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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, November 27, 1903, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1903-11-27/ed-1/seq-3/

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CURTAIN 8:30 SHARP.
Satarday, Nov. 28
Qp.c GfftnJ Cotjcert by th£
WojrThoK
felXTV MUSICIANS.
:m»mw,nSQ^oist^
tBO PSO nf AN s,
^•l^oifloatrons tthd mttie'rlntenSeijc«^Roonis
2» 11 ud 21, Edwards Building.
ALBRANT, W. ARCHITECT AND
Snporlntcndent. estimates and de
•vtnlls. Offlee: No. »4 Broudway, Fargo,
If. Telephone No. 53-4.
O'HHEA. ARCHITECT AND Slil'KK
^iutpiident, prnctieal plans, speclfleations
'fml estimates furnished for all kinds.of
liuildings. Offices N. 1». Block, Broad
^ay.
0KEBE, M. E., ARCHITECT-PLANS
»nd Hpecltlentlohs furnished for all classes
Of building. Telephone 755 office at 618
Tlrst Avenue North, Fargo, N. D.
Hancock
f'argo,
bros., architects, of-
ee over Douglas Block, 113 Brqadway,
N. 1). Plans and estlmatA for all
d^luds of buildings.
PHYSICIANS.
«t. WEAR.—DR. SORKNESS.—PHYSI
flans and Surgeons. Office ov^r Wllger'^i
|rug Storer. Office hours: 10 to 12 a.
I11. 2 to 5 and 7 to 8, p. in.
LltlJO#,& WEIBLE, physicians A|»D
•urfe^ionB. Office deLeddrtfcltt^loek, ieor
fcer'.'.Hf ^ront aud geventll Streets, O^ee
|iour#: l) to 12 a. m., 3 to 6 and 7 to 0
111., Fargo, N. D,,
C.'N. ('ALLANDBR DR. A. C.MORRIS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
Office Hour8 Ofllce Hours:
11 to 12 a. in. 9 to 11 a. in.
444 .3 to 6 p. D». 2 to 5 p. m.
7 to 8 p. 01.
1
bring
V
:the
to 8 m.
Tel. 343 K office. Tel. 345 office.
845 Residence. 1043 Residence.
jHH nm^
UNDERTAKERS.
5(l»I) LICENSED EMBALMER-FUNERAL
Supplies. J. F. Rice, 8 South Broadway,
rear of Moody's store.
On Your Way
„..
r'
Doctor's OffidllS®
^description to us.' You
may wait for it or have de
liver it—as you please,
In either event you
ittay
'k*11
v.,Fargo
:^r^,4{.
Miss Jenny Osborne .soprano
r. Leopold Krarner ^.«. 4, Violin
Mr. Bruno Steindet .. .'Cello
1
1
V
Seats now on salt at Broadway
Pharmacy.
No person will be allowed to pur
chase more than eight seats for each
'concert.
:'.v
v,
Tickets mast {Maid for When
Or­
dered.
Mail orders should be addressed to
Alson Brubaker, manager Fargo
opera house, and must contain post
office or express order to cover price
of tickets. If purchasers wish tickets
forwarded by mail they must include
in tlieir remittance the cost of reg
istering. When this is not done the
tickets will be held until called for.
SCALE OF PRICES.
Parquet and Lower .Box Seats. .$2.50
Parquet Circle .... .... .. 2.00
Balcony and Upper Box Seats.. 1.50
Gallery (not reserved) ........ 1.00
CARRIAGE REGULATION^.
Carriages will approach the thea
tre from the west. After the con
cert waiting carriages (which will
form facing the east on Second Ave
nue North) will, when called, ap
proach the theatre from the west and
leave via Broadway.
J. N. RMlaufc, IN. D. Diutetk MmRm*, M. D.
DRS. RINDLAUB
SPECIALISTS.
EYE. EAR, NOSE AND THROAT,,
FARGO, N. D. V
d*L*ndr«cle Block, opposite N.
P. Dftfwt.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
ATTORNEYS.
JfcW, ARTHUR ATTORNEY AT LAW.
^oflltTs in 'MnglU Kulklliitt, Hroadway and
J'"iout Street Fill-go. rractt^es,in all
'•ii^-ourts. .' -i- ..r
jetHNKit. II. It.. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
I11 Kdwnrds Uulldlag, Broadway,
ruetIces In nil eourts.
•HAIINKTT & itEESK, ATTORNEYS AT
J.inv—Oftleos: 4 aud 8, Morton Building,
Jiroiulwny.
tfOLK, A. T.. LAWYER. ROOMS 10 TO 22,
lluiitingtoii Jtloek, Broadway.
^flLLKIt, HENRY F.. ATTORNEY AND
K).
pv^ar^atm
MOB IN SON, J. E.. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
012 i'rout Street, Fargo. I'ractices in all
.X'ourts. Tax cases 11 speeialty.
TOOTT, W. A., ATTORNEY AT LAW,
aeeond floor Morton Block, Brodd
jvjiy, FargOj N. 11.
dtipend
prompt and feare
you ask to
Option it ||will
ien|
J-
i*
James Tees in Winnip^jg I'Vee Press:
I am asked fo give my impressions ol
the first Thomas orchestra concert.
My chief impressions are gratifica
tion and bewilderment—the first for a
very obvious reason, the second be
cause, and I cannot yet accustom my
self to the idea, that Winnipeg has
really had "the good fortune to hear the
gr.9Sfc'fli$hgs|tray pf•: v^hicK, in
my estimation, is more than ari 'ipisode
i n e a v a n e e n o e i y i s a s
miich an egiich as tl^je $7,000,ooq, worth
of building nirft ^iasjbcen achieved this
year. v
This is strong language, but one who
for twenty years has devoted some time
and effort to musical work may perhaps
be for once allowed a little enthusiasm.
I have heard the Thomas orchestra
under it$ veteran leader many times in
Chicago, and have more than once
waited over for the -usual'Friday-after
noon concert in the Auditorium. But
it is a new and pleasant experience to
hear the aggregation of artists at close
range the light and shade and tone
coloring are accentuated by the small
ness of the building, and the accuracy
-of bowing and general, orchestral
"technique" appear to be more won
derful than ever.'
§1. W. Handscotrib in Winnipeg Free
Press: As you saw grouped on' the
stage of theWinnipeg theatre last night
one of the world's most famous orches
tras, and in the auditorium a brilliant
representation of culture, wealth and
fashion, did the thought not corrie that
~'v:U
Miss Jennie Osborn, Soprano.'
:^is Wijiftitieg.'f ours has mightily de
veloped? V, ....
Probably not,'if you are but one of
the unsentimental newcomers knowiug
only .the busy, bustling Winipeg of to
day—but surely so, if it was your lot
to have shared the hopes and aspira
tions of .Winnipeg in the days of smfcll
beginnings.
It means something, this gr^at or
chestral festival, to those of us W10
AGRICULTURAL YEAR BOOK.
CoogrMunaii Marshall Wants Copies Sent to
All Agricultural College Students.
Congressman Marshall has introduc
is urging cohsideration of' his
bill making appropriation for the pub
lication of 42/oo.copies of.the year book
of the agricultural department for cir
cjilation amon^ the agricultural colleges
of the country, to be delivered pro r&ta
according to the nufnber of students in
tht-various colleges. This bill was
urged last year-- in the house of repre
sentatives by Mr. Marshall, and in the
senate chamber by Senator M)cCumb»r,
but the committee would .not make fav
orable reports on the proposition.
This year Mr, Marshall hi^pes to in
duce tlie secretary of ag^i^Ujjure* to rec
ommend the appropriation fn his esti
mates for the actual current expenses
of the department of ^gjriMilture, and
believes that the comflEp^ will not
withstand the request of a member of
the cabinet. But, in the event that the
committee is still obdurate, he hopes to
have the. appropriation made as an
amendment to one of the deficiency bills,
or to one of the sundry civil bills.
He will spare no effort to produce the
desired effect.
President Worst, of the' state agricul
tural college, and Professor Shepperd,
of Fargo, were ii? Washington attending
the convention of presidents and pro
fessors of agricultural colleges, and they,
favor the Marshall bill. In the mean
time Mr. Marshall and Senator Mc
Curaber have each s^nt 500 copies of the
year book, out of their allowance.for
the state, to the students of the state ag
ricultural college. But thpy can't do th§t
every year, as it deprives ptjie^s wjip, de
sire and! neecSf the book?.. ., V
.. ODD FELLOWS ENT^TATN!
Tonight the members, of Wildey
.juodge, I. O. O. F., will be the "hosts'
ial ah entertainment which is to be giv
in honor of the Daughters of Rfe
hekah. Each Odd Fellow has been ap
cbrded the privilege of inviting two
fes$s.
The programme will be open
at o'clock and interspersed with a
lumber of short- talks. There will be
j^fverai musical selections and after
W]ftf(tsi|l|«4^fee-linkers will enjoy a so
j&fting w^tich refreshmeats
^Si^RR^fe
THE THOMAS ORCHESTRA
The'tifeat Musical Organization Wlfl Be Wafrnly Welconieil in
Tomorrow Cv^iing^A Splendid HIL Is Scpr^d Jn
fil'
*t /i v
here have labored and waited—to those
of us who have seen this Winipeg grow
from a mud-hole_to a metropolis, from
an unsettled little hamlet to a populpus
center pf music and art.
To the pioneers in rrittsic effort thsue
is in the cbnii'ng of this celebrated or
ganisation a v fulfillment of hope, a re
ward of1 patient endeavor—rarecogni-
It was the wonderful effect produced
by the soft brass and. wood wind in the
Melusine overture that first revealed
the fact that there were new sensations*
to be experienced at this concert.
RAILROAD NOTES.)
CREWS LAID OFF HERE,
The change of time schedule on the
d. N% has made forgo the lay-off'point1
for several more passenger train crews,
and added to the charmed circle of pas
senger conductors who make their
headquarters at the Waldorf 'are-Con-'
dviCfdfrs Scott, Braitierd rind Sewcll.
NEW TRAIN NAME.
The new G. N. train, St. Paul to Win
nipeg, making ,the time in fourteeii
hours and twenty minutes, has been
named by the patrons the "Time Sav-
Judge Loren W. Collins of the Min
nesota supreme court announces that
he will "be a candidate for governor of
the state before the next republican
state convention. This action is thought
to shelve Governor Van Sant, whose
friends have been grooming him for a
third term.
THE PERPETUAL
WAR
ZTH E FARGO FORUM AND DAILY REPUBLICAN, FRIDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 27, -1903.
VisKri Sot^isti
tion of the attainment of metropolitan
status, musically as well as commercially.
And though the waiting has been
wearisome and the discouragements
a'many, still as we look b.aifjf, .over it
all must we not admit that ditr' pro
gress has been remarkable?
Why. Wininpeg was born after Theo
dore Thomas had become famous in
artistic maturity—it is scarcely more
than twrx decades from the Red River
'ig of the Metis fiddler to the classic
Blue Danube waltz of the world's
greatest orchestra.
The music of the Thomas, orchestra
is beyond description ds it is beyond
criticism—the task I undertake is but
the pleasant one of welcoming the dis
tinguished musicians, of*congratulating
Winnipeg on its substantial evidence of
artistic appreciation and of expressing
public thanks to the .gentleman fhose
courage and enterprise made possible
so rare a privilege. V
James Matthew^ in \Vinrtipeg Free
Press: In response to your courteous
request as to my impressions of the
concert given by the Thomas orchestra
this evening with the effect of the
music still lingering in my mind, I can
most emphatically say that I never rel
ished so well a programme consisting
for the most.-part of purely instrument
al mtVsic.
Each and evfery number brought
some new delight. Fearing somewhat
from previous experiences to find an
orchestra in which m-edominance would
be given to brass ana wind, I was pleas
ed to find an agreeable balance between
strings and wind instruments, the or
chestra in fact constituting a delightful
instrument, upon which the conductor
might,'and did, plav with perfect con
fidence, secure of getting his effects
and of interpreting the comp6sers'
meaning.
-'ii
There- is always
going on in. every hutnan
body between health andldis
ease. On one.side are poor
food, bad air, oyer-work,
ment.
The reason Scott Etiul
sion fights so pdiyerfullji for
health is because it give
much more nourishment
Get ^nd.^
•*.
SCANDINAVIAN REPUBLICANS.
The Park River Republican Takes a Vary Pro
nounced Posltiqa.
Park River Republican! *In 6tlir last
issue we published a report of the pro
ceedings of the annual meeting of the
Scandinavian republican league, recent
ly held at Hillsboro, and also published
the resolutions adopted at the meeting.
The principles promulgated in this
platform, advocating the primary law,
and greater purity generally in political
matters, are the expressions of every
honest, independent voter in'the state.
But the platform is very deficient in
one fespect, narnely in failing to'state
the main object of the.organization, as
expressed in the name' of the' league,
namejy to secure for the Scandinavian
population in the state of North Dako
ta such a share of the public offices as
their number and intelligence entitle
them to. We have always advocated
calling a spade a'spade. Is the Scan
dinivan republican league ashamed of
its main object? If so, they had better
disband at once. But they have noth
ing to be ashamed of, the object is very,
commendable, and if the league suc
ceeds in accomplishing its object, we
will have a better governed state and
better governed municipalities than in
the past, and corruption in office will
be less frequent than in former years.
To be sure, there are dishonest Scan
dinavians as there are dishonest men in
all classes and nationalities, but com
paratively speaking the Scandinavians
are as honest and upright as the aver
age run of people in this country. And
011 the stump when the object is to
get votes for the party the politicians
are \Villing to concede this truth, and
very lavishly proclaim the praise of the
Northmen but in the Conventions
where the object is to get office for
your friends, the Scandinavians are re
garded as an undesirable lot, and the
crttmbs, which fall to their lot, are giv
en them, not as an admission of their
fitness and qualification, but in hopes
that a Scandinavian name on the ticket
now and then may induce the Scandi
navians generally to vote the entire
ticket, it being well known that this
nationality holds the balance of power
in the state of North Dakota. And
when a Scandinavian once in a great
while succeeds in landing a nomina
tion, it is usually some third or fourth
rate man with whom the bosses figure
they can make terms, and one whom
the Scandinavians themselves don't
want this was illustrated in the last
republican state convention at Fargo
And when one of these Scandinavians,
whom the Scandinavians don't want,
gets into office and displays his incom
petency, the intelligence of the entire
race is measured by the ignorance of
this their socalled representative se
lected for them by some one else. It
•is time that the Scandinavian people
should rise in their might and say: We
are as intelligent and as honest as any
other class of people in North Dakota,
and we insist upon having proportion
ately as much representation in public
office as the number of Scandinavians
votes cast bear to the total number of
votes in the state. This is no more than
fair, just and equitable. It is very true
"that here we should politically lay
asidfe our race preferences, and should
all strive to become and to be loyal
'American citizens, each and every one
of us members of the same body poli
tic, (knd in this respect the Scandinav
ians certainly take the lead), but when,
as the history of our state indicates,
a certain class or nationality is sys
tematically and Continually ignored and
Snubbed in the matter of political pre
ference, then silence ceases to be a vir
tue, and the self esteem born and bred
in every right thinking man. will call
for a protest and then becomes justifi
able and right the organization of just
such a body as the Scandinavian repub
lican league. The league advocates the
primary election system, and its annu
al meeting was addressed by Governor
LaFollette. the great champion of this
system, and one thing is certain if that
law is adopted in the state of North
Dakota the Scandinavian republican
league shall have accomplished its
main object, and need not thereafter
beg the bosses for1 recognition. Tlie
entire people of North Dakota will be
benefited by the success of the league.
wojrry,. colds, accidents. ftrQUed th* ex
the other iare* sunshine xj'L^
cheerfulness' iand r^urish
tni jrou a auntie free opoo reqacsi.
,VA NOBLE WOMAN* p'
A bill has been- introduced ift^fhe
Alabama legislature to place the por
trait of Mrs. Juliet Opie Hopkins, the
so-called Florence Nightingale of the
south, in the Alabama portrait gallery.
At the beginning of the civil war Mrs.
Hopkins disposed of her valuable es
tates and gave the proceeds, amount
ing to some $200,000, to the confeder
ate government to be used in establish
ing hospitals. When the hospital corps
was organized at "Richmond Mrs. Hop
kins was appointed chief matron. She
was also closely associated with the
hospital work of Lee's army. Mrs.
Hopkins became destitute after the
war, but refused a purse coHected for
her from the impoverished confederate
soldiers. When Mrs. Hopkins return
ed again to her southern home she was
given a tremendous ovation. When
she died in Washington she was inter
red at Arlington with military honors.
WELCOME VALLEY.
Welcome Valley, N. D., Nov lis.—
To The Forum: Mrs. Schultz's house
was burned last Saturady evening. No
one was at home when the fire started
and it had broken throug the roof be
fore it was discovered. Nothing was
savecl but a few pkgjes of {umitufe. 11
Messrs* Williams and George Hudson
are visiting relatives in Erie and Hun
ter this week.
Henry Muhs was threshing some flax
for Mrs. Collins last Saturday.
Geo. Hudson's teams were in this
vicinity hauling home some unthreshed
barley.
The Welcome Valley school has just
received some new seats, which were. ,v
badly needed. 1^
Mrs. A: Slingsby of Argusville was
in this vicinity on business last week.
..j.MfS. Schultz and her daughter An
1e, were vwtting in Fargo last Satur
.,
Th»"fttLy taBlfMHry" Rani*.
f'2. -i
Aii abundance of hot water,
says the Monarch man, is
quickly obtained and easily
kept because oJ the very large
heating surface of the Monarch
pin extension tirater front.' It
te located on the left side of
the.fjire box,and does not inter
fere in the least with the per
feet worfcihg of the oven."
Seasoned Maple ....$7.00 per cofd
Seasoned Birch ..... 6.50 per cord
Seasoned Oak 6.00 per cord
Seasoned Tamarack. 5.25 per cord
Dry Cut,Tamarack.. 5.00 per cord
-lit#
roa(^ un^er
•f' \, 1
onc
nsi
0,fi. CARPfiNTBR,
A. T. S. P. Ry.
Oaamtfy ion BM«r.»
MIWNBAP0U8.M1W.
-.v.
4'
"i,'
•v. ..", .s. ".'••-•
-k ?vs.i, '•H-c-
,v:': :vb v,' :W$
iU- fiit-ritiS .'. if ....
TO INTENDING PURCHASERS ONI.V
Postal Card us for our new booklet, "Hints for Range Buyers or how
it kitchen work in two." It's worth reading. If
you State
soon you expect to purchase a range, wo will send yon Free a Toy
W 1^ Ai/
arch Range, 0 iache^ high, 5/£ inches wide, 2H ioches'f ront to back. Addn
MALLEABLE
•ffti. 1«.)
IRON
FOR SALE BYiPt I. Ali&S, BBQADWA3\ F&kGO, N. p.
WOOD LIGNITE! g|'WOOD
My prices for fuel on cars at Fargo are as follows:
Seasoned Jack Fine.
Dry Cut
These' prices will apply to points west of Fargo, with proper,?*!
lowance: made for difference in freight from shipping points. Prompt
shipment and full measure guaranteed. The business qf car lot buyers
solicited. Address -w
L-. B. GIBBS,
It 'tkkes knowledge sis
Well
THIS IS "IT"—
the CLOTHCRAFT eost TOu
oa^ht to wMr. It looks llKe
the 04O Kind* lut it Is wait*
tag for you. hero at £IO to $25*
CLOTHCRAFT suits and
Overcoats are out of the
v e a y a e u e y a e
hard to tell from custom*
made* But there's a big dif
ference in price—flO to $Sj
n d^O'jjr :g o
gosftftiMd puro
ALEX. STERN CC
(s»®* ®4®#
v-._
Whether the journey is for pleasure, busi|-J
ness or health—for a few days or sefverafc 3
weeks—near by, to Oklahoma or 'cross con^
tinent to California-5- I
It will pay you to look tfrc itff,
to go. Vou can ride on. the California Limited or ia^irf
the more economical sleeper on other last traine.
service is faultless either way.
Bear in mind the fact that the
about
RANGE COMPANY,
BE*™
VAM,
SANTA FE
WII
.$4.25 per cor
4.00 per cor
.' 4.00
per cor
.'•4-5° Per
c"r
3.50 per cqr,
Seasoned Poplar ...
•White Oak Slabsi.-.
Pine Slabs
Lignite Coal .$3.25^ per ton
Gr»«d Fork*. N. »«Hot.
Takes Knowledge
ks drUgfs
to properly fill prescriptions in a
drug store, and on the degree of
knowledge depends the degree of
value of the prescription^
w :v.
Fout & Porterfield
Wholesale and Retail Druggists
Broadway
,^•1
iS iPitrgo, N,, D.
ii -'r '.
•o#®
•fr
i
is i6»e onlfi
management from Chicago through to "th^-
Pacific Coast. Banta F\s AlV the
sW«y,!
much.io.say. .- vi^-•• -y-*
rc We realise that tfte: best adyertisement is a pleased patron^
^nd no etfort will ibc spared to maRe yout tHp enjoyable?
..v This coupon is offered for? ydur
and tliat'i
I km ptMimia* a trip to
PletM send (tie Literature and iofotofttkill tf
-1'-/? 'I
Mama.
V-/
Stmt No.....,..... ... ......
mn^umxri
"sMy
1,01

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