now Ifi
his sixty-second year.
through Sl«epi|Hf Car ^rrtc*
ill......
-v..-.

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