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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, October 31, 1903, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1903-10-31/ed-1/seq-3/

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CURTAIN 8:30 SHARP J"
,-
,','V ^.".
(From the German of Robt.Pohl,
adapted for tht English stagfe by
M,'SWiniefjp^
Miss Alice Johnson,
il
.©•©•©•©•a#®4®4®4®«©«®4®
CURTAIN 8:30 SHARP.
Tuesday, Nov. 3i
Richard Qolden's
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
ATTORNEYS.
I«EH, ARTHUR B., ATTORNEY AT LAW,
offices in Magili Building, Broadway and
-Front Street, Fargo. Practice* fn ail
courts.
"%L*RNICR, H. R., ATTORNEY AT LAW,
V ^Offices In Edwards -Building, Broadway,
.'j 'Practices In all courts.
'MvnNJOTT & REESE,
FILLER,
V?
tails.
N.
FI- IN.
riWm
it.
"J*."- ,:.•
A
-vf. V?.' s5

vv .i *V-
v"^
'M.',
''M f*
1
vi
.Saturday, Oct 31..
=&:
Mx
with Charles Cowles-and
Harry Morse in the cast.
Hear the original'
BucKaport Choir*
PRICES- .ft, 75c, 50c and 25o
All reserved seat' tickets ordered laid
aside, but not jAid for, will be plaoed on
sale at 3 o'olock p, m., day of perform
ance.
J.H. I.D. EltiaMfeRMtanfeM.•.
DRS. RINDLAUB
SPECIALISTS. I il
BYE,
BAR.
NOSE AMD
THROI^f
FARGO, N. D. I
ileLmfcerie Block. opposite IV. iDf»l
St
ATTORNEYS
-^Huntington Block, Broadway,
v V
Telephone No. 53-4.
AT
^. ^Iiaw—Offices: 4 and 8 Morton Bolldlng,
^Broadway.
'JCJPLE, A. T», LAWYER, ROOMS
10 TO 23,
HENRY R., ATTORNEYS ANO
Counselor at Law. O.ver Farj o National
y'ifvHank, Karjp, N. D.
JfOBlNSON, J. E., ATTORNEY, AT LAW,
r\
Front Street, Fargo. Practice* In all
Courts. Tax cases a specialty.
•JtftOTT,
W.
A., ATTORNEY AT LAW,
.Office second flpor Morton Block, Broad
way, Fargo, N. D.
architects.
....
?$3Fv,«iij(MC' w. c.. uomtaot AND
Superintendent. Plans, estimates and de
Office: No. 64 Broadway, Fargo,
J. O'SHEA, ARCHITECT AND SUPER
Intqndent, practical plans, specifications
and estimate furnlabed for all! kUdi of
buiidings.' Offices N. P. Block, Rroiaway.
BEEBE, M. E., ARCHITECT-PLANS
and Bpeciflcations furnished for all classes
'of building, Telephone 755, office at 618
First Avenue North, Fargo, N. D.
JttANCOCK BKOB., ARCHITECTS,
v. lice over Douglas Block, 118 RrojulW&
,' N. D. Plant and estimates for all
buildings.
Ot-
PHYSICIAN*.
DR. WEAR.—DR. SORENESS.—PItYSICIANS
and Surgeons. Office over Wifcer's Dr
•Store. Office hours: 10 to 12a. mi 2 to 5an
7 V 8 p. m.
PHYSICIANS AND BORGERNS.
Office Hours:. Office Hours:
11 to 12 a. to ll ki. n.
3 to 6 p. mv aWVw.-'S to Pp. m.
7 to 8 p. m, V-'--vs 7 to 8 p. tn
K offlee.
Tel. 315
34$ Rasidane*.
iV-h Str, ,:•
t' JX' '\'T^
Tel. 345 office.
1013 Besidenoe.
UNDBkTAjdERS.
•WWT AND. LICENSED EMBALMER— FUNBRA*
*1 Supplies. J.-rn, MtoeTE-Bom 3k«adw«A
rear of Moody'* atom.
•uftorOvertoat
nobbietftafyte?
PICKT0N
R:
MUSIC AND MUSICIANS.
The Fargo Musical Club opened its
season with & social meeting Thursday
night at the Waldorf. Tlie parlor was
well filled, w.ith active and associate
members. 'The programme rendered
was
an entirely informal one. An
nouncements vvere made for the new
year's work, ^hich were listened to by
all
present with evidence of an. en
thusiastic interest in the plans and
prospects for,'the year. "Mrs. Grace Lin
coln Burnam,,a lormer president of the
club,
was
present and tavored the corhv
pany with a few remarks by way of
greeting. Beginning with heixt Vveek
Thursday, Nov.
5,
who
and others.
PRICES, 91.Q0, 75c, 50c and 25c
Nov.
the club will hold its
regular members, program mes"'e!vpry
two weeks, except on legal holidays..
These meetings will usualy occur in the
evening, and at the Waldorf parlors un
less otherwise announced. Many of the
associate members can attend these
meetings when they occur in the even
ing,
could not come in the morning.
Last year a large number of the regular
programmes were placed in the even
ing for the accommodation especially
of the associate members, with the re
sult that the club officers are now re
joicing in a large and rapidly increasing
list
of suph members.
With
the
9.
is
$2
the excep­
tion of programmes appropriate to the
seasons,' the entire season will be de
voted to a study of Wagner. This plan
is meeting with enthusiastic approval on
the part of all classes of the members
and it is expected that many more names
will be received before the first artist's
recital of
season,
which will
for
the
occur
The associate membership fee
year. This admits to
all
except business meetings of the club in
cluding
all the
pected
artist's recitals. It is ex­
that
there will be a considerably
larger number of aTtist's recitals this
year than ever before. Any one who
wishes such a season ticket may apply
for associate membership.
The programme for the pianoforte
lecture-recital to be given by Edward
T.axter Perry next Wednesday will be
as follows:
Chopin—Scherzo B' flat min0r.,Sf'
Chopin—Prelude, Op.
28,
No.firj$
Cnopin—Etude, Op.
25,
No. i i.!t:
Schumann, Aufschwung, Op. J2.V
Schumann—Warum, Op. 12.
Schumann—Novellette, Op.
12,
No.
7.
E. B. Perry—Die Lorelei.
Hofmann—Aus Schonor Zeit, Off* 34
Silas—Gavotte, E minbr. k
Liszt—Gondoliera.
Liszt—Rhapsodie Hongroise, No.
12.
Miss Luger and Mr. Bronson are pro
jecting some students' musicals in the
near future and will have some an
nouncements to make of interest.
Messrs. Bronson and Nerhaugen will
move into their new rooms in the old
Walker building next Tuesday. Mr.
Bronson will be out of town next
Wednesday and Thursday, at Grand
Forks and Crookston.
Clarence L. Partee, secretary and
treasurer of the American guild of ban
joists, mandolinists and guitarists, is
the promoter and manager qf a grand
banjo, mandolin, guitar musical festival
to be held at Carnegie Hall, New York,
op'tfte evening #fc Jan. 1904. It will
be one'of the most elaborate afifiirs of
its kind evej-. attempted in this, or any
Other country, and leading artists will
be heard on their respective instruments.
A feature of the affair will be an elab
orate souvenir programme,.
"When I'am Away from You, Deaf,"
Paul Dresser's new song, is written in a
vein entirely, different from recent pro
duction of .this very popular writer. It
was sung for the first time in Phila
delphia a few evenings ago.
The band at the agricultural college
cntinues to grow* There are now twen
ty-seven names on the roster, and more
coming. The reed section is filling up
nicely, Dr. Putnam reporting nine clar
inets' in the band and one more waiting
for his instrument. The band was out
on the campus, drilling in "marching
Friday afternoon and elicited some
complimentary comments ffom .Captain
IJlio, the commandant. The band will
soon be fully, uniformed ^nd will be
heard from musically before spring.
Some concerts are contemplated for the
winter.
Next Monday morning at
At the recepton at the agricultural
college ^last week the newly organized
Mandolin Club' made its first appearr
ance for the j^ear and made. quite a
hit with Students atad faculty. At the
same reception a new musical organiza^
tion at the college made its initial Bow
to the public. The A. C. Orchestra of
ten pieces played several selectipns ?nd
met-with a hearty reception ,bjfv .the
students.'
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
&
Of
In the matter of the estate
Cuyler Gregory* deceased.
Notice iss hereby given by the und3i
sigrtfed, Florence L. Gregory, executrix* S
of the estate of C.-_ Cuyler Gregory, late
of tfye city of Fargo, in {he cbuiity of
Case artd state of North Dakota, de*
ceased, to the-creditors of, andj all per
&ons having claims against, 5&id de
ceasea, to exhibit them with tlje neces*
saty vouchers, withln'fout- months af|45
fcr the ftr.st publication of this notice, t&.
said executrix, at the office of Emer$o^
H. Sniitlt, her attorney, rboms
5
FLORENCE L. GREGORY,
Executrix.
First publication on the 31st day of
October, A. D. 1903
't- (Oct. 3h yov. 7 14 and atl, 1903
•New*' R*ad4Efa£ F4ru»
Be Prompt
By being proitipt in attending to your
eyes at the first signs of trouble^you will
be able to have the defect speedily and
permanently corrected' See our litest
device for Eye Correction.
FARGO,
A BI3 PURCHASE
W
Bismarck Tribune: The state board
of university and school lands yester
day authorized the investment of about
$200,000
in bonds,* from the permanent
institution funds. The great part of
these were school district bonds, some
of them issued in the early days of the
state and floated at six and seven per
cent, and now bought by the state at
such a premium as will net four per
cent. This action is necessary to find
investment for the fund, which has bfeen
growing beyond the possibility of in
vestment in such securities as are pre
scribed by the constitution.
A peculiar fact in connection with
some of the school districts is that
they do not all understand that the
state school fund is- open for the pur
chase of school district bonds at four
per cent interest. By way of example,
it may be stated that a school district
in the northern part of the state floated
an issue of $6j0po of bonds not long
ago, sold them to private buyers at
five per cent and the buyers then sold
them to the state school fund for four
per cent making .a profit of one per cent
cent on the amount for twenty years, or
$1,200
given away by the district. With
the state seeking good..bonds at four
per cent, it would seem that school
districts would take advantage qf this
opportunity to float bonds at thf low
est rate of interest.
It will be. noticed, in connection with
the purchase of bonds yesterday i that
their purchase was ordered from the
permanent institution fund. This fijnd
arises from the sale of institution lands
and the interest on its investment goes
into the maintenance fund of the differ
ent institutions that hafc been made
from that fund and will reduce it to a
minimum figure untiT itiore .funds ac
cumulate from the sale of lands.
A number of inquiries are being
made as to farm land investments
and the board yesterday authorized
the appraisal of twenty-one tracts?, upon
which loans aggregating
000
PAPER MAKING IN CANADA.
'London Telegraph: In Canada the'
subject of water power is gaining con
sideration in connection with various in
dustries. One of these is the manufac
ture of paper from wood pulp. The do
minion contains more spruce, the best
wood for this purpose, than all the rest
of the world put together, and possesses
at the same time vastly more unused wa
ter power. According to the dominion
statistician, the spruce forests cover
0O0, 000
10
o'clock
the usuaL convocation exercises of the
agricultural college will consist of a
musicale. Nothing of an elaborate or
classical character will be attempted,
but some phasing 'numbers, are bqing
prepared. A' jsemi-chohts' will- sing
Kipling's "Re6«sional," by DeKov%i#
Misses Bryant and Reid, Messrs. Put
nam and MfcArdle will sing Pinsuti's
"Spring Song."a Mr. Harold Wester
gaard will plav a violin solo Mr. N$ck
e s w i k i n y S e n i n e A I
Grant will play a S^iarf Dance Mias
Carter will play a piano solo and Dr.
Putnam will play a cornet Fantasia by
Millard^ The public is cordially invited
to this musicale.
acres, or about
PCffitfH-'AXtrmitiY ^PtTBMOA!Ti'klWCAY ^mG^OWOB® rfr,'fliroi.'4
Bofros.
State Board Authorizes' the Purchase of $200,
000 of Bonds for the Institution Funds.
$17,000
tp
450,-
700,000
square
miles—roughly eight, times the area of
Great Britian. Yea£ by year the exports
of wood and w-ood pulp for the rhaking
of papery are rising and now the Canadian
protectionists are putting forward the
demand that they should not export the
pulp, but the paper hot the raw material,
but the manufactured article, for the
production of which their immense wa
ter. power gives t|^em
!eteirmoitSv.advan-
tages. It seems not improbable that
ere
long a heavy export duty will be levied
on wood pulp, and that Canad% jvill
be­
come a great exporter of paper. She
Hibkls the^energetic Je^ition, and can al
£0 make flier own term'l. It is said that
nine times as much labor would be
re­
quired to manufacture paper a i is needed
simply to export the wodd. Sin-far the
United States is concerned, Canada is
becoming more and more the one avail
able source of: supply, and for the New
York newspapers alone a clearance of.
10,000
acres of forest is hecessar yevery
year. .r. w
^Tfcr State Nfcws Read The "tfbriim.
WILSERS
Pink
Liver Plilsll
Tii^ae^afe^s good a LafttLve
ever sold. Gftitle
R) not cause fcrjp
taken in ovetdoq^B,
a i o e i e
liable cure for .babitiial
kation and ffc Jp ck
focKe, BiliOTimefiT^jprn-
Lost of Apipelite.^ •,
or at duritOfe.'
*£p4nte|er boltlfe.
and-^
First National Bank Building, Far#*)
N. D.. -v.
Dated October .11 st. A. Di igoj. i
only «l.
mmm
AIRINCE OF
MUCH NAME
Prince Kalaneanaole of lOdlna, Kona,
Spent an Hour in Fargo LMt
Evening.
He Talked Interestingly of Hawaiian
-lilted and Gave Poor
MM
Tip to Sfay Away.
Prince J. K. Kalaniaiiaole, accompan
ied' wife, his private secretary,
Mojris Kpohokalole, and his wife's at
tendant, Maria Niau, of Kailna, Kona,
Hawaiian Isfdhds, delegate to the fifty
eighth' congress of the United States,
were in Fargo over an hour last night,
and left at 11:30 over the N. P. for
Washington, D. C. They came into
the state from Seattle over the Great
Northern and came down from Grand
Forks last night, leaving over the N. P.
for the east.
When interviewed by a Forum-'re
porter the prince was sitting in the
ladies' parlor at the Metropole quietly
smoking a Turkish cigarette, his wife
beside him and the .secretary was sit
ting at their side conversing in the low,
easy tones peculiar to the Tropics. He
greeted the reporter pleasantly atld of
fered a seat by his side.
"We had intended," said the prince,
"to spend quite a little time in the
northwest, but were delayed on the
ocean longer than we expected. Wc
are familiar with the east, middle west
and mountain regions, but were anx
ious to see this country, and regret
very much that we cannot stay longer
in Fargo, as I am told you have a beau
tiful city here, but our time is limited
and we Will have to be moving again
in a few minutes.
"Yes,
Will
$i8,-
^are asked. These loans are^ re
vested by farmers in Benson Couiitv.
The board refused to buy the state
bonds. offered yesterday. They would
have netted only three per cent to'the
state and it was felt that this. npt a
desirable "investment.
1
jf, i
DO YOU WANT A
Desirably located within six^ blWcks^of
the government huilding on easy mbnth
ly payments interest six per cent a
great snap. Morton & Co.
probably ask congress
for an appropriation of about
$3,000,-
odo," he said, as he blew a wreath
vestment. doesn't it? But I don't
NATURAL GARDEN-.,
ii i'
on Spectator: There is a wide
difference between flowers scattered at
random and the same when nature
groups them and forms wild gardens.
It is as great as that between the
gtOwth of seeds spilled
011
Among the very rare examples of
nature's gardens in this country are
'those on a portion of the banks of the
Kamont, which divides Cumberland
from, Westmoreland. Flora has ever
»been regarded as a civilized goddess,
Rearing baskets of the finesj cut' fldw
4«f£, 'land tWihing wreaths df* the latest
SkHwtfes tif foses to deck^ the marble
.teittplfes of.the gods. But she may have,
fci&yfcowild half-sister, Flora SitvicUl
Jflix, who had altars built to her by the
JRomah soldiers guarding' the frontier
the north, and who in niturii first
laid crat the wild gardens by this lovely
^northern, stream. The Eamont is the
frverspill of Ullswater, which it leave
I rapid and well-grown stream, an
ffter coursing through the rich mea
Penrith, und under the walls
titan one tower and fortress, past
.f*'J. of cliff after cliff of crimson
r^j'set with every form of tree and,
fr/'ldd with sprouting rock fountains
Ifiif^ttffcklin'- cascades, cuts through a
the oldest sedimentary rocks
and then runs between ffat
to meet the. Eden. %t Eeden
in
YIELDS
GOOD
RETURNS
of
smoke ilito the air. 'This money,
should I get it, will be applied to har
bor improvements, federal buildings,
custom houses, etc. So far as harbor
improvements are concerned we have
practically none, and as to federal
buildings and custom houses there
arc
also practically none in the islands.
When it is considered that the United
States derives about $1,500,000 annu
ally from the Hawaiian Islands and
they did not cost her a cent, it looks
as though 'this were a pretty good
in­
know
whether I will be able to make
con­
gress think so or not. At our last
home legislature we voted
•$••)
granary for
vv^ll
$3,000,000
for improvements in the islands and
this monty will be paid in ten years.
"How about the islands for Ameri
cans?. Well, yoil kno.w the sugar plan
tations are the main product of the is
lands, and the people depend almost
entirely upop agriculture for a. living.
For a. man with little capital the Ha
waiian Islands are good, but for a man
without money it is no good, Labor
$
i
cheap and nearly all the capital in'the
islands comes from America."
The prince and "his small, rfiirty left
Honolulu on the first of the month and
arrived in Seattle on the eighth, where
the remained until about four
rice,
days
ago. The prince was educated at St.
Mathew-s Hall, San Marcial, Cal., and
after graduating from his school fin
ished hi$ education in Europe. He
has
not visited is South America, and after
congress-adjourns it is his intention to
takfe a $hree or Jour months' trip
through Cuba and Porto Rico.
$35.00,
jTerms reasonable.
NO. 156.
640
r.,
has
been around the world three times, the
last voyage being finished about two
years ago. The only country he
)out
waste
ground and the fair order of the same
blossoms in a garden made by hand
Such natural gardens are rare. It is
the habit of the wild flowers to grow
ejther so intermingled as to produce no
decided effect at all, as, for instance, in
the hayfields or by roadsides or for
one plant only to cover broad patches
with a single hue, as do the popies, the
Wild hyacinths, and, on the moors, the
heather. These broad1 flower masses
rejoice the eye—but they are not na
ture's gardens, any more than the lav
ender fields, or the crimson sainfoin,
are the gardens of the art. The chance
sown wild flowers, on the other hand,
are only "items," though beautiful in
themselves. When the country child
ren pluck them to make into posies,
the result is an epitome of the want of
effect in the manner of growth for
children never try to improve upon na
ture, and placing side by side the blos
soms of many hues and shapes in or
der as they jiuck them, their nosegay
lacks fohn, and the colors brtak and
are lost.-
$5,000
NO» 775.
«,200ofCass
"l '|R"
if!
•*,
4®4S*® 4m 8*® ®4®
I The following described farms
1 give you a good idea of the Bar
I gains which I am able to offer to
you, and are only I
ew^ of
iifr 'pi II?,'.' rfii14
to be found upon my counter. I
will show you many more if you
will call.
NO. 96. THIRTY DOLLARS per acre will buy the
Farm in Cass County, containing
.rtond, with 1,000 acres all plowed ready for seeding. Fine
Jet buildings, including a modern elevator for
_pvishels. Only five miles from railroad town, well drained
i|nd under high state of cultivation. Land i» WQ(£h $4W8-'
per acre, and it is a snap. Terms are easy.
NO. 782. A QUARTER SECTION Farm, oill^ *!x mm
from a good railroad town in Cass County, on N. P. All
Under
cultivation,
with house
2,000 bushels.
wind-mill. Price,
$25.00
NO. 786. A HALF SECTION of splendid land, only three
tniles from town 011 branch of N. P. R. R., in Cass County.
25
under cultivation and to be plowed ready for seeding,
fexcept
acres of meadow. House of seven rooms in good
^flrder. Large barn and granary. Fine well of water and
~v #ind-mill. Cement cistern. Price,
including half interest in loading platform.
acres, located three and one-half miles frdfti
either Gardner or Argusville. All under cultivation.
icres of timothy pasture. House of nine rooms. Bam
^42x56 feet for forty head. Three granaries holding
j|ushels of grain. Blacksmith shop and hen house. Buildings
jrorth
$3,300.
Price,
$30.00
''tttsume a mortgage of
per acre. Terms,
$8,000,
acres of the best land, located two and one-half miles from
the village of Tower City
450
cash, assume mortgage of
on easy terms.
50ms, cost $1,200. Barn
half mile west of the village of Mapleton. All under cul
tivation, except
40
"jhich is fenced for pasture. Old house,, barn, granary and
Machine shed. Price,
$38.00
ish, remainder time.
480
acres uhder cultivation.
20
jx rooms. Barn for
22
ialf the land. Very cheap. Price,
nottse five rooms, summer barn for
hedge near house. Price,
m:.
IT
IFOR SALE
lit
1,440
1.
I
I
I
s
•w*® •o#® •®#c
I
i
(j/-
acres of rich YalTey
4i
@K
30,000
of six rooms, large bam,
Chicken house, good well and
per acre,,iipon a cash payment of
fi,200. Balance easy terms.
NO. 784. A CHEAP QUARTER section, only three miles
ffom Tower City. All under cultivation and in ^ood con
y'Jitiofi. No buildings. Price,
$21.00
^£1,200 cash and remainder on reasonable time, ,|if.
$23.00
/required, $1,500, remainder in annual payments of'$500.00.
798. AN UNIMPROVED qnarter section only nine
.-/lihiles from Buffalo. Fine hay and grain land, and is in the
.Mabidst of cultivated farms. Price,
$17.00
^liird to be cash and remainder on easy time at 6 per cent
interest. y,
NO. 154. A SECTION of excel!elit'^ahd, located' efsftt ittiles
west of Fargo, and half a mile from loading station. All
tinder cultivation. House of seven rooms. Large granary,
arn for
24
I:
per acr&^'Tefntt,
u
per acre. Cash
per acre. One-
horses- and machine' shed. First-class farm,
I:
50
$3,000
s1
12,000
i!
$6,000
cash*
balance on easy terms.
NO. 343. STOCK AND GRAIN FARM, containing
650
acres in cultivation, most of
Vhich will be ready for crop. Small house. Timothy and
frome grass meadow. Price,
$24.00
per acre. Terms,
and'remainder
v 9
615. 1,400 ACRES one and a half miles west of
Wheatland. Loading station adjoins land. All under cul
tivation, with about
950
acres plowed. New house of eight
20x80
feet, two stories stone
nmdation. Several small buildings for machinery. Good
Hell with wind-mill and feed-grinding house. Price,
":r acre. Terms, one-third cash, assume mortgage
fi2,000,
and the remainder on satisfactory terms.
NO. 763. A GOOD HOME FARM, of
$21,00
320
acres, one-
acres of timber along the Maple River,
per acre. Terms, one-half
acres, seven miles northwest of Buffalo., jap,
acres good pasture. House of
head. Good well. Will plow back
$23.00
one-third cash.
NQ. 17. 480 ACRBS of ridi. Valley laqd, located one utile
fl-o'm railroad station. All under cultivation hnd halt plowed
back. Good buildings, consisting of house, barn, granary,
flowing well and grove of trees. Price,
Terms, one-quarter cash, remainder easy time.
per acre. Terms,
16
cash, remainder on( crop payments if desire^
Loans negotiated upon
itig Lands and Improved Fargo
Rat|s given upon
application.
CALL AND SEE
i
$28.00
NO. 794. HALF SECTION located six miles from 11
fown in County, with
200
per acre.
acres under cultivation. New
horses, good well
$24.00
per acre.. ./JJftaafe
•f
Mm
i
1

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