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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, November 13, 1903, Image 10

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Outing always'gives ope a longing to
gtt o'ut into the woods, to fish in the
pifctutcd streams, and to see nature in
her varied moods it is a strong com
pliment to the magazine. Its contents
are always the best, and the November
issue is more attractive than usual even.
The first article discribes The Golf Links
of Paris Frontiering in an Automobile
19 & description of a trip through Color
ado and New Mexico The Silent Places
is an Indian story and is continued
Quail in Painted Covers tells of wood
life that will interest all hunters On the
Happy Nutting Grounds is a well pic^
turcd attraction of one of the delights
of autumn in some parts of the coun
try. In the Cape Sable Wilderness there
is much to learn concerning the birds of
that region Mrs. Burton Kingsland dis
cribes A Driving Trip: several articles
are devoted to squirral hunting Ante
lope Hunting of Thirty Years Ago and
Today is a well illustrated article and
there is a vast fund of good matter in all
the departments. 239 Fifth Avenue,
New York: $3.
Anything from the pen of Gen. Charles
King is always read with much inter
est, and his latest novel will be especially
eagerly perused the title is An Apache
Princess, and it is a tale of the Indian
frontier. The illustrations are by Fred
erick Remington and Edwin Willard
Deming. It is now for sale at all book
stores, and is published by The Hobart
Co,,
*iScribner's Magazine for the current
month opens with a review of the work
of John S. Sargent, the celebrated por
trait painter, by Royal Cortissoz. Ern
est C. Peixotto writfs of Through Bret
Harte's Country. Henry Cabot Lodge
continues his serial 011 the United
States Senate, and one of the most
timely articles is that from the pen of
Noah Brooks, describing How We
Bought the Great West, being a sketch
of the Louisiana purchase. Brander
Matthews describes the Literary Merit
of Our Latter Day Drama while An
drew J. Stone writes of Camp Life in
Arctic America. In addition to these
sketches there are excellent novels
i:o
I!
MM
PUBLICATION NOTES
114 Fifth Avenue, New York: $1.50.
One of the most remarkable casua
littes that has ever occurred in connec
tion with bridge-building was that at.
Pittsburg recently, when a huge crane,
used in the construction of the canti
lever bridge over the Monongahela
River, fell, crushing to death twelve
employes and leaving a terrible gap in
the magnificent work. A panoramic pic
ture of this unique accident is one of
the most interesting pictorial features
of the current issue of Leslie's Week
ly. The double page and the front arc
devoted to the great manoeuvres at
Camp Young, Kentucky, in which militia
and regulars both took part, and which
were conducted with notable success.
Other illustrations include a page show
ing a bloody bull-fight in Arizona pho
tographs of the American naval gunners
who have made such an excellent rec
ord recently New Jersey flood photo
graphs a page on Yale's football heavy
weights: a page of dramatic, and one
of amateur photographs in the prize
contest, and other pictures of timely in
terest. The letterpress includes an ex
cellent story of a Philippine friar, by
Paul T. Gilbert: suggestive facts regard
ing "Vice-Presidents who died in office."
"A Tale of the Police," an exciting story
by George E. Walsh a review of
Charles Warner's famous realistic play.
"Drink," by Eleanor Franklin and
Jasper's invaluable "Hints to Money
makers." Judge Company, 225 Fourth
Avenue, New York: $4.
Cw*1
tftb
SHREDDED W8EAT
BISCUIT
Dr. S. R. Harris, 76 Summer St., Worcester, Mass.
says: ••One of the very best things in health and
in sickness, and as a preventive of sickness. A
'Godsend in every family."
FOR SALE BY ALL GROCERS
E U S I V E
features of CLOTH
CRAFT Clothes are the
non-breaKable coat
front, the patented tele
scope sleeve (easily
lengthened), and the
v telescope vest-bacK (size
®f vest readily increased).
A n o e e u s i v e
CLOTH CRAFT idea~the
best of fabric, fit, and finish,
the least of pric»«uif|
And overcoats upward.
CPC«r v
ALEX STERN CO.
(THE
from the pens of such writers as Cyrus
Townsend Brady, Edith Wharton, Ella
W. Peattie, James Barnes and Ella
Heath. Chas. Scribner's Sdns, New
York, N. Y.: $3.
"A House Divided" is the taking ti
tle of the novel in Lippincott's Maga
zine for November. It's author's name,
Ella Middleton Tybout, is a familiar
one to readers of Lippincott's Magazine,
though heretofore her productions have
been in the line of short stories. Her
"Parables in Black" lately running in
Lippincott's are particularly striking and
indicate that which is richly fulfilled in
this latest work. "The Girl with the
Banjo" is by a writer whose pen-name,
Jean D. Hallowell, keeps one guessing
who is the real author of so racy a
talc. 'The sex is confessed by such ex
pressions as "a soncy little lace petti
coat," and the whole thing shows the
piquancy of a woman rather- than the
touch of a "mere man." "The Man in
the Tower," by Francis Howard Wil
liams, is a forceful story of a railroad
signal tower. "The Brothers Implac
able," by Eleanor L. Stuart, is a stirring
episode of a secret society pitted against
a mother's love for her son. Two papers
of much interest, and each possessing
the intimate personal note, are con
tributed to the November number: "A
Royal Interview with Italy's Queen," by
Maud Howe, is a very pleasant descrip
tion of a private interview with the
Queen and a charming talk about Ameri
cans in both Worlds. In the third chap
ter of "Avowals" George Moore tears
out 1 olstoy and his work in very radi
cal fashion. J. B. Lippincott Co., 227
South Seventh Street, Philadelphia:
$2.50.
The current issue of The Woman's
Home Companion is decidedly a
Thanksgiving number. The Progres
sive Work of the Jews in the United
States is well described and Gibson
William Harris tells My Recollections
of Abraham Lincoln. The Nature
Study Club deals with mice this time
and the Old Home Week Scenes in
Old New England has the double page
illustration. In addition to the fashion
department there is an excellent article
on the Care of the Complexion by Dr.
Caissarato. Crowell Publishing Co.,
Springfield, O: $1.
The Forum has received* a copy of
the address of Senator Charles W. Fair
banks at the unveiling of theMcKinley
Monument at Toledo, Sept. 14. It is
an eloauent document and one of the
best tributes ever uttered to!- the mem
ory of tjiis great statesman! V]. 1
Good housekeeping for November has
a charnting Thanksgiving cover design
in blue and orange, and opens with the
first installment of a serial story. Pay
ing Guests, by Mary Stewart Cutting,
the author of Little Stories of Married
Life. This is illustrated by Karl A11
dersap.. Boys, their \vays and-ueeds. are
sympathetically treated in a symposium
whose chief contributors are William
Allen White and Judge Shute, the
author of The Real Diary of a Real Boy.
The court of justice at the George
Junior Republic is described by John A.
Parker with the aid of a spirited illus
tration. Other leading features of a
rich number are: Thanksgiving Day on
the Road, by Josiah Flynt, illustrated
Places for Books, by F. Chouteau Brown,
ilustrated The White Woman and the
Negro, by Ellen Barret Ligon, Ml D.
Indoor Sports, by Dr. Peirson S. Page
Hospitality, Old and New, by Edwin
Markliam A Bachelor's Thanksgiving
Dinner, by Hester Price, illustrated
The Home of the Chrysanthemum, by
Split
and
Toast
Crispy toast
is made by split
ting the biscuit
lengthwise with a
sharp knife and
placing in oven
for a few minutes.
si
Florence Peltier, illustrated Oysters,
by W. B. Thornton, illustrated. The
array of autumnal cookery is a notable
one. Ten cents a copy, $1 a year. The
Phelps Publishing Co., Springfield,
Mass., iiqwr tYork, Chicago |an flan-.
CISCO.
The November issue of Sports Afield
fully sustains, that magazine's reputation
for rarely interesting reading matter and
bright, newsy gossip, for the sportsman
guild. The frontistpiece—a scene of
darkey life on the old plantation—lends
added interest to one of S. D. Barries'
inimitable southern stories. Dr. T. M.
Bridges" of Idaho writes of an Indian
rabbit drive while, in "Labbit and Old
Sank," the forceful Dan ,de Foe tells a
tale of frontier adventure as he alone
can tell it. "Snow Bound on the Sum
mit" is a true account of the experi
ences of Billy Dunbar's teaming outfit
while imprisoned at an elevation of 12.
000 feet by an historic Colorado snow
storm. In addition, the various depart
ments treating of game news, fishing,
natural history, shot gun and rifle, to
gether with several pages of spirited
editorial comment—all beautifully illus
strated—make this issue of Sports^Afield
an unusually good number. Sports
Afield, 358 Dearborn Stre^ Piicagp:
$i-SO.
Sound Currency is a publication is
sued quarterly by the Reform Club and
has most able articles on the monetary
situation. One of the most interesting
papers in the present issue is by E. C.
Bellows describing the Financial Sys
tem of Japan. James H. Eckels writes
of the Government and' the Banks.
August Blum shows that Bank Notes
are not Money but Promises to Pay
and Edward O. Graves presents a pa
per on the Need of Elastic Currency.
Reform Club, 52 Pine St., N. Y. City
$1.
The Sanitarium for November open$
with the publication of a paper by W,
D. Scott-Moncrieff on the Full Solu
tion of the Sewage Problem. Dr. Wil
liam Barnetson writes of the Congested
Areas and one of the best of the pa
pers is bv Doctor Bashore on the Hy
giene of the Farm. The full report
of the American Climatologal Associa
tion is presented in addition to many
interesting notes. A. N. Bell, M. D.,
337 Clinton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. $4.
The Red Book for November intro
duces some excellent types of Aemrican
beauty in its full page illustrations and
in addition presents a dozen short
stories of a thoroughly interesting
character from the pen of some of the
most popular writersof the day and
these arc well illustrated. Every novel
is complete in itself and these stories
furnish the manner in which to pass
many a pleasant hour away. Red Book
Corporation, 158-164 State St.. Chicago,
HI. $1.
The November issue of The Awerjj
can Monthly has a timely "arncle on
What if Panama Should Revolt, WAfcfr
seems quite prophetic in view of the re
certt dispatches from the ist-hnmaf
George F. Kunz describes Radfuin and
Its Wonders and Philip Eastman has
an interesting article on the Military
Maneuvers at Fort Riley. .There is a
fine article on Galveston's Grea,t Sea
Wall, showing the efforts being made
to properly protect this city from .an
other deluge such as it suffered a short
time ago. Among other tppi.es which
all readers will want to peruse arc*
Men and Issues of the New York' City
Campaign, The President and the Post
al Investigation, The Nation's "Print
Shop and Its Methods, The New Rifle
for the United States Army, Rebirth of
the Japanese Literature and A Defense
of Russia's Policy in Finland. The Re
view of Reviews Co 13 Astor Place,
N. Y. $2.50.
There is an interesting sketch of
Floral Decorations for the TabTe' in
he Household-Ledger for the current
month and all lovers of nature will be
especially interested in November
YVoods and Fields. Making and Fur
nishing of a Doll House will interest
all who have children, and under Cel
ebrities of Today are the portraits of
many of those prominently before the
public. There are stories, fashion hints
and various other items in making up
an excellent number. Household
Ledger Pub. Co.,1 New-York, N. Y. $1.
The last issue of Forest and Stream
describes Moose Hunting in New
Brunswick and has a most entertaining
chapter on American Game Birds, de
scribing their habits and the best
methods of hunting. There is an im
portant department devoted to Game
Laws and Decisions Thereon. Consid
erable space is given to fishing and the
Yachting Department is of more than
usual interest, presenting some valu
able designs. All the departments are
well filled and this journal deserves the
popularity which it has attained. For
est & Stream Pub. Co* 346 Broadway,
N. Y. $4.
What-To-Eat Is a pioneer in the line
of pure food investigation, and is en
titled to great credit for the progress
made in this movement. Dr. Felix L.
Oswald writes on Gastronomic Anti
pathies Dr. Hunter discusses Indiges
tion and the Selection of Food. There
are many seasonable recipes in the
number, and^some interesting sugges
tions are given presenting new Ideas
for Children's Parties, and an excel
lent portrait is given of Professor
Ladd of Fargo, and sketch of some of
the work done by him in the direction
of pure food. TTie department devot
ed to illustrated dishes will be eagerly
welcomed by. the housewife. The
Pierce Publishing Co.. 171 Washington
Street, Chicago, 111: $1.
particular.
York: $1.
The November issue of The Criter
ion devotes considerable space to The
Building of the Balkan States, written
by Charles Johnston, who has recent
ly returned from the Bengal Civil Ser
vice. General. James Grant Wilson,
has a most interesting paper onXar
lyle, containing some unfamiliar pbr
traits of this distinguished scholar.
Daisy Fitzhugh Ayres writes of The' Boston and the
White House, its Mistresses'and Mem-.j by Frank B. Tracy, now a prominent
ories. Minna Irving continue^ TTarry- joutnalist of Bostop, but at One time
town Fables. Several vefy interesting a newspaper man in North Dakot^
stories are also presented, making the These are only a portion o| the larg^
I number a most
valuable one: in every
156 Fiftk, Avenue Ne w
The Atlantic Monthly for November
opens with an article,by Charles'W.
Eliot on The School, which is an able
discussion of the educational system of
this country. Brooks Adams writes of
the Economic Conditions for Future
Defense and William Carrott Brown
discusses The Problem of the Ameri
can Historian. Burton Hendrick
describes A Great Municipal Reform,
giving some of the details of the pro
gress made n New York City during
tlie, past two years. Charles M. Skin
ner writes of Walt Whitman as an Edi
t»r, and among the stories in the cur
rent number are the following: The
Story of the Queen, A Woman's Fancy
and The Boy who Lived at the Bottom
of a Well. The Atlantic always keeps
its contents up to a high standard.
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 4 Park
Street, Boston, Mass:: $4.
The. Cosmopolitan for November
opfcns with a description of Adventures
oiuthe Ice-Floes, written by P. T. Mc
Grath, and well illustrated. The ladies
wifl be especially interested in the ar
ticle bn The Appareling of a Pretty
Woman, written by Mrs. Wilson
Woodrow. Fritz Morris writes of
Ihe Turk as a Soldier, and Herbert
George Wells describes The Food of
the Gods, which is a decidedly inter
esting story. Under Captains of In
dustry considerable soace is devoted to
Sir William Van Home. Jerusalem
as it is today is well described, and the
serial on Henry Hudson is continued.
Japan's Wonderful Progress is a well
written article and the second part «f
the great steel corporation is given
in addition to these are a large num
ber of well written stories. The Cos
mopolitjftv Irvington, New York: $1.
The endrmbus profits of begging in
the crowded streets of New York arc
graphically recounted in the current
number of Leslie's Weekly, which also
present protraits of some of the most
notorious mendicants of the metro
polis. Other articles of interest in
clude "A Good Actor and His Bad
Plaiy,*' by Eleanor Franklin an ac
count of a botanical laboratory estab
lished in the Arizona desert by the
Carnegie institution the* story of a
railroad run on the Santa Fe system
which broke all records "A Woman's
Pathetic Plea for Macedonia John
Diciks Howe's readable estimate of the
valine of the pack-mule to the Ameri
ca^ army, which is accompanied by a
page of pertinent illustrations and a
comprehensive statement of the im
mense damage wrought by the insect
foes of mankind. Among the illustra
ticms is a striking front, showing the
hazards encountered in building the
skyscrapers of New York a page of
very attractive amateur photographs,
and, pictures of leading stage favorites
and of notable sporting and other
scenes. The departments are well sup
plied, and "Jasper's Hints to Money
makers" are as instructive as ejt$r. £25
Foarth Avenue. New York: .$4^
National Magazine' for November
•has an interesting review of matters
in Washnigton frorii thfe:,pen of Edi
tor' Chappie, and this is followed by a
discussion of The Year* with the La
bor Unions, by Frank Putnam, in
which he contrasts the enlightened
fnetjiods of John Mitchell, with bung
ling leadership in Chicago and New
York. There is an interesting resume
of timely topics concerning the Stage,
which is well illustrated. Joseph Howe
Dickson, of New Brunswick, writes of
Canadian Annexations Frank Putnam
describes The Squirrels of Harvard
Yard.s There is an interesting sketch
.of Governor Cummins of Iowa, aitd
quite an extended article appeftrs On
£?bte
Honorables, written
of contents. The Chappie Pub-
v..
^*K5VK»)+
First in price
First in
First in aroma
The Largest Selling Brand of Cigars in the World
The Band is the Smoker's Protection•
lishing Co., 41 West First Street, Bos
ton, Mass: $1.
The Cosmopolitan Co., will now is
sue a second magazine: this will be
called The Twentieth Century Home.
Among the contents will be Physical
Beauty, Practical Training fir Women,
Problems in the Lives of Wives, Hus
bands and Daughters, Money Making
for Women, The Fairyland of. Science,
Home Building and Home Furnishing,
The Kitchen Laboratory, Near to the
Soil. The Children at School, Educa
tion Within tHe Family Circle, New
Books Worth Reading, Entertainment
and Recreations of the Family, In
Household Chemistry, and Famous
Dishes of Many Lands. Irvington, N.
i
MARTIN
President -f
i
i w
lfARTIN H»OT(g^
N. A. LBWtyk
President^
B. S. LBWljfc
President
J. W. SMITH.
President.
Transacts a General Banking and ForeigD Rxcangc Business, Drafts Draw*
Direct on All Principal Cities of Dnrop*.
Y.: $1 per year 10 centspf^flewstatlds:^
and sample copy free.
Home and Flowers for November
has much concerning house, plants and
kindred topics that will be of interest
at this season of the year^Mr. Rexford
presents several articles ""of a, most
timely nature and the little magazine
will be as eagerly read by its many
admirers as during the spring time.
Home Pub. Co., Springfield, O. 50c*
TO CURE A COLD IN ONE
C*)+i*)+W+ iWHf. *KSK»K*)
A. WALL
LUMBER DEALER
Corner Front and Eleventh Streets, Fargo, N. 0.
FARGO BANKING HOUSES.
J. deLENDRBOI^ ji.^
Vice- President.
FARGO NATIONAL BANK
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENf
'I"',' DIRECTORS. *.
^JO.
QBO. H. NICHOL8, W. C. MACFADDBN.
Q* G. BARNES, & W. GBARX&
Vice-President. Cashier.
the MERCHANTS STATE BANK
OF FARGO
$100,000.00
4ftDIRECTORS.
O. G. BARNBB, H. W. GBAREY, J. E. CRONAN, I. N. WBAR, H. A. LB WIS.
J. D. BMMTUM, XUVMAB BAKEM, JK., W. P. BAL.L, J. D. MeCONMBbl*
ALEX STERN, B. F. 8PA*LD1NG.
I. S. WATSON,
Vice President.'
W. VON NIBDA,
.OHM*,
RED RIVER VALLEY NATIONAL BANK
OF FARGO, NORTH, DAKOTA
CAPITAL AMD SURPLUS $150,000.00
DIRECTORS,
a» A P«RRT, 8. WATSON, H. LEWIS, JAHB8K1INNK1)I, R, tiBwiA
J. A. MONTGOMERY, J. W. VON NIKDA, FRANK B. KINDRED, F. A. IR1SM
L. R. HANNA,
•fee-President
SAFBTY DEPOSIT BOXES FbR RBNr,
DIRECTORS.
I« W. SMITH, HBTH NEWMAN,
w. H. CROSBY.
%v
DAlt.
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets.
All druggists refund the money if it
fails to cure. E, W. Grove's sigqatpre
is on each box.. 2Scv
... -t «. "V •«.
r*rpr
P. MAOVADJMMI,
Cashier.
s- .-
v
J. deLMNDRKOIJfcv ft. WSIOBt,
B. F, BPALDIKG,
Attorney.
F. •. IR1BH
Ass't Cashier.
jfc 8. LYON,
Cashier.
0
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $200,000.00
iasKiNvAM*A' S. fc'LloS?0**'
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