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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, November 13, 1903, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1903-11-13/ed-1/seq-2/

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VI. I.
I?
GARDNER, N. D.
ARGUSVILLE, N. D.
HARWOOD, N. D.
MAPLETON, N. 0,
HORACE, N. D.
LEONARD, N. O.
SHELDON, N. ft
Orders taken at
Or. F. E. Ball. Dr. J. L. Graves
JAMES W. VXOAL* M. D.
Homeopathic Physician and Surgeon
416 Eighth 8t. So,, Fargo. N. D.
Office Hours: From 9 a. m. to 5 p.m.
Privata Hospital.
DR. CHRISTIANSEN,
—DENTIST—
Third Floor, Edwards Building. Fargo.
DIL WHECLER. ML CARPENTER.
Physicians and Surgeons.
Office, Edwards Building. Fargo, N. D.
AUOBN UWD OHBEN KSANHEITEN
OGON BCHOR BJUKDOMBS
DR. B£AUDOUX
SPECIALIST
EYE, EAR, ROSE AND THROAT
Honrs 9 to 12 and 2 to 5.
Over Elliott HoteL Fargo, N. D.
Dr. C. L. Rose
DENTIST
Porcelaia filling, porcelain crown and
bridge work a specialty.
Offices Third Floor Edwards Bldg.
DR. F. H. BAILEY
DR. C. KACHELMACHER
Practice limited to diseases of the
EYE, EAR, NOSE and THROAT
Stern Block, oyer Font Porterfleld's
Drug Store.
Dr. Halan daLendracla
Dr. Edward E Buy*
Osteopathic Physicians
All curable diseases, acute or chronid,
successfully treated without drugs.
Osteopathic Building, 101 Eighth St. So.
Telephone 853. Fargo, N. D»
AD I £9! $1 to $3 will make your
soiled party gown as good as new.
Let nslsend for it. We guarantee satis
faction,
Pantorium,
Phone 658. 107 Broadway.
F. O. Rockwell, Mgr.
A 1 5 O
HACKS or
COUPES
Day or Night.
Jeff Young & Co.
Baggage Delivered at All Hours
HEAVY WORK HORSES
roR
iau
Sixty head from Morton County.
Weight from 1100 to 1500.
Dri Holconbf
Washington House Feed and Sale Stable
DON'T BE FOOLED!
dennine ROCKY MOUNTAIN TEA
Is pat uf ia white packages, manufactured
•KtouJvely by tb« Madison Mtdiclnm
Co.. Madison, Wis. Sells at 35 cant* a
package. All others are rank imitations
and substitutes, don't risk your health by
taking them. THEOENUNE make* side
people WoM, Keeps you Well. All Hoaest
Dealers seM the Oenulne.
HOLUSTBR DRUG CO, Madison, Wl*
VIENNA BAKERY
Always has ©ir hand the
famous Macaroni Bread
wrapped in wax paper.
Hundreds of families bre
eating no other bread. You,
too, will like it, it stays fresh
so long-
WHITE LUMBER CD.
Paid up Capital and Surplus* $150,000.00
GENIRAL OFFICE AT rARCO-MTAIL YARDS AT
feUTTZVILLE,
jMSEON, N. D.
'fcWIGHT, N. D.
WILD RICE, N. D.
HICKSON, N. D.
^WAHPETON, N. D.
FARMINGTON, N.
MOORETON, N.
BARNEY, N. D.
PERLEY, MINN.
GEORGETOWN, MINN
ELMER, MINN.
COMSTOCK, MINN.
WOLVERTON, MINN.
Office in Fargo for all of the above yards.
AND DAILY REPUBLICAN.
THE FORUMPRINTING CO,
H.C.
VOLUME XXVI, No 807.
Entered at Postofflce as
The Fargo Fornm and Republican Is pub
lished every evening except Sunday In the
Loyal Knights Temple, First Avenue North,
Fargp, N. D.
Subscription—The Fargo Forum and Daily
Republican, by carrier, 15c per week, or
40c per month, In advance $5 per year.
The Fargo Fornm and Weekly Republican
|1 per year. The Fargo Forum and Satur
day Republican, $2 per year. Single copies
5c. Subscribers will find the date to which
they have paid, printed opposite their
names on their aadress slips.
Address all communications to The1 Fo
rum, Fargo, N. D.
FRIDAY, NOV. 13, 1903.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CASS COUNTY.
FORUM TELEPHONE CALLS.
Business Office 504L
Composing Room 504H
Editorial Room .639L
Local Reporters and News Room....639M
FABQO TIME TABLB.
Trains Arrive.
N. P.—From east, 5:15 p. m., 5:80 a. m.
5:40 a. m., 6 p. m.
N. P.—From west, 7:00 a. m., 9:25 p. m.
10:56 p. m.
F. & S. W.—From west, 7:05. p. m.
0., M. & St. P.—From south, 11:50 a. m.
and 6:00 p. in.
Q. N.—From east, 5:10 a. m., 5:45, 7:35 p.
m., 5:20 p. m.
O. N.—From west, 8:44, 10:82 p. m., 8:40
a. m.
Moorhead Northern arrives 10:15 p. m.
Traloa Depart.
N. P.-Golng east, 7:10, 8:00 a. m., 0:40
and 11:10 p. m.
N. P.—Going west, 6:00, 7:80 a. m., 5:25
p. m.
F. & 8. W.—Going west, 8:30 a. m.
C., M. & St. P.—Going south, 7tUU a. m.
and 7:40 p. m.
G. N.—Going east, 8:44, 7:30 a. m., S:«0
a. m., 10:30 p. m.
G. N.—Going west, 5:10 a. m. and 5:45
p. in., 6:20 p. m.
Moorhead Northern departs B:00 a. m.
A Paris dispatch states that the
police are actively engaged in the sup
pression of traffic in young. French
girls, who are said to be Supplied
yearly to the number of fifty "to public
houses in Holland, Belgium and Ger
many. One man has been arrested
who has, it is claimed, made $io,ooo
annually, in this nefarious business.
People of North Dakota will note this
evidence of mor&l depravity and crime
with horror and dilate upon the awful
conditions in the French capital. They
are awful, but similar conditions
though perhaps not upon so extensive
a scale, exist in this country and fre
quently instances of as inhuman a traf
fic as related in the dispatch.' It is not
by condoning crime that it may be sup
pressed and this is as true in Fargo as
in any other city. The fottei^af right
eousness and sobriety must be as ag
gressive as the hordes of immorality
and crime or the latter will prevail.
The principle of arbitration seems
to have become so firmly established
as a just method of settling disputes
when agreement between the parties
concerned is impracticable that it ap
pears strange when a matter of such
importance as street railway transpor
tation in Chicago is concerned that re
sort to force should be deemed neces
sary to bring one of the parties to
terms. Street railway transportation
on over 220 miles of track in a city of
over 2,000,000 inhabitants is paralyzed
because the railway company cannot
come to an agreement with employes
and refuse to submit the differences to
an arbitration committee. The em
ployes refused to work until the, com
pany would consent to arbitrate. Up
on the face of the matter it would ap
pear that the railway company has
some potent reasons for not submit
ting the differences to arbitration that
would not appeal |to a body of disinter
e s e a i a o s
The ruling of Jfiitge ^iite'n of
Pennsylvania to the effect that in the
eyes of the law the decision of the an
thracite coal strike commission is not
binding either on the miners or the
operators ought not to have any bear
ing upon the obligation of both parties
to abide by the terms of settlement
outlined by the commission and which
both o'perators and miners agreed to
carry out. It is no secret that Presi
dent Roosevelt did not appoint the
commission in his official capacity but
as a man and it was necessary for oper
ators and miners to approve the de
cision of the arbitration committee*
but who will hold that having promised
to abide by the decision both parties
V* iJO't morally bound to keep its
Judge Auten's ruling, if it be
by the higfecr courts, ought
Ml some, ftctionthat will mike
utpMt cu4*^jd lit4
U
•d*
The Cause of Many
Sudden Deauis.
There is a disease prevailing In this
is because
so decep
tive. Many sudden
deaths are.ct
by it—heart dis
ease, pneumonia,
heart failure or
apoplexy are often
the result of kid
ney disease. If
kidney trouble is
lI allowedtoadvance
the kidney-poison
ed blood will at
tack the vital organs, causing catarrh of
the bladder, or the kidneys themselves
break down and waste away cell by cell.
Bladder troubles almost always result
from a derangement of the kidneys and
a cure is obtained quickest by a proper
treatment of the kidneys. If you are feel
badly you can make no mistake by
ing ba
takint
Pr- Kilmer's Swamp-Root, the
great kidney, liver and bladder remedy.
It corrects inability to hold urine and
scalding pain in passing it, and over
comes that unpleasant necessity of being
compelled to go often through the day,
and to get up many times during the
night. The mild and the
effect of Swamp-Root is soon
It stands the highest for its wonderful
cures of the most distressing cases.
Swamp-Root is pleasant to take and is
sold by all druggists in fifty-cent and
one-dollar size bottles. You may have a
sample bottle of this wonderful new dis
covery and a book that tells all about it,
both sent free by mail. Address, Dr. Kil
mer & Co., Binghamton, N. Y. When
writing mention reading this generous
offer in this paper. Don't make any
mistake, but remember the name, Swamp
Root, Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root, and the
address, Binghamton, N. Y., on everv
bottle.
3
that appointed by the president legally
binding.
Congressman Spalding haS -di
rected the attention of Postmaster
General Payne to the fact that North
Dakota has but little more than half
her proportion of rural free delivery
mail routes as compared with most
other states that is, the average num
ber of routes in the United States is
about thirty for each congressman,
whereas North Dakota has only seven
teen for each representative. The ser
vice has proven very popular in North
Dakota and this effort of Mr. Spalding
to secure its extension will receive
hearty support. The policy of the de
partment, adopted a short time ago,
providing that there must be at least
100 families for each route, is directly
opposed to the establishment of more
routes in the state at present and it
seems unjust. There have been about
100 applicants for the establishment of
new routes in the state in addition to
those already established, which showst
how important it is that
the
limit should be reduced.
*3" Senator McCumber has intro
duced his bill providing for a national
inspection of grain and for the abolish
ment of state grain inspection. It is
expected that the Minnesota senators
will strongly object to the passage of
the measure, deeming it opposed to the,
interests of those controlling grain in
spection in the gopher state. While
that may not be the reason given for
attempting to defeat the bill it will ap
parently be the real reason. A nation
al grain inspection system would pos
sess several merits. There is no good
reason why the state of Minnesota or
any other state should control the in
spection of grain that* comes from a
number of states. There seem to be
several good reasons why the federal
government should supervise the in
spection. The fact that there has been,
so much dissatisfaction with state in
spection and that the majority of those
interested have no power to interfere
as matters stand ought to bring sup
port to Senator McCumber's measure.
Anyway the rails of the Fargo Street
Railway Co. are steel.
The president's appointment of
collector of customs for Charleston, S.
C., does not seem to be a Crum of
comfort for the United States senate.
A dispatch states that 10,000 people
kept 200 police busy protecting the
guests at the wedding of Miss May
Goelet to the duke of Roxburghe from
their demonstrative curiosity—a SQjrt
of circus gathering.
DO YOU WANT A HOME*
Desirably located within six blocks of
the government building on easy month
ly payments interest six per cent a
great snap. Morton & Co.
EXPERIMENTAL STATIONS.
American Farmer: The delegates
from the agricultural colleges and ex
perimental stations which receive gov
ernment aid will hold their annual con
vention in Washington City on Nov.
17, and the occasion will be one of
especial interest to the agricultural de
partment. Prof. A. True, director
of experimental stations, has charge of
the local arrangements and the attend
ance will be large, as sixty-five colleges
and sixty experiment stations now hold
membership in the association. These
agricultural colleges are doing a great
work for the country. They have funds
and equipment estimated at $70,000,000,
and an annual income of $10,000,000.
There are 3,000 men in the faculties and
a student body of nearly 50,000. Of
these students nearly 7,000 are study
ing agriculture alone. The experiment
statioiu employ 7,000 experts and issue
some 4pct pithllcatidns annually. Con
Cress appropriated $100,000 to enable
these coJl4g$s to
v«nake
A boy not more than 8 years old was
walking down Front Street and crying
as if his heart would, break yesterday
afternoon.
"What's the matter, little fellow?"
queried Policemen Berg, when the boy
reached the Waldorf HoteL
"I'm lost?" wailed the boy.
"Lost? Why, that's nothing tov cry
about. Lots of little boys are lost
every day and they find their way
home again."
"I know, but it ain't no fun being
lost," cried the little fellow.
"Of course not. But you'll get home
all right,' and the policeman attempt-'
ed' to comfort the child. "Now, quit
crying and I'll take you home. What's
your name?"
"Don't know," sobbed the boy.
"Forgotten it?" queried Policemarf
Berg.
"No, just don't know what it is,''
sobbed the little fellow. "I know what
my name used to be, but I don't know
what my name is now."
The policeman began to wonder. Sq
did the other people who stood around,
"Well, that's queer. How does that
COMIC
"My name used to be Jones. That
was when I was a little bit of a fellow,
Then it was changed to Smith."
"How's that?"
"Ma married again. And now
got another name and I don't know
what it is."
ficiency is. mad«.
1
"Mother married again?"
"Yes, and this time I forgot who."
Policeman Berg took the boy to the.
station. An hour later a distracted
mother rushed up and caught him in
her arms and left the station, after
thanking the officer. v»
By thunder, doesrPtYit
heat- 'every
thing?" saida commercial traveler as
he stood in the office of the Metropole.
"What's up?'*- said another.
"Why, they refuse to
take gold
here."
"Well, give it to me. I'll take all I
can get. But what do you mean?"
"Why, I asked the clerk there if he
would give me change for $20 and he
said he could. But when I laid a $20
gold piece down in front of him, he
said: "Oh, no, I could not change^
that. I cannot get people to take it."^
Now, doesn't that beat everything
people won't take gold!"
"It all reminds me, you know, of
what W. J. Bryan said when he was
running for president the last time.
'Elect McKinley,' he said 'and maintain
the gold standard, and every dollar of
gold coin will leave the country, and
we will bave nothing but paper and
silver.' That was all he knew about
it. Gold has got to be so plentiful that
it is almost a nuisance. It is not only
inconvenient, but a great deal of it is a
little worn and the banks and post
offices won't take it, at least until it is
weighed and the deficiency is made up
—some say until more than the de
famiwi
up,., So. it rqally
^amounts to this, that gold is at a dis
count. How Bryan can still hold up
his head and talk poltics is, a wonder
to me."
For State News Read The Forum.
The Largest
and Most
Complete
House
Furnishers
tin the West.
1
INSUEAR
K
a suitable ex-
^~irk at the St. Louis
6fi^fhi$ftcter of this
,i opics'.
.dis
iventiiBi^
I
1
MAKES
to sttit
on dls
your
...
pocket
WASENI & GAARD
ON THE CORNER BROADWAY AND SECOND AVENUE NORTH
TTHE past week we have put on display a, car load of High Qrade Furniture
that is drawing the admiration of everyone who calls, and many exquisite
pieces are selected every day by lovers of the artistic. You will not see the
same
kind anywhere else, and as our mammoth assortment of HOME FUR
NISHINGS is now complete, would ask for an inspection and comparison of
FARGO OPERA HOUSE
CURTAIN 8:30 SHARP.
SATURDAY EVENING, NOV. 28
GRAND CONCERT
BY THE
Theodore Thomas
Chicago Orchestra
SIXTY PLAYERS*
J*
SOLOISTS
J*
Miss JENNY OSBORN... ........
Soprano
MR. LEOPOLD kRAMER .Violin
MR. BRUNO STEINDEL... 'Cello
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
The sale of seats for the Theodore Thomas Orchestra will
open at 2 p. m. Monday, Nov. 23, at usual place (Broadway
Pharmacy.) Not more than eight seats'will be sold to any
one purchaser. All tickets must be paid for when ordered.
Mail orders must be addressed to Alson Brubaker, Manager
Fargo Opera House (P. O. Box 246), Fargo, N. D. They
must be accompanied by check, postoffice or express order,
payable to Alson Brubaker. If purchasers wish tickets sent
by mail they must enclose stamped and addressed envelope
and stamps to cover cost of registering letter. If this is not
done, the tickets will be'held until called for.
SCALE OP PRICES:
Parquette and Lower Box Seata,..........!..., $2.50
Parquette Circle. .v....... $2.00
Balcony and Upper Box Seats..... $1.50
Gallery (not reserved) $1.00
WOOD! LIGNITE! WOOD!
My prices for fuel on cars at Fargo are as follows:
Seasoned Maple. 7.00 per cord Seasoned Jack PlM... $ 4.ti per cord
Seasoned Birch I fO per cord Dry Cut 4.00 per cord
Seasoned Oak —16.00 per cord Seasoned Poplar v
Seasoned Tamarack .. 1.85 per cord White Oak Slabs*., .. 4.S0 per cord
Dry Cut Tamarack ... 5.00 per cord Pine Slabs ,aMQpercord
lignite Coal U.U per-to*
These prices wlH apply to-aetata west of Parso, with proper allowance made for
difference in freight from shipping points. Prompt shipment and full measure guar
anteed. The business of car lot buyers solicited. AddrMM^
L. B. GIBBS.
prices with goods offered elsewhere.1 V.:jV .iV
fXVX
Remember it is money in your pocket "to look aver the STAND*
ARD
items.
I,
Grand ForKi,
N. Dak,
Exhibit
Are You
Keeping
.-yr Vf "...
--'ArfSv
.4. hi
.• We have the largest assortment
stoves in thfc city and are in
position to save' you at least
$5.00 to $8.00 on each stove.
Look over the many different
kinds we have before you make
up your miftd. We hav*
Hard Coal Stoves
we can give you very easy terms
save X°u money on the purchase
i
-l
Jf
I
WW.
•'j
v.
J.
'V:
... 4.00 per cord
•r«
The Big
Store
With
the
Little
Prices.
-r\
•. Vii i.Cat-'
I:
A
K
w.
A
.p.

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